Conquistador

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Conquistador
Uniform Title:
Conquistador (Canal Zone Junior College)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone College
Publisher:
Conquistador Staff
Place of Publication:
Balboa Canal Zone
Balboa Canal Zone
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1972
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School yearbooks -- Panama -- Balboa   ( lcsh )
Genre:
School yearbooks   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Canal Zone Junior College.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: 1936.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: 1972.
Issuing Body:
Student yearbook of the Canal Zone Junior College from 1936 to 1963, and the Canal Zone College from 1964 to 1972.
General Note:
Description based on: 1936; title from cover.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: 1972.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 472468547
lccn - 2009229561
System ID:
UF00095973:00019


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







Cr


>2


rs7


-%.s-%%-


JU


IOR


COLLEGE


`^r~


~**CC4


v


''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''


CI~


1C\


















DEDICATION


Yearbook is dedicated to a world without war, in the con-


fident and firm resolve on our part to make a peaceful world.


"You,


the graduates, are now entering a harsh world, full of tribulations" has


been said so often that it has become trite.


The meaning, however,


still holds,


especially today,


when we face the terrifying threat of


World War III,


which could easily destroy all existing civilizations.


While recognizing the many obstacles which clutter the road to peace,

we still feel that the people of the world, working together, may effect


the constructive development of peace.


Therefore,


we do humbly


dedicate the 1953 Yearbook to the thing we want above all others--

a world without war.





















ra If college graduates of
Sthe post-World War II era de-
... velop split personalities, it
may be argued that "the state
: 'ohthe world is in" is the cause
Sdl thereof. On the one hand it
a appears that the world is clam -
s o oring for their services at
rates of pay, even considering
the reduced purchasing power
eof the dollar, that would have
Sl been thought fantastic not so
o long ago. The problem of
Sa "getting a start, bugaboo of
needt many generations of college
graduates, therefore no longer
need bother them. From an economic point of view their future looks
at least moderately secure, not to say rosy. But on the other hand we
are assured by supposed authorities that there hangs over them the
ominous shadow of a terrible World War III, which might well result
in the "total destruction"' of all life on the planet, and even the planet
itself. Such dire predictions as these naturally tend to make the
hypothetically economically secure future of the college graduates of
today look rather less secure! Under the circumstances perhaps no
one can blame them if there develops among them an epidemic of
schizophrenia


But perhaps the danger to all of us as individuals, and to western
civilization as such, is not as great as it may seem. Maybe we-are
not all in imminent danger of extermination or enslavement after all!
At any rate several lines of arguments can be adduced in support of
this view, to wit: 1. The argument of progress, or historical con-
tinuity. On the whole, man has progressed marvellously in the last
few centuries in bettering his standard of living and attaining a good
measure of personal, political, and religious freedom. It is unreason-
able to suppose that the whole trend of modern history will now be
reversed for any considerable period of time. 2. The argument of
strength. A potential aggressor is not likely to attack any nation un-
less it is reasonably sure of a quick and easy victory. As long as the
United States "keeps its guard up" (against both external and internal
enemies) it is doubtful if any enemy ever can (within the foreseeable
future) feel such an assurance. 3. The argument of unreasonableness
of possible "total destruction." Despite the admitted power of atomic
and hydrogen bombs, it is unlikely that their use will ever bring
TOTAL destruction and loss of all life over ANY considerable area,
still less that it will result in the "vaporizing" of the earth. At the
worst the unrestrained use of such terrible weapons would indeed deal
a heavy blow to our civilization, but it would assuredly not be a fatal
one. 4. The argument of false prophecy. Americans are famous for






















their "calamity-howling." Individuals not yet old can easily remem-
ber various times in the past when publicists were prophesying dire
things--which never came to pass. A search of United States periodi-


cal literature
to the genera
such danger
were going to


of almost any ten year period would reveal statements
1 effect that the country was never in such a mess and/or
before and that the only thing certain was that "things"
be worse soon, and probably never would be -any better


Foreign travellers early noted this propensity of Americans to
look too intently at the dark side of the socio-economic-political
picture. Thus Charles Dickens in his MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, published
in 1844, records that the title character of the book heard a casual
American acquaintance declare that the United States was then "at a
season of great commercial depression," "in a period of unprecedented


stagnation, and in the midst of "an alarming crisis." The author
then added that "Martin knew nothing about America, or he would
have known perfectly well that if its individual citizens, to a man,


are to be believed, it always is depressed, and always is stagnated,
and always is at an alarming crisis, and never was otherwise; though
as a body they are ready to make oath upon the Evangelists at any hour
of the day or night, that it is the most thriving and prosperous of all
countries on the habitable globe."


Possibly the "alarming crisis" that the United States was in
in 1844(as recorded byDickens) was just as significant to the people of
that day as the "alarming crisis" that the American people are in now
is to 1953 Americans. And just as the 1844 "crisis" was presently
resolved, it may well be that the 1953 one will fare equally well.


So, to the graduates of the Class of 1953, I say be of good
cheer. "Things" are not really so bad as some would have you be-
lieve--any more than they were in the time of Dickens' first visit to


the United States more than one hundred years ago.


It is entirely


possible that no member of the class will live to see another World
War (on the scale of the ones of 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, that is),
and that he will live out his life in peace and comfort and maybe
even be on hand to attend the Seventy-fifth Reunion of his Canal
Zone Junior College class in 2028!









etean


The editor of the CON- ... i
QUISTADOR has honored me by ..: -r
allotting me this space in .
which to write of my work as -.
Dean of Women. This assign- .
ment is difficult for me in tat p :
I usually think of myself as a .
mere teacher rather than as a
dean. And certainly I have .'..:
little in common with the .-...;
Olympian beings I knew--or ...
did notknow--in my own col- :-
lege days. Full of aplomb,
these magnificent personages
remained isolated in private
offices with secretaries to stand
between them and the bust-
ling academic world outside.
My own office, shared with
friendly colleagues, is no such
SANCTUM SANCTORUM. There people drift-
at all hours, without benefit of appointment.
the TC staff, to have a lively -- not to say rauc
workers on the yearbook, to tear their hair ov
photography; an entire class (it seems) to do som
ming before a test. Individuals appear: a teach
the dictionary or the ancient typewriter; a stude:
on the bulletin boards, to borrow books, or to a
lems of many kinds: personal, academic, vocati
an alumna, to talk over experiences in college
in a job, or in marriage. Seldom is the atmos
mal.


of ?/omen


. a ..
' '.
t. :L 1"..


-or burst-- in and out
Whole groups come:
ous -- meeting there;
er crises of finance or
.e last minute cram-
:her or a pupil, to use
nt, to read the notices
.sk for help with prob-
tonal, social, literary;
e in the United States,
phere orderly and for-


Yet I do not envy the lofty deans of my student years, in their
lonely offices, behind their uncluttered mahogany desks. Nor do I
object to being a teacher as well as a dean. The teacher, I feel,
helps to keep the dean human. True, there are many frustrations and
disappointments in teaching, for both the teacher and the taught.
The instructor often fails to win the student's interest and cooperation,
and adds nothing to his knowledge; but the successes are frequent
enough to make the struggle exhilarating, and the teacher has many
good memories. Alumni write reassuring letters: one, that he has
heard the readings of JOHN BROWN'S BODY, another that she has
been to hear DON JUAN IN HELL; one that she is absorbed by lec-
tures on existentialism, another that he has visited the homes of
Longfellow and Emerson; one, that she has been nominated for a Ford
Foundation scholarship, another that she is serving in a Quaker Work
Camp in a war-devastated country. Other former students drop by:
a girl, now a nun, who will devote her life to teaching the under-
privileged; a man, now a dentist, who is ministering to the natives in
the Interior of Panama; a young woman, an honor student in her day,
now a mother, interested in children's literature.

So as both dean and teacher, I thoroughly agree with the Clerk









ean of en
The Conquistador edi-
"". "' l tor asked me to write some-
thing in a humorous vein about
the work of a Dean of Men.
The first response that occurs
to me is that such work might
have more humorous aspects
if I were to swap jobs with
the Dean of Women, but that
^approach strikes me as bor-
dering on the facetious rather
Than the humorous.

STo tell the truth, I don't
Sf feel that there is much humor
P attached to the job of coun-
seling students, and counseling
is the primary work of a Dean
of Men.

There is a widespread belief that school days are a carefree,
irresponsible time of life, punctuated by song, laughter, and delight-
ful interludes of puppy love. I doubt that that has ever been true
'except in the minds of harassed adults groping into the past for bright-
er moments than the present affords. Certainly it does not seem to be
true of our college students today. Never before have they seemed
to need more desperately the same three things that we adults spend
a lifetime striving for: affection, security, and freedom. And
never before have those goals been more difficult to attain. Working
mothers, inflated prices, and the uncertainty of world conditions all
conspire to create an atmosphere of instability and, in some students,
a feeling of hopelessness. This in turn breeds indifference to and neg-
lect of scholastic opportunity.

It's when a student feels he has reached the end of his own re-
sources in trying to solve a problem, emotional or scholastic, that
the work of a Dean of Men begins. If the problem is scholastic, he
may not want to go to the teacher involved. He knows the cards may
well be stacked against him--and for good reason. The Dean of the
College is a busy administrator, and most students would hesitate to
encroach on his time. Between these two, the teacher and the Dean,
stands the Dean of Men. He is the neutral "sounding-board" to whom
the confused student confides his problems and airs his grievances,
often finding welcome catharsis by putting into words the things that
have been disturbing him. Many times that is all he needs--just an
opportunity to talk things out without fear of ridicule or censure.

Sometimes the problem has a solution; other times the student
simply has to learn how to live with and adjust to a home or college
condition that he does not like. There are times, too, when the cold,
hard realities of life need to be driven home to a self-pitying student.

It is not only the Dean of Men who does this kind of counseling.
Every teacher worthy of the name does it easily and naturally, con-
sidering it an integral part of his job. There are times, however,
when a student liRe to talk to someone whom he does not know so well
a Ia+. _, 2 -l-- S --. ... o 7o. t. r c-- . ... ... _... ___ __ ,-





Thats for the birds


p Af


k


was hungry


9.


