Conquistador

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Conquistador
Uniform Title:
Conquistador (Canal Zone Junior College)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone College
Publisher:
Conquistador Staff
Place of Publication:
Balboa, Canal Zone
Creation Date:
1969
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School yearbooks -- Panama -- Balboa   ( lcsh )
Genre:
School yearbooks
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: 1936.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: 1972.
Issuing Body:
Student yearbook of the Canal Zone Junior College from 1936 to 1963, and the Canal Zone College from 1964 to 1972.
General Note:
Description based on: 1936; title from cover.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: 1972.
Statement of Responsibility:
Canal Zone Junior College.

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 472468547
lccn - 2009229561
System ID:
UF00095973:00035


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charged out for overnight use.
You are responsible for the re-
turn of this book.


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dedication


Mrs. Ewing is as active in the present as she
has always been in the past. She is so "hip"
that our interviewers had a difficult time to get
her to talk about herself because she took more
of an interest in the interviewers and their ac-
tivities. Mrs. Ewing is, in fact, the unsung hero
to whom we dedicate the 1969 Conquistador.


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She has been, and continues to be, a great
teacher of history. She has the facts: The names,
dates, and places come to life as she insightfully
portrays the personalities of the people who built
the Canal.


From her first visit in 1907


to the present,


Mrs. Ewing can chronicle how far the tide used
to flow into Balboa, the long walks to the station
where she caught the train to Empire where she
taught in a one room school house, the ice carts
hrin rinr thep day's met and nrndnp. in t.hp hanek





"People used to ...


"Now I've
picture
shows..."


got a
that


"But before that...


"In those days.


"You


when I first had...


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Mr. Frank A. Castles
A.B.--Villanova University
M.Ed.-Boston University
Superintendent of Schools


The real
those quali
developing


need in education is for the teaching of
ties of mind and spirit which will aid in
a modern student into a mature individual


to survive in times of tension and to achieve his
own ideals. The preservation of democracy, the
building of a lasting peace, and the guarantee of
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canal


zone


college

advisory


council


Patrick Conley
Chairman


Vice-Chairman


FK


Bruce C. Blevins


J. Foster Collins


Alfredo Cragwell


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Norman E. Demers


Edward A. Doolan


Arthur J.


O'leary


Carl J.


Browne


--






The theme of this year's CONQUISTADOR, The
Modern Student, is a very appropriate one; yet, one
must ask, "How modern is the modern student?"
The trademark of the modern student is said to be
that he is both modem and interested in the pursuits
of the eternal verities expressed through our culture.
I was an undergraduate student before most of our
full-time students were born; however, some of the
same concerns of the modern student were equally


important to students when I was in coll
today, I still consider that I am a modern
Such is the opportunity of education. The
is continually refreshed and motivated by d
association with today's modern youth ...
.. .who have more demands and pressures


lege. And
student!
educator
lay-to-day

than my


generation of students,
. ..who have always lived in an unsettled world,
...who are caught between conflicting values and
loyalties,
.. .who must accomplish much in limited time,
.. .who must prepare for rigorous competition and
specialization in the world of work,
S. .who have new "fads and frills,"
. . .and who have ideals and aspirations representing
the best of our national character.
My message to you-the modern student of 1968-
1969-is to encourage you to accept unprecedented
challenges and responsibilities. We hope that each of
you has made significant progress on your educational
goal this year at the Canal Zone College. Our best
wishes for continued success go with each student
leaving our campus at the end of this academic year.


Glen E. Murphy
Dean


Dr. Glen E. Murphy
A.B.-Colorado State College of Education
M.A.-Teachers College, Columbia University
Ed.D.-Teachers College, Columbia University
Dean


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Modern students are products of their homes,


changing environments,


and past experiences. The


newest students in higher education today


from


all socio-economic levels.


In this


great American dream becomes a reality


versal


higher


education


becomes


a part


American scene.


The
staff


members of
at Canal Zon


the guidance and


ie College


come


respect a
as uni-
of the


counseling


see a multitude


fresh opportunities in the future for the college-
trained. Automation will take over many jobs but
will produce many more.


Topflight


professionals,


technicians and


scien-


tists will be in short supply. The greatest need
will be for enlightened leaders and well-educated
citizens in order to plan and govern a very com-


plex urban society.


The modern students must be


Don't you think that it ticks rather


loudly?


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ready to meet the transitions and challenges that
await them.
The extracurricular activities at Canal Zone Col-
lege help to promote higher standards of scholar-
ship, many friendships and stronger college spirit.
Through active participation in campus organiza-
tions and activities, students gain experience and
develop qualities of leadership and loyalty which
will serve them well as they meet the challenges


of a modern world.


This year for the first time


there was student representation on faculty stand-
ing committees. In addition, the Dean's Student
Advisory Committee was selected by the Execu-
tive Council of the Student Association. This com-


mittee


proved to be


suggestions to
the College.


very


helpful


the Dean for ways of


submitting
improving


Margaret Gately
Assistant Dean


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The Registrar's Office is perhaps the most
cloistered department of any college; however, cer-
tain of the most exciting changes of modern higher
education are most apparent there. From the vantage
point of records and statistics, a distinct change in


the college population is quite apparent.
The modern college student represent
plete spectrum of society. No longer is t
body exclusively middle and upper-class
30 years ago. Today's student is more
tive of the community than has ever bee
In our student body, as well as almost
supported college and university, we find
and women from the most humble home
cases, the family makes great sacrifices
and even personal freedom in order to i
opportunity for their child or brother o
have this opportunity. Communication
is so much improved that it is no longer
to "sell" the idea of higher education in o
the family to cooperate in sending a child
Today, in the most isolated places, it is


S


the com-


;he student
as it was
representa-
n the case.
every tax-
young men
s. In many
in comfort
providee the
ir sister to
everywhere
r necessary
irder to get
I to college.
axiomatic


that college training improves the person's chances
in life.


The
contril
dent's
contact
mer y
social
vide e
for th
the de


pressing
Canal
sending
religion,
guages,
prestige


"modern" colle
butes much mor
education by i
ts beyond the tr
ears. Hopefully,
"melting" or "n
extended horizon
e "mixed" or "o
sperately needed


, nation
Zone (


al and
College,


ge student today, therefore,
e to his fellow "modern" stu-
)roviding cultural and social
additionall middle class of for-
this enlarged academic and
fixing" pot will not only pro-
s and enriched opportunities
melted," but also will supply
I material for the solution of
world-wide problems.
with a student body repre-


every continent, every race, every major
, over twenty countries, speaking several lan-
and from the most humble to the most
ous families in the Canal Zone and Panama,


truly serves the "modern" student.


Norman B. Altenberg
B.A.-George Pepperdine College
M.A.-Los Angeles State College
Registrar


Norman Altenberg
Registrar




































You think YOU'VE got problems!


David B. Baglien
B.S.--North Dakota State University
M.S.-North Dakota State University
Counselor


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department of


english, speech,


and drama

The Department of English, Speech and Drama is con-
cerned about meeting the needs of students who differ greatly
in experiences, capacities, interests and aspirations. The lan-
guage arts program aids the aims of the general education
program by helping each student increase his competence in
exercising the privileges and responsibilities of democratic citi-
zenship; developing an aware set of moral and spiritual values
by which he guides his life, expressing his thoughts clearly in
speaking and writing, reading and listening with understanding,
using methods of critical thinking for the solution of problems
and for the discrimination among values, understanding his cul-
tural heritage so that he may gain a perspective of his time
and place in the world, achieving a satisfactory vocational
adjustment, taking part in some form of satisfying creative
activity, and in appreciating the creative activities and accom-
plishments of others.
The responsibility of the humanities to the development of
the individual modern student in our fragmented world is par-
ticularly great: The failure to provide any core for unity in
the essential diversity of higher education is a cause for grave
concern. A society whose members lack a body of common ex-
perience and common knowledge is a society without a funda-
mental culture; it tends to disintegrate into a mere aggregation
of anarchistic individuals. Some community of values, ideas,
and concepts is essential as a cohesive force in this age of
minute division of labor and intense conflict of special interests.
The crucial task of higher education today, therefore, is to pro-
vide a unified liberal education for American youth. Colleges
must help students find a humane way of reconciling specialized
training aiming at a thousand different careers and the need
for the transmission of our common cultural heritage.
John P. Marshall


John P. Marshall
B.S.-University of Nebraska
M.A.-University of Nebraska
Chairman


Ul


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Hark! He knows how to write


Linda W. Brislin
B.A.-University of Washington
M.A.-University of Washington


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Robert W. Kitterman
B.S.E.-Arkansas State University
M.S.E.-Arkansas State University


No, it's


not baldness


I have just decided to grow a high forehead.


* . ..


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How many times have I told you not to chew your nails?


David Lommen
B.A.-Concordia College
M.A.-North Dakota State University


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department


business ad


of


ministration


Neither machines nor money are going to be
enough to solve the business problems of the future.
Men and women are going to do it.
We are headed for a world that technology and
financial resources will make possible, but it will be
a world that only men and women will make sensible.
Men and women who plan, men and women who cre-


ate, men and women


who decide, men and women


who manage.
One of our great fears as a nation is that as the
structure and scope of our endeavors becomes more
complex, the individual is going to be submerged
and defeated.
The Business Administration teachers at C.Z.C.
do not believe this.
Whether we are looking out at next year, or 1984,
or the turn of a new century, we cannot see how
an improved society is going to come from any
source but improved men and women.
... Only individual effort can provide the leader-
ship to achieve the goals of our society.
... Only individuals can continue to define and
articulate our most cherished values.
... Only the individual can continue to provide
moral leadership.
The great challenge to our generation of business
leaders and teachers will be to produce such men
and women for organizations.
We do not think the challenge will be beyond us,
for the continued creativity and aliveness of our en-
terprises, as well as the future of our free society,
depend on teachers and students alike being success-
ful.


Arthur A. Honea
B.B.A.-North Texas State University
M.B.A.-North Texas State University
Chairman


Arthur A. Honea


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Ruth E. Gibson
B.S.-University of Missouri
M.Ed.-University of Missouri


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Sharon J.


Shaw


B.S.-Illinois State University
M.S.--Illinois State University


Ellis L. Siders
B.S.-Simpson College
M.A.-Stanford University


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department


natural


DeWitt E. Myers
B.A.-Valley City State College
M.A.-Washington State University
Chairman


of


science,


mathematics,

engineering,

and technology
No area is more challenging and exciting today
than science and technology, engineering and mathe-
matics. The recent advances are overwhelming and
indeed bewildering to the non-science oriented per-
son. OuQfaeulty has stressed the need for and the
inclusion of mathematics and science courses for
everyone in every program being followeldThe mod-
ern student graduating from college must be an in-
formed citizen, informed in science and mathematics
as well as inopther humanities, in sociology, in com-
munication. Canal Zone College is keeping abreast
of these changes as they affect scienceoeducatioi.
The continued training of er faculty, fi-e continued
improve ents in tr laboratory facilities attest to
this. eazVphysics, chemistry, biology laboratories,
and ou mathematics program are all designed to
keep 'Pi-hodern student abreast of the modern ad-
vances in these disciplines.


DeWitt Myers


- _ __ _ ___ __ _ __


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"Woe is me, woe is me...


Charles E. Courchaine
B.S.-University of Rhode Island
M.Ed-Boston University
M.A.-University of Oregon


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Lyle V. Jenkins
B.S.-Portland State College
M.S.-Oregon State University


Ya think so


huh?


