Conquistador

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Conquistador
Uniform Title:
Conquistador (Canal Zone Junior College)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone College
Publisher:
Conquistador Staff
Place of Publication:
Balboa Canal Zone
Balboa Canal Zone
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1972
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School yearbooks -- Panama -- Balboa   ( lcsh )
Genre:
School yearbooks   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Canal Zone Junior College.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: 1936.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: 1972.
Issuing Body:
Student yearbook of the Canal Zone Junior College from 1936 to 1963, and the Canal Zone College from 1964 to 1972.
General Note:
Description based on: 1936; title from cover.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: 1972.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 472468547
lccn - 2009229561
System ID:
UF00095973:00036


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






























CANAL ZONE


1nrr A


COLLEGE


SA LI A 1 -7%LI















DEDICATION


Oustanding teacher


husband, father


artist


, thinker, and


comrade


... we will never forget how fully he


was available to whoever needed him in any hour


of the twenty-four


SC


ompanionable,


witty,


and full


gusto,


the only


adjective descriptive of the


he drew is charismatic ...
His insights were fresh,


servation.


full resp


onse


salty, and honed by acute


His compassion and sensitivity led him to deep,


ersona


vement


in the


problems


sufferings


others
Humor


. . I


difficult to sum up so multi-faceted a man:


insight,


friendship,


blend


onal warmth,


the capacity for enjoyment-a


of them


comprised the unique spirit of David Lommen.


friends


from


Moscow to


South


heightened sense


Invo


ement


in living engendered a


of being alive in others; he made existence a fuller, richer
thing for many people.


He


Seas.


lived life




AN


ERA


ENDING.


FROM


NEW


EMERGING


STUDENT



































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FRESHMAN


CLASS


OFFICERS


w -


xxxxx,


m



























Ricardo Acevado


Sadid Aguilera


Gardenia Ah K


Wayne Albritton


Linda Alexander


Laine Almstead


E;.
































John Barb


Javier Barrios


Antonio Barzey


John Bay


"Dear


Santa


(" Eda Beechner


eresa


Benbenek


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Mary Best


Theresa Bierbaum


Brent Bingham


Robert B


Ricardo Bolandos


Mario


Bournes


"Braa! B


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Lynda Brock


Bill Brooks


Debbie Brown


Delica Brown


Wendell Brown


Keith Bullinger


I_.
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Pablo Carrasquillo


Jaime Carrizo


"If at first you don't succeed, Tie, Tie Again!!" .


Rosaro Ca


Cris Castro


- *I - I -. -


" P-


d. 1F


..X~LI~E

































eresa


Cherie


Carolin


Omar


Chipsen


Angella Cockburn


>4 4.


Casma Cockburn


Patricia Cockburn


Alfonso


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Daryl Date


Dee Davis


Cynthia De La Cruz


Maria De La


Theresa Da


Guardia


y Elaine Dedecker
y


Yoli De La Guardia


- .t -


a


*h W **


I:






































Fernando Diaz


John Diaz


"The Think


Roberto Donikian


Charles Dooley III


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Jonathan Dunham


Penny Earl


Ezra Dyan


C I

LImm


"Quotes


William England


- Cr


- a


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Donaldo


Kathleen Foster


"Very interesting !


Sing Fong


Neil Fraunheim


Edward Frensley


Gloria


Galindo


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Luis Garcia Lavergne


Charles Garner


Nancy


Garner


Steve Gemmell


Guillermo


Gerberding


Dennis


Gilbert


John Gilbert


Nellie Goffeney


S -. ~-I-


n


Lli


/




































Carmen Gonzalez


Vicente


Gonzalez


Frank Goodwin


Pat Gregory


Patricia


Grimm


Ella Guerra


Gall G


uerrero


Joe Guthrie


4. <


- a.


-- a -


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Marcella Hawk


Joan Head


Elmer Henriquez


William H


erbeck


Mac Hill


Mimy Ho


Vivian H


I I.


ooper


Ernest Horter


-


:..!MX M .* **


I"IC.I


I II















-- xx V


Ana R. Jimenez


Juan Kam


Maxine Karst


Linda Kemp


Jack Kent


Francisco King


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"Cartoon Time


x x xx


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Michelle La


Philip-Lawyer


Anna Lee


Edward Lee


Penny Leeser


Marlene Letourneau


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4r1


Edmund Lopez IIl


Lopez


John Manley


Jesse


Linda Lowe


Nom M c 1


Norma Masco


Martie


eresa


4

its


Zaida


Lubrano


I
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Maftas


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Elvira Mendez


sabel M


endez


"Now


a touch


of Vodka.


Mercedes Ng


Kenneth Morales


Luella Morales


Pete Morales


- a


lillEl~n~'


'ICBJIIIUE





























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Ken Murphy


Tish Murphy


Ana Nelson


Carlos Notyce


* -,


Lynn O'Connell


ngrid Olivo


Olga Park


Amrutlal Patel


1 ~~~ ----


111-.





















*,


Yvonne Pezel


Susan Plante


Edward Portier


Pablo Prieto


Don Rathgeber


Duffy Reynolds


Rachel Rice


Jose Richa


F~ W*--I


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Ron Robson


Sara Rodriguez


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Malena Romero


Teresina Rotondaro


Kathleen Sager


Jorge Silen


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Slover


Robert Smalling


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Ted Snyder


Patricia


Springer


Strickl


Sharon Swann


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Nicky Tin


iacos


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Eugene Tucker, Jr.


Fatima Vargas


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ue Ward


Stuart Warner


Watson


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Frederick Wieand


Paul Willenborgc


Donna Williams


Madeleine


Yolanda Williams


Williams


"You can have your


and eat it, too.


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First Row:


Dan Ga


Sherry


rcia,


Forseth, Lynn


vent, Luis Garcia, J


Bissell,


Donald


Jackie Evan
ae Carizo.


Dean,
Chen


Clark,
Foster


s, Jim Harnage,
Mr. Des Londes.


Marlene
, Marilyn


Romero, Gail G
Hare. Second
Kathy Mulroy,


7uerrero
Row: M


, Barbara Biltocks,


Ir. Lesser


Kenny Justice,


Pat Perry,


Mr. Honea,


John Bay, Juan Bena-


PHI


BETA


LAMBDA


Mr.
ident


Honea
Larrm


Kathy Foster,


, Sponsor:
y Forseth,


Mr. Lesser,
V-President:


ponsor;
Marilyn


Mary Clark, Pres-
Hare, Secretary;


Representative; Mr. Des Londes, Sponsor.


A>.TE~ '1


Mercedes
Patton,


Darlene


Treasurer; Pat Perry, Reporter; Don Dean. S.A.


^ **


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Yoo hoo! Are you with me?


The
business
ship an<


purpose or ri
s club of CZC,


deve


lop qualities


Lambda,


improve scholar-


that wil


enable


members


business


, profc


to part
essional,


The only membership


enrolled


in one busine!


cipate
and c


effective
communityy


requirement is to be
ss subject.












NEWMAN



COMMUNITY


V..
-' i -



Newman Community bake sale.
Newman Com mu nity ba ke sale.


Guest


eaker at a mee


Is as -t


=


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OFFICERS:


execu


Mr. Courch


five secretary: Ara


ne, faculty sponsor;


Louis Julian


cell Enriquez, corresponding


tative; Eduardo Davis, publicity chairman.


secret


resident; Elsa
r: Thomas Mu


Richard,
treasurer:


vice-president;
Pete Morales,


Diovelis Diaz,
S.A. Represen-


Newman


Community of


CZC


is an


organization
intellectual,
i L i


that
and


helps
social


to foster


spiritual,


interest


I I ,- -


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\Xit


- 4
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First Row:


Jenkins,
Jesse M


sabel Mendez,


facuIt"


lartie, Ri


sponsor.
cardo Bol


oveles


Second


ys Sagel,


Row: Edmund


Henry


Lopez


Rose,
arcia F


Gemma
Richard, I


Fernandez,


gnacio


Scope,


1 Richard,
Pete Morali


Paula
ss, En


Kuyoth, Mr.
a Archibold,


anos.


CZC



SCIENCE



SOCIETY


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First Row:
Elsa Kam.


Laura
Second


Townsend, Diovelis Diaz,


Leonardo


Wong,


Kathy Jestice, Elva Sellens, Barbara Eaton,


Eduardo


Davis,


Tom Riley


Mr. Marshall,


Dee Boarman,
Larry Forseth.


PHI


THETA


KAPPA


Phi Theta


of CZC. I


Kappa


ts purpose


is the


honorary society


is to recognize and en-


- -____


a q


t


* I














*






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Margaret Miller, Co-President










PILOTS











Mr. Kitterman, sponsor of Pilots


.**.1



*".
*

I" 4 .4~,


Sherry Bissell, Co-President






Pilots are the most active and industrious or-
ganization at CZC. At practically all school spon-
sored events, Pilots are requested to help inc
ushering, selling tickets, handing out programs and
guiding. To be a member of Pilots one must be a
student at CZC and must be willing to serve the
college. On the opposite page are this year's
Pilots in action.







Vicky Rodriguez, S.A. Representative


U l K -*:.::::*::.:*!










STUDENT



ASSOCIATION


^alia


A. OFFICERS


Mr. Ho


, Seated: Janet Hunt, President. Standing:


nea, Faculty advisor:


Cvnthia B


oukalis, Secreta


Rivera
Kam,


resident;


treasurer.


The F
finance
the schc
student
commune


pur
an
,ol


"pose


of the


d direct
year. T


e Student
official a,
S. A. prc


Association


activities
>vides a


throughout
forum for


expression for the benefit of the school and
ty.


a~ - -


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MEETING


PICTURES.

























Sitting:


Fong,
Troitin


James Stephen
Vice-president;


o: Ezra Da


. Standing: Omar Chipsen
Jorge Quijano, Jon Rivei


yan; George


Marcella Hawk; Karl Huebner, President; Donaldo


ra,


representative;


Charles


Meyers;


Berman.


The purpose of the


hess Club of


CZC


is to stimulate interest and to improve skills
in the game of chess. This year has been one
of their most active.


Dr. Annis,


sponsor, and kibitzer


















x xK X X
KKKKKK KK K


xx:':' *;


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AN


J.B


PRIESTLEY


AN


INSPECTOR


CALLS


PLAY


WITH


MESSAGE


SOCIAL


AND


PERSONAL


RESPONSE


THE CAST


(in order


of appearance)


Mr. Birling
Mrs. Birling


Hester


Benner
JsicerA


Sheila


Birlinq


Catherine


. .


. . . . . . . . .


TOR






























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COLLEGE


CAPERS


1969





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"Well, you


"f c "nfni


U l" l


a ..







































"They call it that good ole moun-
tain dew ..."




























"Everybody always


blames me."