U^


- i. 1,






ROGER


HACKETT. . . . . . .
Marion, Kentucky
A. B. Indiana University
A.M. Harvard University
Graduate work, Oxford University


.Dean


Academic Experience:
Bosse High School, Evansville, Ind.
Dean, Pineland Junior College, Salemburg, N.
Hobbies:
Tennis, travel, movie photography
Last Year:
Twenty-fourth year in academic work


MOODY
Instructor in English,
Johnson County, Kansas
B. A. University of Kansas


M. A.
Ph. D.


Dean of Women


Yale University
Yale University


Academic Experience:
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
Hobbies:
Reading, writing, travel, pet cat
Last Year:
Bought phonograph and began collection of classical records;
studied Spanish.


JAMES


LYONS
. . Instructor, Commercial


Dept.


Peru, New York
B. S. New York University
M. A. New York University
Graduate work, Columbia University


Dean of Men


Academic Experience:
University of Puerto Rico, P. R.
Hunter College, New York City, N. Y.
Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.
Hobbies:
Free lance writing
Last Year:
Moved to cottage in Ancon; Observed Psychological Studies,
Testing and Guidance Laboratory, N. Y. C., N.Y.


CHARLES


R. BOWEN
Instructor in History and Social Science
Logan, Ohio
B. S., Baldwin Wallace College
M. S., Ohio State University


Academic F-xnerinrsp.


DOROTHY


____~~ ____ .______I *






NEIL


V. BRANSTETTER. . . Instructor in Music
Pittsburg, Kansas
B. S., Kansas State Teachers College
M. A., Columbia University


Academic Experience:
Superintendent of Music, Coffeyville, Kansas
Panama Conservatory of Music, Panama, R. P.
Hobbies:
Home shop
Last Year:
Moved to cottage in Diablo.


KATHARINE


I. CLARK. . . . .
B. S., Columbia University
M. A., New York University


Librarian


Academic Experience:
New York School System, New York
Director of Private Schools in Istanbul, Turkey
Librarian Cairo School for American Children, Egypt.
Hobbies:
Cabinet Making, travel, and photography.
Last Year:
Trip to the States.


SHEPARD


D7


PICTURED


S. CLARK. .Instructor in Commercial Education
Elmira Heights, New York
B. S. New York University
M. A. New York University


RUBY


CRYER.


'Academic Experience:
National City Bank of New York City, New York
Rockville Center, N. Y.
Shelter Island, N. Y.
Hobby:
Tennis
Last Yept:
Oldest daughter graduated from Balboa High School in '53.


n.t





. . . Instructor in Physical Education .'. .


Saratoga, Texas
B. A. Sam Houston State Teachers College


Academic Experience:
Houston, Texas







GRACE


ELY. . .


B. S.


M. A.


. . Instructor in Physical Education
Colmor, N. M.
, New York University


, New York University


MOT

PICTURED


California


Oil painting, travel, photography.
Last Year:
First trip to United States since coming to the Canal Zone.


BEATRICE


GARDNER. . . . .
Westown, New York


Instructor in Art


B. S. Columbia University
M. A.; Columbia University
Graduate work, Columbia and Chicago Universities

Academic Experience:
State Teachers College, E. Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
Occupational Therapist US Army Hospital, New York
Hobbies:
Free lance writing and travel
Last Year:
Received honorable mention for block print; exhibited an
American Community Exhibit, Art Week.


NATALIE


JOHNSON. . . . . .
Brockton, Mass.
A. B.. Duke University
A. M. Duke University


Instructor in French


Academic Experience:
Florida State College for Women, Tallahassee, Fla.
Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fla.
Hobbies:
Reading, foreign movies, and traveling.
Last Year:
Trip to Ecuador.


GEORGE O.


Instructor in Biological Sciences


B. S., Iowa State College
A. M., Columbia University
Graduate work, Universities of Chicago and Southern Calif.
Academic Experience:


a


Academic Experience:
Ramona Union High School, Ramona,
Hobbies:


Sll







KENNETH


W. MARTIN. .


S Instructor in Physics


Warrensburg, Missouri
B. S., Central Missouri State College
M. A., University of Oklahoma


l Academic Experience:
Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Mo.
S.,.. Savannah Division of University of Savannah, Ga.
.i Florida State University, Tallahasesee, Fla.
Hobbies:
:-. Tennis and swimming.
.~ Last Year:
', Little son born Sept. 15, second child.






J. STUART McNAIR. .. . .Instructor in Mathematics
Winebega, Illinois
B. S. Knox College
M. S. University of Chicago
Graduate work, University of Wisconsin ..


Academic Experience:
University of Wisconsin
Sheboygan High School, Sheboygan, Wis.
Hobbies:
Travel, photography, and music


Last Year:
Elected President,
of Teachers.


Teachers Local


American Federation


,:4


SUBERT TURBYFILL. . Instructor in English and Dramatics
Norman, Oklahoma
B. F. A.; B. A.; M. A. University of Oklahoma
Graduate work, Columbia U., and Mich. State College
Professional Study, Rice School of the Theatre

Academic Experience:
Seminole High School, Seminole, Oklhoma
Carbondale Community High .School, Carbondale, Ill.
Balboa High School, Balboa, Canal Zone
Hobbies:
Gardening, free lance writing
Last Year:
Son (Dick) Sang in Carnegie Hall; Poem: "The Teacher's
Crowning Virtue," to be featured in Nat'1l Poetry Anthology
for 1953, (MAY)


KENNETH W.


VINTON. ..
Fond du Lac


. Instructor in Physical Sciences
. Wisconsin


A. B., Ripon College, Wisconsin
A. M., Columbia University
Graduate work. Universities of Wisconsin and Colorado


Academic Experience:











WARD


A.
A.
Graduate work,


urtsnI c tor in S parish


S., U tr t o b ask
B., University of Nebraska
M., University of Nebraska
Universities of Minnesota and Puerto Rico


JAMES


WOLF.


.Instructor in Physical Education


B. A ., Pennsylvania State College


Academic Experience:


Penn State College,


Milton Hershey School, Pa.
Hobbies:
Writing and Reading History


Last Year:
Published a novel


YAHOO.


WILLIAM


ZEMER. .
B. S.


Instructor in Physican Education
Ohio State


1 yr. Graduate work at Wash. State College


Academic experience:
Washington State College, Pullman,


Washington


Last Year:
Little girl born in January.


ROCHELLE


HEAD. . . . . . Office Secretary
Draughons Business College, Georgia


Hobby:
Reading


ALLEN


" ,;/1I""Eli" ",jl~E
x:. ,
*:" "i
ill
:"l"rB": 91


1_





YEARBOOK


STAFF


Editer & Business Manager


Final Copy


It goes like this


You dopes!


You made an error


































~ hr






'N

I, /







o ornmore


lGss


fI


cerj


Elias Entebi
Ann Edwards


. .. .. . . . .. . . . . . President
. . . . . Vice-President


Yvonne Kuperman


Secretary
Treasurer


Jack Pearson


CLASS


ADVISER


Mr. Lyons








ALFRED


ALEGUAS


"Freddy"
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Cristobal High School


*Football,


*Basketb


Staging in "Death Drums"
cal Collegian-1.


all, 1-2; *Baseball, 1-2;
-2; Sports Editor for Tropi-


"All-around athlete... Terrific personality
to know."


ADILIA


...Nice


ESTHER ARAUZ
"Adilia"


Panama City, Panama
Balboa High School


Basketball, 1-2; Volleyball,
Natural Science Society, 1-2;
Christmas Dance Committee,
Committee, 2; Ad Seller, 2; 1


; Gamma Chi, 2;
Spanish Club, 1-2;


2; Hallow
Jsher, 1-2.


green Dance


"Plenty of rhythm.
lasting friend."


... Magic in her feet... An ever-


ii
w ^ ij
4 K 4
^X^ K1 K X '


CATHERINE EVA BUDD
"Kit"
Brooklyn, New York
Cambridge High and Latin


Contributing Editor of Tropical Collegian,
Editor of Conquistador, 2.


"Interesting conversationalist.
Friendly."


Faculty


.. Nice to everyone...


KATHRYIN


JAYNE
"K 1


BUTLER


Washington, Pennsylvania
Balboa High School

Basketball, 1*-2; Softball, 2*; Volleyball, 2*;








SHIRLEY RUTH BUTLER
"Shirl"
Washington, Pennsylvania
Butler, High School


Gamma Chi,
Committee A


Dance Committee


Cheerleader,


Lounge


Christmas Dance


Committee


Halloween


"Nice to know... Fashion-wise... Noted for her pretty
red hair."


* i..Y
L i:


RUTH


NERY


CANEPA


"Mamy"
Panama City, Panama
Institute Pan-Americano

Spanish Club, 2.

"Good things come in small packages... Nice to know
...Friendry."


ED


WARD JOAQUIN CASTA]
"Big Ed"
New York City, New York
Jamaica High School


NO


Delta Psi Omega, 1-2; Natural Science Society, 2;
Spanish Club, 1-2; "Death in the Junior College",
1; "Death Drums," 2; "The Whole Town's Talking,"
1; Sophomore Banquet, 1; Christmas Dance Commit-
tee, 1-2; President of S. A. 2; Business Manager
and Assistant Editor of Conquistador, 1.

"The boss... Polite... Contagious laugh."


KATHRYN


ANN COLCLASURE
"Kathy"


Anadarko, Oklahoma
Anadarko High School


Basketb


all; 1&-2; Softball, 2*; Volleyball, 1-2*;


:, "
: ; ^ :







MARIAN LEE DORRIS
"Marian"
Norfolk, Virginia
Washington-Lee High School


Gamma Chi,


"The Whole T


"Death Drums", 2; Valentine Da
Christmas Dance Committee, 2.


'own's Talking",
since Committee,


"Has a smile for everyone..


.Loads of fun.


..Like-


ANN RUSSELL


EDWARDS


"Ann"
Panama C Lty, Panama
Balboa High School

Gamma Chi, 2; Delta Psi Omega, 1-2; "Murder
in the Junior College", 1; "The Whole Town's
Talking", 1; Vice-President of Sophomore Class,
2; Chairman of Christmas Dance Committee, 2.


"Has a quiet charm.
ing to help."