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department


foreign


and


fine


of


languages

Starts


In a shrinking world people are pushed c
together and they must learn to get along with
another. The modern student, who is learning
cross boundaries of all types, needs foreign
guages to help him cross cultural lines. Lear
the languages of other cultures is a necessary
towards understanding the people themselves.
Music and art, like language, are integral par
a culture and play valuable roles in the interrela
of the peoples of the world.
Stephen R. Peck


loser
L one
g to
lan-
mning
step
ts of
tions


Stephen R. Peck
B.A.-University of Southern California
M.A.-University of Southern California
Chairman


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Clinton C.


Carney, Jr.


A.B.-University of Southern California
M.A.-University of Southern California


Carl H. Chapman
B.M.-Texas Wesleyan College
M.A.-Ohio State University


CHEERS!


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department


social

and e


science


hduation


Charles R. Bowen
B.A.-Baldwin-Wallace College
M.A.-Ohio State University
Chairman


Social science and education are particular areas of con-
cern for the college student today. Student unrest and dis-
satisfaction, so evident in American college life, arise, in
part, from an apprehension that social science may become
a Pandora's Box through which an "establishment" may
exploit mankind and that modern education may provide the
methodology through which exploitation of man might be
effected.
Knowledge, perverted, can be used by man to exploit
his fellows and is widely employed in this manner. Knowl-


edge, wisely governed by ethics an<
aegis that helps man raise himself
to which he can fall: that in wh
establishment, against his will, for ii
At the Canal Zone College the ph
the curriculum in social science and E
is a firm devotion to the ideal of


i morality, can be the
from the lowest depth
ich he is used by an
ts own ends.
Lilosophy around which
education has developed
a free man in a free


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Dr. Russell W. Annis
B.S.-University of Kansas
M.S.-University of Kansas


-University of Kansas


Walter M. Mikulich
B.A.-Michigan State College
B.E.-Moorhead State Teachers College
M.A.-State University of Iowa


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Well. in 1492.


Clarence R. Vosburgh
B.S.-Hamilton College
M.A.-Teachers College, Columbia University


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department


physical ed


of


ucation


The
Cana
1.
2.


goals


of the Physical


Education


Department


1 Zone College are:
To develop the whole student-his interests, his
skills, his attitudes, and his physique.
To discipline the body just as the academic de-
partments discipline the mind.


3. To teach good sportsmanship and a


sense


of fair


play by the participants.
To give each individual, regardless of his stage of
development an equal opportunity to develop phys-
ical skills.
To educate students in leisure-time activities that
can be carried into adulthood.


modern


student


both his physical
achieve success


is aware


of the importance


I and mental development in order to
in a complex and competitive society


of which he is an integral part.
-Morris Finkelstein-


Morris Finkelstein
B.S.-Newberry College
M.A.-George Peabody College for Teachers
Chairman

































The return of William Tell ...


Patricia A. Lehman
B.S.-Northwest Missouri State College
M.S.-Northwest Missouri State College


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part-


time


faculty


Johanne H.


Bray


Fine Arts


Robert Donaldson
Engineering


Ralph E. Farnsworth
Engineering


S'r'I .4* -


Elizabeth A.


Fesmire


Natural Science


Paul L. Goudie
Natural Science


Candace Harsany
Natural Science


Dr. John Harsany
Natural Science


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library


The educational scene is rapidly changing and two
key phases are in independent study and continuing
education. Recognizing the varied talents of indi-
viduals and the need for their continual search for
knowledge, the library has created a program of
staying abreast of this ever changing role.
Study carrels, educational resource centers and
hard books have expanded so greatly that they com-
plement the advent of independent study. Automa-
tion, hardware, informational retrieval systems have
released professional librarians so that they can be-
come resource teachers in the educational process.
The rise of independent study and continuing ed-
ucation widens the gap between quality and quantity
education and the library becomes the bridge between
the two.
Libraries will grow larger, continue to provide


research sources, and take on a mi
teaching role. By modernizing our
modernize our student population.
This is our vision. Let us continually
us as we move into "our day."


ore important
libraries, we

keep it before


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p/ne
Vi


Joseph P. Kane
Librarian


Joseph P. Kane
B.S.-State University College at Geneseo,
New York
M.S.-Syracuse University
Supervisory Librarian


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Yvonne M. Crane
A.B.-Barry College
Librarian