MUSIC


MUSIC


A is the CZC Cultural society responsi-


ble for providing
the best talent av


in both the


'ailable.


and Panama


Throughout the


organization sponsors many fine concerts.


year,
Some


year's


Recorder
Panama,"


presentations included the


Concert,


" "The


'Ars Antigua
Polifonico de


and The USAFSO Band Christmas Con-


Mr. Chapman, Faculty Sponsor


Henry Rose, President


MUSICA Christmas Concert







CONQUISTADOR


STAFF


Mr. Lesser
Yearbook Advisor


Catherine Jestice
Editor













John McLelland:
Asst. to the
Editor:
Advertisements.


Elsa Kam:
Chairman, Faculty
and Administration:
Advertisements.


John Manley:
Chairman
of Classes:
Chairman of
Sports:
Asst. of
the Editor:


A
a' *
. .'^ v .:^ .


Margaret Miller:
Co-Chairman
A | I I



























Becky Whiting
Arts and Staff


t'


Sherry Bissell
Co-Chairman Advertisements
and Organizations


Belinda De La Cruz


Freshman Class


Karen Sun


Administration


and Faculty


Cynthia De La Cruz
Arts and


fr


C L~






























And now for a touch


of rouge


Hmmm


keeps this up,


won't have any fingers left


Now look here, Sport


Big Brother is watching you.


'
.....................................................
":;': .*t ,. *1 ,," "!8:.a ,

















Steve Gemmell
Freshman Class Editor;
Chronology Staff.


John Mercier


Arts and


rts Staff


; Photographer


Bobbee Garrett
Chronology Staff.


n I









STAFF



PHOTOGRAPHERS


Paul Stewart
Head Photographer


Warren Leon
Photographer


i
. .


Bill Duffus
Photographer


Jorge Quijano
Photographer


r. -


__



























She thinks she's so smart!


No! It wasn't me,


honest!


see, it's like













TROPICAL


COLLEGIAN


Debbie Avram
Managing Editor


The
and ,


Tropical


Collegian


magazine.


provides Canel
opportunity to s
are encouraged


oems,


the col


short
legian


Zone


is the


Published


Colle


ee their


school'


literary


semester


young hopefuls


work in print.


to submit


ones


articles


selects


All students


sir original
and sketches


for publication


essays,
s; and
those


works which it feels stand


as the most outstanding


examples


of the school's


creative


artistic


output.


N


K *V ,
/: / y X


































Margaret Miller
Production Editor


David Mimbs
Art Editor


Carmen Behrens "A musical comedy version of A Tale of Two Cities?"


Asst. Editor;


Representative.











DELTA


PS I


OMEGA


Bill Gonzales, President


Alida Lynton, Vice President


Delta I
fraternity
generally


Psi Omega,
of Canal
eligible f


he has


Chapter


Zone College.
or membership


participated


138: the dramatic


A student is
consideration


tribute to two dramatic functions at the college.


The purpose
dramatic int
advantages


of Delta Psi Omega is to encourage


secure


for the college the


erests,


of a large national fraternity, and to


secure for the worthy student rewarding opportuni-
ties to further develop his dramatic skills.













Terri Smith, Secretary Daryl Garrett, Treasurer


in or otherwise


con-





THE


BEST


PLAYS


OF


THE


DECADE

"Little Mary Sunshine"-1963


"L'I Abner"-1967






"John Brown


's Body"-1967


"How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying."--1969


*--*-ff ** " "
















































"Romeo and Juliet"-1963


S1
































"Imaginary


Invalid"--1966..


"Imaginary


Invalid"


--1966


re -




























































































































































































































Ex
x e.




















Ex xx
SNx
xxixx
MER x x x


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SOPHOMORE


CLASS


OFFICERS


L. to R. President,


Carole Arn


; V. President,


rrett; Secretary,


Rodriguez;


Treasu


rer, Bill Barrera.


-C





















Ar


Carole Arnold


Ida Ash


Debbie Avram


Barbara Beall


Irma Deaulieus


Carmen Behrens


Juan Benavent


Jose Bibbo


* .


!I






























Barbara Biltoft


Clara Birch


i'




Olga Bolado


Sherry Bissell


Steve Bolt


Paul Boostram


Maria Bo


Cynthia Boukalis


-n a


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ALm


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>+>
4*;
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^^iK^


Gregg Brown


Kathy Brown


Gregory Bryant


lisa Carbaial


Michael Chadw


Alicia Chan


Joanna Chavez


I~ w


dT


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$4-


John Cowan


Mario Cruz


Richard D'Addario


Eduardo Davis


Donald Dean


"A well deserving pat


Belinda De La Cruz


on the back"


r 4lk


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! ..... "<'-


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Karl Ebert


Araceli Enriquez


Jackie Evans


Tom Frensley


Danny


Garcia


Daryl Garrett


Albert


Gonzalez


Natalia


Gotty


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"We bought it in the lounge.


Guime


Barbara Han


Edward Hazel


Michael H


m


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4< ~>1<
4


Louise


Julian


Kenneth Justice


E. Koll-Nescher


tsm-
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Dianne Locke


Nancy Locklear


Juan Lyew


G-


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SIr
V:"~
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-r

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Kathy Jane


Melanson


John Mercier


Julie Mercier


Margaret Miller


- -^


>4
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John Mimbs


Valerie Mustde


Thomas Muy


CP
m1


o1 *lw


J^d~


.@































Rogelio Nicosia


Franklin Novet


Deborah Olllver


Nick Panszczyk


Florysabel Ponce


Carolyn Reeves


"Feeling Groovy


aW


9


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m


~Fr~l
















S- -


.l-- t
: -^ "


anet R


ocheleau


Victoria Rodriguez


Chris Ross


Inga Rossan


S,-
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Calvind Rueba


Vilma


mpson


Julie Sanson


I .nl iSm


* *- .^.*


$*- :
*


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Sollas


Smith


-"""F i


onnie Steward


uarez


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Karen


Millcent Turner


Virginia We


Vilma Vergara


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S. *.


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Barbara


Wesley


Marcia


Welch


Curtis Whitehead


Becky Whiting


I
-a-***


P '\ *


Tom Wiggins


Paula Witt


"Are you sure da Vinci started this way?"


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Full Text





































Donald S. Seitz-Instructor
B.A.-North Dakota State University
M.S.-North Dakota State University


hear you


say I'm


stible?


__ ,,, -


rI


I








LIBRARY


technology has


left its mark on just


about


every


aspect


of the world


we live


students of Canal


to be


Colle


a part of this new


are fortunate


era of technol


You are indeed


a New Student at the dawn


of one of history
lenging decades.


promising


and chal-


The
New
of thi


library of t
Student-it h
e new ideas,


oday
lelps


is in pace
him to keep


concepts,


with the
abreast
advances


made by modern man.


The Canal


Library provides its students with


e Col-
books,


magazines,
and modern


audio-visual m
techniques to


materials,


periodicals,


keep up with


changes in our society.
Just as the library augments the New Stu-


awareness


of present happenings, it also


facilitates
cordings
filmstrips,
paintings,


closer to the subject


a student's
of cherished


study of t
musical


compositions,


, prints and movies of famous
s and events bring the student


so that he may deve


a greater


appreciation


for the


contribution


Allen D. Griffin


B.A.-Texas WesI
M.A.-North Texas


library


yan College
tate University


media


to the world.


a vital


for the New


Student's


* in providing
benefit. With


can per


present,


the past,


prepare


keep pace with the


for the future.


I


__


6..








DEPARTMENT


OF


ENGLISH,


SPEECH,


AND


DRAMA


John P. Marshall-A
B.S.-U university


assistant Professor
of Nebraska


M.A.-University of Nebraska
Chairman


PROVE THEM


WRONG!


Political


philoso


and historians


are becoming


increasingly


alarmed about the future: Th


ey see that


the primary dilemma of our


time is the tension between the desire for freedom and the need


for some forms of authority and orderliness.


What they do not


loudly enough


or often enough is that in the


name


of freedom and


relevance, a new


anti-intellectualism that disdains all form, tradition-


self discipli


ne--is


making it increasingly difficult for people to


their individual


inarticulate
curriculum


and social problems


mobs clamoring


and burning


in adult


for the relevance


libraries


can hardy


ways.


of Sanskrit


even


new world or preserve the culture of the past and present.


Amoral,
to the


a brave
George


Orwell said it best:


"One


realize that the present political


chaos is connected with the decay of language, and that


probably bring about


some


improvement by starting at th


one can
e verbal


end."


The English major


as a student of humanities today studies


the problems


and tensions


our time


in relation


to the history


even


^"1x:*....


~ I














































That's no problem. Take


shoes


... and let me check your b


pressure.


mI


.. ....~"








DEPARTMENT



MATHEMATICS, EN


OF


NATURAL


GINEERING,


AN


SCIENCE,




D TECHNOLOGY


DeWitt Myers--Assistant Professor


B.A.-Valley City
M.A.-Washington


State College
State Universit


Chairman


theme


Student


ected for


ear s
eralds


Conquistador


indeed ap


propriate


a promising and challenging


do the students


decade


in this department relate


as 1970
e. How
to this


theme?
this mo
and tec
were enr
before
themsel


Certainly


Iment


:hnc
Irol


promise


in history


related


advances


led in this department this


in our college


ves


history.


to understand


and challe


to our scientific


... and more students


ever


preparing
e of the


this adventure


whole hu
love this


man race
universe


venture is indeed


now as never


before


values between


to learn


in which the
science. The
e humanistic
generations,


new student in this


- I -


age of s
r i


in and perhaps to


... this ad-


new student


conflicts


races, an
scientific
i i *


sees


t interests
d nations.
and tech-


tL**.


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1:::"::: ::
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::,







,:X"NE:"







DEAN


-


-,,r.


Dr. Glen E. Murphy
A.B.-Colorado State College of Education


M.A.-Teachers College,
Ed.D.-Teachers College,


Columbia University
Columbia University


The C
during th
curricula,
activities.


anal Zone


College


s-a new


new courses,
The theme


has made


campus, new


new


faculty,


dramatic


changes


administrators, new


new students,


new student


new


is an apt


one as we look forward to a
lenges and opportunities for a


new decade filled


of us.


Administrators


, faculty,


and students


be al


the demands of our society


insure


that the educational


objectives


our college


are rel


evan


our search


new content a
dismiss the exp


nd methodology,


erience


gained


we must


during


the pc


not, however,
ast decade or


the truths that have


existed through previous decades and


L


I


j







ASSISTANT


DEAN


vancements


student has
in technol


sixties, and, a
threshold of the


to witness
scribed as
enal.


seen great
ogy during


stands


seventies,


progress
nothing


The new student


and he


is concerned


the world's hungry


on mte
is about


that will be


less than

is deeply


about


clothing th


poor, healing the world'


phenom-


feeding


e wo


sick. and ed-


ucating the


world


S


ignorant. For him,


life is a search,


and he


is free and


flexible


explore


it. He hopes


create something new


and to


use the


technology to make a better


, and he believes


that the


seven-


ties is everybody


's business.