..Sparkling eyes... Always will-


ELIAS ENTEBI
"Eli"
Panama City, Panama
Balboa High School


*Football, 1-2;
ture Committee,


ClassPresident, 2;- Sophomore Pic-
2; Christmas Dance Committee. 2.


"Easy-going guy...Fun to be with...Fits into any
crowd easily."


ADA ELIZABETH FL
"Betty"
New York City, Ne'
Balboa High Sche

Softball, 2*; Volleyball, 1-2;


UMAC

v York
1ol


H


Gamma Chi, 1-2;








MA RGUERITE


ELLEN


"Babe"
Ancon, Canal Zone
Balboa High School

Basketball, 1-2; Softball, 2; Volleyball, 1-2;
ma Chi, 2; Cheerleader, 1-2; Lounge Con
2.


"Personality plus.
sports ability."


JOHN


N. GORHAM


.. Contagious laugh.


"Nick"
Ashland, Ohio
Balboa High School


*Football,


*Basketball,


2; *Baseball,


"Magnetic charm... Added to the girls' list of looks
... Someone to know."


PIu sy


GERALD


LUND HENDRICKSON
"Gerald"


Chicago, Illinois
Balboa High School


Natural Science Society; 2 Business Manager of Tropi-
cal Collegian 2; Make-up Editor of Conquistador 2.


"Friendly manner.


.. Casual ways. .A quiet lad.


RALPH


HULS


"Ralph"
Washington, D. C
Balboa High Schoo


*Football, 1-2; *Basketball, 1-2; "Th


,e Whole







VERNA ELAINE KELLY
"Elaine"
Los Angeles, California
Balboa High School

Basketball, 1*-2; Softball, 2; Volleyball, 1*-2*;
Gamma Chi, 1-2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Christmas
Dance Committee, 2; Halloween Dance Committee,
2; Lounge Committee, 2; Contributing Editor of
Tropical Collegian, 2.

"Likes a good argument... The gal with the "Brains"
S.. A lively wit. "


YVONNE KUPERMAN
"Ivoncita"
Cartagena, Colombia
Balboa High School

Basketball, 1-2; Softball, 1; Volleyball, 1-2';
Gamma Chi, 1-2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Natural
Science Society, 1-2; Class Secretary, 2; Hallo-
ween Dance Committee, 2; Business Manager of
Conquistador, 2; Business Manager of Tropical Col-
legian, 1.

"A dynamo of vitality... Always a smile for every-
one... Very sweet."


FELIX LARRINAGA
'Larry"
Ancon, Canal Zone
Balboa High School

*Baseball, 1-2.

"Latin lad with charm... Magnetic eyes that smile
.. .Swell friend."


VINCENT LEAVER
"Vinnie"
Colon, Panama
Balboa High School








SONIA


MENDIETA


"Sony"
Panama City, Panama
Institute Pan-Americano


Basketball, 2;
Natural Sciern


Gamma Chi,
:e Society,


2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2;
; Spanish Club, 1-2;
Staf


Halloween Dance Committee, 2; Advertising
of Conquistador, 2; Tropical Collegian Artist,


"Fun to know.
lass. "


Staff
1-2.


.. All-around artist... A likeable Latin


GEORGE


MICHAEL


METIVIER


"Mac"
Ancon, Canal Zone
Balboa High School


Manager of Football Team, 1; "Death
Photography Editor of Conquistador, 1;
of Tropical Collegian, 1.


Drums", 1;
Cartoonist


"The ready eye behind many of our snapshots.


going guy.


.Friendly."


. Easy-


,-. t ..f^ ^...,
.. .,
'l|'t;


SONYA MIGNON MORLEY
"Sonya"
Lincoln, Nebraska
Balboa High School

Volleyball, 2; Chief Artist of Tropical Collegian, 2.

"Ace in art... Blond bombshell... Sweet as sugar."


. fB.
*^ **,


WILLIAM JOHN NICKISHER
"Spider"
McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania
Balboa High School


b









JACK


HERBERT
"Herb"


Franklin,


PEARSON


Tennessee


Cristobal High School


Natural Science Society,

"A calm, quiet fellow..


2; Class Treasurer,


.Nice to know... Polite.


MARKELA


IRENE


PEREZ


"Macky"
Panama City, Panama
Institute Pan-Americano


Basketball, 1;
Theta Kappa,
Spanish Club,
legian, 1.


Volleyball, 1;


"A helping hand anyl
likeable senorita."


Gamma Chi, 1


Natural Science


Society,


Staff Writer for Tropical Col-

time...Well liked by all...A


5

RUSSELL EARL PIERSON
"Russ"
Ancon, Canal Zone
Balboa High School


Natural Science Soc
cal Collegian, 1;

"Talent in his finger
Sincere."


iety, 2; Feature Writer for Tropi-
Panama American Reporter, 1-2.

rtips... A pleasant guy to know...


EDGAR EUGENE PLUMMER
"Eddie"
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Wheaton College Academy


too









CARMEN


ROSA RECUERO


"Carmencita"
Panama City, Panama
Colegio de Maria Immaculada


Gamma Chi, 2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Natural Science
Society, 2; Spanish Club, 2; Christmas Dance Com-
mittee, 2.


"Fireball.. Friendly manner.
small packages."


GLORIELA


..Good things come in


ROSAS


"Cuty"
Panama City, Panama
Balboa High School


Basketball, 1*; Volleyball, 1*, Gamma Chi, 2;
Spanish Club, 1-2; Halloween Dance Committee, 2;
Christmas Daflce Committee, 2; Assistant Advertis-
ing Manager for Conquistador, 2.


"Naturally
meet."


nice. Sensational


smile. . Sweet to


JIMEE SUE SEATE
"Jimee"
Springfield, Missouri


ROBERT


Basketball, 1*; Softball, 1; Volleyball, 1?-2; Gam-
ma Chi, 1-2; Phi Theta Kappa, 1-2; Spanish Club,
2; "Death Drums", 2; S. A. Treasurer, 2; Art Edi-
tor for Conquistador, 2; Art Editor for Tropical COl-
legian, 1.

"Captivating personality... Always on the go. Bright,
sunny disposition."










CARL SIEVERS
"Bob"


St. Louis, Missouri


I. **


* t
\^








WENDALL


N. SPREADBURY
"Wendy"


*Football, 1; *Track, 1; Delta Psi Omega, 1-2;
NaturalScienceSociety, 1-2; "Murder in the Junior
College", 1; "The Whole Town's Talking"., 1;
"Death Drums", 2; Christmas Dance Committee,
1-2; Nocturnal Bird Migration Society, 2.

"As much fun as a barrel of monkeys... Always with
a sparkling grin... Very likeable fellow."


DOROTHY JANET STEARN
Jan"
Cumberland, Maryland
Allegany High School


"Neat as a pin... A likeable friendly newcomer...
Fun-loving personality."


WILLIAM GEORGE STEVENSON
"Bill"
Panama City, Panama
Bolles High School


*Football, 1; *Basketball, 1-2;
Polo, 1.


*Softball, 1;


Water


"As crazy as the day is long...Happy-go-lucky fel-
low... Friendly smile for all."


EDWARD NICHOLOS STOKES
"Nick"
Chicago, Illinois
Peekskill High School






I
Fi.


- -


IEXlkiY






ROBRIGO ALBARRSCIN "Roy"
Cartago, Costa Rica St. Mary's
High School, California.

A guy with a friendly smile.


JOHN ALBRITTON
Honda, Colombia
School.


"Johnny"
- Balboa


Favorite of all... .Wonderful friend
to have.


SALVADOR ALEGUAS "Sal"
Colon, Rep. of Panama, -Cristobal
High School.

A ready smile for everyone... A
ladies' man.


YOLA ISABEL
Panama, R. P.

Mischievous
know.


ARIAS "Yolita"
-Balboa High School


laughter


. . Fun


ERNESTO
Panama,


AROSEMENA
R. P. -La Salle


"Kiko"
. Panama


Short but brainy... Interesting fel-
low.


MARTA


IRENE


i BRID






JULIO


CABALEIRO


"Titi"


Panama, R. P. Riverside Military
Academy, Georgia.


A shy and quiet fellow.


THOMAS CAMERON "F
Long Beach, California,
High Washington, D. C.


tod"
Western


Quiet but
know him.


nice when


you get to


GERMAN CAG
Ancon, Canal


5TILLO


Lone


"Mon"


Wherever there are sports there you
find Mon.


TERESA CASTILLO "Teresita"
Panama, R.P. -ColegioInternacion-
al de Maria Inmaculada. Panama


Quiet but friendly.


..Nice to know.


AURORA CHAN "Lolita"
Ocu, Panama-Instituto Pan-Ameri-
cano, Panama, R. P.


Sweet.


..Nice to everyone


ADOLFO


CHANG


" Adolfo"


S- --- 3-T-------------------- Ft -- -


P i'Hlla~i ~






MABEL CHATBURN "Mae"
Guayaquil, Ecuador Balboa, High
School


Full of life.., Athletic


SUSIE


CHAVE


San Antonio,
High School,


Z "Suzie"
Texas-Sidney Lanier


s. A.


exas


"If you knew Susie


T&Kin3


tJlLA...


JOYCE
Panama


CHENALLOY "Cuquita"
, R. P. -Balboa High School


Intellectual... Friendly


ELVIA


CHUNG


Panama, R. P. Colegio Interna-
cional de Maria Inmaculada, Pana-
ma.

Talented... Tranquil manner


itL
* ..
id = =*i


HENRY C
Ancon, C
School

Wonderful
nature.


RUZ "Pep
anal Zone


e"
- Balboa High


personality. . Teasing


ERIC
f a .,


DELVALLE
. ~ Y n t T


"Tuturo"


- V


41>






RICHARD


DILLMAN


"Peaches"


Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa High
School.

High man in sports... A real swell
person.


ills


ROBERT


DOLAN


"Bob"


Asbury Park, New Jersey Balboa
High School.
Good things come in small packages.


JOHN


DRO


St. Louis,
School.


STE "Johnny"
Missouri Cristobal High


A motorcycle enthusiast.


MARILYN


JEAN


DUPUIS


"Mimi"


Woonsocket, Rhode Island-Mt- Ver-


non High School,


Virginia


Lots of vim and vigor.