Surely they won't find my comic books here.


~~~~I~. i.. U - .. -








dormitories


The Residence Halls of Canal Zone
for students from the Atlantic side
tempts to develop an atmosphere whi
ducive to achievement.
Operating for the benefit of the r
gram has been initiated which takes i1
interests and abilities of the residents.


College provide a place
to live. Each hall at-
ch is friendly and con-

nodern student, a pro-
nto account the various
Councils represent stu-


dent government in the dormitories. Under the guidance
of the Residence Hall Counselor, the councils handle the
problems of group living; sponsor teas, open-houses, athletic
teams, and films; and encourage the students to participate
in all phases of college life. Mrs. Davison and Mr. Kowalski
help the men and women to benefit from these programs
and to set up suitable guidelines.
The experience of living in the Residence Halls gives
the students the opportunity to develop self-discipline. The
independence of and responsibility for their actions are con-
sidered to be an important part of their education.


Robert A. Kowalski
A.B.-College of William and Mary
M.S.-University of Pennsylvania
Dormitory Supervisor


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office

personnel


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Maria del Pilar Bustamante


Luz Ballesteros


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bookstore


Ir


"Just sign on the dotted line."


Jovet's


Adding Machine


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Doc Johnson


I. Francis


J. Thompson


G. Garcia


E. Roach
Head Custodian


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student

association


Mr. Walter Mikulich
First Semester Advisor


Richard Hollander
First Semester President


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Aurthur Honea, Michael Smith
Co-Advisors, Second Semester


Vincent Olsen
Second Semester Vice-President


Jerry Maloney
First Semester Vice-President


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First Row: Mike Perez, Larry Forsyth, Gustavo Arosemena, Don Dean, Jerry Turner. Second Row: Jim
Dertien, Fernando Ostrea, Andy Page, Rene Gomez, Danny Garcia, Dennis Jacobs. Third Row: Mr. Honea,
Ray Undei'wood, Sharon Lane, Yadira Diaz, Lucia Ng, Marciel Edson, David McGrath. Fourth Row:
Kathy Lum, Clara Moore, Nory Lau, Karen Sun, Janie Wikline, Maria Barcia, Diane Gomez.


- ....F - -


Phi Beta Lambda is a national fraternity
for students of business administration. The
purpose is to encourage interest, to gain more
knowledge about business activities and the


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beta


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Business student learning how to work the
3M copy machine.


President speaking at Initiation Banquet.


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Chess


Club


was organized


in CZC


to promote a better understanding of how


to play chess and
with other schools.


to provide competition
Dr. Annis, faculty ad-


visor, shares his interest of chess with the
club members.


Members: Aaron Grazette, Dr. Annis,


Mike Dennis, Andy Page,


Joyce White, Jon Rivera, Hal Wade, Hugh Best, Paul Stewart,
Bill Wilmoth.


chess


club


Officers: Bi
nis, Faculty


A game of President


1 Wilmoth, Vice-President; Dr. An-
Advisor; Jon Rivera, President.


Vice-President.


























Officers: Marsha Hellmund, Treasurer; Linda Hellmund,
President; James Hellmund, Vice-President; Miss Hilliker,
Faculty Advisor.


christian

science

organization






The Christian Science Organization was organized
to unite young people interested in Christian Science
so that they may participate in activities which pro-
mote a better understanding of their religion. In-
cluded in their activities are lectures, social events
such as picnics, and a Christmas party.


First Row: Marsha Hellmund,
mund, James Hellmund. Second
Garrett, Daryl Garrett, Cindy
Miss Hilliker.


Linda Hell-
Row: Mrs.
Terwilliger,


- -
























pilots


Mr. Smith, Faculty Advisor.


- * I
*' At:


Membership of the Pilots consists of stu-
dents of the CZC who offer their services to
aid the activities of the clubs and organiza-
tions of the college. Among the services ren-
,aQ Iat hhr, P Tln c, A,"."i irn, dlt 1 'rot ' rnm.


v~�~l~







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pilots


at


work

























First Row: Charita Small, Maria del P. Barcia, Maritza Limchin, Dr. Thompson, Claudina
Lee, Maxine Fennell, Benilda Atherly, Miguel De Sousa, and Pat Booth. Second Row: San-
tiago Wood, Catalina Lou, Elsa Richard, Julie -Cris, Mirian Mazarachi, Carman Kresh, Lucia
Ng, Mitzi Rios, Melinda Stevens, Paul Best, and Sona Brathwaite.


spirit


francais


L'Espirit Francais


Canal


Zone


College


is a club organized in
vith the main goal of


Officers: Charita Small, S.A. RE
erley, Treasurer; Maxine Fern
V-President; Melinda Stevens,
Faculty Advisor.


Representative; Benilda Ath-
nell, Secretary; Hugh Best,
President; Dr. Thompson,


introducing


and studying


the French


guage and culture.


I :I






























First Row: Mike Dennis, Ignacio Scope, Pat Nellis, Yadira Diaz, Lucia Ng, Trina Huish,
Judy Vasques, Lynn Fraunheim, Desnee Sousa, Angel Rodriquez, Helen Vales, Henry
Rose, Mazine Fennell, Melinda SteVens. Second Row: Ginger Wertz, Florypakel Ponce,
Genina Fernandez, Diavolis Diaz, Chris Ross, Clara Moore, Victoria Rodriquez, Louise
Julian, Maria Bosch, Elsa Richards.


biological


society


The purpose of the Biological Society of
CZC is to promote knowledge and interest in
fha hnlnrrlirol oianPoc' hr* nkrmniiinn lio


*� - - "


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First Row:
cio, Catherii


Stinson,


Carmen Ramsey, Pat Booth, Angel Rodriquez, Catalina Lau, Lynn Frauenheim, Lucia Ng, Mary Ann Igna-
ne Lum. Second Row: John Caulfield, Julio Luque, Laura Townsend, Marceil Edson, Rowena Josephs, Ralph


Sharon


Fusselman,


Helen


Vales,


Harold


Laurie.


Si~~ - ~ - S - rr e n_ _ -














Phi Theta Kappa, honor fraternity in Canal
Zone College, promotes scholarship and social
achievements in junior colleges by rewarding
and recognizing those students who qualify
with a 3.00 or better grade point average.


Phi Theta F
initiations, a


music program
Founders Day


;appa


year


trip through i
m celebrating
.


presented


;he canal, and a
November 17.


Spring Initiation.


- --




































First Row:
Moore, Diov
Mr. Kane. S
Lowe, Jim I


Kathy Melanson, Iliana Pasmino, Gloriela Rodriquez, Diane Gomez, Maricusa Richard, Becky Bryant, Clara
elis Diaz, Yadira, Jacinta Lewis, Catherine Lum, Kathy Filo, Karen Sun, Lynn Fraunheim, Mary Sharp,
second Row: Gabriel Pereira, Rick Velasco, Mike Chavez, Catalina Lau, Judy Vasquez, Julio Luque, Bob


licks, Mike Halley.


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The Teahouse of


the August Moon may not possess the wit of Moliere,


the insight of Chekhov, or the
that it is becoming one of the cl
we mean a play continuously
instant hit, its original run (19
performances. And it captured
including the Pulitzer and the I


brilliance of Shaw, but
assics of our stage. That
performed for a decade
)53-56) went on for 128
the six major prizes of
Qew York Drama Critics


it just
is, if by
and a
weeks
its open
Award.


could be
"classic"
half. An
and 1026
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Further,


it boasted tremendous successes in Japan, the nation which lost Okinawa
to the United States, and in Germany (the longest Berlin run in history),
which also felt the burden of our occupation forces.
Thus the play's classical status if augmented by an unusual record of
international performance, not only in countries that shared the victory
of World War II (great acclaim also in Paris, London, and Amsterdam),
but also in the lands having painful and recent recollections of the alien
domination depicted in the play. This obviously universal appeal of a
well made, but not unequaled, comedy requires some additional com-
mentary.
The story's focus and its bridge between two opposing cultures is


Sakini. His opening monologue
external relations: a succession of
is a half rueful, half bantering


gives a caps
conquests by
recognition


sule history
outsiders. B
that a conq


e Okinawa's
his attitude
ring people,


though they bring the world to your door, stand to learn a few things
from you too. His wisdom, that all cultural exchanges are reciprocal,
enables him to unscrupulously extract advantages for his subdued country-
men from the more naive victors. These victors, chauvinistically deluded
(like all victors), see their campaign of democratization, not as an attempt
to increase their nation's political power, but rather as a purely altruistic
gesture (doing well by doing good). This is what Sakini ironically pokes


fun at in the first speech:


Okinawa very fortunate.
Culture brought to us ... not have to
leave home for it.
Learn many things.


But more significantly, he goes on to say,
Most important that rest of world
not like Okinawa.
World filled with delightful variation.


And so it is! However unscrupulous this r
a heart as well as a mind. His wisdom re
knowledge of how to exploit the exploiter
his realization of the basic humanity on
Thus from the play's beginning, its most
a point that is fully developed and exempt
and parlous excursion into the mystique
Tobiki village's faltering essays into free
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pur ei n ^i~;hr nrnn MCfT i/y-vin-4c


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ally
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i sides. Both modes of life.
us point is slyly introduced,
I by Captain Fisby's uneasy
le oriental teahouse, and by
!rprise and self-government.
ited clash of cultures. At the


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Lord Astor


Good clean Okinawan fun ...


Friends


should always travel in a well organized group!


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make


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The neurotic
Psychiatrist


Look there.







"The roar of the crowd


, the smell of the greasepaint...


And as the curtain falls on
"the happy ever after,"
TEAHOUSE ...
Loman-san, Banzai!!!


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MODERN


CLASSICAL


GAS




















































































"Cuando calienta el sol ...


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The
'ORACLE
of
DUH'


Would you believe,


Wash the


blood from my sarong???


"Boy, now you've done it!!!"


lblla.. S












Flavias Maximus,
Private Roman
Eye.
















The Senate in session ...




























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at "Alice's


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Accompanist


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Mr. David Lommen
Faculty Advisor to
DELTA PSI OMEGA


delta

psi


omega


-


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Mr. Carl H. Chapman
Faculty Advisor for MUSICA


music








conquistador


Mr. Irvin H. Lesser-Faculty Advisor


Harriet Hays-Editor-in-Chief










Wayne Foscue-Layout Editor,
Freshman Class Assistant Editor
















p


Julie Murphy-Assistant to the Editor,
Freshman Class Editor



















Carole Arnold-Advertising Editor, Treasurer


Glenn Curtis-Arts


Editor


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Coleen O'Connor-Advertising Staff













David Winn-Photographer


Howard


Wagoner-Faculty


and Administration


Editor


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Celso Carbonell-Advertising Staff


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Jim Hicks-Sports Editor


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Full Text

PAGE 2

.c3c6 T'P4' TJ:E rmln"T"'"'''''' f,Q This reserve book Is NOT transferable and must NOT be taken from the library eXC8fct when charged out for ovem ght use. You are responsible for the re-turn of this book. DATE NAME I I I I I I r I I I I I I I

PAGE 4

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/conquistador1969cana

PAGE 5

the conquistador canal zone college 10 boca, canal zone volume xxxiii 11t.1 X'po. tv'

PAGE 6

no man is an island

PAGE 7

man was not created to exist in a vacuum

PAGE 8

man must exchange ideas with his fellow man ...

PAGE 9

to exist ...

PAGE 10

to live ...

PAGE 11

.. to benefit from life.

PAGE 12

the person who lives a well-balanced ... and orderly life ...

PAGE 13

.. who readily grasps any challenge ...

PAGE 14

10 and accepts the responsibilities that accompany that challenge -

PAGE 15

who always does his best no matter what the odds II

PAGE 16

and truly loves his fellow man 12

PAGE 17

is the person who lives an active 13

PAGE 18

. fu I fi II ed . 14

PAGE 19

. rewarding life. 15

PAGE 20

16 . that person -that spirit -is embodied in the youth of today .

PAGE 21

.. that person is ... the modern student. 17

PAGE 22