Today's student wants an education


contains


contemporary


education


the best of
thought. He


that will develop


past
wants


a ques-


toning


Margaret M. Gately


so that he


can


life's problems without fear and
make intelligent decisions.


.-Emmanuel


M.S.-Boston


College


College


The modern


student


believes


he is what he does and what he dares


to risk and that he


given


moment for greatness, his chance


his particular ability or m


will be needed.


He hopes


strength
that life


will lead him to problems that demand his best
Wl ea Im 0ro em a ean i es


in some


et, despite these sterling qualities +
students a sense of futility because


and fleeting pleasures.


Gradually, it


becomes


These students are c
apparent to today's


onstantly
student


in achie
describe
/ have


search


solutions


the sti
lost the
thing, fo


so that he


may prove


his worth.


dent of today, at times there seems to be present
meaning of life apart from its immediate excitements


'r such


a philosophy can


in the end the


never


lasting happiness.


the world can become a better place


is by individual men


women b


eing better


peop


STUDENT


ADVISORY


GROUP


u(





PAGE 2

LA 469. 5 ARCIlIVES RESERVE c3c6 THE CONQUISTADOR ref l u a DATE DUE

PAGE 5

THE CONQUISTADOR CANAL ZONE COLLEGE LA BOCA, CANAL ZONE VOLUME XXXIV

PAGE 6

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/conquistador1970cana

PAGE 8

4 AN ERA IS ENDING. FROM IT IS EMERGING A NEW STUDENT -

PAGE 10

DEEPLY COMMITTED,

PAGE 12

ACTIVELY INVOLVED,

PAGE 14

REMARKABLY AWARE,

PAGE 16

12 PREPARED AND EAGER TO ACCEPT HIS ROLE IN A NEW ERA.

PAGE 17

WE ARE THE NEW S TUDEN T 13

PAGE 19

DEDICATION Oustanding teacher, husband, father, artist, thinker, and comrade we will never forget how fully he lived life ... He was available to whoever needed him in any hour of the twenty-four ... Companionable, witty, and full of gusto, the only adjective descriptive of the full response he drew is charismatic His insights were fresh, salty, and honed by acute observation. His compassion and sensitivity led him to deep, personal involvement in the problems and sufferings of others It is difficult to sum up so multi-faceted a man: Humor, insight, the gift of friendship, the blend of the personal warmth, the capacity for enjoyment-all of them comprised the unique spirit of David Lommen He had friends from Moscow to the South Seas His own involvement in living engendered a heightened sense of being alive in others; he made existence a fuller, richer thing for many people. 15

PAGE 21

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY

PAGE 22

18 Mr. Frank A. Castles Superintendent of Schools A.B.-Villanova University M.Ed.-Boston University In comparison with his peers elsewhere, the student in the Canal Zone appears better able to bridge the gap between generations, and fo pass from childhood to adulthood in a manner more con structive both for himself and for society. This apparent maturity, which seems to combine the idealism and enthusiasm characteristic of youth with the caution and judgment of age, is doubtless due to the breadth and depth of experience which our students have acquired in a few years. Our students represent families from every region, from both rural and urban backgrounds, or all diverse ethnic and racial groups. In addition, they have lived in many different parts of the world and observed many cultures and many political systems. Here in the Canal Zone there is the opportunity to experience deeply influences originating in the several diverse cultural paHerns of Panama. From all this experience comes a pattern of life, living, and education which bodes well for the future. There is an optimism on the part of our students, a faith in science and research, a belief that problems can be examined objectively and solved effectively. There is an appreciation of diversity, a realization that all seg ments of society must participate in reaching societal goals and that all people must benefit from societal progress. There is respect for both ability and hard work as the basis for progress by individuals and nations. From all these factors which characterize our students will come the young adults of the next decade-realizing that they will continue to face problems of great magnitude but willing to face these problems squarely and believing that they can and will be solved.

PAGE 23

CANAL ZONE COLLEGE ADV ISORY COUNCIL I Seated, left to right : Mr. Bruce C. Blevins D irector of E ducMi on, USARSO; Mr. Carl J Browne Vice-Chai r man As sistant Engineer and C onst ruction D i rector; Mr. J Patrick Conley, Chairman, Deputy Executive Secretory; Dr. Glen EI Murphy, Del!ln. Conal Zone College an d Secretary, Advisory Council. Standing left to right : Mr G e org e V Richards Principal, Para iso High School; Dr. Charl e s L. latimer Acting Superintendent o f Schools; Mr. Fred Secchetti, Cultural Affa irs Officer, American Embassy. Mr. A l fr e d o Cragwell Principal Rainbow City High School M e mber s abs ent in ab o v e picture: Mr. Norman E. Dem e r s Asst. Director T ransporiation and Terminals Bureau Mr E dward A Dool an Personnel Director Panama Canal Company Mr. A rthur J. O 'leary Deput y Comptroller Comp-'ny 19

PAGE 24

20 DEAN The Canal Zone College has made dramatic changes during the 1960's-a new campus, new administrators, new curricula, new courses, new faculty. new students, ne w activities. The theme of "the new student" is an apt one as we look forward to a new decade filled with chal lenges and opportunities for all of us. Administrators. faculty, and students must be alert to the demands of our society to insure that the educational objectives of OUf college are relevant. In our search for new content and methodology, we must not, however, dismiss the experience gained during the past decade or the truths that have existed through previous decades and centuries. Man walked on the surface of the moon in 1969. In the coming decade educators and their students must rise to the unprecedented implications this outstanding feat brings to the fields of science, medicine, communications, history, and the humanities. The "new student" will be studying and living in the most exciting era in the history of mankind. We hope that your 1 969-70 year spent at the Canal Zone College will prepare you for the 1970's and the years to come. Our best wishes for continued success go with each student leaving our campus at the end of this academic year. Dr. Glen E. Murphy A.B.-Colorado State College of Education M.A.-Teachers College, Columbia University Ed. D.-Teachers College, Columbia University "At first glance, it looks like a long. hot summer for Engli s h classes."

PAGE 25

ASSISTANT DEAN Margaret M. Gately A.B.-Emmanuel College M.S. B oston College T oday's student has seen great advancements in technology during the sixties, and, as he stands on the threshold of the seventies. he is about to witness progress that will be described as nothing less than phenomenal. The new student is deeply involved, and he is concerned about feeding the world s hungry, clothing the world's poor, healing the world s sick, and educating the world's ignorant. For him, life is a search, and he is free and flexible to explore it. He hopes to create something new and to use the tools of technology to make a better world, and he believes that the seventies is everybody's business. T oday's student wants an education that contains the best of past and contemporary thought. He wants an education that will develop a ques tioning mind so that he can meet life' s problems without fear and then make intelligent decisions. The modern student believes that he is what he does and what he dares to risk and that he will be given his moment for greatness, his chance when his particular ability or moral strength will be needed. He hopes that life will lead him to problems that demand his best in achieving solutions so that he may prove his worth. And yet, despite these sterling qualities that describe the student of today, at times there seems to be present in some student s a sens e of futility because they have lost the meaning of life apart from its immediate excitements and fleeting pleasures. The s e students are constantly searching, for such a philosophy can never bring lasting happiness. Gradually, it becomes apparent to today's studer.t that in th e end the only way the w o rld can become a better place is by individual men and women being better people, STUDENT ADVISORY GROUP The Student Advisory Group, formed in fall, 1969, suggests improvements to the College's Administration. From left to right, Heraldo Williams, Jerry Dare J uan Quintero, Jon Rivera, Janet Hunt, Darleen Woodruff, and Lynn Patten. 21

PAGE 26

2 2 REGISTRAR Norman B Altenberg B.A.-George Pepperdine College M.A.-Los Angeles State College The Registrar's Office is a sort of Savings Bank of Achievement; however, unlike other banks, only deposits are uccepted and nothing is ever destroyed. The student graduatin9 in the sixties and entering the world of work in the seventies is more carefurly documented than ever before in history. Not only do colleges keep more extensive records than ever before, but a11 kinds of institutions, even more or less informal ones have readily available stocks of information about every person who ever had any contact with them. Canal Zone College is proud of the records of most of the 15.000 students who have passed through its doors since 1933. These records speak eloquently for the student and the institution. Hopefully, they are a commendation. Since the first day a student attends CZC, there exists a permanent record of his academic progress. Now the records are kept on permanent record ct!lrds, punched cards, microfilm, in professors' roll books, on computer p rinted class rosters, and possibly, in the future also on magnetic disks. No matter where you go, you can order a copy of your record to be sent to you or any person or institution you designate. Our intention is to keep the records for at least 100 yeMS. We hope you will continue to contact us during that period.

PAGE 27

David B Bagli e n B.S.-North Dakota State University M.S.-North Dakota State University M arie Weir B.S.-University of Florida M.A.-Columbia University COUNSELORS I thought I had all the answers to all the problems. 23

PAGE 28

24 DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arthur A. Hon ea-Instructor B.B.A.-North Texas State Unive r sity M.B.A.-North T exas State University Chairman "What's it all about, my life, my world?" I assume the question is as perplexing and inescapable to other s as to me. And fo r what they are worth, here are two premises I find helpful in examining the questions of life : I. Fo r all practical purposes, we are living in an unfinished world. a world in process of being completed and understood by man. 2 Each per son is uniquely equipped to participate in this ongoing process of completion and understanding. That each of us l ives out his years in an incompletely understood world is all too obvious W e are still seeking answers to fill in the gaps in all areas of ou r knowledge of the world and of ourselves, and each answer we find poses new questions. But the incompleteness of our knowledge appears to be compounded by the added element that we are actually living in a world whicfr is incomplete-one that is still being "worked out." To speak of an unfinished world may shock some. The fact of the matter is not subject to scientific proof or disproof, for it is of the nature of an expectant extension of the mind in an attempt to adequately compre hend the involvements of our life in this world. But, fact or faith, we humans are scarcely in a position to set limiting boundaries when accounting for the energies operating in this world. If, then, the world in which we live is still under construction, we who live in it are definitely parts of the on going process. Imperfect as we are, we are nonetheless integral pads of the present stage of the whole We are "In," "of," and "by" the completing process. The abilities and personal equipment which we have are ours to be used. used up to the limit of our individual skills and situations. As in any productive process, we may work for its success, "goof off," or, with a distorted sense of personal importance, impede and sabotage the process. Everyone of us has a stake in the whole, and every individua l counts. for only through individual initiative and action will some small part of the process be satisfactorily aided as, and if. it advances. We have the 9ptions of choice inherent in our freedom. Within the rules every person has the right to freely choose and freely pursue his goals. This dangerous harmony in dive r sity is essential to t h e ongoing process. Like the liHle boy delivering an address at a school exercise in the Philippines, w ho after greeting th e honored guests, turned to the audience and greeted them, "Distinguished Everybodies." we need to recogniz e that we are just that. "distinguished everybodies": everybodies who are here to help inc h our wo r ld and man kind along nearer to the next higher level of completion.