CAMILO
Denver,
Panama.


ENRIQUE FEUILLET
"Popito"
Colorado Colegio Javier,


Pleasing ways and warm smile.


Ci can *
a
(ce^>*


Vl


( If


divivis






CAROLYN

Glendale,
School.


FITZPATRICK
"Caroline"
California Balboa High


Definitely an individualist, optimis-
tic... A dry wit.


PATRICIA


FOSTER


"Pat"


Middletown, New York-Balboa High
School

Quick-witted. .. A sparkle of delight .


GERALD


"Jerry"


Peoria, Illinois-Balboa High School.

A witty and sports-loving guy.


NANCY
Brockton,


High School.


CORA FULLER
Massachusetts


- Balboa


Nice to be with.
everyone.


RO[G GAMBOA


Panama


R. P.


..goes along with


"Cangri"
a Salle, Panama.


Ready to help a friend
know.


..Nice to


RAYMOND GARGUIS


"Rav"





-*
/Aj '\


GIBBS
Michigan


- Balboa


Quiet type.. .Really a wonderful
girl to know.


JOAN
Ancon,


GIBSON


"Joanie"


Canal Zone Balboa High


School.

C.Z.J.C. top joker.




HAZEL GRIFFITH


Colon,

Quiet.
fun.


R. P. Balboa High School.

..Nice to know and loads of












IRENE GUIZADO


Panama


R. P. Maria Inmaculada.


A quiet and likeable lass.


ERIC


HAGBORG


"P.B.


BritishHonduras-Balboa High School.

A quiet but nice guy.










JERRY HALSALL


Philadelphia,


Pennsylvania- Balboa


JANET
Detroit,
School.


,'i. *.l' '




. :: .' .
*^. ;,.s'k$V.


MOISES
Colon,
School.


HERE
R.P.,


S


"Moe"


- New Utrecht High


New York.


Ready to work.


..Friendly


Whe ie


a nice


k' HOJ
SoSa


MANUEL


HIDALGO


Santiago de Chile,
Nacional, Santiago,


Chile-Instituto
Chile.


411.


Jury
a- -1



JY Cy


A nice guy when you get


to know


LOWELL JONES
Stevens Point,
High School.

Quite a joker..
siastic.


"Jonesy"
Wisconsin


- Balboa


.friendly and enthu-


MARY


STUART


JONES


"Jonesy"


Alexandria, Louisiana-Perry Central
High School, New York

A lover of horses, men and people
in general.


SHIRLEY


KARST


Bellingham,
High School.


Friendly
know.


Washington


. . Well


- Balboa


liked


ARIANNE LINARES


.-


N @


*< .





ELIZABETH LOCKRIDGE "Beth"
Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa High
School.


Always willing to help.
alert.








DOLORES


..Full of pep,


LOWE


Panama, R. P. -
High School, Iow

Conscientious...
nice gal.


"Lolita"
Our Lady of Angels
'a.

quiet sort of charm


IMARY MALI
Washington,
School.

Mischievous,
tod lover.


LAN "1
D. C.


Merry"
- Balboa


fun-loving. A hot


VELMA
Ancon,
School.


MEDINA "
Canal Zone


Vel"
- Balboa High


Wonderful personality, cooperative
...never out of place.


CARL MEISSNER
San Francisco,
High School.


"Tubby"
California Balboa


A friendly and nice guy.


ROBERT


METIVIER


"Bob"


yo-


0
rIa~yeS..


K, K.: .K K -KK .K K K^. KKK : 3 $5^^^ ^-: KK KK^^ K'KKK 1K KKW ^






HECTOR MIRANDA


Panama R. P.


-Balboa High School.


Big boss II. . Intelligent,
life.


ka


- Balboa


full of










MORLEY


MARY
Lincoln,
School.


ADELIA
, Nebras


Likes tocutup... always a live wire.


ANNE MORI
High Point,
High School.


UILL "Annie"
North Carolina-Balboa


Nice to everyone... always a friend -
ly smile.


MARIA NAVARRO "Mariel"
Panama, R. P. Colegio Interna-
cionalde Maria Inmaculada, Pana-
ma.


Cute.


.. attractive personality.


VERN


NEAL


"Cammie"


Sheridan, Wyoming-E1Dorado High
School, California

A likeable newcomer a come
quick smile.


tDCrN4


CRousaoRs.


P/CS


WrEs T9KEA


HELEN


OSTER "Pat"


fiayin8


O u tdoos


reuos o


^osy


(Wt.L






CHARLES
Elmhurst,

Terrific .


RHEIN
Illinois


"Charlie"
- Army G.E.D.


S. An all around fellow


who's tops with all.


EVELYN
Ancon,


RINALDO
Canal- Zone


School.

Sweet little girl.


* Erie"
- Balboa High


.. very polite.


SENUS RIVERA
Panama, R. P. Colegio Intema-
cionalde Maria Inmaculada, Pana-
ma


One of Mr. Bowen's


many admirers.


RUTHERFORD


Ancon,
School.


RIVET


Canal Zone


"Sonny"
-Balboa High


C. Z.


5 *tt


* ENITH
David,


C. Bing Crosby


ROMERO


Panama


- Nuestra Senora de


Los Angeles, David, Panama.


A quiet and vivacious










ADDY S


newcomer.










;ANCHEZ


nabr


S* .




Hir ..M..._n- .... .'


KATHRYI
Canton.


N


SANDIDGE


"Kathy"


Mississippi-Hinds Jr.


lege, Mississippi.


The girl with a friendly smile...
Nice to know.


DORIS SIU
Pese, Panama-Instituto Pan-Ameri-
cano, Panama.

A little bundle of charm.


GILBERT'
Colon.


SMITH


Panama


"Gil"


, R. P. -Balboa High


School.

The quiet and friendly type to know


SMYSER


GRAIGE
Manila,
Institute.


Nice to all.


"Butch"


Philippine-Texas Military


.. quiet and friendly.


JACK
Ancon,
School,


TINNIN


"Tanan"


Canal Zone


- *. .-.=>. .
"* ..
j. i


- Griggs


North Carolina.


Weed fiend and a sport lover.


\:
1i.

,iS .;*


__ ___ ___ __ ____









vCi S it
vi~ifor


HUGH VANDERGRIFT
New York City-Balboa High School.

Full of fun... A whiz at math.


6oSqt SS


AUGUSTO VARELA "Chichi"
Panama, R.P.-BrownMilitary Acad-
emy, California.

Interesting conversationalist. .. A
subtle sense of humor.


JOSE VARELA
Panama, R.P. -
emy, Californi


Craz


but nice.


"I


Junior"


Brown Military Acad-
a.

... likeable.


JOSE VELAZQUEZ
Panama, R. P.-
Panama.


'^
*.; i
;i,


"Gabrielito"
Colegio Javier,


The guy with the subtle charms...
always pleasing.


WILLIAM WAESCHE
Balboa High School.


"Bill"


Gone but not forgotten... a friendly


ANN WEST


"Annie"






ELIZABETH WILKINSON


Ancon,
School.


Canal Zone


"Betty"


- Balboa High


Cute and likeable.


ARDIS WILLOUGHBY


"Ardie"


Scottsbluff, Nebraska-Cristobal High
School.

The friendly smile to all.


WILLIAM


WILLOUGHBY


"Will"


Scottsbluff, Nebraska- Cristobal High
School.

Slow and easy...Outstanding sports-
man.


DUNCAN
Panama,
Academy

Friendly,


WONG


R. P.


- Augusta Military


, Virginia.

helpful...


. .


an expert in art.


EDGARDO


Panama
Florida.


YCAZA


"Lenny"


R. P. Jesuit High School,


An easy-going guy, well liked by all.


NEW


STUDENTS


Jose Anibal Sitten
Thomas Alberte Sitton
Patt Walker


^::E ! ::: 4.^:" .'' :t"" ."l ^-',*'
./ ~ ~ ;; ",, *',iK' .i **' v ^ '** E '^"'***:


;:, ''


-* ,\~


ii 1 j
*^.IM i^'






A-rnea


Vtsee


G A.%\


1 6*


CATHERINE E. A. BUDD
Hooksett, N. H.
Education: Cambridge High and Latin School Louisi-
ana State Univ. 2 yrs.
Entered W. A. C. 8 Oct. '48 until 22 Dec. '50. Sta-
tioned: Fort Lee, Virginia, Fort Myer, Va., Fort
Clayton, C. Z. Assignment as General Cashier, Fa-
vorite Sport: Pistol Target Shooting, Future Plans:
Sociologist.


h sergeant


DONALD J.
Columbus
Education: Balboa High, 6
Entered U.S.A.F. 26 Marci
A.F. B. C.Z. Assignment:
ite Sport: Football; Future
at Ohio State.


DIVNEY
, Ohio
mo.
i '51, Stationed Albrook
Provost-Marshal. Favor-
Plans: Further Education


Scores

SO -

photo a


o a.


Ow. *


W:


Education: Lin
Nebr. 1 yr.
Entered U.S.A.
A.F.B. Texas,
A.F.B. Canal
Favorite Sport:
Officers School,


(


ILLIAM K. PARCHEN
Denver, Colorado
coln High, Lincoln, N


lebr.


Univ. of


.F. Jan. 31, '51 Stationed Lackland
Tyndall A. F. B. Florida, Albrook
Zone, Assignment: Provost-MarshaL
Jump Rope, Future Plans: U.S.A.F.
, Texas.


EDGAR EUGENE PLUMMER
Muir, Michigan
Education: Wheaton College Academy, Mich.
Entered U. S. A. F. 15 Aug. 46 until 15 Aug.
Stationed: Lackland A.F.B. Texas, Kessler A.
WlAiciTeinni r,"'rhanit A 1f R Til f-lnw4rrI A F R


. .
.








CHARLES L. RHEIN
Bath, Maine
Education: Rindge Tech, Cambridge, Mass. En-
tered U.S. Army 13 Aug. '50, Stationed: Fort Dix,
N. J., Camp Gordon, Ga., Fort Amador, Canal
Zone. Assignment, Criminal Investigation. Favor-
ite Sport, Snowball Fights, Future Plans: Further
Education at Hofstra College, Hempstead, N. Y.