dedication Mrs. Winifred Ewing I want yo u t o m ee t o n e o f m y b oys. 18 Mrs. Ewing i s as active in the present as she has always been in the past. S he is so "hip" that our interviewe r s had a difficu l t time to get her to talk about herself because s he t ook m o r e of an interest in the interviewers and their ac tivities. Mrs. Ewing i s, in fact, the unsung hero to whom we dedicate the 1969 Conqu istador. She has been, and cont inue s to be, a great teacher of history. She has the facts: The names, dates, and places come to life as she ins ightfully portrays the personalities of the people who built the Canal. From her first visit in 1907 to the present, Mrs. Ewing ca n chro nicle how far the tide u sed to flow into Balboa, the l ong walks to the station where she caught the train to Empire where she taught in a one room schoo l house, the ice carts bringing the day's meat and produce to the back door, the wood and coal burning stoves, the ha ppy family years w ith two daughters and one granddaughter born here, and the twenty-five good years as mother to "her" boys and girls in our dOl'mitories. She is best summed up in her own phrase. "I HAVE NO REGRETS."

PAGE 23

"N o w I've got a pictu,-e that s h ows. "I n those days _ "You know th ere s one thing. flPeople used to UBut before that. "You see, when I first had. "And I'll tell you who did it_ "That's what you get fol' being here so long 19

PAGE 25

admi n istration and faculty

PAGE 26

22 Mr. Frank A. Cast l es A .B.-Villanova University M.Ed.-Boston University Superintendent of Schools The rea l need in educati on is for the teaching of those qualities of mind and spirit which will aid in developing a modern student into a mature indiv idual to survi ve in times of tension and to achieve his OWI1 ideals The preservation of democracy, the building of a lasting peace, and the guarantee of respect for the dignity of each human being all de mand an education of such scope and divers ity as to enable every student to rise to his own potential.

PAGE 27

canal zone college advisory council Bruce C. Blevins Norman E Demer s George V. Richards J. Patrick Conley Chailman J. Foster Collins Edward A. Doolan Frank A. Castles Exofficio Carl J. Browne Vice-Chailman Alfredo Cragwell Arthur J. O'leary Glen E. Murphy Secretary 23

PAGE 28

The theme of this year's CONQUISTADOR. The Modern Student, is a very appropriate one; yet, one mllst ask. "How modern is the modern stllde nt?" The trademark of the modern student is said to be that he is both modern and interested in the pursuits of the eternal veriti es expressed through ou r c ulture. I was an undergraduate student hefore most of our full-time students were born; however, some of the same concer n s of the modern student were equally important to students when I was in college. And today. I still COil sider that I am a modern student! Such is the opportunity of education. Th e educator is cont inuall y refreshed and motivated by day-te-day association with today's modern youth. .. who have more demands and preSSllres than my generation of students, .. who have always lived in an u nsettl ed wor l d, who are caught between conf l icting values and lo.valties, .. who mllst accomplish much in l imited t i me .. who must prepare for rigorous competition and specialization in the world of work, .. who have new "fads and frills .. and who have ideals and aspirations representing the best of our national character. My message to you-the modern student of 1968 1969-is to encourage you to accept unprece dented challenges and responsibilities. \Ve hope that each of you has made sign ifi cant progress 011 your educationa l goal this year at the Canal Zone College. Our best wishes for contin ued success go with each student leaving OUI' campus at the end of this academic year. Glen E. Murphy Dean Bills, bills, and more b ills! Dr. Gle n E MUl'ph y A.B.-Colol'ado State College o f Edu catio n M .A.-T eachel's College, Columbia Un i vel'sity Ed.D.-Teachers College, Col umbia Un i vel'sity Dean They never leave me alo n e!

PAGE 29

Don't you think that it ticks rathe r loudly? Margaret M. Gately A.B.-Emmanuel College M.S.-Boston College Assistant D ean Modern students are products of their homes, changing environments. and past experiences The newest students in higher education today come from all socio-economic levels. In this respect a great American dream becomes a reality as univer s a l higher education becomes a part of the American scene. The members of the guidance and counse ling staff at Canal Zone College see a multitude of fres h opportunities in the future for the college trained. Automation will take over jobs but will prod u ce many more, T opfl i ght professiona l s, technicians and scientists will be in short s uppl,\'. The g r ea test need will be fol' en l ightened lead e r s and well-educated citizens in orde r to pla n and govern a ver.v com plex urban soc i ety. The modern students must be read y to meet the trans ition s and c hallenge s that await them. Th e extr acurricular activities at Canal Zone Col lege h e lp to promote higher standard s of sc holar ship, many friendsli i ps and stronger college spirit. Throug h active participation in campus organiza tion s and activities s tud ents gain experience and develop qualities of l ea dership and loyalty which will serve them well as the." meet the challenges of a modern world. This yea r for the first time there was student representation on facu lty standing committees. In addition the D ea n' s Student Ad viso r y Committee was se l ected by the Execu tive Council of the Student Association. This committee proved to be very h e lpful by submitting suggestio n s to the Dean fol' ways of improving the College. Margaret Gately Assistant Dean Today my crystal ball says, "No classes for anyone." 25

PAGE 30

The Registrar's Office i s perhaps the mo s t cloistered department o f a ny college; however cer tain of the most exc iting c hange s of modern higher education are most apparent there. From the vantage point of records and stati s ti cs, a dis tin c t change in the college population i s quite apparent. Th e modern college student repre sents the com plete spectrum of soc i e t y No long e r i s the stud en t body exclus ivel y middle and upperc lass as it was 30 years ago Today' s student is mor e representa tive of the community than has ever been the case In our s tud ent body, as well as almost every tax s upport e d college and univ e r s ity. \ve find yo ung men and women from the most humbl e home s In ma n y cases, the fami l y make s great sac rifice s in comfort and even pe r so na l f r eedom in o rd e r to prov i de the opportunity for thei r c hild or brother o r sister to have thi s opportun i ty. Communication eve r yw h e r e is so much i mproved that it i s no l onge r n ecessary to "sell" the idea of higher ed ucation in o r de r to get the family to cooperate in se nding a chi l d t o college. Today in th e most i solated pla ces, it is axio m atic that college training impro ves the person's c h a n ces in life. The m odern" college stud ent today, ther efo re, contributes mu c h m o r e to hi s fellow modern" student' s education by providing cu l t u ral and soc i al conta cts beyond the traditional m i dd l e class of f o r mer years. Hopefully, thi s en larged academic a nd social "melting" or "mixing" pot will not only pro vide extended horizon s and en r iched opportunit i es for the "mixed" or "mel ted," but also will s u pp l y t he de s p e rately needed material fo r t he solut i o n of p r essing nation a l and wor l d wide proble m s. Ca n a l Zone College, wit h a stu dent b o d y r ep resenting every cont i ne nt, every r ace, eve r y major r e l igio n over twenty coun t r ies, s p ea king seve r a l l ang u age s, and f rom the most h u mble t o the m os t p r estigious families in t h e Ca n a l Z o n e a nd P a n a m a, t ruly se rve s the mode r n" student. 26 NOlman A ltenbe r g Regi s t rar Norman B. Altenberg B.A.-Geor ge Peppe r dine College M.A L os A n ge l es State College Reg istrar Pay attention to thi s.

PAGE 31

David B. Baglien B S .-North Dak o t a Stat e University M.S.-North Dakota State University Counselor Ivaleen S. Goudie B.A.-Iowa W es l eyan M.Ed.-Univ e r sity of Oklahoma Counselor You think YOU'VE go t prob l ems! 27

PAGE 32

28 department of english, speech, and drama The Department of Engli sh, Speec h a n d Drama i s con cerned about meeting the ne eds of students who differ greatly in experiences, capacities, interests a nd aspirations. Th e l anguage a rts program aids the aims of the g e n e ral education program helping each student increase his competen ce in exe r cising the p r ivi l eges and re spo n sib ilities of d emocratic citi zenship; developing an aware set of moral and spiri t ual val ues b y which he guides hi s life, expressin g hi s thoughts clearly i n speaking and writing, reading and l istening with und erstandi ng, u s ing method s of critica l thinking for the so l ution of problem s and for the discrimination a m ong values, und e r standing his cultural heritage so that he may gain a p e r s pectiv e o f hi s time and place in the world, ach i ev ing a s ati sfactory vocational adjustment, taking part in so me f o rm of sati sfying creati ve activity, and in appreciating the creative activities and accom plishments of oth ers. Th e re s pon s ibility of the humanities to the d eve lopment of the individual m odern student in our fragmen ted world i s pa r ticularly g reat: The failure to pro v ide any cor e fol' unity in the essential dive r s ity o f higher edu ca tion is a ca u se fo r grave concern A soc iety whose members lack a body of common ex p e ri ence and common know l edge is a soc i e t y w ithout a fundamental cultu re; it tends to disintegrate into a m ere a gg r ega ti o n of anarchistic indi vid ual s Some community of va lues, i d eas, and concepts i s essential a s a cohe s ive force in this age of minute division of l abo r and inte nse conflict of' snecia l inte rests. Th e c ru cia l task of highe r edu ca t i on toda y, therefore, i s to p rovide a unified lib e ral educati on fol' Ameri can yo uth. Colleges must h elp students find a humane wa y of reconciling specialized training aiming at a thousand diffe r ent careers and the need f o r the transmi ss i on of our common cultural heri tage. John P. Marshall "She lov es m e, s h e l oves me not. J o hn P. Ma r s h all B.S. -University of Nebraska M.A.-Unive rsity of Nebraska Chairman Ye s, Lyn ne, the bir ds and the bees ARE a lot more interesting!

PAGE 33

Lind a \V. Bris lin B.A.-University of \Vas hington M.A.-University of \ Vashington J a net M Hilliker B.A .-J\l ichigan State University M.A.-Michigan State University Hark! He knows how to write! Now listen to this ... 29

PAGE 34

30 Robert W. Kitterman B.S. E.-Arkansas State Univer sity M.S.E.-Arkansas State Unive r sity Herbert W. Knapp B.S.-University of Missouri M .A.-University of Kansas City No, it's not baldness; I have jus t decided to grow a high forehead. Art is a wonderful mean s of self expression. Ask any artist.

PAGE 35

H ow m a n y times h ave T to l d you not to chew your nails? Freda L. Stohrer B A .--Jacksonvilie State University M.A.-Un iversity of Tennessee David Lommen B.A.-Concord ia Coliege M.A.-North Dakota State U n ivers ity And now-to i n c r ease o ut' knowledge of s emicolons ... 31

PAGE 36

32 department of b usiness administration Neither machines nor m oney are go ing to be enough to so l ve t h e bu siness problems of the future. Men and women are going to do it. We al'e headed fol' a wOl'ld that technology and financial r esources will make possib l e, but i t will be a wor l d that on l y men and women will make s ensib l e. Men and women who plan m e n and women who create, m en and women who decide, men and women who manage. One of ollr great fears as a nation i s that as the structure and scope of QUI' ende avor s becomes more comp l ex, the individual is going to b e s ubmerged and defeated. Th e Bu si ne ss Admin i s t r ation teachers at C.Z.C. do not believe th is. \Vhether we a re looking out at next yeaI', 01' 1984 or the turn o f a new century. we cannot see how an impr oved soc i e t y is going to come f r o m any source but improved men and women. .. Only individua l effort ca n provide the leader s hip to achieve the goals of our soc i ety. .. Onl y indiv idual s can continu e to d e fine and a r ticulate our most c h e ri s h ed val u es. .. Onl y the individual ca n conti nue to provide moral l eade r s hip. Th e great c h allenge to oll r ge neration o f business l e a de r s a nd teachers will be to prod u ce suc h men and women for organi zations. We do not think the c h allenge will b e beyond us, for the continued creativity and aliveness of ou r en terprises as well as the future of ou r free society, dep e nd on teachers and s tud ents a l ike being s u ccess ful. Arthur A. Honea Is it a,s,d,f" o r "a,s,f,d"? Arthur A. Ho nea B.B.A.-North Texas State University M.B.A.-North Texas S tate Unive rsity Chairman Rl'lTight!

PAGE 37

Aga in ? Irvin H. Lesser B.B.A .-Un iversity of M i ami M.B .A.-Indiana University Ruth E Gibson B .S.-Univer s ity of Misso uri M.Ed.-University of M i sso uri What can one s ay e lectrifying about a typewriter? 33

PAGE 38

34 Sharon J. Shaw B S.-IIJinois State University M.S.-IIJinoi s State Unive r sity Lippmann Re sto n ... Schneitzenburg? Ellis L. S iders B.S.-Simpson College M.A.-Stanford University Caro l yn Swinn ey B.S.-University o f Oklahoma M.B.E.-University of Oklahoma

PAGE 39