PAGE 29

C ome on L assie, you've got to do it! Irvin H L esser Instructor B.B.A.-University of Miami M B.A.-lndi"M University Daniel D esLondes-lnstructor B.S.-Middle Tennessee State University M.Ed.-Florida Atlantic University O K cast, Act I, Scene II

PAGE 30

26 Lawr e n ce P e rkins-Instructor B.S.-Northeastern State College M.S.-Northeastern State College Ellis L. Side r s Assistant Professor B.S.-Simpson College M.A.-Stanford University Sha r o n J S hawInstructor B.S.-Illinois State University M.S.-Illinois State Univers;ty But I didn't take the money .

PAGE 31

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH, SPEECH, AND DRAMA J ohn P. Mar s hallAssistant Professor B.s.-University of Nebraska M.A.-University of Nebraska Chairman PROVE THEM WRONG! Political philosophers and historians are becoming increasingly alarmed about the future: They see that the primary dilemma of our time is the tension between the desire for freedom and the need for some forms of authority and orderliness. What they do not say loudly enough or often enough is that in the name of freedom and relevance, a new anti-intellectualism that disdains all form. traditioneven self discipline-is making it increasingly difficult for people to solve their individual and social problems in adult ways. Amoral, inarticulote mobs clamoring for the relevance of Sanskrit to the curriculum and burning libraries can hardy build even a brave new world or preserve the culture of the past and present. George Orwell said it best: "One ought to realize that the present political chaos is connected with the decay of language, and that one can probably bring about some improvement by starting at the verbal end." The English major as a student of humanitie!t today studies the problems and tensions of our time in relation to the history and future of civilization. By his concern, his choices, end his solitary influence, he will help determine the kind of future we will share. He may even "Prove Them Wrong." Oeor Ann Landers: 27

PAGE 32

28 Geraldine Kidd-lnstructor B.A.-College of the Ozarks M.A.-Central State College of Oklahoma D on't call me, / '11 call you. Robe rt W. Kitt erman-Assistant Professor 8.S.E.-Arkansas State University M.S.E.-Arkansas State Univer s ity

PAGE 33

o L ois H. P ass man Instructo r B.A.-B,ooklyn College M.A.-City University of New York David Lomme n Assistant Professor B.A.-Concordia College M.A.-North Dakota State University Patrici a Sherlock Instruct or B.A.-New York University M.A.-New York Univer sity 29

PAGE 34

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES Ste p he n R. P eck Assistant Professor B.A.-University of Southern Caljfornia M.A.-University of Southern California Chairman Well, I guess the rest dropped. AND FINE ARTS In each generation the "new" student inherits an "old" w orld. The student of 1970 inherits one in which problems are generated at a much faster rate than ever before. In a shrinking world people are forced into ever closer contact and they must learn to get along. The new student. who is learning to cross boundaries of all types, needs foreign languages to help him cross cultural lines. Learning the languages of other cultures is a necessary step towards understanding the people themselves. Music and art, like language, are integral parts of culture and play valuable roles in the interrelations of the peoples of the world. They are also important vehicles for the ex pression of those new and exciting ideas which are characteristic of youth and with which the new student is richly endowed. Ahum! That wa s some party last night.

PAGE 35

Clinton C. Carney, Jr.-Instructor A.B.-University of Southern California M.A.-University of Southern California Herbert W. Knapp-Instructor B.s.-University of Missouri M.A.-University of Kansas City Carl H Chapman-Instructor B.M.-Texas Wesleyan College M.A.-Ohio State University ..::.-\ 3J

PAGE 36

32 DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY The theme, The N ew Stud e nt, selected for this year's Conquistador is indeed appropriate as 1 970 heralds a promising and challenging decade. H o w do the students in this department relate to this theme? Certainly the promise and challeng e of this moment in history is related to our scientific and technological advances ... and more studen ts were enrolled in this department this year than ever before in our college's history. They are preparing themselves to understand this adventure of the whole human race to learn to live in and perhaps to love this universe in which they are this adventure is indeed science. The new student sees now as never before humanistic conflicts of interests and values between generations, races, and nations. The new student in this age of scientific and technologic<"J1 advances and of conflict is realizing more than ev, r the necessity of educating oneself in the humanities as well as in the pure sciences. There are 'gaps' in our society, of course, but none more worthy of mention than that between the social sciences and the physical sciences. The new student will in time realize the formidable task of narrowing this separation while broadening the horizons of scientific discovery and application. DeWitt Myers A ssistant Professor B.A.-Valley City State College M.A.-Washington State University Chairman T eday we'll dissect a fan.

PAGE 37

That' s no problem. Take off your shoes ... Charl es E. Courchaine--Assistant Professor B.S.-University of Rhode Island M.Ed.-Boston University M.A.-University of Oregon .. and let me check your blood pressure. lyl e V Jenkins-AssistMt Professor B.S.-Portland St.te College M.S.-Oregon State University 33

PAGE 38

34 Donald S. Seih.-Instructor B.A.-North Dakota State University M.S.-North Dakota State University Pss-Don't turn around, but keep turning the pages Did I hear you say I'm Irresistible? I Karl W Shirley -Instructo r B.A.T eKas Christian University M.Ed.-Wes t Texas State M.A.-Stanford University

PAGE 39

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION The study in the field of Physico I Education for the new student will playa maior role in helping him to adjust to the vast advances which our scientific society will demand of him. This society will give the new student more leisure time in order to pursue his athletic endeavors and abilities by less work loads, and earlier retirement. The student o!Iffected by more leisure time will be both physically sound and mentally well by participating in the field of Physical Education. One may have a choice or be forced to live in cities under the sea or in outer space due to the increasing world papule tion. These tremendous changes will re quire more physical and mental discipline of the human body than ever. Physical Educo!ltion with its emphasis upon free and spontaneous pll11Y in childhood, vigorous rhythmic movements in the adolescent, and recreational activities for older people may hold the key for III fuller life for the new student. Forward Mllirch! Morris Professor B.S.-Newberry College M.A.-George Pellibody College for Teachers Chlllirmllin Patricilll A. lehman--lnstructor B.S.-Northwest Missouri State College M.S.-Northwest Missouri State College 35

PAGE 40

36 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE AND EDUCATION The New Student of the socia l sciences and of education will find himself precise'r where the action is in' the coming decade 0 the 1 970's. Our dual department (social science and education) at the Canal Zone College faces a greater chal. lenge than that of any previous decade in its embattled history. The New Student demands that his college pro gram be "relevant" to his anticipated needs in these volatile times. He turns particularly to t he social sciences and to the humanities to provide him with the mogic something which he can accept enthusiastically as relevant. He is impatient for action. He seeks instant relevance. He senses the Malthusian disp r oportion between successful socia l problem solving and the spawning of new socia l problems. The New Student insists that the methods and techniques of education in the 1970's program relevant knowledge into his brain so that he can learn more, faster and more effectively than ever before. He expects his education to be prescient, to teach him today what he must know in the 1980's. The New Student tends to view the world through a lens of subjective quality. The Old Profes so'rs were generally trained to view the world through objective lenses. Can these views be rec onciled ? Don't cop out, drop out, turn off or tune cut. Stay with the action and work for the G reat Reconcilia tion o f the 1970 's. (By the end of this decade of oction the New Student will be close upon his thirtieth birthday.) Charles R. Bowen-Assi sta nt Professor B.A.-Baldwin-Wallace College M.A.-Ohio State U n i versity Chairman Let's s ee, the best place f o r m y marbles Right here!

PAGE 41

I only twisted his arm and it came off. Michael E Smith-I nstructo r B.S.-University of Minnesota M.Ed.-University of Minnesota Dr. Russell' W Annis Professor B.S.-University of Kansas M.S.-University of Kansas Ph.D.-University of Kansas If he checks me here, I'll check him there; and if ... 37

PAGE 42

38 I can't decide who is going to get the "F Clarenc e R Vosburgh-Instructo r B.S.-Hamilton College M.A.-T eachers College. Columbia University H Loring White Instructo r B.A.-University of Connecticut M.A.-University of Connecticut M.A.-Univer sity of Col o rado

PAGE 43

Barbara Carson B usiness A dminist ration Raymond D a v i dson N a t u r al Scienc e Anabe l Gammon Natural Science PART-TIME FACULTY Rob ert F D ahlstro m B usin ess Administration \ .. Ro b ert D o n aldso n E ngin eeri ng P aul l. Goudie Natural Science Adrianne D a v i d son Natural Science R a lph F a r nswo rth E ngineering Dr. R. Gross Visiting Lecturer Natural Science 3 9

PAGE 44

40 Bobby Harp English, Speech and Drama Candace M Harsany Natural Science Dr John H arsa n y N atural Science Keller J. H eard Engineering and Technology Carlos A. Vaz. Rica rdo V allarino Natural Science Foreign Languages Lloyd Murphy Business Administration F iorella Weaver Foreign Languages

PAGE 45

DORMITORIES Oh no! who is knocking at the door Steve Bunyea Bernice K. Davison 41

PAGE 46

4 2 Allen D. Griffin B.A.-Texas Wesleyan College M.A.-North T exas State University Antoinette O s mun B.A.-University of Delaware M.s.-University of Maryland LIBRARY Technology has left its mark on just about every aspect of the world we l ive in. The students of Canal Zone College are fortunate to be a part of this new era of technology. You are indeed a New Student at the dawn of one of history's most promising and chal. lenging decades. The library of today is in pace with the New Student-it helps him to keep abreast of the new ideas, concepts, and advances made by modern man. The Canal Zone College Library provides its students with books. magazines, audio-visual materials, periodicals, and modern techniques to keep up with the changes in our society. Just as the library augments the New Stu dent's awareness of present happenings, it also facilitates a student's study of the past. Re cordings of cherished musical filmstrips, slides, p rints and movies of famous paintings, places and events bring the student closer to the subject so that he may develop a greater appreciation for the past and its contribution to the world. The library plays a vital role in providing all media for the New Student's benefit. With it he can peruse the past, keep pace with the present, and prepare for the future. Patric i a Booth

PAGE 47

OFFICE PERSONNEL Ballesteros Lut Bustamante, Maria Del Pilar Sanchez Roberto A re you really going to date h i m 1 43

PAGE 48

BOOKSTORE Mrs. M. Balmas No comments. Je, Je, No discount; he doesn't have an S.A. card.

PAGE 49

Aleman, J. / Gargia, G. P ineda, T. CUSTODIANS Alveo,8. Roach E. Leader, Grounds Keeper Cordova I. Hool er, I. Head Custodian Thomp son, J. If;l, F Crai g Louis Dre ssing Room Attendant P.E. Department Tunon, E. 45

PAGE 50

46 CZC mathematics instructor Ellis l. Siders, discusses his new book, New College Arithmetic, with a group of his students. left to right are: S. Sgt. Fred Gray, Mrs. Helen Reeves, Siders, and Mrs. C. W. Crane. Mrs. Crane is holding Siders' first book. FACULTY CITATIONS l yle J enkins assistant profes sor of biology at cze. re ceived a special "life Saving Award" for his prompt action in saving the eyesight of student when an acid explo sion occurred in the chemistry laboratory at the college.