STANLEY ROMBAUM
SN.Y. City, N.Y.
Education: Seward-Park High, N.Y., Fordham Col-
lege, N.Y. 1 yr. Entered U.S.A.F. 13 April '51,
Stationed: Sampson A. F. B., N. Y., Camp Gordon,
Ga., Albrook A. F. B. Canal Zone; Assignment:
Provest Marshal. Favorite Sport: Football, Future
Plans: To be one of N. Y. 's finest.


MICHAEL T. SUGRUE
San Francisco, Calif.
Education: Lincoln High, San Fran.
of San Francisco, 1 yr. Entered U.S
'51 Stationed: Lackland A. F. B. T
A.F.B. Florida, Brookley A.F.B. Ala.


, City College
K.A.F. 31 Jan.
'exas, Tyndall
Albrook A.F.


B., Canal Zone, Assignment: Provost-Marshal, Fa-
voriteSport: Spear Fishing, Future Plans: San Fran-
cisco Police Department.


JAMES E,
Vallego,
Education: Vallejo High
Entered U.S.A.F. Jan. 10


/TE.

FGh w


. WEBSTER
California
School, Vallejo J. C. 1 yr.
, '51, Stationed: Lackland


f -"-. --





































STUDENT


ASSOCIATION


The president of the Student Association,
I year. The other officers, Ralph Huls, ViP


tries; Jimee Sue Seate,


Edward Castano


S. was elected at the end of the 1952


ce-President; Anne Morrill and Betty Wilkinson,


Treasurer; were elected at the beginning of this school


Council members were elected at the beginning of this school year. Other reg
the Sophomore Class President, Elias Entebi and the Freshman Class President,
dent Association's Faculty advisor is Mr. McNair.


year.


Secre-


Other regular


lar Council members are
Dick Dillman. The Stu-


The first big event sponsored by the S. A. was a school picnic on Oct. 25 at the country home of
Edward Castano at Coronado Beach. This party was given in honor of the faculty, who had given the
students a beach party at Amador a short time before.


The S. A. decorated the Lounge with a tree and ornaments during the Christmas season. The S. A.
sponsored the Sophomore class Christmas Formal on Dec. 23, at the American Legion Hall in Fort Amador.
Ann Edwards was elected chairman of the Christmas Dance Committee.


On Friday, Feb. 13, the Spanish Club gave
at the Tivoli Hotel in Ancon. The dance was a 1
the Spanish Club.


The Freshman Spring Dance is to be give


a Carnival Dance sponsored by the Student Association,
tremendous success due to the hard-working members of


n on March 27 aftthe Army-Navy Club at Fort Amador.


The final affair of the year will be the huge Sophomore-Freshman Banquet which will be held in
thP RPlla Victa rnnmn at thp. l Panama Hntel nn May 1R 15 q.


school


u






























ear


00


Editor-in Chief


Charles Rhein


Asst. Editor


K. J.


Butler


Business Manager


Yvonne Kuperman


Secretary
Art Editor
Make-up


Velma Medina
Jimee Seate


Gerald Hendrickson


EDITORIAL


ASSISTANTS


Adilia Arauz
Catherine Budd
Mabel Chatburn
Pat Foster


Beth Lockridge
Sonia Mendieta
George Metivier
Hector Miranda


Sonya Morley
Gloriela Rosas
Michael Sugrue
Shirley Van Der Dijs


FACULTY


ADVISORS


ta











































"THE


SPANISH


CLUB"


The purpose of this Club is to promote good relations between Panamanians and North American
students in the Canal Zone Junior College. This Club held its first meeting on October 9, 1952.
The officers elected were the following: Miss Sonia Mendieta, President; Mr. Eduardo Castano,
Vice-President; Mr. Hector Miranda, Treasurer; Miss Markela Perez, Secretary. At the beginning
of the school semester the members of this Club had to elect a new president because Miss Mendieta
finished school in January. Later we had to elect another treasurer because Mr. Miranda resigned.
The new president is Mr. Morris Heres. The new treasurer is Mr. German Castillo.


This Club has held various activities during the year.


of Panamanian costumes. Our second activity was a Lunche
Mr. and Mrs. Hackett and Mr. and Mrs. Ward. Our third act
Folklore at a tea held by the Canal Zone College Club. O
tion (similar to the third one) at the Balboa Women's Club.
val Dance, which the Student Association put on through us.


The first activity was an exhibition


on at El Rancho, having as honor guests
:ivity was a presentation of Panamanian
ur fourth activity was another presenta-
Our fifth and last activity was a Carni-


The Carnival Dance was held on February 13, at The Tivoli Hotel. We also had a Carnival
Queen, who was Miss Markela Perez. The court was made up of Miss Shirley Van der Dijs, Miss
Dolores Lowe, Miss Beth Lockridge, and Miss Marilyn Dupuis.


v







GAMMA


President .
Vice-Presiden
First Semester
Second Semes
Secretary.
Treasurer .


. . . . . . Jinee Seate


t*
t


te . . . . . . . .. . -Sonia Mendieta
ter . . . . . . . Babe Flynn
. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . arian Dorris
.. .. Elaine Kelly


The Gamma Chi sorority is both a social and service club.


The Sophomore girls formed a sorority with thirteen members, in November, 1945 it received
official recognition and it was named Gamma Chi. The aims are to perform service and to promote
social life.


Throughout the year the members have sold sodas at the games, ushered at activities, and have done
other service for the college. The main service Gamma Chi has taken upon itself is the re-decorating
of the lounge.


In the beginning of the year a tea was held for all the women attending Canal Zone Junior College.
New members of Gamma Chi were initiated as a result of this tea. On November first the Halloween
dance was held in the upper gym. The dance was considered very successful by many although very little
profit was made. Another tea is planned in the near future.


CAMERA-SHY


GAMMA


MEMBERS


Marguerite Flynn

Betty Flumach

Beth Lockridge


Anne Morrill

Markela Perez

Carmen Recuero


Sonya Morley


Jimee Seate








esr&


GLORIELA


ADILIA


ROSA S


ARAUZ


SHIRLEY


BUTLER


ANN


EDWA RDS


MARIAN


KATHRYN


DORRIS


SANDIDGE


I,


ELAINE


KELLY


K. JAYNE BUTLER


JOYCE


CHENALLOY
'-I 's. "B:** .'-' ' :'.'


YVONNE


KUPERMA N


SONIA


MENDIETA


** *-.









































NATURAL


SCIENCE


SOCIETY


Founded in 1933, the Natural Science is sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Lee. The officers are
Yvonne Kuperman, President; Edward Castano, Vice-President; and Kathryn Colclasure, Secretary.


Meetings are scheduled monthly, and the activities have been varied. Films of the San Bias
Islands, the marine gardens in Florida, and other scenes have been presented by Wendall Spreadbury
and Kathryn Colclasure. A lecture concerning scientific names, their derivation, classification,
and origin was admirably presented by Dr. Graham Bell Fairchild, a noted entomologist. There
was a meeting in the home of Mr. Karl P. Curtis, a widely known archaeologist, who showed the
members his collection of interesting artifacts. Recently, a trip was made to the National Museum
of Panama, where members had an opportunity to observe historical relics of the 16th and 17th
centuries.


The tentative future plans of the Society include the following: an account of a voyage
through India, by Colonel Mallan; a talk about some phase of public health by Dr. Herald Trapido;
a trip to Barro Colorado, an ideal Isthmian island to observe nature in its full bloom; and a tour
through the Panama Canal. To conclude the year's activities, the members are invited to a won-
derful waffle party offered by the sponsors at their home.









































TROPICAL COLLEGIAN



One of the Canal Zone Junior College publications is the Tropical Collegian. This literary
magazine, published five times a year, presents articles, stories, poem, and news of the college
written by its capable staff members and also contains selections written by outside contributors.

Under the guidance of Dr. Dorothy Moody, the staff of the Tropical Collegian met each
Tuesday noon of the school year to discuss and solve problems, make assignments, and consider
suggestions for future issues.

As Editor of the Tropical Collegian, it was Betty Flumach's responsibility to set deadlines,
distribute assignments, confer with staff artists, and control the assembling and publishing of the
magazine. In charge of the technical and business managing was Gerald Hendrickson, whose capa-
ble handling of mimeographing and assembling helped the Tropical Collegian to a.successful year.
The members of the staff, artists, and typists all played important parts in cringing forth the maga-
zjne.

A special vote of thanks is due to Dr. Moody and Mr. Lyons' secretarial class for tneir capa-
ble guidance and help throughout the year.
ble guidance and help throughout the year.







































DELTA


OMEGA


Cast No. 138 of Delta Psi Omega was organized in 1943, and is a part of the largest national
honorary dramatic fraternity for junior colleges. Its purpose is to cultivate interest and improvement in
college dramatics.


To be eligible for Delta Psi Omega, one must have worked in three fields of dramatics: acting,
staging, and producing. One must also have completed one year of dramatics with acceptable grades.


This year's social activities included a Christmas dinner at the Tivoli Hotel, a dry-season picnic,
and the "Baccalaureate Breakfast" in honor of the graduating sophomore members.


Mr. Turbyfill is the faculty sponsor,
honorary member.


Dr. Moody is a faculty member,


and Mrs. Turbyfill is an


Officers for the year were Cast Director, Wendall Spreadbury; Stage Manager, Edward Castano;
and Business Manager, Ann Edwards. The other first semester members were Ronald Angermuller, Kay
Butler, Kathryn Colclasure. and Betty Flumach. There will be another initiation in the spring, when
many more students will be eligible to join.


















ri




S1 ^I

IlxI
EaIB I -^4


THETA


KAPPA


HONORARY


SCHOLASTIC


SOCIETY


On September 18, 1952, a meeting
electing the officers for the school year.
Jimee Sue Seate, Vice-President; Sonia
Mr. Subert Turbyfill as faculty sponsor.


g of Phi Theta Kappa members was called for the purpose of
The officers elected were: Edgar E. Plummer, President;


Mendieta,


Secretary;


Carmen Rosa Recuero, Treasurer, with


October 3, 1952 a closed initiation was held for all those who had accepted invitations for mem-
bership in Phi Theta Kappa. Katherine Colclasure, Elaine Kelly, Yvonne Kuperman, and Markela Perez
were initiated at the closed initiation ceremony.