D eWitt E M yers B.A.-Valley City State College M.A.-Washington State University Chailman It took me to come up with a cure for the A,. H ong KongFlu. department of natural scie nce, mathematics engineering, I and technology No area is more challenging and exciting today than science and technology, enginee rin g and mathematics. The recent advances are overwhelming and ind eed bewildering to the non scie n ce oriented pel'-5011. Our faculty has stressed the need for and the inclusion of mathematics and science courses for everyone in every program being f ollowe.1J..The modern student graduating from college must be an in formed citizen, informed in science and mathematics as well as il1J>ther humaniti es, in soc i o l ogy. in communication.Leana l Zone College is keeping abreast of changes as they affect The continued training of facu lt)';llie continued in .QtH.> laboratory facilities attest to t his> ehr-p hysics, chemistry, biology laboratories, and Offi,> mathematics program are all designed to keep student abreast of the modern ad vances in these discipli n es. DeWitt Myers Interpreting the handwriting on the wall. 35

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IIWoe i s me, woe i s m e. But they told me that it was n't carni v orou s 36 Charles E. Courc haine B.S.-University of Rhode I sland University M.A. University of Oregon Raymond A. David so n B.S .-Colorado State Unive r sity M.S.-New Mexico Highlands University

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Lyle V. Jenkin s B.S.-Portland State College M.S.-Or egon State University Donald S. Seitz B.A.-North Dakota State University M.S.-North Dakota State University Ya think so, huh? Gordon B. S m all, Jr. A.B.-Bowdoin College M.A.-Brown University 37

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38 department of forei gn languages and fine arts In a shrinking world people are pushed closer together and they must learn to get along with one another. The modern student, who is learning to c r oss boundaries of all types, need s foreign languages to help him cross cultural lines L earning the languages of other cultures i s a ne cessa r y step towards understanding the peop l e the msel ves. Music and art, l ike l a nguage are integral parts of a culture a nd play va luab l e rol es in the interre lation s of the p eoples of the world. S tephen R. Peck Stephen R Peck B.A .-University of Southern Ca lifornia M.A.-University of So uthern Ca l ifornia Chailman Oh, what a beautiful m orning!

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C linton C. Carne y, Jr. A.B.-University of So uth er n Calif ornia M.A.-Uni ve r s it y of Sou thern California ( 01'. E nri que A. Thomp s on B.A.-Univers ity of 1\I ichigan M.A.-Middlebur y College D octora te-Uni\ 'ersity of Valen cia, Spain Carl H C hapman B.i\l.-Texa s W es l eyan College State University C HEERS! 39

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40 departm ent of social s cience and eduation C h a r l es R. Bowe n B.A.-Baldwin-Wallace College M .A.-Ohio State University Chairma n Social sc i e n ce and ed ucati on a r e particula r a r eas of con ce rn for the college student tocla,v. Student unrest and dissatisfaction so evident in A meri ca n college lif e, a ri se, in p art. fro m an apprehe n sion that soc i al sc i ence may become a Pandora's B ox through which a n "establis hm ent" may expl oit mankind and that moderll edu catio n may pl'Ovide the methodology thro u g h which expl oitati on o f man might be effected. K now l edge, pe r verted, ca n be lIsed by m a n to exploit hi s fellows a nd i s wide l y e m p l oyed in this mann e r. Kn owledge, w i se l y governed by eth ics and m o r ality. ca n be the aegi s tha t h elps man rai se h i m se l f from the lowest depth to which he can fall: that in whic h h e is u se d by an establishment, against hi s will, fO I its own e nd s At the Ca n a l Zon e College t h e p h i l oso p h y a r o u n d w hich the cUl'l'ic u l um .in soc ia l sc i e n ce and e du ca tion has deve l oped i s a film d evo ti o n to t h e ide a l o f a free man in a f r ee society. A free man, truly e du ca t ed in the nature of Ma n and of Society, and r espons i ve to the ethi cs a n d morality of his time and place, will not s ubmi t to expl o itation

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Dr. Russell W Annis B.S .-Unive r s i ty of K a n sas M .S.-Unive r s it y o f K a n sas Ph.D .-Unive r s it y o f J
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42 Well, in 1492. If only I could take my shoes off fol' a moment, for an hOllr. C larence R. Vosburgh B.S.-Hamilton College M.A.-Teachers College, Columbi a Unive r s it y H. Loring White B.A.-University of Connect i c ut M.A.-llnivel'sity of Connectic ut M.A.-University of Col orado

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Morri s Finkelstein B.S.-Newbe!'!'y College M.A.-Geo!,ge Peabody College f o!' Teac he!'s Chairman I'll show those guys I can l ose weight. I'm drinking D iet -Ri te! department of physical education Th e goals of the Phys ical Education Department of Cana l Zone College are: 1. To develop the whole student-his interests, his s kills, his attitudes, and hi s physique. 2. To discipline the bodyjl'st as the academic departments disc ipline the mind. 3. To teach goed sportsmanship and a se n se of fail' play by the participants. 4. To give each individual. regardless of his stage of deve l opment a n eq ual opportunity to develop phys i ca l skills. 5. To educate students in lei sure -tim e activities that ca n be canied into adulthood. The modern student i s aware of the importance of bO,th his physical and mental development in order to achieve sllccess in a complex and competitiv e society of which he i s an integral part. -Morris Finkelstein-I'll never ask YOU to danc e again! 43

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Th e !'e t urn of William T ell Awh yo u r e s h y Pa tri c i a A Le hm a n B.S.-No!'thw e s t Mis s ou!'i S t a t e College M.S.-No!'t hwes t Mis s o u!'i S t a t e College My j ob? I p!'o du ce ca ndidates f o!' the Miss Americ a co ntest.

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parttime faculty Elizabeth A. Fe smire attu"a ) Science J Kener Heard Engineering Johanne H Bray Fine Arts Paul L. Goud i e Natural Science Barbara Nave English, Speech, and Drama Robert Donaldson Engineering Candace Harsany Natural Sc i e n ce Laura E. Orta Foreign Languages Ralph E. Farnsworth Engineering Dr. John Hal'sany Natural Science Henry J. Williams Business Administration 45

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46 library The educationa l scene is rapidly changing a nd t w o key phases are i n independent study and con t i n uin g education Recog nizing the varied talents of ind i vidua l s and t h e need for their contin u a l sear c h f o r knowledge, the library has created a p r og r a m o f staying abreast of this ever changing r o l e. Stu dy carre l s, educational r esource ce n ters and hard boo k s h ave expanded so greatl y t hat they com p lement t h e adve n t of inde p e n dent s tud y Au to m a tion, hard ware. information a l retr i eva l syst e m s h ave r e l eased p r o f essiona l libra ri a n s so that they c an b e co m e reSOU l'ce teachers i n the e du cati o n a l p r ocess Th e r ise of independent study and continuing e d ucation widens the gap be t wee n Qua l ity a n d qu a ntity ed u cation and the l ibra r y beco mes the b ridge b e tw ee n the two. Libr a r ies w m grow l a rger con t inu e t o p r ovide research sources, an d take o n a m o r e i mportant teaching role By m o d e rnizi n g our libra r ies, we modernize our student p opulati o n T his is ou r v i s i on L e t u s con t inu ally kee p i t b e f o r e us as we move into our d ay. J ose ph P. K a n e Libraria n G u ess w hat's i n the m ug. J ose ph P K a ne B.S -State U ni ve r sitv Colle g e at C e neseo, NewYo l'k M.S.-Syrac u se U n i v e r s ity S u p e r v i so r y Lib r a ri a n I'm so n y but our Play b oy s ub sc ripti o n has ex pired.

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Yvo n ne M C rane A .B.B arry College Librari a n Su r e l y they won't find my comic books h ere. Maybe i f I move it three to the left and fOllr to the right. 4 7

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48 dormitories The Hall s of Canal Zone College provide a place for students from the Atlantic side to live Eac h hall attempts to d eve lop an atmosphere which i s friend l y and COIlduci\'e to achic\'ement. Operating for the b enefit of the modern stu dent, a p r ogram has been initiated which takes into account the vario u s interes t s and abilities of the re sidents COllnci1s represent student go\'crnment in the dormitories. Under t h e guidance of the Re s idence Hall Counselor, the coun cils h a ndl e th e prob l ems of g r oup living; sponsor teas, ope n ho u ses athleti c teams, and films; and encourage t h e stud ents to pa r t i c ipate i n all phase s of college life. Mrs. D av i so n a n d Mr. Kowa lski he l p the men and women to benef i t f ro m t h ese programs a n d to set up suitabl e guide l ines. The experience of living in t h e Reside n ce H alls g i ves the students the opportun ity to deve l o p self-disc i p lin e. T h e independenc e of and respons i bility for thei r actio n s are co n sidered to b e an important pa r t of thei r ed ucati on. For our bedtime stor y tonight Robert A. Kowalski A.B.-College of W illia m a n d Ma r y M .S.-Uni ve r s ity o f Penn sy l v ani a D o rmi to r y S up erv i so r Bernice K Davi s on Reside n t H ead of the \Vomen's D0l111i to r y

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---..... ".. .... J ... -, M a ria del Pilar Bu s tamante Bubbl e Gum ? office personnel Luz Balle s tero s Roberto Sa n c h ez 4 9

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bookstore Jovet's Add i n g Mac hin e An idle mind i s the D evil's workshop. Mrs B almas 50

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Doc Johnson I. Franci s G. Garcia L. Craig l. Cardob. E. Roach H ead Custod i an J. Thompson E.Tunon 51

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organizations

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54 student association Ri c h a rd H olla nd e r First Semester Pr es i dent \ Jan e t Hu n t Fir s t and Second Seme s ter Secl'etarr M r. W alte r Mikulich F ir s t Semester Adv i so r Ca t a lin a La u First and Second Se mester Tr easure r

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Aurthur Hon ea. Michael Smith Co-Advisors. Second Semester Jim Dertein Second Semester p J 'esident Vincent Olsen Second Semester Vice-President .Jerry Maloney First Semester Vice-President 55

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5& Firs t Row: Mik e Perez, Larry F o rsyth, G ustavo Al'osemen a, D o n D ean, Jerry Turne r. Second Row; Jim Del'tien, Fernando O s h ea, Andy Page, Rene Gomez, Dann y Garci a. D ennis Jacobs Third Row: Mr. Honea, Ra y Undei'wood, Sharon L ane. Yadil'a D iaz. Lu cia Ng, M a r c i e l Ed so n D avid M cGrath. Fourth Row: Kathy Lum, Clara Moor e, Nory Lau Kare n S u n Janie \ Vikline. Maria Barc ia Diane Gomez. Officers : MI'. H onea, Advisor; Shar on L a n e, Secreta ry; Clara Moore, V-President; Yadira Diaz, President; Kath y Lum, Treasure) ; David ?\lcGl'ath, S. A. Representative; ShelTY Bissell, Reporter, Phi Beta L a mbd a i s a nati onal fraternity for students of b u siness ad mini s t rati on. Th e purpose is to encourage inter est, to gain more know l edge about bu s ine ss activities an d the f u ture career of the busine ss stud ents. Mem bershi p i s limited to all s t udents enrolle d in a bus i ness s ubj e ct.

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phi beta lambda Bu s in ess student l ea rnin g how to wor k the 3M cop y mac hin e P resident speaki n g at Initiati on Ba n q u et. Off i cers tak i ng their vows at the Banquet 57

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5 8 Member s : A a ron G r azet t e Dr. Anni s, Mike D ennis Andy Pag e J oyce Vhite J o n Rive ra, Ha l V a de, Hugh B es t P aul S t e wa r t Bill Wilmoth The Chess Club wa s o rganized in C Z C to pr o m o t e a b ette r unde r s t a nding o f how t o play chess and t o provide c ompetiti o n with oth e r schoo ls. Dr. Anni s, fa c u l t y a d v i sor, s har es his int eres t uf che ss with the club m e mber s chess club Officers: Bill Wilm oth. Vice-Preside n t ; Dr. Annis Fa c u l ty Adv i so r; J o n River a Pr eside nt. A game of Pr eside n t v s Vice-P r e side n t

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Officer s : M a rsha lle llmund Trea surer; Linda I-Iell mund President; James Hellmund, Vice-Preside n t ; Mis s Hilliker Faculty Advi s or. christian science organization Th e Chri s ti a n S c i e nce Orga niza t i o n w as o r ganized to unite p eople intere s t e d in Chri s ti a n Sc i e nce s o that th ey may participate in a c ti v ities whi c h pro mote a b ette r und e r standing o f their r e ligi on. In clud e d in the ir a cti v ities are l ectures soc i a l e v ents s u c h as picnics, and a C hri stmas party Firs t R ow: M a r s h a lI e llmund Lind a H ellmund, J a m es H e llmund. Second Row: Garrett. Dary l Garrett, C ind y T e rw illige r Hilliker. 59

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MI'. S mith, Faculty Advi so r. M e m bership of the Pilot s con s i s t s of student s of the CZC who offe r t h e ir se r vices to aid th e act i v iti es of the c lubs a nd o r g an i z a ti ons of the college. Among th e se r vices r endered b.v Pilot s du r ing the sc ho o l yea r are se llin g ticket s at athleti c events dan ces play s, tal e n t shows, and other college fun c t i o n s. They also usher at events and se rv e a s guides on the co llege camp us. pilots Vick i Spears, Preside n t.

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pilots at work 61