PAGE 51

Dr. Russell W. Annis receives promotion to full professor. Ellis l. Siders receives promotion t o As sistant Professor. Superintendent on left and Dean Murphy on right. Mrs. James Wright, a 1947 graduate of CZC, looks over an alumni bulletin with Dr. Murphy. A ssistant Dean Margaret M. Gately displays a Distinguished Alumna -Award plaque presented her recently from Emmanuel College in Boston, Mass. 47

PAGE 53

FRESHMAN CLASS 49

PAGE 54

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS L. t o R.: Secretory. Chris Costr o; President, Kothy Mulroy; V. President, Dee Davis; T rea surer, Debbie Olliver; Sponso r Lowrence Perkins. 50

PAGE 55

Ricardo Acevado Sadid Aguilera Gardenia Ah Kai Wayne Albritton Linda Alexander Laine Almstead Socorro Alvarado Roy Archer Valerie Ash 51

PAGE 56

John Javie r BMrios Antonio John Say Santa . Beec hner Teresa Benbenek Rita Hester B enner George Ber ma n T om Bero nia 52

PAGE 57

Mary B est Theresa B ierbaum B rent Bingham Robert B ishop Ricardo Bolandos Mario Bournes "Brag Brag! B rag!" Russell Bowen Cathy Boyer David Braswell Sue Brinson 53

PAGE 58

-I Brock Bill Brooks Debbie Brown Delico Brown Wendell Brown Keith Bullinger "Who S.;d I couldn't PAIN T." Tom C",los 54

PAGE 59

P ablo C a r rasqu illo J a i me Carrizo "If at first you don't succeed, Tie, Tie Again!!" Rosar o Carrizo C ris Castr o lucia Chang Wong J esus Checo Berta Chen Fernando Cheong 55

PAGE 60

Teresa Cherie Carolin Choy Omar Chipsen Angella Cockburn Casma C ockburn Patricia Cockburn Alfonso Cox Jeff Craig Roy Culb,eth Lizabeth Daily Darlene Daily 56

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Dee Davis Theresa Day Ell!line Ded ecke r Cynthio!l De Lo!I Cruz Maria De La Guardia Yoli De La Guardio!l R olando DeLeon Mireya Dem ocea Patri cia Dertien Dorothy Detamore 57

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Fer na nd o D i az J o h n Dial "The Thin k e r ? R o b e rt o D o n i kian C ha r le s D o oley III Elaine D o rfman Jeanne D os hier Woodwo rth Dra ugho n William D u ffus 58

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JonathM Dunh am P enny E arl Cynthia Fade 1'. , t Ezra D yan William EnglMd Guy Fealey "Quotes" ) Cecil i a FernMdez Patricia Finn 59

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Donold o F o ng Kathleen F oster "Very interest ing'" Sing Fong Nei l Fraunhei m Edward Frensley Gl orio Golindo Thomos Gorber Antho n y Garcio Irma Garcia J uon Gorcia De Paredes 60

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I Luis Gc!lfcia Lavergne Charles Garner Nancy Garner Steve Gemmell Guillermo Gerberding Dennis Gilbert John Gilbert Nellie Goffeney Normc!l Gomez Phillip Gonz"les "Sorry, we don't co!Ifry Plc!1yboy." 61

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V icent e Gonzolez Frank G oodwi n P a t Greg ory \ PotricioGrimm Elia Guerra Gail Guerrero J oe Guthri e t P eggy H.le Blonche Hammond Morilynn Hare 62

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Marcella Hawk Joan Heady Elmer Henriquez William Herbeck Mac Hal Mimy Ho Vivian Hooper Ernest Horter Bill Howard Karl Huebner Jack Humphries Janet Husum 63

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Ana R Jim en e z JUc!ln K am M axin e Kar s t L i nd a Kemp Jack Kent Fr ancisco Ki ng C artoo n Time" Chris tinc!l La Pat k a S tephanie Lc!lws on 64

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Michelle Lee Lee Penny Leeser Limc h i n J ohn L ocke 65

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.r Edmund Lopez III Lilia Lopez linda L ow e T erese Lubrano John Manley Jesse Martie Norma Mascol Zaida Matias Rosanne Mcilvaine John McLelland "Cetsup, pleese." 66

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Elvira Mendez Isabel Mendez "Now, iust a touch of Vodka." Mercedes Ng Kenneth MOf"les lueU" MOf"les Pete MOf"les CosseHe Moren o M"ry Mortell"fo Clifford Mullins K.thy Mulroy 67

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Ken Murphy Tish Murphy Ana Nelson Carlos Notyce : Lynn O C onnell Ingrid Olivo Olgo Pork Amrutl11l Patel Edisll P ene David Penrose Lucia Perez Pat Perry 68

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Yvonne Pezel Susan Plante Edward Portier P ablo Prieto Don R
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Ron Robson Sc!lfcl Rodriguez T eresina Rotondo!!lro Kathleen Sager Jorge Site n Alberto Simhan Cristabel Siu 70

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Sue Slover Robert Sm.!lUing Ted Snyde r Patricia Springer Katherine Strickland Sharon Swann Tervo T am.!lki Lynn T erreU 71

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Nicky Tiniacos Gay o Troll Eugene Tucker, Jr. F a t imll VlIrgas Ruben VlIron, Jr. An ge lll Vassell Annette Violette Jim Vosburgh 72

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Rod Walline Sue Ward Stuart Warner Sylvia Watson M a rgare t Webb R obed Wheeler Gloriela White JlJyne Wickline 73

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Frederick Wiea nd Paul Willenborg D o nna Williams Madeleine Williams Y olanda Willi"ms "You can h av e your cake and eat it, too." StephMia Wils o n L ouis Yearwood M arina Young 74

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ORGANIZATIONS

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First Row: Sherry Bissell, D onald Dean M a ry C lark, M arlene Romero, Gail Guerr ero, Barbara Biltocks, Pat P erry, D an Garcia, Mercedes Ng, Berta Chen, Kathy Foster, Marilyn Hare. Second Row: Mr. Lesser, Mr. H o nea, Larry F orseth, Lynn Patton, J ackie E vans, Jim Harnage, D arlene Daly, Kathy Mulroy, K e nny Justic e J ohn B ay, Juan Benavent, Luis Garcia, Jorge Carizo. Mr. Des Londes. Mr. Honea, Sponsor; Mr. Lesser, Sponsor; Mary CI
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The purpose of Phi Beta Lambda, the business club of CZC, is to improve scholar ship and develop qualities that will enable the members to participate effectively in business, professional, and community l ife. The on l y membership requirement is to be enrolled in one business subject. Yoo hOD! Are you wit h me? Officers at Installation Dinner. 77

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78 NEWMAN COMMUNITY Newman C o mmunity bake s ale. G u e s t spea ker at a meeting. F irst Row : A u rea Hogan Carm en Behren s Cynthi a D e La C ruz, Gemma Fernandez. D alys Sagel, Lucia Chang Wong, Lou ise J ulian, Henr y R os e Berta Chen, Kathy Melan so n A r aceli Enriq u ez Mercedes N g. Second Row: Maril y n Hare, Susy W i l so n B elinda De L a Cr u z Irma R i v era M artha R o bles, Judith Vas quez, Dioveli s Diaz, Elsa Rich ard, M a rcia Ric hard. Third Row: J ohn Salas, Pete M o r a l es, J ua n Benavente, R o geli a N ico sia Ricard o B o lan os, Eduard o Da v is, Fath e r Murphy Thomas Muy.

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OFFICERS: Mr. Courchaine. faculty sponsor; Louis Julian, president, Elsa Richard. vice president; Diovelis Diaz, e xecutive secretary; Araceli Enriquez, corresponding secretary; Thomas Muy, treasurer Pete Morales, S.A. Represen t ative; Eduardo Davis. publicity chairman. The Newman Community of CZC is an organization that helps to foster spiritual, i ntellectual. and social interest of the students. Membership is open to anyone enrolled at CZc. Father Murphy, Church Advisor. enjoying himself at Newman Com munity picnic 79

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80 First Row: Isabel Mendez. Dioveles Diaz. Dalys Sagel. Henr y Rose. Gemma Fernandez. Elsa Ric hard, Paula Kuyoth Mr. Jenk ins. faculty s p onsor. Second Row: Edmund Lopez III. Marcia Richard Ignacio Scope. Pete M o rales. Ena Archibald. Je sse Martie. Ricardo Bolanos. OFF I CERS : Henry R ose, SA Representative; Els a Richard. treasurer; Ena Arc hibald s ecre t ar y ; Gemma Fernandez vicepresident; Pete M orales, president. CZC SCIENCE SOCIETY The purpose of CZC Science S ocie ty, formerly known as the Biologica l Society, is to promote science activities for CZC students. These activities include guest s peak ers, field trips, and tours to various labo ratories The only membersh ip requirement is to be a studen t of the college.

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First Row: Laura Townsend, Diovelis Diaz, Kathy Jestice Elva Sellens. Barbara Eaton. Dee Boarman, Elsa Kam. Second Row: L eonardo Wong, E duard o Davis, Tom Riley, Mr. Marshall, Larry Forseth. PHI THETA KAPPA Phi Theta Kappa is the honorary society of CZc. its purpose is to recognize and encourage scholarship among CZC studen ts. To be a member one must be a full-time student, who has completed one full semester with a cumulative grade point average o f 3.0. OFFICERS: Mr. M a r s h all. Sponsor; Larry F orseth, Presi den t : B a rbar a E aton, Vice-Pr esident ; Diovelis Diaz Secretc!lry: Laur a Townsend Treasurer : L eonardo Wong, Sergeant-at -Arms. 8 1

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Margar e t Mille r Co-Pres ide nt PILOTS Mr KiHerman sponsor of Pilots Sherry Bis s ell, Co-Pre sident P ilots a re the most active and industrious or ganization at CZc. At practically all schoo l spon so r e d events, P ilofs are reque sted to help in" ush ering selling tickets, handing ou t programs Md guiding. T o be a member of Pilots one must be a student at CZC and must be willing to serve the college. On t he opposite page are this year's P ilots i n action. Vicky Rodriguez S.A. Repre sen tative

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STUDENT ASSOCIATION 84 S. A. OFFICERS. Seated: Janet H unt, President. Standing: J on Rivera, VicePresident; Mr. Honea. Faculty advisor; Cynth;" Boukalis. Secretary; Elsa Kam. Tre asu rer. The purpose of the Student Association is to finance and direct all official activities throughout the school year. The S. A. provides a f orum for student expression for the benef jt of the school an d community. S.A. Representatives.