The pledges will be welcomed into full fellowship at a public initiation ceremony to be held
February 27, 1953. Judge Guthrie F. Crowe will be our guest speaker. Ten new pledges, eligible for
membership at the beginning of the second semester will also be initiated. They are Betty Flumach,
Ruth Canepa, Helen Oster, Heliana Filos, Elvia Chung, Joyce Chenalloy, William Willoughby, Mabel
Chatburn, Hector Miranda and Charles Rhein.


Wednesday, March 25, the annual Phi Theta Kappa Banquet will be held at the Tivoli Hotel for
old and new members of Phi Theta Kappa.


In April,
with npelta Pdi fi


National Fraternity Day will be celebrated with a picnic.
n-btf -.^ -~ a


lmitU


A joint picnic will be held

















-5-






GLORIELA ROSAS will give the shorthand ability back to MR. LYONS.
JIMEE SEATE will leave her all-around abilities to SHIRLEY KARST.
BOBBY SIEVERS will leave his bitter love life to JERRY FOX.
WENDALL SPREADBURY will leave half of his wit (which will leave him with none)
to K, JAYINE BUTLER.
JANET STEARN will leave her millionaire boy friend to MERRY -MALLAN.
BILL STEVENSON will leave his tabula raca (empty head) to HENRY CRUZ.
EUGENE NICK STOKES will leave his girl friends to JOHN ALBRITTON.
ELAINE KELLY will leave her miniature Einstein brains to HELEN OSTER.
LARRY LARRINAGA will leave his care for nothing attitude to CAROLYN FITZPATRICK.
VINCENT LEAVER will leave his friendliness to DOLORES LOWE.
SONIA MENDIETA will leave her string of "amigos" to ADDIE SANCHEZ.
SONYA MORLEY will leave her artistic talents to GEORGE METIVIER.
JACK PEARSON will leave his secluded little world to GILBERT SMITH.
RUSSEL PIERSON will leave his JC column in the Panama American to PAT FOSTER.
MARQUELA PEREZ will leave her Phi Theta Kappa membership to JOYCE CHENNALOY.
EDGAR PLUMMER will leave his intellectual abilities to EUGENE LAU.
CARMEN RECUERO will leave her ability to make friends easily to EVELYN RINALDO.
KATHY'COLCLASURE leaves her sportmanship ability to MABEL CHATBURN.
SHIRLEY BUTLER leaves her dancing ability to SHIRLEY VAN DER DIJS.
ANN EDWARDS will leave her librarian's job to GERALD HENDRICKSON.
BETTY FLUMACH will leave her never-ending quest for new words to MARY ADELIA MORLEY.
ED CASTANO will leave his ability to give orders to HECTOR MIRANDA.
FRED ALEGUAS will leave his Latin sex appeal to his brother SALVADOR.
ADILIA ARAUZ will leave her pretty clothes to BETTY WILKINSON.
CATHERINE BUDD will leave her reserved lounge seat during lunch hour to TERESA CASTILLO.
ELIAS ENTEBI will leave his ability for doing everything to little DICK DILLMAN.
MARIAN DORRIS will leave her ability to cut class effectively to MARY STUART JONES.
St NICK GORHAM will not leave anything; he insists on taking it all with him.
f-" RALPH HULS will leave his super good looks to MIKE SUGRUE.
f YVONNE KUPERMAN will leave her co-operativeness to ANN MORRILL.





xI


* *
1 /h


.. .h.: 1. .
* "" : ::. "X > .h
* h'. *
LIHI
p.,I~


a?






C ... .
j ~ ~ ~i i" .*B ^
jy: .s ', {


I:;

f .:h .
'. '-?


^ *











BASKETBALL


Many of the men who represented Collegt during th
the Green and White in the Interscholastic Basketbal
the underdog Junior College trounced the stronger
three games played. Freddie Aleguas, top point-i
the basket consistently, and was chosen a member o
the season, In review, it was a very successful
superior coach, James Wolf.


e football season turned to the hardwoods for
1 League. Placing second in the final count,
high school of Balboa two times out of the
naker for the Green Devils, put the ball into
f the Honorary All-Zone Team at the end of
season for the Junior College Five and their


Standings


TEAMS
Cristobal


CZJC


Basketball is the last girl's intramural sport of the year. The intramural's captains chosen from
JC were Janet Gibbs, KathrynCoiclasure, and Mabel Chatburn. Basketball is just getting started as the
Conquistador goes to Press, and the All-Star team that will represent Junior College will be chosen on
March 28. Here's to a victorious season, girls!


------^^s ---L^-W-^'""^ \ -=_y -
BASE BA L
R _




BASEBALL









































VOLLEYBALL




Intramurals began a few weeks after school started and volleyball was the first sport on the
agenda. Enough girls signed up so that it was possible for Junior College to have two full teams.
The J. C. team, captained by Joan Gibson placed second in the intramural league.

The all-star team was chosen at the end of the season and although the representatives of
the Green and White did not win any of their games, they were especially proud when the final
score was 24-20.

All-Star Standings


TEAMS


CZJC







































Softall


Softball was the second sport event of the school year. This year's peculiar rainy season canceled
most of the games, so a Round-Robin Tournament was held. Shirley Karst's team got into the semi-
final but was beaten at this time.


Because of the condition of the Pan-Canal Train system, the softball all-stars did not travel to
Cristobal but played two games against Balboa; one against the high school A-League, and another
against the high school B-League.

All-Star Standing


TEAMS


BHS (A-League)
BHS (B-League)
n-- It.






































FOOTBALL

This year was not Very profitable for the outnumbered Junior College Football
Team; something to brag about, however, was the fact that they scored twice, a feat
which the stronger team of last year did not accomplish.

In the first game, against Cristobal, Carl Meissner, backed up by a strong line,
blocked a Cristobal punt which Went into the end zone, bringing home two points to
College. The second game against Balboa provided no such opening, however, and
College received a 20-0 defeat.

The scrappy Green Devils scored again in their third game with Cristobal. Two
minutes were all that remained between College's scoring and the ending gun. Bob
Dolan came through by catching a pass thrown by Freddie Aleguas, and driving into the
end zone to complete the most exciting play of the season.

Top coach, James Wolf, assisted by Bill "Get me India" Zemer, were the men
responsible for the fight in the team, and it was their true spirit that kept the team going
against insurmountable odds. This is the team future generations of Junior College
should not forget; they only had thirteen men.

STANDINGS
Team W L


























eer


ea


ers


"C-O-L-L-E-G-E, YEA, COLLEGE!" was the constant cheer we heard from the throats of our
eight tireless cheerleaders at every football and basketball game. Whether College was winning or losing,
these faithful girls were behind our teams, cheering them on, every minute of the games. Although the
attendance of college students at the games was small, our cheering eight were not discouraged, but
kept right on yelling to prove to all what true spirit really is: It is not the size of the dog in the fight,
but the size of the fight in the dogl









*t .1 E I
* *., .
~. gm . ..

S.

mm mm~ *.. m5


eC


0oo














So^y
rPo?'






















Most


uCC




























oJs


Sellecu


IRY














Km








I

I





I



























Act


IrnnnMr























It r ||
---- Friendliest"




,*/










PP
mH~ fatl II^&


.. / .5? .*
** / -





W I-est








8






Ta Ilen ted


Mos +




Mosr


AFhleFic


Ct
































C








Sjf




"-



r




S
KI


BST


PoP I Ar





U-o. w


"A


0*


Lo





LiK1 I
To


c C.


-C,


a^-r
^v^S.


IMe


Xst


CurAt I


^towV


F ^- f:!* ** *^^^^
'* .^ ^ ^ ^


Cu^COFvJL^



















ro


Al-


ArounD








Fri


0\i


esl


QCt


bAS


*~
x"x
:::""
0
.


x x : :
0il:
h. *^i


__ _


v~o 0^r\/




Mo


TA M-t;-e.


C)


\,,s"t At Hlet ic





^jft^W^Q^- W~sALwn


tCE


^^-O^XaXBL^


J^^Lo9






COLLEGE


LOUNGE


Pat Foster


Our lounge is a wonderful" place
Where cokes can be drunk by the
Where lunches and snacks
Are consumed amid facts
Of history and who sets the pace.


case


This lounge can be bothersome too
When we raise up a hullabaloo
The teachers complain
While the students refrain
And are quiet a moment or two.


In all, it's our very own lair
Where smoke takes the place of the air
Where we study and strain
And work 'til we gain
A knowledge of life's wear and tear.


FRUSTRATIONS


A STUDENT


Kathryn Ann Colclasure


She started to cry
As I passed by,


So I stopped to


what had happened.


She pulled her hair
And started to swear,
And her spirits, I gathered,


were dampened.


She began to weep
And tears, in a heap,
Fell at her feet on the floor.


She uttered a sob
As she turned the knob
And beat on her locker door.


She shouted a curse
(Which was most adverse)
Hers was a state of frustration.


But I understood,
As most anyone should;
c' Ai/ Cn ..an ttt hra m inrh nn nn t


t-z- -%~




__


ASC
SB E F





The Snooping Conquistador




I just went snooping into the annuals of the
past and found some things that are going to interest
us now in the present. I was not allowed enough space
to tell all the things that happened to the graduates
of 1953, so I just picked a few choice bits from their
biographies:

Zt A '4 KINDERGARTEN: Vinnie Leaver's mother got partial
relief- -Vin started kindergarten... Ralph Huls's teach-
er picked him up and set him on her knee because
she thought he was just too cute for words...

FIRST: Ed Castano had a big letter "A" hung on his
ear so that he would learn the alphabet... Shirley
Butler cried and cried when she found out that there
wasn't any Easter Bunny...Elias Entebi got a black-
eye from a girl because he didn'thave the arithmetic
homework...

THIRD: Betty Flumach wrote backwards, starting at
the left edge of her paper. Sonia Morley had to sit
in the wastepaper basket for talking... Adelia Arauz
had to stand in the corner for eating peanuts during
the reading class and she got a triangular forehead...

-LP FOURTH: Ann Edwards was the daisy in the annual
school play... Kathy Colclasure got pushed in a gar-
bage can head first. Jack Pearson put a cricket in
the teacher's inkwell... Elaine Kelly asked the teach-
er if she had false teeth...