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62 First Row: Charita Small, Maria del P. Barcia, Maritza Lim c hin Dr. Thomp so n Claudina Lee, Maxine Fennell Benilda Atheri y, Miguel D e So u sa, and Pat Booth. Second How: San tiago Catalina L o u El s a Ric hard. Julie 'Cris, Mirian Maz a ra c hi, Carman Kres h, Lu cia Ng, J \'Iitzi Rios, Melinda Stevens, Paul Best, and Son a Brathwaite. Officers: Charita Small, S .A. R ep re sentati ve; B en ilda Ath erley, Treasurer; Maxine Fennell Sec retary; Hu gh Best, V-Pr esident; l\Ie linda Steve n s, President; Dr. Thomp son, F ac ult y Advi s o r. During a meeting I'espirit francais L'Es pirit Franca i s i s a club organized in Canal Z one College with the main goa l of introdu c ing and s tud y in g the Frenc h language and culture. El ect ion of officers.

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Firs t Row: 1\Iike Dennis, I gnacio Scope. Pat Nellis, Yadira Diaz, Lucia Ng, Trina Hui s h, J udy Va s ques, Lynn Fraunheim, De s nee So u sa, Angel Rodriquez, Helen Va l es, Henry l::'ose, Mazine Fennell, Melinda Stevens Secon d Row: Ginger Wertz, F l ol'ypakel Ponce, Gen ina Fernandez, Diavoli s Diaz, Chris R oss Clara Moore, Victoria Rodriquez Loui se Julian, Ma r ia Bo sc h, Elsa Richard s biological society T he p urpo se of the Biolog i ca l Society of CZC is to promote know l edge and interest in the biological sc i e nce s by acquainting the club member s with guest lecturers and field tri ps to many of the sc ientifi c installati ons in the Canal Zone. O fficers: Henry Rose. V-President; Diavolis Diaz, Secretary j Angel TIodriquez. President; 'frini Hui s h Treasurer. bl

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First Row : Carmen Ramsey, Pat Booth, Angel Rodriqu ez, Catalin a Lau, L yn n Frauen h eim, Lu cia Ng, Mary Ann Ignac io, Catherine Lum. Seco nd Row: John Cau lfi eld, Julio Luqu e, Laura Town se nd, Mal'cei l Edso n Rowena Jose ph s, R a lph Stinson, Sharon Fusse lman Hel e n Val es, H arold Laurie. J o hn P. Mar s h all. Faculty Advisor Officers : Lu cia Ng, Treasurer; L yn n F r auen h eim, President; Ange l Rodriquez, Vice-Presi d ent; Catalina Lau Secretary.

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phi theta kappa FalJ Initiation. Phi Theta Kappa, honor fraternity in Canal Zone College, promotes scholarship and social achievements in junior colleges by rewarding and recognizing those students who qualify with a 3.00 o r better grade point average. Phi Theta Kappa this yea r presented two initiations, a trip through the canal, and a music program celebrating November 17, Founders Day. Spring Initiation. 65

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First Row: Kathy Melanson, Iliana Pasmino, G l orie l a Rodriquez Diane Gomez, Maricusa Richard Becky Br ya nt, C l ara Moore, Diovelis Diaz, Y adira, Jacinta L ewis, Catherine Lurn Kathy Filo Karen Sun L y nn Fraunheirn, Mar y Sharp, Mr. Kane. Second Row: Gabriel Pereira, Ric k Vela sco, Mike C ha vez, Catalina L au, Jud y Va sq u ez, Julio Luque Bob Lowe. Jim Hi cks, Mike Halle y. 66 newman community The Newman Community i s an organization under the auspices of the Catho lic Church. Thi s is a fellowship that fosters spirit ual, int ellectua l and social interests in colle ge students.

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Newman Community Choir Seated: Mr. Kane, Faculty Advisor Standing: Cathy Filo, S.A. Representatives; Lynn Fraunheim Vice-Pres i dent; Father Murphy, Church Advisor; Mary Sharp, President; Sharon Lane, Secretary. 67

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arts

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70 The Teahou se of the August Moon may not possess the wit of Moliere, the insight of Che kh ov, o r t h e brillianc e of Shaw, but it jus t could be that it i s be c om in g one of the c lassi cs of ollr stage. That is, if by "classic" we mean a p lay co ntinuou s l y performe d for a decade and a half. An instant h i t, i t s original nln (1953-56) went on for 128 week s and 1026 performances. And it captured the s ix maior prizes of its opening year, in c luding the Pulitzer and the New York Drama Critics Award. Furthe r it boaste d tremendous "Su ccesses in Japan, the nation wh i ch lost Okinawa to the United States, and in Germany (the longe s t Berlin run in history), which a l so felt the burden o f our occupation forc es. Thus t h e p lay's c lassi ca l statu s if augmented b y an unu s ua l record of internatio nal perfOlmance, n o t only in countries that shared the victo}ty of World War 11 (great acclaim also in P a ri s, London. and Am s t erdam), but a l so in the lands hav ing painful and r ecent re co lle c tion s of the alien d omination depicted in the p l ay. This obviousl,v univer s al appeal of a well made but not un eq ua l ed, comedy requires so m e additiona l com m entary. The story's focus a nd it s bridge between two opposing cultures is Sak ini. His opening monologue gi ves a capsu l e hi story of Okinawa' s external relation s : a s u ccess ion of conquests b y outs ider s But his attitude is a half rueful, half bantering recognition that a conquering peop l e, though they bring the world to your door, stand to learn a few things from you too His wisdom, that all c ultural exchanges a re reciproca l e nable s him t o un sc rupulou s l y extract advantages for his subdued countrymen from the more na i ve victors. These victors, c hauvini s tically deluded (like all victors), see their campaign o f d emocratization, n o t as an attempt to increase their nation's political power but rather as a purel y a ltruistic gesture (doing w ell by doing good). This i s what Sakini ironically poke s fun at in the first s peech: Okinawa very fortunate. Culture brought to u s n o t have to lea ve h o m e for it. Learn many things. But more s ignificantl y he goes on to say. Most important that res t of world not lik e Okinawa. World filled with delightful va riation. And so it is! How eve r unscrupulous this rogue may be, h e i s a rogu e with a heart as w ell as a mind. His wisdom really extends bey o nd the cynica l knowledge of how to expl oit the exploiter; hi s playfu l wit i s founded on hi s realizati o n of t he basic humanity on b o th sides. Both mode s of life. Thus fmlll the play's beginning, its mo s t se riou s p oint i s s l y l y introduced, a point that i s full y de ve l oped a nd exemplified by Captain Fisby's uneasy and parlous excursion into the mystique of the oriental teahouse, a nd by T ob iki village's faltering essays into free enterprise and self-government. Eve r yone reaps di vide nd s in this comically heated cla s h of cultures At the end w h e n Fis b y comments, Now I'm not sure, who' s the co nqu e ror, who's the c onquered He i s finally catch ing on to what Sakini understood in the beginning: If y o u approach the stranger with empathy, he soo n b eco me s a fliend. H. Loring White

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"Just a question of geography"!! '01' "BRIGHT" eyes! 71

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72 Good c l ea n Okinawan fun. Friend s s hould a l ways t ravel in a well o rgani ze d g r o up --0 H Ad\'enture Magazine's" greatest fan. DONT WA.sTe PAPeR A ssocia te profe sso r of \\' H A T ? Did you sar Canal Zone College? ? ? L o rd A s t o r POOOOl' Lotu s Blosu m !

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The j oys of t r ave l \\' h e n yo u m ake a mista ke, i t's a b eaut Sock it to 'em, boys! You've got to be kid ding! The "Fight .. I'll bet it was rigged!! 73

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The neurotic Psychiatrist Look there. !Tobiki' s own the L adies L ea gue For D emoc rati c A c tion!!

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"The roar of the c r owd, the smell of the greasepaint, A nd as the clirtain fall s on "the happy e\ el' after, TEAHOUSE ... L o m an-san. Banzai!!! 75

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college capers 1968 MODER1\' CLASS I CAL GAS 76

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HGu ando calienta e l sol ; _Ii r .. '-w',' .. -:fif' ; .i' r .. --, . B eats a rhythm to my head. 77

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78 The 'ORACLE of DUH' "Boy, now you've done it!!!11 I t ol' 'im Juli, Juli don't go, 1 tol' 'im. Wou l d you believe, Wa s h the blood from my sar o ng???

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Flavias Maximus, Pl'ivate Roman Eye. The Senate in session ... . license number also handy as an eye chart." 79

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Bananas. at "Alice's Res t a ur ant" doing their thing, the Hippies were there 80

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"Tiptoe through Tulip s ... "There's no business lik e show business. 81

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82 1968 christmas concert The solo i sts of the evening: Alida Diane Lyton, violin and Henry L. R ose, piano.

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Newman Community Cho1'lIS Accompanist Canal Zone College Women's Chorus 83

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84 MI'. David Lomme n Faculty AdvL'Sor to DELTA PSI OMECA delta pSI OFFICERS (Left to Right): Car y Pooek, In es Ba l m aced a, Jacinta L ewis, Benilda Atherly, Earl Alexis. omega

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musica Mr. C.r1 H C h a p ma n Faculty Ad v i so r fo r M US I C A H enry Hose -Pl'es i de n t 85

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conquistador 1\11'. Irvin H. Lesser-Facu l ty Advi so r Harriet Hays--Editor-in-C hi e f 86

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\Vay n e Fo c u e Layout Editor Fres hman Class Assistant Editor Juli e Murph y -Ass istant to the Editor, Freshman C l ass Editor Paul Stewart-Head Photogl'apher 87

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Carol e Arnold-Adv e rti s ing Editor Treasurer G lenn Curtis-Arts Editor Kathy Olsen-Ad,'e rti s ing Staff 88

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Cathy Jes t ice-A rts A ss i stant Editor Col een O'Connor-Adver t i s ing Sta ff Jon Rh'eraChrono ) ogy Editor 89

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David \Vinn-Photographer Howard \ Vagoner -Fac ulty and Administration Editor Sherry Rissell-OJ'ganizations A ss istant Editor 90

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Ce' s o Carbon ell-Advertis ing Staff Margaret O'C onn ell-Sophomore Class Ed itor K a r e n Sun-Junior Class Editor 9 1

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Margaret Miller-Organizations Edito r M ark H oward-Adverti s ing Staff Jim Hic ks-Sports Editor Louise Julian-Advel'tis ing Staff

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tropical collegian Mr s. S toh rer-F aculty Adv i s o r V i c ki S p e ars--S.A. R epresentatI ve ,. Rober t Lowe-Edi to r -in-Chi e f 93

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nose Knight Production Editor Catalina Lau-Al't Editor 94

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Sherry B i ssell-Contributing Arti s t M a r ga r e t Miller -Layo ut Staff, typi s t 95

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sports

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football at c.z.c. Firs t Row: Alej a ndro William s, Skip C othran, Paul J e nning s, Ric k S egarra, Mario Cruz Gary Poo c k Tom Sli ce M onty Trim G regg Br o wn, B e n Dogu e Second Row: L ouis Hus t e d Gre g Br y ant, K e n Jus tic e, C urti s Whit e h ead, Neil \,yh ee l e r Jim Hic k s, R o b Kalb Tom Fulch e r Nel so n ]zquierdo. Third Row: Jim H a rnag e, David Winn Ste v e Bolt T o m Wig gi ns, Da vid S teph e n s Mark H o ward Ken B os l ey, Fre d DeJe s u s, Larry Tyn es, Arno l d T a lb o tt. 19 b8 C Z C. 8 C HS. C Z C . . . . . . BHS. .. ....... 19 CZC. .... 1 2 B HS. 6 CZC .. 6 CIIS ... . 14 98

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Out of the shad ow, int o the limelight Out of the way, ref! 99

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100 Don't l ook so s tun ned H a lf way the r e Duh w hi c h way did e go, coa ch?

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, liang it up! A Big Brother and the H olding Comp an y r t; .. "!' -f -, .. ( .-' .. .. , .,. ,. l' I'm goin'. 101

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102 B e f o r e and Afte r

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Let's go, Slice; the)-'re not that BIG_ It 's not a face ma sk; it's a he l met hand l e /03

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iamboree queen M iss J a n e t Hunt 104

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105

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106 Dee Boatman, Kal'en Park, Janet Hunt Chris Mitten, Becky Bl'yant, Trin i Huish, Deanna Boswell. Not Pic lured: Dadeen Woodruff. cheerleaders Becky Bryanl Captain

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Dee Boarman Ah, s hu cks \Vhat a chor u s line! 107

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lOB Ready f01" take off. Ooomph! J a n e t Hunt .. J Trini Hui s h C hri s Mitt e n

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Karen Park Darlene Woodruff S i g n h e r u p for t h e b r oa d jump! True devot i on 109

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. sWimmin g T e nse m o m e n ts befo r e t h e m ee t Don' t f all as l ee p o n li S, D enni s And they're off! 110

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The return trip A flying start III

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tennis You'll never get anywhere lik e that. 112 Morris Finkelstein Coach Cet back down t o earth.