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S. A. MEETING PICTURES. 85

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Sitting: James Stephen. Standing: Omar Chipsen; Marcella Haw!:; Karl Huebner, President; Donaldo Fong, Vice-president; Jorge Quijano, Jon Rivera, S.A. representative; Charles Meyers; Jose Troitino; Ezra Dayan; George Berman. The purpose of the Chess Club of CZC is to stimulate interest and to improve skills in the game of chess. This year has been one of their most active. Dr. Annis, sponsor, and kibitzer, looks on. CHESS ClUB 86

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ARTS

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88 AN INSPECTOR CALLS A PLAY WITH A MESSAGE OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY THE CAST (in order of appearance) Mr. Birling Mrs. Birling ..... ..... Sheila Birling Eric Birling Ger
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89

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93

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COLLEGE CAPERS 1969

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"Look, I can fly!" I didn't know you cared." 9&

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"Well, you see, it's this way." "Coming. "Hold ;1. 97

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"They call it th"t good ole moun t"in dew .. LR. S.m, Russ, Jeff, Ted, Don, Ed, and Jim.

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"Everybody olways bIomes me." "M o th e r olwoys l iked you best!"

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Mr. Chapman, Sponsor M USICA Christmas Concert 100 MUSICA MUSICA is the CZC Cultural society responsi ble for providing in both the Zone and P anama the best talent available. Thr oughout the yelJr thi s orga,jization sponso r s many fine concerts. Some o f this year's presentations included the "Ars Antigua Recorder Concert." "The Coro Polif onico de Panam a," lJnd The USAFSO Band Christmas Con cert. H enry Rose, Pre sident I

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CONQUISTADOR Mr L esse r Yeerbook Adviso r J o n R ive r a As st. Editor ond Production Ch i e f STAFF Catherine J es t ice Editor 101

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102. John Mclelland: Elsa Kem: Chairman, Faculty and Administration; Advertisements. Margaret Miller: Co-Chairman Advertisements and Organizations. Chairman of Citations. Asst. to the Editor; Advertisements. John Manley: Chairman of Classes; Chairman of Sports; Asst. o f the Editor:

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Becky Whiting Arts and St.ff Cynthia De La Cruz Arts and Freshman Sherry Bissell C o-C h airman Advertisements and B elinda De La Cruz. Karen Sun Administration F aculty Art s and Class 103

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And now for touch of rouge Hmmm If he keeps this up, I won't have any fingers left. Now l ook h e r e, Spo r t . Big B r othe r is watching you. 104

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Steve Gemmell Fres h man Cl ass Editor; Chr onology Staff. Bobbee Garrett Chronology Staff John Mercier Arts and Sports Staff; Photographer. Gemma F ernandez Faculty and Administration Staff. 105

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-106 Paul Stewart Head Photographe r 8 ;11 Duffus Photographer STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS J ohn Napi e r Photographer Warr e n Leon Photograph e r Jorge Quiiano Photographer Edward Hazel Developing

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She thinks she's so sm"rt! You see, it's like this ... Working H.rd(lyJ! N o! It w"sn t me, honest! 107

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108 TROPICAL COLLEGIAN Mr. J ohn Mar s h a l l Faculty Advisor D e bbi e A v r a m Managing Edit o r The Tropical Collegian is the sc h ool's literary and arts magazine. Published each semes fer, it provides Canel Zone College's young hopefuls a n opportunity to see t h eir work in pri nt. All studenh are encouraged t o submit t h e i r original essays, poems, s h or t stories. articles and sketches ; Md th e collegian staff selects for publicatio n works which i t fee l s stand as the most outs tanding exam ples o f the sc h ool's creative an d artist i c output.

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David Mimbs Art Editor Carmen Behrens A sst. E ditor; S.A. Representat i v e. Margaret Miller P roduction Editor "A musical comedy version o f A Tale of Two Cities?" 109

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Bill Gonzales, President Alida Lynton, Vice Presi.:lent 110 DELTA PSI OMEGA Delta Psi Omega, 138: the dramatic fr aternity of Canal Zone College. A student is generally eligible for members h ip consideration after he h as participated in o r otherwise contributed to two dramatic f unctions at t he college. The purpose of D elta Psi Omega i s to encourc!!lge dramatic interests, to secure for the co llege the advantages of a large national frc!!lternity, and t o secu re for the worthy student rewarding opportuni ties to further develop his dramatic skills Terri Smith, Secretary Daryl Garrett, Treasurer

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THE BEST PLAYS OF THE DECADE L i ttl e M a r y S unshine" 1963 III

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"John Brown's Body"-1967 "How to S u ccee d in Business Without Really Trying."-196Q

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113

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"Imaginary Invalid"-1966 "Imaginary Invalid"-1966 "Frantasticks"-1963 114

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SOPHOMORE ClASS 115

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SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS L. to R. President, Carole Arnold; V. President. Daryl Garrett; Secretary. Vicki Rodriguez; Treasurer, Bill Barrera. 116 Mr. Ellis J. Siders, Sponsor

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Carole Arn old Ida Ash Debbie Avram Barb ara BeaJl Irma Deaulieus Carmen Behrens Juon Benavent Jose B ibbo "The Enlightened One" 117

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1 Barbaro Biltoft Cloro Birch Sherry Bissell Olg. B o l.d o Steve B olt Paul Boostram Maria Bosch Cynthio Boukalis Cather ine B owers "All right now where is the A." 118

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Gregg Brown Brown Gregory Bryant lisa Carbajal Terri Case Michael Chan Chavez J Edna Cordova did I see?" "Just me and my wind ow" 119

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John Cowon M
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Karl Ebert Aracel i Enriquez Jackie Evans Tom Frensley Danny Garcia Daryl Garrett Albert Gonzalez Natalia Gotty Gretchen Grim Dionne Gomez "She did it 121

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"We bought it in the lounge." Nora Guime Barbara Hancock Edward Hazel $usy H it e Michael Hoy Catherine Jestice Hazel Jones L ola Jones Juvenal Jovet, Jr. 122

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Louise Juli.!!n Kenneth J ustic e M.!!c Kuhn D ianne Locke Pablo Mayrgundter Mariel.!! M orris E. Koll-Nescher N.!!ncy L ockleM Rose.!!nna McArthur --' Julie Kris Ju.!!n Lyew Sam McGuinness 123

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Ko!!Ithy Jane Melanson J ohn Mer cie r Juli e Mercier Morgaret Miller John Mimbs Valerie Mustde Thomo!!ls Muy Orlando Myrie Vilma Nesfield 124

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Rogelio Nicosia Franklin Novet Deborah Olliver Nick P"nszczyk J Florys"bel Ponce Ca rolyn Reeves "Feeling Groovy" Els" Richards lrm" Rivera "'., I EI"ine River" Jon Rivera 125

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Janet Rocheleau Victoria Rodriguez Chris Ross Inga Rosson < --' .0 -.... ..' Calvind Rueba Dolys Sogol Vilma S"mpson Julie S"nson Anglea Scott Dennis Smith Terri A. Smith 126

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John Soll.s Silvia Smith Vonnie Steward Fair" Suarez Karen Sun Milicent T urne r Virginia Wertz Vilma Vergara Michael Weade Peggy Wesley "2 .nd 2=4" 127

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Barbara Wesley Marcia Welch Curtis Whitehead Becky Whiting -----Tom Wiggins P aula Witt Are you sure da Vinci sta rted this way?" Leonardo Wong Sandra Wood D arlene Woodruff J ose Luis Zerr 128

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JUNIOR CLASS Nena Archibold G emma F ernand e z Kam Eyd. Luque H enry Rose Linda Wyant MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY STUDENTS 129

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130 .J / The Medical Te chnology students lire second Md third year students who want to become medical technicians. We are happy that these students hav e the opportunity to achieve this goal through a course of study at the College and thei r p r octical work at Gorgas Hospi tal under the direction o f Mr. Vallarino.

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SPORTS

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JAMBOREE QUEEN MISS JEANNE MARIE CHANCE 132

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"King of the Pile" JAMBOREE Just step ove r t hat line. 133

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First R ow: (l to R) Greg Bryant, Kenneth Murph y Rick V e lasco, N orman S p e cto r Daniel Garcia, Tom Slice, J o n D unham Eugene Tucker Second Row: Neil Frauenhei m Stati stician; T ony Ca bal, Man ager ; Curti s W h i t e head Jame s V o sburgh Russe l l B owen, E dward Frensley, Don R at h gebe r Kennet h Justice, R o bert o Donikion, T o m Garber, J o h n MMley, Man ager ; M o rris Finkelstein Haa d C oac h T hird Row: K e n S h etle r Statis t i c i a n ; R a m o n Reyes, C oach; S i d K enno n Coach; Chris Ross, Rich ar d Swain, J ohn S t anley, Samuel M cGui nness, Keit h Bullinge r Bill Brooks, Tom W iggi n s Mac k Hill, and R o y Arche r INTERSCHOLASTIC CZC T h i s year t he footbal l team t ook t h e I nter scho l as ti c Champio n s hip averaging 1 9 poin t s a g a me whil e only gi v i n g up 6 p o ints. The CZC stu dent b ody is rightly proud o f th i s t e am Score Boa r d C Z C ........... 10 C H S .... . . . 6 CZ C ......... . 28 BHS . .......... 0 CZC ... ....... 8 C H S ........... 0 C Z C .... .... . 30 B H S ... ....... 0

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" Chain Reaction" CHAMPS

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You Wo!Int Me to wo!Ish my hMds? This is A stick-up! 136

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Inte r scholastic Champs 1 4 All St." 20 PALM BOWL 137

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138 CZC CHEERLEADERS Back Row, L to R : Joan Heady, Chris laPatka. Darleen Woodruff, and J a net Hunt. Front Row, L to R: Elaine Dedecker, Gaye Treff, Dee Boarma n and Patricia Murphy.

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Anne Riggs Elaine Dedecker Chris Lo Potko 139

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140 Darlene Woodruff Eight wonderful, talented
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GIRLS' BASKETBALL 141

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142

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eze GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEA M Top Row, L to R: Darlene Daily, Rose Mcil vaine, Kathy Mulroy, Cindy Boukalis, Sue Slover. Bott o m Row, l to R: Peggy Hale, Janet Husum, Tish Murphy, Paula Kuyoth, Elva Sellens. 143

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BOYS INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 144

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145

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CZC TRACK TEAM l to R : Cooch Mike Smith, J"mes Vosb ourgh, Ch rle s M ye rs. E uge n e T ucker, Nie l F rouen h eim. No r m Spector. D on Wilson, Steven Bolt, Corl Ebert, Copt. Bill Brooks, Roy Arch e r "A footb.1I huddle." Superman! i47

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"And they didn't even give me a head start." "That's no way t o throw a FRISBEE" If only the pole would bend 148

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U p Up And 149

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"I run in my bare feeH" "Boy, does that tickle" A worried

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eze TENNIS TEAM Yes, I do use a tennis r"cket," Score? shoot, w e d o n't k eep sco re." Don't worry, I will kill the FLY! Who A m I ? Why I'm .!I tennis p l"yer When you ask me to smile. I smile! 151

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eze BASEBALL TEAM Front Row, l to R: Ken Brogie, Mario Cruz. Eugene Tucker. Augustin Rey, Alfredo Lou, Robert Bailey. Back Row, l to R: T om Frensley, Neil Frauenheim, Ken Murphy. Charlie M eyers, J oh n Stanley, J ohn Spilling, Hen r y Swann, Gordy Jacks on. Jim Hellmund, Coach Smith. Winding Up! 153

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"It's My QUc!lrter; I saw it first." Y ou s h ould stMd up so you won't get you r clothes dirty. '----Va! Ya! You missed!