SFIFTH: Freddie Aleguas had to stay in for imitating
Don Juan in a sword fight because Freddie was using
his ruler.. Yvonne Kuperman tried to hide her dog
under her desk...

SIXTH: RussellPierson got a spanking when somebody
else should have. Markela Perez got punished for
A f sticking her blackjack gum on her teeth and then
grinning at her classmates... BillStevenson was made
4a E janitor of the third and fourth grade rooms...


/l 14 SEVENTH: Nick Stokes cried when a little girl kissed
S____ him... Jimee Seate always was terrifically ill until
after it was too late to go to school...
~s A


c^


~LTII I IlrVm













EIGHTH: Gloriela Rosas got caught sliding down the
school banister. Edgar Plummer found out that he
was going to be commencement speaker so he threat-
ened to quit school...


NINTH: WillNickisher was well known as the current
dream boy of the junior high set... Catherine Budd
did a ballet off the end of the stage in the school
play...


TENTH: George Metivier's name was misspelled as
Georgia on the teacher's list so he was seated with
the girls on the first day.. .Sonia Mendieta got lost
in the big high school building and ended up in the
principals office...


ELEVENTH: Wendall Spreadbury was all ready to
lead the flag salute when he forgot it... K. Butler
got caught reading a comic book under her copy of
Evangelme.


TWELFTH: Gerald Hendrickson had the last of his
baby diseases--the measles.. .Babe Flynn had a spe-
cial seat reserved in front of the principal's office for
throwing toy lizards in the study hall... Marian Dorris
wrote a revised edition of ROMEO AND JULIET,
featuring herself as Juliet...


COLLEGE FRESHMEN: Merry Mallan got a note
from the dean for taking 13 class cuts... Larry Larri-
naga got his schedule mixed up and appeared at the
girl's gym class the first time it met...Janet Steam
tried to reserve a room in the boy's dorm, no soap...
Nick Gorham was afraid of all the college girls so he
tried to blow himself up in the lab.


ggt5 WI


COLLEGE SOPHOMORES: Vinnie, Ralph, Carmen,
Bob, Betty, Sonia Morley, Ed, Shirley, Elias, Ann,
Russell, Adilia, Kathy, Jack, Elaine, Fred, Yvonne,
Markela, Bill, Nick, Jimee, Gloriela, Edgar, Will,
Kathyn., George, Sonta, Wendall, K. Jayne, Gerald,
Babe, Marian, Larry, Nick G., Janet and Merry all
signed their own diplomas...


*~ r r L' a -"rf s 5


~c~c


Ifr-
Jl^^hB ^


II


fIllr n I|





Miscelaneous


Delayed homework


So what?


Que rice el mambo


The blues


Class cuts


:"X




Full Text

PAGE 2

IIfCi -rvr:r RrSD iL TIL Ca,CUIS'IPL'CR 1953 DATE DUE

PAGE 8

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive org/detai Is/co nqu i stado r1953cana

PAGE 9

CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE SAL BOA ,CANAL ZONe

PAGE 10

4

PAGE 13

DEDICATION This Yearbook is dedicated to a world without war, in the confident and firm r eso lv e on our part to make a peaceful world. "You, the gradua tes, are now enter ing a harsh world, full of tribulations" has been said so often that it has become trite. The meaning. however, still ho l ds, especiall y today, when we face the terrifying threat of World War III, which could easily destroy all existing civilizations. While recognizing the many obstacles which clutter the road to peace, we still feel that th e people of th e wo rld working togethe r, may e ffect the constructive development of peace. The refore. we do humb l y dedicat e th e 1953 Yearbook to the thing we want above all others-a world without war. 7

PAGE 14

8 To the Graduates Of If college gr;lduates of the post-World War II era develop split personalities, it may be argued that" the state the world is in" is the cause thereof. On the one hand it appears that world is clam-0ring for their services at rates of pay. even considering the reduced purchasingjOWer of the dollar, that woul have been thought fantastic not so long ago. The problem of .. getting a srart," bugaboo of many generations of cOllege graduates. therefore no longer need bother them. From an economic point of view their future looks at least m'oderately secure, not to say rosy. But on the other hand we are assured by supposed authorities that there hangs over them the ominous shadow of a terrible World War llI, which might well result in the "total destruction" of all life on the planet, and even the planet itself. Such dire predictions as these naturally tend to make the hypothetically economically secure future of rhe college graduates of today look rather less secure! Under the circumstances perhaps no one can blame them if there devel ops among them an epidemic of sch izophrenia But pe r haps the danger to all of us as indiViduals, and to western civilization as such, is not as great as it may seem. Maybe we are not all in imminent danger of extermination or enslavement after all! At any rate several lines of arguments can be adduced in support of this view, to wit: L The argument of progress, or historical continuity. On the whole, man has progressed marvellously in the last few centuries in bettering his standard of living and attaining a good measure of personal, political, and religious freedom. It is unreasonable to suppose that the whole uend of modern history will now be reversed for any considerable period of time. 2. The argument of strength. A potential aggressor is not likely to attack any nation unless it is reasonably sure o f a quick and easy victory. As long as the United States "keeps its guard up" (against both external and internal enemies) it is doubtful if any enemy ever can (Within the foreseeable future) feel such an assurance. 3, The a rgument of unreasonableness of possible" total destruction," Despite the admitted power of atomic and hydrogen bombs, it is unlikely that their use will ever bring TOTAL destruction and loss of all life over ANY considerable area, still less that it will result in the "vaporizing" of the earth. At the worst the unrestrained use of such terrible weapons would indeed deal a heavy blow to our civUization, but it would assuredly not be a fatal one. 4. Tht:: argument of false prophecy. Americans are famous for

PAGE 15

the Class of 1953 their "calamity-howling Indi.viduals not yet old can easily remember various times in the past when publicists wer e prophesying dire thingswhich never came to pass. A sea r ch of United States pe r iodical literature of almost any ten year pe riod would reveal statements to the general effect that the country was never in such a mess and/or such danger before and that the only thing certain was that "things" were going to be worse soon, and probably never would be 'any better I Foreign travellers early noted this propensity of Americans to look roo intently at the dark side of the socio-economic-political picture. Thus Charles Dickens in his MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, published in 1844, records that the title characte r of the book heard a casual American acquaintance declare that the United States was then" at a season of great commercial depression, "in a period of unprecedented s tagnation, and in the midst of "an alarming crisis." The author then "adde d that "Martin knew nothing about America, or he would have known perfectly well that if its individual citizens, to a man, are to be believed, it always is depressed, and always is stagnated, and always is at an alarming crisis, and never was otherwise: though as a body they are ready to make oath upon the Evangelisrsatanyhow of the day or night, that it is the most thri ving and prosperous of all counuies on the habitable globe .. Possibly the "al arming crisis" that the United States was in in 1844(as recorded by Dickens) was just as significant to the people of that day as the" alarming crisis" that the American people are in now is to 1953 Ame rican s And just as the 1844 "c risi s was presently resolved, it ma y well be that th e 1953 one will fare equally well. So, to the graduates of th e Class of 1953, I say be of good cheer "Things" are not really so bad as some would have you believe--any more than they were in the time of Dickens' first visit to the United States more than one hundred yea r s ago. It is entire l y possible that no member of the class will live to see another World War (on the scale of the ones of 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, that is), and that he will liv:e oU[ his life in peace and comfort and maybe even be on hand to attend the Seventy-fifth Reunion of his Canal Zone lunior College c lass in 2028! 9

PAGE 16

10 The ed itor of the CON QUIST ADOR has honored me by allotting me this space in which to write of my wo r k as Dean of Women. This assignment is difficult for me in that I usually think of myself as a mere teacher rather than as a dean. And certainly I have little in common with the Olympian beings I knew--or did notknow--in my own college days. Full of aplomb. these magnificant per sonages remained isolated in p rivate offices with secretaries to stand bet ween them and the bu!'tling academic world outside. My own office, shared with ::Dean 0/ Women f rien dly colleagues, is no such SANCTUM SANCTORUM Ther e peop l e d rift--or b urst-in and o ut at a ll ho urs, without be'nefit of appointment. Whole come: the TC staff. to have a lively -no t to say raucous --meen n g there; wo r kers on the yearbook, to tear their hair over crises of finance or photography; an entire class ( i t seems) to do some last cramming be fate a test Individuals appear: a teacher or a pupIl, to. use the dictionar y o r the ancient t ypew r i t e r ; a student, to read the nonces on the bulletin boards to bo rrow books. o r to ask for help with problems of many kinds : personal, academic, vocational social, literar y; an alumna, to talk over experiences in college in the United States in a job, or in marriage. Seldom is the atmosphere orde rly and formal. Yet I do not envy the lofty deans of my student years, in their lonely offices, behind their uncluttered mahogany desks. Nor d o I object to bein g a teacher as well a s a dean. The teacher, I feel, helps to keep tfie dean human. True, ther e are many frusuations and disappointments in teaching, for both the teacher and the taull h t The ins tr uctor often fails to win the student's interest and cooperanon, and adds nothi n g to his knowledge; but the successes are frequent enough to make the struggle exhilarating. and the teacher has many good memories. Alumni write reassuring letters: one, that he has heard the r eadings of JOHN BROWN'S BODY, anothe r that she has been to hear DON JUAN IN HELL; one that she is absorbed b y lectures on eXistentialism anothe r that he has visited the homes of Longfellow and Eme r son; one, that she has he en nominat ed for a Ford Foundation scholarship, another that she is serving in a Quake r Work Camp in a war-devastated country. Other forme r students drop by: a girl, now a nun, who will devote her life to teaching the underprivileged; a man, now a dentist, who is ministering to the natives in the Interior of Panama; a young woman, an honor student in her day. now a mother, interested in children's literature. So as both dean and teacher, I thoroughly ag ree wit h the Cler k of Oxford, of whom Chaucer said. "Gladly wolde he Ierne. and gladly teache." I have learned a g reat deal from members of the C l ass of 1953 (one of them, indeed, is really my teacher and an exc ellent one. in Spanish!) and I have taught them gladly. May they p ro sper in future years, and, like their predecessors, from time to ti m e WIite to us who hold the fort at CZJC, or better still, come back t o v isi t us!