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Melvin Cabey John Garcia Rene Gomez Sam McGuinne s Gary Sandacz Allan Sellens 113

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114 track First Row: Rick Velasco, Rudy Sobers, Gary Poock, Juvenal Jovet, Richard Allen. Second Row: Gregg Bryant, Tom Duncan, Mike Chavez, Mike Kredell. G r egg Brown, Hal'oldo William s, Karl Ebert, Coach Mike Smith. So far, so good The so ft s h oe ?

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Gal'.\" Poock ALONE 115

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Holland e r at his Best. Levity on the field. -. \ &. D o n 't s it down o n the job! 116

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C oach Mike S mith The r e you go again. S h ould I o r sho uldn t I? And with Illy bar e t ee th. 117

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You've had it now. 118 You're going to have to watch to leal'n. "Don't mess with the kid 1 didn't know YOli cared.

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I'd rather fight than s witch Olympics 1972 here f come Second i s n't bad. No?!! I d i dn't know rou were Italian. 119

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1 2 0 ... 1 s t Row: M ari o Cruz, Ne l son Izquirdo Fr ank Rodtiguez Ric k Vela sco, T o m I-Ielma nn y Larry Forsey th. 2nd Row: Coach Mike Smith, John Spilli n g Gar y J ohns t on, Rocky M ason, Jam es Mahan Doug H arre l s on, T o m Dun ca n Fre d D e J es u s K enne th S h e l t e r. Batt e r b e w a r e \ V ith the mitt n ot y o ur m o uth

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Th e boogaloo 01' the watusi ? Misse d again! No u se begging. You'll have to open you r eyes. Oh, yea 121

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122 physical education You put your left foot in you take your left foot out. The Green Arrow in di s guise. Thi s mu s t be th e pla ce.

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Look Ma one hand You expect u s to do that? Yep. we're doing it nlll'ight. 123

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intramurals No, it's mine. Come on, fell as. Th e Ball Gazers" 124

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Oops, a lmost got away. Reach out. R eac h o ut again. 125

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classes 127

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128 freshman class D o n a R athg eber Treasurer Darle e n Woodruff Sec r e t a r y M iss Caro l y n Sw iney Faculty Adv isor Mike Chavez P resident How ard \Vagoner V i cePre side nt

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129

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K a thy Allis C h emis tr y i s fun but thi s i s ridi c ulo u s Caro l e Arn old V a l erie A s h Luis A v i l es Debor a h A r a m 130

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Gera l dine Bass Arm y. here I come. Cmmen Behren s -Lester Bernard She rry Bissell D ee Boar m a n 131

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St,,"e Bolt Ginny Bonner l\' lal'ia Bosc h Ri c hard Bouchez Reflection s of life" " Looks lik e t h e studyi n g type. rloesn't s h e ? Cynthia Boukalis Il2

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Gregg Brow n Greg Bl'ya n t Colleen Campbell Kathleen Ca m pbell What subway? l\l a l'th a Cal'te r 133

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Did she really, did she really? Aleyda Castro Luisa Chan Teresa Chel'ie Rafae l Ciniglio Mary Clark Nuncio Cog liandro Marian Colclas ur e 134

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I ren e Coreo Th ey' r e m y bead s, not yours! S kip Cot hran Here it is. b-oy ... i\J al'io C ruz G l e n Curtis TwiJa Darden 135

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Edua r do Davi s D o n a l d Dean B elinda D e La Cl'UZ Valerie D e Piper equa l s two. Phew! I rect ol' d e So u za 136

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O iovelis Diaz Joe Dolan Tom Duncan Quit it, that tickle s Barbara Eaton Arracelli Enriqu ez Lois Faulconer Kat)' Fil o 137

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Haquel Flores What is so funny about my hair? / Mama really was righ t! Jeannette Fong LaIT Y Forsyth \Vayne roseue T o m Fulcher 138

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Danny Garcia Dary l Garrett Barbara Geddes Diane Gomez You should read what I just r ead. Gail Gordon Gretchen Grimm Harriet Hays 139

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Jame s Hellmund Now, as I was telling y o u . James Hick s Aurea Hogan Sue H olloway Janet Hunt 140

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.-It's a l ong, long walk from Physical Education. Nelson I zquie rd o Denni s Jacobs Jean Jensen Katherine Jestice Loui se Julian Ju\' enal Jovet 141

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K e nneth J u s t i c e J o m a r Ketring Juli e Kri s L M, N 0 ... uh whe r e i s P hiding? S har o n Lan e No r v L a u F elix L ee Ri c k y L ee 1 42

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Milton Leid i g You ca n come o ut n ow. Beth Lewis Lloyd Ernesto Lou Juan 143

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/ Franc i s Mar av ill a Ple ase, so m e b o d y sc r a t c h m y b ack. Jes se Martie 1,2, uh . l e t m e think. Sandra Maruri Kathy Jane Me l a nson J o hn Mer c i e r 144

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Ju l ia M e r cier Margaret Miller David Mimbs No. 110 improvement-yet. Miriam I\li zra c hi Prisci l a l\Iorgan Jim Murphy Juli e MlII1)hy 145

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Chi Phi eats. eh ristine Norton Marta Oller Kathy Olsen Joseph Orr J en n y O sborne Dawn Pan i s h lleana Pazm i no 146

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Gabrie l P el'e ira I know T put it somewhere Patsy Per e ir a If yo u give m e any more lip, I'll ... Mike Perez D onna Rathgeber Agu s tin Re y 147

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Jon Rivera Maria Robl es Chris Ross D a l ys Sagel Could that be an ana lyti c geomet r y textbook'? H ave fun! Ooh, that s marts! 148

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Rick Segar r a Elva Sellens Kenie Skehan H e did what? Sy l via Smith I J ohn Sollis Patricia Springe r Peter Stevens 149

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The B os ton Str a ngl e r s trik es a g ain. O lga Stuart M arga r e t Tu c k e r Lil y Vargas Ric k V e l a sc o A l be r to Villag'lie u Cef erino Vill nmil 1 5 0

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Hal W a d e The r e's so methin g about his beard. Howal'd \Vagonel' i\Iarcia \Ve l c h Vil'ginia \Vertz Barbara 151

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Tom Wiggins J oyce \Vhit e Curtis White h e ad B ec k y It might see n easy from the o ut s ide. but jus t co me on in! H a r oldo \Villia m s 152

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William Wilm oth David \\finn L ee Winstead Jim Wohlfal'th L eonal'do \Vong Santiago W ood Bob Wood s Cha in s moker's dilemma. 153

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154 J a m es Dertien 1 st Semeste r Pres iden t Bec k y Brya n t Secretar'y sophomore class officers '" '.I' to' .. of., r '. .. /0. ,. ., C l ass Spo n so r Mr C linton Ca rney ". Gary P ooc k 1 s t Semeste r Vice-President 2 nd Se m es t e r President Jon Coffi n Treasu rer

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Gustavo Arosem e na J T n ez Balmecedia Benilda Atherly Calvin Best Frederick Atkinson Kenneth Bo s ley 155

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Kenwood Braswell T wonde r w hat Dr H yde w ould d o next? Nancy Briscoe I Becky Bryant John Cau l fie l d Con sta nt C hase 15b

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W ell, miss, T gu ess I co uld arm wrestl e w i t h yo u . to see i f I h ave t o pay t h e lib r a r y fine J o n Coffin Boli va r de Gra c i a SOllsa D es n ee James Derti e n Mike Denni s 157

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Jnes Duffu s Gemma F e l'nand ez Mar ceil Ed s on L ynn Fl'aunh eim J Maxi n e F ennell 158

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Re n e Gom ez P a m G i anne t ta Cecilia Grima l do S h a r o n Fu ss elma E d wa rd H azell 159

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Orhtndo lIen land L ouis Hu s t e d Richanl Hollander Marie J o nes Trini ] lui s h 160

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Catali n a Lau Rosalin d Knight Claudina Lee Rowena Jose ph s .Jacinta Lewi s 161

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Barbara L ore nz e n Julio Luque JI'. A l ida L y nton Kathy Lum 162

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Sally McLaren D av i d McGrath C lam I\!oore M arle n e Maj o r Lucia Ng 16J

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Margaret O'Connell H ow will I eve r ex p l ain these f ive aces? K a r e n Park Kathy Park Elen a Phillip s 164

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H eh, h e h .. jus t wait until Mr. Chap man gets thi s anony m ous letter complainin g about the piano!! Mary Rabbitt Carmen Ramse.\' Vicki Rodriguez Angel Rodriguez 165

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Henry Rose L o rind a Seeley Yol anda St. R ose Sen e r Gary Sandacz I

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Mar garet S l over R o b ert S hu l tz Charita Small Mary S harp Viki Spears 167

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Melinda Ste\Oen s Kare n S un Ralph Stin s o n IVfike Tread 168

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RelY U nd e rw ood lI e len Vales And:. Thomas Neil \Vh ee ler 169

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170 iunior class G lor i e l a Pani za M edica l T ec hn o l ogy P a n Ame ri ca n Soc i e t y l ; Bio l og i c a l S o c i e t y 1. 2; Vice-Preside n t 2 ; Stu d ent A ss i stant t o P r o fesso r M ye r s 3. P a t r i c i a Booth F o r e i g n L a n g uage New m a n Community J 2 ; G irl s f nll'amura l Spo rts 1 2, 3; 'Tr opi c a l Col l eg ian-Proclucti o n Staff 2; Stud e n t Assi stantL a n g uage Lab 2; M ain Offi ce 3: S potl ig h t Ed itor 2. 3; Phi Theta Kappa 2 3.

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Aida Brid T ec hnolog y Paul E. ne s t Engin ee ring Sc i e n ce Intramura l Sports 2, 3. Pan Ameri ca n Soc iety 1; Biological So c i ety 1. 2. Linda S. Hellmund Mathematics Phi Beta L a m bda 1. Mar garita Nuclue s Medical T ec hn o logy Pan America n Society 1 ; Biologi ca l So c iety 1. 2. P a m e l a Gian n e U a Art Educati o n lI e llmund 1\Iathematics Phi Bela L ambda 1. 171

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citations

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Trini Hui s h Jim Dertien mr. and miss canal zone college 174

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most popular Ga r y P oock Karen Park 175

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C l ara Moore Eddi e Gom ez friendliest 176

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most likely to succeed Lynne Frauenheim Julio LUClue 177

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Ra l p h Stin s on M a r y Ann I g n ac i o most intellectual 178

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most talented K athy P ark H enry Rose Kare n Park 1 79

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Kathy Park Celso Carbonell best looking 180

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best dressed Vince Olsen Maxine Fennell 181

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Becky Bryant Ric h ard H ollande r most school-spirited 182

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most athletic L o ui s Huste d Lorind a Sea l ey 183

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Mary Sharp Bill Cal'pe nter wittiest 184

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outstanding club members L y nn e F r a u enheim Phi Theta K a pp a Mary S h ar p Newman Clu b Jacinta L e wi s V icki Spea r s Pilots Yadira D i az Ph i Beta Lambda Ga r y Pooc k Delta Psi Omega Bill Wilmoth C h ess Club 185

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who's who in american Becky Brya n t I ne s Balm ace d a Jon Coffin Jim D er tien Yad i ra Diaz 186

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iunior colleges Lynne Frauenheim Louis Hus t e d Mary Ann Ignacio J ac inta Lewis Cata lin a L ao 18'7

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who's who In Luci a Ng Cathy Lum Vincent O l s o n Karen Park K athy Park 188

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merican iunior colleges G a r y Poock A n ge l R o d rig uez H e nr y Rose M a r y S h a rp C harita S mall 189

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chronology

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september: bonfire 192

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193

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)ctober: nusica -,h i theta kappa -lssembly 194

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195

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october: freshman class picnic 196

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198

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199

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200

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201

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202 december: christmas formal D eanna Ros well ell I'istmas F orma l Queen E scort-John Ca ulfi eld