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"They pitch underhand in Baseball?" In case one doesn't m
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156 JUDO CLASS

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157

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DANCE CLASS

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"It's better now we have something to aim at." "Now I can TELL you my D ad is a good shot." ARCHERY "Now I'm g oing to eat ;t." Robin HOOD Md his Merrymen

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"IN DAYS OF THE LONGBOW" 160

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CITATIONS

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Oaryl Garret Richard Velasco MR. AND MISS CANAL ZONE COLLEGE 162

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MOST POPULAR Peggy Collins Mike Halley 163

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Juvenal Jovet FRI ENDLI EST 11.4

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MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED larry Forseth Debby Avram 165

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Eduardo Davis 166 ,#---------Elsa Kam MOST INTELLECTUAL

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MOST TALENTED Alida Lynton David Mimbs 167

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Jim Harnage Janet Hunt BEST LOOKING 168

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BEST DRESSED Ste ve Bolt D iane G o m e z 169

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Jon Rivera Margaret Miller MOST SCHOOL-SPIRITED 170

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MOST ATHLETIC Cynthia Boukalis Tom Slice 171

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John Mercier Kathy 015en WITTIEST 172

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OUTSTANDING Chess Club James St ephan Musica Alida Lynton CLUB MEMBERS Del ta Psi Omega Daryl Garret 173

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174 OUTSTANDING CLUB MEMBERS CONT. Phi Beta L"mbda Mary Clark Pilots Margaret Miller Ph; Theta K appa larr y F o rseth Tropical Collegian David Mimbs

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WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN JUNIOR COLLEGES -Carol e Arn old Mar y Clark D iovelis Oia z L arry F o r set h 175

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WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN J a n e t Hunt Dar y l Garret Catheri n e Jestice Elsa Kam 176

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JUNIOR COLLEGES Alida Lynton Jon Rivera Kenneth Shetler Elva Sellens 177

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WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN JUNIOR COLLEGES Thomas Slice Curtis Whitehead Darlene Woodruff 178

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CHRONOLOGY 179

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REMEMBER LAST YEAR 180

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lSI

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SEPTEMBER ClUB ORGANIZATION AND PEP ASSEMBLY 182

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G E T A C Q U A I N T E D FRESHMAN DANCE 183

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184 COllEGE CAPERS REHEARSALS AND PRODUCTION

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185

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OCTOBER: NEWMAN CLUB PICNIC 18b

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187

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188 SOCCER COMES TO CZC

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189

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-PHI BETA LAMBDA BANQUET 190

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U.S.A.F.S.O. BAND CONCERT J9J

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192 NOVEMBER POP CONCERT BY M.U.S.l.C.A.

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193

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194 DECEMBER FOOTBALL BANQUET

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CHRISTMAS PARTY SPONSORED BY S.A. -195

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CHRISTMAS FORMAL 196 Gail Gordon Christma s Formal Queen Escort-James Harnage

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198 Christina La P a tka Freshman Princess Escort-Kenneth Murphy Marilynn Hare Freshman Princess Escort-Neil Frau enheim

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Elsa Richard Sophomore Princess Escort-Pete Morales Marcia Welch Sophomore Princess Escort-Guillermo Barrera 199

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AFTER THE CORONATION

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JANUARY SPRING REGISTRATION

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203

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204 TRACK BEGINS FOR C.Z.c. AT CRISTOBAL

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205

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206 PREPARATION FOR BASEBALL SEASON

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BELATED CLASS PICTURES l arry Forseth Alida litto n James Stephen 207

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Janet Hunt Elva Sellens Kenneth Shetler 208

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Thomas Slice Robert Spilling Fernando Jemmott 209

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210

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IN APPRECIATION : T o a humorous young man Who has acted as Master of Ceremonies at College Functions Who has lent successful theatrical performances to the College Theater Who is constantly on hand whenever his assistance is needed. Always giving of himself for the benefit o f his f r iends, associa t es, the Canol Zone College, and the Community as a whole. We, the Conquistador staff, acknowledge F rank Bright. 211

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ANIMATION 213

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230

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"Double jointed" "Passed history" "All AmericM" "Ouch!" 231

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232 INDEX TITLE PAGE: 1 INTRODUCTION: 2 DEDICATION: 14 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY: 17 FRESHMAN CLASS: 49 ORGANIZATIONS: 75 ARTS: 87 Phi Beta L
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SOPHOMORE CLASS: 115 JUNIOR CLASS: 129 SPORTS: 131 Jambo ree Queen ................ .... .. 132 F ootball ... . . . . . . .. . .. 131 Ch e erleaders .. ... ..... ..... 138 G;ds' Bas ketball .... 141 Boys' Bas ketball . ....... 144 Track. ........ ............ .... 147 Tenni s ... Baseball . ................ 151 .. ............... 153 J,do ...................... .. .. 156 Physical Education ..... 158 CITATIONS: 161 Mr. and Miss CMal Zone C ollec"e ... .... 162 M ost P opula r .............. ... 163 Friend l iest ..... .... 164 Most Likely to Succeed ..... . .... . .. 165 Most Intellectual ............... ...... t 66 Most Talented ........................ 167 Best Looking .............. .. 168 Best Dressed . ..... 169 Most School -Spirit ed ................... 170 Most Athletic ..................... ... 171 Wittiest . .................. ,172 Outstanding Club Mem bers .. .173 Who's Wh o ............................. 175 CHRONOLOGY: 179 ANIMATION: 213 ADVERTISEMENTS: 239 233

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234 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The ink and pages that comprise a yearbook are inanimated ingredients. But with these two ingredients. coupled with the imagination of people, the yearbook speaksand at times shouts-with much vigor and jubilation. The organization of such an enterprise, the selection of photographs. the write-ups, the pressures of meeting deadlines, and the decision making are some of the majo r problems that were confronted and hopefully solved by the 1970 Conquist
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The Admini stration: Without whose support, such a project could never come into being. The Facult y : For its generous cooperation-particularly during those "trying days" in taking Class pictures The Student Body: The 1970 Conqui stador is for and by the students of Canal Zone College. Without this body, the yearbook h
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yesterday 236 fl,yj 0/ 6 .. y ffo.,! 7 \ o/bo.e II<>/&: THE CONQUISTADOR firM au-/; dolfy%n Il; \ today

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A WORD FROM THE EDITOR Since this year's Conquistador staff was fortunc!lte enough to have the school year fall ot the end of one decade and the beginning of another, I, as editor. felt we should eKploit the possibilities of this infrequent situation. Our theme revolves around the N ew Student at the dawn of one o f history's most promising and chal. lenging decades. This past decade has been a fast-moving one. It has seen the violent conflict of values between generations, races, socia-cultural groups. and nations. It has seen unprecedented
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ADVERTISEMENTS

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240 Curundu Flower Shop Free Deliveries to Hospitals and Locations in the Canal Zone Weddings Anniversaries Funerals Corsages Must be Ordered Two Days in Advance for Dances Large Supply of Local and States' Flowers Just call Balboa 2793 or Curundu 7292 We Will Be Ready To Serve You!

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Heladeria CANAL ZONE CREDIT UNION BALBOA-MARGARITA A fanama Canal c.ompany Canal Zone Government Qwned Corporation LASTRA, S. A. Via Espana The Best Ice Cream in Panama and the Canal Zone PIZZA Telephone: 25-6002 A Water W o rld At 50th Street Aquarium s and Tropi ca l Fish Complete Lin e on Sporting Goods 241

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242 Courtesy of MORGAN'S GARDEN Flower s in Beautiful A rr a n gements for Any O cc asion Place Your Order by Phoning 2 2390 REMEMBER THE SCHOOL DANCES y MCA RESTAURANT AND SODA FOUNTAIN Season's fresh sea food p latter Gou rmet chine se dis h es Complete s teak dinne r s Daily Specia l menu Cold drinks F o r reservations please ca ll : Balboa 2-2759 2-2839 REMEMBER, YOU HAVE A FRIEND A T C HASE MAN H ATTAN THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK Nati ona l Assoc iation Via ESI>ana, Plaza 5 de 1\layo, Betania, Col on, Da\'id, Chitre. Balboa.

PAGE 247

Congratulations and Best Wishes COLPAN MOTORS INC. Panama, R.P. Distributors for American and English Ford Cars and Trucks Tel. 61-3500 243

PAGE 248

244 INDUSTRIAS SAN JUAN Eng.-JUAN FONG Engineering Servic es, Furniture, and Lumber Company Via Fernandez de Cordova (Final) P O Box 9247 Panama 6, R P Telephones: 61 /84 For good eating and good comf()rt your best place is the fl[)til; Travel ... anywhere. Frangipani.Street (In Front of the National Stadium) or i n Madurito', Store. Telephone Numbers 2 in the Canal Zone and 25 in Panama "CLUB PANAMAR" SEA -FOOD -HOUSE ---RESTAURANT AND BAR---' End of SO Stree t San Francisco de la Caleta H ear the Sea side SIERRA HNOS. (Manager) Tel. 26-0892

PAGE 249

Congratulations to 1970 Class KONZIL Rinse Regenerador Siluela es mtjor___ y s u cabello 1 0 sabe Konzll Rinse -Silueta' DlstnbuldoresE'x clus; \ 'uS; YATE DE ANGELO Enioy a delicious seafood dinner in front of a calm salt lake accompanied by the magn ificent organ music of Angelo. End of Via Porras (Dead End) Telephon e 24 Congratulations to 1970 Class AUGUSTUS R. KAM 2 4 5

PAGE 250

246 Best Wishes, C. Z. College Students FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK Balboa. C. Z. "The Right Bank in the Right Place" A colored ball may not knock down any more pins than a black one. but it l ooks groovier and it's a lot easier to find on the rack. BOWLER'S PRO Complete Accessories Gloves Grease Bags Etc SHOP @ .,. i .'; r ,,---, Bld.-2055, Curundu Phone 83-5125 CURUNDU CAR D AND PARTY SHOP Adjacent to Curunda Post Office A smart new shop full of enchanting things for your world of thoughtfulness, Hallmark cards, party ac cessories, stationery gifts, gift wraps, candles, books and bridge ensem bles Drop by soon.

PAGE 251

247

































Bobby Harp
English, Speech and Drama


Candace M. Harsany
Natural Science


Dr. John Harsany


Natural


Science


Keller J. Heard
Engineering and Technology


Lloyd Murphy
Business Administration


- U


I~







FACULTY


CITATIONS


Lyle Jenkins, assistant profes-


sor of biology
ceived a special


at CZC,
"Life Sa


Award" for his prompt action


in saving


student when


the eyesight


an acid explo-


sion occurred in the chemistry
laboratory at the college.







OFFICE


PERSONNEL


Ballesteros, Luz


Bustamante, Maria Del Pilar


V.rl


,,:,
,r:


9




































- ,t '*j * I *"

nilr ,*','*; >
..v *...
3S / *i"


.t *.; s '




.


C


- -
al


I can't decide who is going to get the


____________________________ Y.manr


* >
,..'


;"~"i~ci
"" 'iS"::


~L~'i~;m







PART


Barbara Carson
Business Administration


-TIME


FACULTY


Robert F. Dahlstrom


Business


Adrianne Davidson


Administration


Natural



V


Science


i


Raymond Davidson


Natural


Robert Donaldson


Science


Ralph Farnsworth
Engineering


eering


s
















































Mr. Frank A. Castles
superintendent of Scho


A.B.-Villanova


University


M.Ed.-Boston University


In comparison with his peers elsewhere,


student in the Canal


Zone appears better able to bridge the gap between generations,


and to pass from child


ood to adulthood in


a manner


more


structive both for himself and for


society.


apparent


maturity,


which


seems


combine


the idealism


and enthusiasm characteristic of youth with the caution and


udgm


of age,


is doubtless due


to the breadth and depth


experience


which our students have acquired in a few


years.


Our students represent families from
urban backgrounds, or all diverse ethnic


every


region,


and racial groups.


rural and


In addition,


lived in many different parts of the


world and observed many cultures


and many politi
to experience i


systems. Here in the Canal


influences


originating


Zone
n the


there is the opportunity
several diverse cultural


patterns of Panama.


From all this experience


comes


a pattern


of life


I iviqnn


and education


con-


I


, ,


~I II 1_1 1_1_1


_


__







DEPARTMENT


OF


SOCIAL


SCIENCE


AND


EDUCATION


Charles R. Bowen-Assistant Professor
B.A.-Baldwin-Wallace College
M.A.-Ohio State University
Chairman


The New Student of the
education will find himself


social


sciences and of


precisely


action is in' the coming decade
Our dual department (social science
at the Canal Zone College faces


of


and education)
I greater chal-


lenge


than that of


any previous


decade


in its


embattled history.
The New Student demands that his college pro-


gram


"relevant


these volatile


social


sciences


times.


to his


He turns


needs


to provide


him with the magic something which he can accept
enthusiastically as relevant. He is impatient for
action. He seeks instant relevance. He senses the
Malthusian disproportion between successful social


problem


solving


and the spawning


new social


problem
The


ns,


New Student insists that the methods and


techniques
relevant knm
learn more,


of education


in the


owledge into his brain


1970's


program


so that he can


faster and more effectively than


ever


where


anticipated


and to the humanities


particularly to


e


^^








































Dr. Russell W.


receives


Annis


receives


promotion to Assistant P


promotion


to full professor.


Ellis L. Siders


professor. Superintendent on left and Dean


Murphy on right.


^*-
* ..
%jf.


Assistant


Dean


Distinguished
recently from


Margaret


Alumna -Awa


M. Gately
rd plaque p


*m






displays a
resented her


Emmanuel College in Boston,


S


JI


I
































Lawrence Perkins-Instructor
B.S.-Northeastern State College
vM.S.-Northeastern State College


Sharon J. Shaw-Instructor
B.S.-Illinois State University


.--llinois


State Universit


w.


PLB


JT~s~


."t **" ., ^ ^- ^ *







COUNSELORS


David B. Baglien
B.S.--North Dakota State


University


M.S.-North Dakota State University


Si;


*I *


1


I ~I







CUSTODIANS


Aleman, J.


Alveo, B.


Cordova. I.


Craig, Louis
Dressing Room Attendant


Gargia,


Hooler, I.
ad Custodian


Ifil, F.
P.E. Department


I















The study in the field of Physica
tion for the new student will play


Educa-
a major


role in helping him to adjust to the vast


advances


which our


scientific


society


demand of him.


This society will give the


new student more leisure time in order to
pursue his athletic endeavors and abilities


work loads,


and earlier retirement.


The student affected by more leisure time


will be both physically


sound and mentally


well by participating in the field of Physi-
cal Education.


One may have


to live in cities unde
space due to the inc


a choice or be


e sea or


forced
in outer


reasing world popula-


tion. These


tremendous


changes


quire more physical and mental discipline


body than ever.


Physical Education with its emphasis up-
on free and spontaneous play in childhood,
vigorous rhythmic movements in the ado-
lescent, and recreational activities for older
people may hold the key for a fuller life
for the new student.


Morris Finkelstein-Assistant Professor
B.S.-Newberry College
M.A.-George Peabody College for Teac
Chairman


- J a r -


DEPARTMENT


OF


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


t r
11 ..
(^H?


of the human


: ox i;
"'" "~33;il~;~~~ i


m r g


















B""r
"*"" ":
:B",::

,i"~": I
i::;


.r.


Dr. Russell W. Annis-Professor
B.S.-University of Kansas
M.S.-University of Kansas


Ph.D.-Unive


Kansas


only twisted his arm and it came off.


i


/~


I


-
























Av







md '









m




d ',-


d '




-h
,4'U




*m
*. **. I


n* -d




e.
^ ?^-
*JL ^' ~-a


Don't call me


call you.


L& w:


. **. x* .


: ^?^ '*i
*' ' : '.







DORMITORIES


Oh no!, who is knocking at the door again?


Steve Bunyea


id u 11111 flf fr^









































Daniel DesLondes-Instructor


B.S.-Middle Tenn
M.Ed.-Florida


essee b


Atlantic


tate University


niversi


Come on Lassie, you


ve go


to do it!


OK cast,


Act I


Scene


II . .






DEPARTMENT


OF


FOREIGN


LANGUAGES


AND


FINE


ARTS


Stephen R. Peck-Assistant


B.A.-University of
vl.A.-University o


Southern
f Southern


Professor
California


ornia


Chairman


, I guess


rest d


dropped.


neration


new


" student


inherits


"old"


world. The student of


1970 inherits


one in which problems


are genera
a shrinking
and they r
is learning
languages
languages


ted at


a much faster rate than


world people
nust learn to


cross


to help
of other


understanding the


are forced into


&long.


boundaries


of all


ever before.


ever do


ser co


The new student,


types,


cross


cultures


people


is a necessary
mselves.


needs


foreign


Learning the
steo towards


Music


and pla
of the


pression o
teristic of


art, I


va unable r<


world. Th


those


nguage,


holes in the
are also ii


are integral parts o
interrelations of the


important vehicles


new and exciting


ich the


which


new student


culture
peoples


for the


are charac-


is richly


owed.









BOOKSTORE


Mrs. M.


Balmas


come


- IMME


*:B *Y ~ *" *


*^ /\ v
*':.** '.m < .- /' *.
*^-.i^^*<'


- .- s T *.


m














































Clinton C. Carney, Jr.-Instructor
A.B.-University of Southern California


Carl H.


Chapman-Instructor


B.M.-Texas Wesleyan


College


M.A.--Unive


rsity of Southern California


M.A.-Ohio


State Un


*I l W* h


iversI


1


























ItH


David Lommen-Assistant Professor
B.A.-Concordia College
M.A.-North Dakota State Universit


Lois H. Passman-Instructor
B.A.-Brooklyn College
M.A.-City University of New Y


- -.


J







CANAL


ZONE


COLLEGE


ADVISORY


COUNCIL


Seated, left to right: Mr. Bruce C. Blevins, Director of Education


sistant Engineer and Construction
El Murphy, Dean, Canal Zone Cc
Richards, Principal, Paraiso High S


Director


allege
school;


USARSO; Mr. Carl J. Browne, Vice-Chairman, As-


; Mr. J. Patrick Conley, Chairman, Deputy Executive


Secretary:


Dr. Glen


and Secretary, Advisory Council. Standing, left to right: Mr. George V.
Dr. Charles L Latimer, Acting Superintendent of Schools; Mr. Fred Becchetti,


Cultural Affairs


Officer, American Embassy.


Members absent in above picture:


S----


U 3


A~r,,


^F .lirl. 1:i.







DEPARTMENT


OF


BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


Arthur A. Honea-lnstructor
B.B.A.-North Texas State University


M.B.A


.-North T


exas State University
airman


"What's it all about, m


as to me. And for what they


For


purposes,


world?"


are worth,


we are living


assume


are two


question
premises


is as perp


find h


in an unfinished world,


helpful in
a world


inesca


to others


examining the questions of life:


recess


of being


completed


and understood by man.
Each person is uniquely equipped to participate


in this


ongoing


process


completion and understanding.


That each of us


answers


out his


to fill in the gaps


years
areas


in an incompletely
of our knowledge


understood


world


world


all too


course


VIOUS.


We are still


lves, and each


answer


seeking
we find


poses


new questions.


But the


actually


incompleteness
vina in a world


of our knowledge appears to


which


is incomp


lete-one


compounded


that is still being


the added


element


we are


worked out."


speak of


an unfinished


world may shock


some.


The fact of the matter


is not subject to


scientific proof


or disproof, for it is of the nature of an expectant


extension


of the mind in an attempt to adequate


compre-


hend the


involved


ents of


our life


in this


world. But, fact or faith,


we humans


are scarcely in


a position to set


limiting boundaries


when accounting for the


energies


operating


in this world.


, then, the


world in


which we live


is still under construction


we who


in it are definite


ly parts of the


going


process.


Imperfect


as we are,


we are nonetheless


integra


parts of the present stage of the whole.


"In," "of," and "by the


completing


process.


The abilities and


persona


equipment which


we have


are ours


to be


used up to the limit


our individual


skills and situations.


As in any productive process,


we may


work for its


success,


goof off,"


with a distorted


sense


of personal


importance,


impede


and sabotage


process.


Every one of


has a stake in the whole, and


every


individual


counts, for


only through individual


initiative


and action will


some


small part of the process be satisfactorily


aided


_







REGISTRAR


Norman B. Altenberg
B.A.-George Pepperdine College
M.A.-Los Angeles State College


Registrar


's Office


is a sort of


Savings


Bank of Achievement:


however


unlike other banks, only deposits are accepted and nothing


is ever destroyed.


The student graduating in the sixties and entering the world of work in the
seventies is more carefully documented than ever before in history. Not only


institutions,


even


more
more


extensive


or less


records


informal


ones


ever before,


readily


but all kinds of


available


stocks


information about every person


ever had


contact with


them.


Canal


College is proud of the records of most of the


15,000 students who have


passed


through


student and


its doors


the institution.


since


1933.


Hopefully


Since the first day a student attends


These
they


CZC,


records


are a


speak


eloquently


commendation.


there exists a permanent record


of his academic


progress.


cards, punched cards, microfilm,


the records
in professors


are kept


on permanent


record


roll books, on computer printed


I i "!1 I t I I -J t- I.