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203

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204 Becky Bryant Sophomor e Prin cess E sco rt -Gal'Y Poock T r ini Hui s h Sop hom o re Princess Escort-Jon Coffin

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Geddes Fr eshman Princess E sco rt-\Vayne Foscue Chris Mitten Fre s hman Prin cess E sco rt-Mike C h avez 205

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206 ianuary: registration

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207

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208 february: how 12 succeed in business without really trying tryouts and rehearsals

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209

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february: phi theta kappa tea 210

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211

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animation of the modern student

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214

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215

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, -r'" 11 216

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217

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218

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219

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221 I

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222

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223

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224

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225

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22b

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228

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230

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231

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233

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234

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23b

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237

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238

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239

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advertisements

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242 SEARS BELIEVES RES O.l\"SIB!-,T." YOL":\'G AD CREDIT i Sears I Opening your first c r edit account? Startin g a n ew job? ... N e wl y married? ... A new homemaker? ... A new parent'! H your m eans are mod est and n ee d s are many, Sears Mands ready to h e lp you with Credit. If YOli want an account with a dependabl e slore, co m e in and have a talk with a c r edit couns elor at Sears. This is a promise: Sears wi ll g iv e your c r edit requ es t prompt attention. You don' t need a c08igne r Your character and ability to pay are your b es t rerereuce. Enjoy the convenience of a Sears Credit Acc ount. Buy the things you need now ... use the m now ... pay for them in easy monthly payments. When you visit Sears, p lan to spend a littl e time browsing a round. You'll be happily surprised with a ll the good things i n life that ca n b e yours at Sears today! Your Dollars G o Further at Sears SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back SEARS LOS AIl::;ELES T,ona,,>th,,"on H,qh .... oy Tel.61*40CO OPEN MONCAY TO FRICAY rrom adO o.m. to 12:::1(' p ..... and 2:00101:00 ....... Solu.dar 8:30 0 1r. u"1016:00 p ..... Open [;"""11 the Noon Hour. SEARS COLON F,.nI. Av.n ... l e l ephon. 7-11)2 OPEN FRo... NONtSAY 70 FRIOAY a n d 10 'tOO p ,m, S a ... day. :31fG.. ... .. nIW6tOO p,"" One" d"'i"o Ih_ noon hou.e.

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Courtesy of GUDICO, S. A. Hom e Improv e ment Product s Building Materials Flexalum Ph o n e : 20333 Col o n Mail Addres", Box 503 Col o n Court es y of JOHN SURANY 10 F ront Stree t Col on. Rep. o f P a nama YMCA RESTAURANT AND SODA FOUNTAIN Seaso n's fr es h se a food p l att e r Gourmet c hinese dis he s Complete s t eak dinn e r s Dail y S p ecial m enu Cold drink s F o r reservation s please ('all: Balboa 2-2759 2-2839 243

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244 JOYERIA CASULLO A venida del Frente N 45 Col o n, R e p. De Panama Comp lim ents o f PAYNE & WARDLOW, INC. Steams hip Agents BEST WISHES, C.Z COLLEGE STUDENTS! FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK Balboa, Canal Zone The Right Bank In The Right Place" With 263 Overseas Branches and Affiliates in 63 Countries o n 6 Continent s

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Free Deliveries Curundu Flower Shop to Hospitals and Locations in the Canal Zone Weddings Anniversaries Funerals Corsages Must be Ordered Two Days in Advance for Dance s Large Supply of Local and States' Flowers Just call Balboa 2793 or Curundu 7292 We Will Be Ready To Serve You! 245

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24b Congratu l ations to the 1969 Graduating C l ass F rom t h e DOROTHY CHASE STUDIO OF DANCE Court esy MORGAN'S GARDENS ANCON GREENHOUSE Tel. 2-2 3 90 PROTEX PANAMA S .A. has the know-how to hondle 011 your concrete problems PROTEX PANAMA S.A.' Apartado 1783. Panama 1. Rupubl10a do Panama T e letonoa : 15-1323 )' 15-156615 Cablel Protex

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PUT A TIGER I N YOUR TANK! ESSO STANDARD OIL, S. A. LTD. CANAL ZONE BALBOA CR I STOBA L R E M EMBER, YOU HAVE A FRIEND AT C H ASE MAN H ATTAN THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK National A ssoc iation ia E spana, Plaza:) de :f\Iayo. Betania Co l on. Chit r e. Balboa. 247

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"J. ASSANDAS" 10.115 Boliva r A venue Betwee n 1 0 and 11 St. 10.115 Distributors of French and Spa ni s h Perfumes ICE CREAM PASTRIES PIZZA Compliments CANAL ZONE CREDIT UNION Tel. 2-2 7 45 W e ... HATCH MATCH and DISPATCH Courtesy MARGARITA FLORIST Tel. 3 -1916

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COUl t esy of MIKE ARBAIZA For good eating and good comfort your best place is the "CLUB PANAMAR" SEA -FOOD -HOUSE AND BAR----" End of SO Street San Francisco de la Caleta I-l ear the Sea side SIERRA HNOS. (Manager ) TEL. 24-4517 249

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2 5 0 Pho ne: BA 2 -3677 W e Cu rl I I p And Dye f o r Y o u V-M.e.;t. BEAUTY S H O P BAlboa 2 3 6 77 For Your A p poi ntment EL PINCEL Alm os t Everyth ing f o r the A r ti s t Via Arge n t i na # 1 EI Con g r e j o A ve C u b a #28-42 T el. 2-7994-.-P .O. B ox 7279 GUUD N lWS Linen House de los WHO LE SALE & RETA I L 1'"'41 A 4 Th OF JULY AVE PASAMA'5 R nf PA .... AMA MOST CO MPLE TE DUTY FREE AND REASONA8L Y PRICED STORE IN FOURTH OF JULY AVENUE 'i1"""J/w m <111 kind <1j N tJnJ L mbrtJ.d(.td Im.:nt<1blt (ltJ,III. Lui'll r oud.. &. /I" It, /I (tJ ...,J. l'I g,rmJI 5,d("T(J r J/umiJJ Dnd /la ujo.' e V af ikaJ,J B<19' &.. F,tnc h r"'/um., Sav e T,m!! a nd E nergy by B uy'n)! at one Pnced S t ore, t-.bll Servlco!" & H o m e Delive r y A ccep t e d LASTRA, S. A. A W a t e r W o rld At 5 0th Street Aqu ariums and T rop i ca l Fi s h Com p l e t e Lin e o n S I)Orting Good s

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AGENCI A DE VIAJES TRA VEL AGENCY. INC. PO BOX 6891, PANAMA 5, R I'. CADLE, GOOAL PHONES: Cana l Zone 2 Panama 22-8802 / 3 Students W hen You Trave l to t h e USA Let Us Make Your Reservatio n s Best Service-Best Fares Student D iscou nts Allowed Tel.: C.Z. 2-4632 Pan. 22-8802 / 3 (We offer ample safe parking.) 'attama :rfiortal J(e;Jiaurani JJar 50 ST N o. 1 00 P O BOX 8 942 The most luxurious and txclusive Dining Room in Panama. V isi t Ou r great wine cellar. Enjoy a pleasant and cozy surroundings in our fam ous Pa tio in a complete tropical atmosphere. Taste the'vario us t y pical panamenian dishes. Delicious ted mea t 5 and sea food from the best and biggest charcoal br o i l e r in lown Dancing niRhtly fr o m 8 pm. on. For reserva t i o ns c all at Phoned: I3 I3 Private and parking. Congratu lations to the 1969 graduating class from the CONQUISTADOR staff. 251

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252 index animations 2 dedication 18 administrati on and faculty 20 organizations Biolog i ca l Society-63 Chess Club-58 Christian Scien ce Organizat ion-59 L'E s pil'it Francais-62 Newman Club-66 Phi Beta Lambda-56 Phi Th eta Kappa -64 Pilots-60 Student A sso ciat ion-54 sports Ba,eball -120 Cheerleaders-106 Football-98 Intramurals-124 Jamboree Que e n 1 0. 1 Physical Education-122 Swimming-liD Tennis-112 Track-I 14 96 52 arts 68 Ch ristmas Concert-82 College Capers-76 CONQUlSTADOR-86 Delta Psi Omega-84 lIIUS ICA-85 Teahou se of the Au g u s t Moon 70 T ROP ICAL COLLEGIAN-93

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citations Outstanding Club Members-185 Supel'iat i ves: 172 Mr. and Miss Cana l Zon e College-174 Most Popu l a r-175 Frie ndliest-176 Most Likely to S ucceed-177 Most Tntellectual-178 Most Talented-17 9 Best Looking-180 Best Dressed I 81 Most School Spir ited-1 82 l\Iost Athletic-183 Wittiest-184 Who's Who-1 86 classes Fres hman C lass-128 Sophomore Class-154 Junior Class-170 chronology September: Bonfire-192 126 190 October: College Asse mbb'-194 Fres hman Class Picnic-I 96 December: Christmas Formal Queen-202 Christmas Formal Court-204 January: Registration-206 February: Spring Musical Reheal'sal-208 animations 212 advertisements 240 253

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254 The 1969 CONQ U ISTADOR staff would lik e to express a s pecial "thank you" to: MR. DAVID BAG LIEN for his efforts to assis t the yearboo k staff in makin g t h e C itation s sect i o n of thi s yearbook a s u ccess MISS YVONNE CRANE for h e r un e nding ass istance in taking and pr ocessing pictures f o r m a n y occasions for the CONQUIS TADOR an d f or h er willingness and e nthu s i as m to h elp in a n y s itu a tion. MR. GUY HALL of C urundu Photo Service for th e many h ours that h e spent a t Ca nal Zone College t a king c l ass pictures f o r the CON QUI STA DOR. MR. JOHN MARSHALL for hi s heart-felt inte r es t in the publication of this yearbook and hi s many invaluabl e ideas conce rnin g the D edication. MR. ARNOLD TALBOTT for the countl ess h ours that h e s pent in he l ping as a photographer, eve n though h e was not a staff m ember. MR. H LORING WHITE f o r p ermitting the staff to u se hi s commentary o n Teahouse of the August Moon.

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Unknown t o h e r, t h e 1 969 CONQUISTADOR would like to pay a ve r y specia l tribute to MISS MARGARET GATELY Many times Miss Gately s pent h e r off h ours atten din g year book staff meetings, h e l ping the editor so l ve an incalcu l able numb e r of problems, approving pages to be se nt to the pubtis her, and faithfully promoting CONQUIS TAD OR proj ects If i t h a d n ot bee n for Miss Gat e l y's cont inu ous assistance, boundless v i vac it y. and unceas ing d esi r e to assist the yearbook s taff in any capacity, the 1 969 CONQU I STADOR would n eve r hav e becom e a reality '255

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The 1969 e dition of the CONQUISTADOR presents a fresh, off-b eat appr oach t o yearbook prod uction at Cana l Zone College. Th e staff has so ught to produ ce a yearbook a s unprecedente d as the different students of thi s institution and the changing institution itself. Most peop l e per hap s, con side r all yearbo o k s the same from year t o year. Thi s i s true in so me respec t s, but there i s always something uniqu e which a r ises fro m the orig inalit y and ing enuity of the staff affecting eve ry different yea r book. To pres ent to th e students of Canal Zone College our origina l interpretation of "th e mod e rn s tud ent/' through inno vatio n s in yearbook d es ign and presentation, i s the purpo se of this e dition of the CON QUISTADOR. The r eader will notice that there a r e two pictorial ess a ys in this book conce rnin g the life of "the m o d e rn s tud e nt. Th e inte nti o n of these section s, with the infOimal balan ce layouts and ve r y lit tle if any cop y. i s for the reader t o exam ine the pi ctures as one clu s t e r, o n e entity, and to make u se of his imagination and experiences to g rasp the ideas b e hind the pictures The pictures o n these pages a r e not inte nd e d to b e a p r a nk by a rebelliou s yearb ook staff. but are presented a s a s ymbo l of the diversity of expe r ience of "the modern student" and the aspirations he hopes to fulfill. The essays a r e meant to s uggest to the r eade r what he "the m odern student, fe e l s, thinks sees, and ex peri ences in life; and, mo s t importantly, what h e represents to him self and hi s eve r-dimini s hing world. Thi s s h ould not prove difficult for the stud ents of Cana l Z o ne College b eca u se they all have something in com mon, so m e innate q u ality of human expe ri e n ce a nd co mpanion s hip. The c ro ss-sect ion of the student b ody is portrayed in these pages. All students are r ep re sente d, whether th ey be Panamanian or American, black 0 1 white, ri c h o r pOOl'. good 01' bad unkn own 01' promin e nt. A s Editor-in-Chief of the 1969 CONQU T S TADOR, [ since r e l y hop e t hat the idea s formalized in thi s book will n o t go unnoti ced by the stud ents and administration of Canal Zone College. T o have these ideas perceived b y all o f the r eade r s i s the terminu s o f a .vear of imaginativ e, dili gent work b y the yea r book staff. \Ve had a stor eho u s e of memories and impress i o n s to c reate for the r eader. Thi s i s you r 1 969 CONQUTS T ADOR; we are all a part of it. 257