PAGE 17

The Conqui s tador e d itor asked me t o wr i t e s omething in a hum o rou s vein about the work of a Dean of M e n. The first response that Deems to me is that such work might have more humorous aspects if I were to swap jobs with tqe Dean of Women, but that approach strikes me as bor -rather To tell the truth. I don't feel that there is mu c h humor a ttac hed to the job of co un -selingstudents. and counseling is the primary work of a Dean of Men. There is a widespread belief that s c hool day s are a carefree, irresponsible time of life, punctuated by song, laughter, and delight ful interludes of puppy love. I doubt that that ha s ever been true 'except in the minds of harassed adults into the pa s t for brighter moments than the present affords. Certainly it does not seem to be true of ow college students today Never before have they seemed to need more desperately the same three things that we adults spend a lifetime suiving for: affection. security, and freedom. And never before have those goals been more difficult to attain. Working mothers, inflated prices, and the uncertainty of world conditions all conspire to create an armosphere of instability and, in some students, a feeling of hopelessness This in turn breeds indifference to and neg-1ect of scholastic opportunity It's when a student feels he has reached the end of his own resowces in uying to solve a problem, emotional or scholastiC, that the work of a Dean of Men begins, If the problem is scholastiC, he may not want to go to the teacher involved. He knows the cards may well be stacked against him--and for good reason. The Dean of the College is a busy administtator, and most students would hesitate to encroach on his time. Between these two, the teacher and the Dean, stands the Dean of Men. He is the neuual "sounding-board" to whom the confused student confides his problems and airs his grievances, often finding welcome catharsis by putting into words the thinss that have been distwbing him. Many times mat is all he n eeds-Just an opportunity to talk things out without fear of ridicule or censwe. Sometimes the problem has a solution; othe r times the student simply has to learn how to live with and adjust to a home or college condition that he does not like. There are times, too, when the cold, hard realities of life need to be driven home to a self-pitying student. It is not only the Dean of Men who does this kind of counseling. Every teacher worthy of the name does it easily and natwally, considering it an integral part of his job. There are times, however, when a student lilte to talk to someone whom he does not know so well as his teacher, or to someone who he feels may have information not in the immediate possession of a classroom teacher. That's when he drops in to see the Dean of Men. At least, that is the way I think of my job. As you can see it doesn't have many humorous aspects. 11

PAGE 18

ThaIS for the birds

PAGE 21

ROGER C. HACKETT.. . .......... Dean Marion, Kentucky A. B. Indiana University A. M. Harvard University Graduate work, Oxford University A c ademic Experience: Bosse School, Evansville. Ind. Dean, Pmeland Jun ior College, Salemburg. N. C Hobbies: Tennis, travel. movie photography Last Year: Twenty-fowth year in academic wor k DR. DOROTHY MOODY Ins tru ctor in English, De an of Women J ohnson COUnty. Kans a s B. A University of Kansas M. A Yale Univer sity Ph. D. Yale University A ca demic Experience: University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas Hobbi es: Reading, writing. travel, pet cat Last Year: Bought phonograph and began collection of classic al records; studied Spanish. JAMES A. LYONS Instructor, Commercial Dept . Dean of Men Peru, New Yor k B. S. New York Univers i ty M. A New York University Graduate work, Columbia University Academic Experience: U n iverSit y of Puerto Rico, P R. Hunter College. New Y o r k City. N. Y. Port Washington. Long Isl a n d, N. Y. Hobbies : F ree lance writing Last Year: Moved to in Ancon ; Obse r ved Psychological Studies, Testi ng and GUidance Laborato r y N. Y. C . N. Y. CHARLES R BOWEN .. Instructor in History and Social Science Logan, Ohio B. S . B a ldwin Wallace College M. S . Ohio State University Acad emic Castle Heights Militray Academy. Lebanon, Tenn. Avia t ton Technical Training US Navy. US Air Force. Hobbies: Boating Las t Yea r : Daughter Elizabeth Ann born December 23, 1952. 15

PAGE 22

16 NEIL V. BRANSTETTER ..... Instructor in Music Pittsburg. Kansas B S .. Kansas State Teachers College M. A. I Columbia University Academic Experience: Superintendent of Music, Coffeyville, Kansas Panama Conservatory of Music, Panama, R. P. Hobbies: Home shop Last Year: Moved to cottage in Diablo. KATHARINE I. CLARK.. . . . . Librarian B. S .. Columbia University M. A . New York University Academic Experience : New York School Syste1ll, New York Di r ector of Private Schools in Istanbul, Turkey Librarian Cairo School for American Children, Egypt. Hobbies: Cabinet Making, travel, and phorography. Last Year: Trip to the States. NOT PICTURED SHEPARD S. CLARK .. InsttuctOI in Commercial Education Elmira Heights, New York B. S. New York University M. A. New York University "Academic Experience: National City Bank of New York City, New York Rockville Center, N. Y. Shelter Island, N. Y. Hobb y : Tennis Last Year: Oldest daughter graduated from Balboa High School in 53. RUBY CkYER. . . Instructor in Physical Education Saratoga, Texas B. A. Sam Houston State Teachers College Academic Experience: Houston, Texas Crowley. Louisiana Hobby: Golf

PAGE 23

NOT PICTURED GRACE C. ELY ....... Instructor in Physical Education Colmor. N. M. B. S New York University M. A . New York University Academic Experience: Union High School, Ramona, California travel. photography. first trip to United States since coming to the Canal Zone. BEATRICE S. GARDNER ........... Instructo r in Art Westown, New York B. S. Columbia University M. A.; Columbia University Graduate work, Columbia and Chicago Universities Academic Experience: State Teachers Colles,e, E Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania Occupational Theraplst US Army Hospital, New York Hobbies: Free lance writing and uavel Last Year: Received honorable mention for block print; exhibited an American Community Exhibit, Art Week. NATALIE JOHNSON. . . . . Instructor in French Brockton, Mass. A. B., Duke University A. M. Duke University Academic Experience: florida State College for Women, Tallahassee, Fla. Florida State Universiry, Tallahassee, Fla. Hobbies: Reading, foreign movies, and traveling. Last Yea r : T r ip to Ecuador. GEORGE O. LEE ....... Instructor in Biological Sciences B. 5 Iowa State College A. M., Columbia Universit y Graduate work, Universities of Chicago and Southern Calif. Academic Expe ri e nce : Principal, Ida Grove High School, Iowa St Mary's College for Men. Winona. Minn. University of New Hampshire, Isle of Shoals, N.H. Hobbies: Animal behavior photography, carpentry, and travel. Last Year: Summer vacation in own cottage, Iowa 17

PAGE 24

18 KENNETH W MAR TIN. . Instructor in Physics Warrensburg I Missouri B. S .. Central Missouri State College M. A .. University of Oklahoma Academic Experience: Wentworth Military Academy. Lexington, Mo. Savannah Division of University of Savannah, Ga, Florida State University. Tallahassee, Fla. Hobbies: Tennis and swtmming. Last Year: Little son born Sept. 15, second child. 1. STUART McNAIR. . . .. Instructor in Mathematics Winebega, Illinois B. S. K nox College M. S. University of Cbicago G raduat e work, University of W isco nsin Academic Experience: University of Wisconsin Sheboygan High School. Sheboygan. Wis. Hobbies: Travel, photograph y and music Las t Year: Elected PreSident, Teachers Local 227, American Federation of Teachers. SUBERT TURBYFILL .... Instructor in English and Dramatics Norman, Ok lahoma B F. A.; B. A.; M. A. University of Oklahoma Graduate work, Columbia U .. and Mich. State College Professional Study, Rice School of the Theatre Academ ic Experience; Seminole High School. Seminole. Oklahoma Carbondale Community High Catbondale, Ill. Balboa High School. Balboa, Canal Zone Hobbies: Gardening, free lance writing Last Year; Son (Dick) Sang in Carnegie Hall; Poem: The Teachers Crowning Virtue," to be featured in Nat'l Poetry Antholog y for 1953. (MAY) KENNETH W. VINTON ... Instructor in Physical Sciences Fond du Lac, Wisconsin A. B .. Ripon College, Wisconsin A. M., Columbia Universit y Graduate work, Universities of Wisconsin and Colorado Academic Experience; Clintonville High School. Clintonville, Wisconsin Beloit High School, Beloit, Wisconsin Cristobal High School. Cristobal, C. Z. Hobbies: Exploring, mineral collecting, hunting for archaeological sites, and gold panning. L::tst Year; Oldest daughter attending University of Wisconsin.

PAGE 25

ALLEN B. WARD. . . . . . Instructor in Spanish A. B .. University of Nebraska A. M . University of Nebraska G r aduate work, Universities of Minnesota and Puerto Rico J A MES L. WOLF. . ... InstructOr in Phy s i ca l Education B. A .. Pennsylvania State College Academi c Experience: Penn State College, Milton Hershey School, Pa, Hobbies: Writing and Reading History La s t Year: Published a novel THE YAHOO WILLIAM E. ZEMER . . Instructor in Physican Education B. S Ohio State 1 yr. Graduate work at Wash. State College Academic experience: Washington State College, Pullm an, Washi ng ton Last Year: Little gir l bam in Januar y ROCHELLE HEAD ..... ..... , Office Secretary Draughons Business College, Georgia Hobby: Reading Not pictured GERTRUDE ONDERDONK ... Assistant Librarian Mount Vernon, New York Nurser y School T r aining Columbia Univ. Academ ie Experience : K inde rganen Ca nal Z.one School System H o bby: Hou se in E l Valle 19 NO .MOTO

PAGE 26

YEARBOOK STAFF Editer & Business Manager You dopes! You made an error 20 The headless d r aftsman

PAGE 28

Elias Entebi Ann Edward s Yvonne Kuperman Jack Pearso n . 22 CLASS ADVISER Mr. Lyons ... President Vice-President Secretary Treasu rer

PAGE 29

ALFRED ALEGUAS "Fredd y Cristobal, Canal Zone Cristobal High School -Football, 1-2; 'Bask etball, 1-2; 'Baseball, 1-2; Staging in "Death Drums -2; SporUEditoI for Tropical Co1legian-1, All-around athlete. Terrific personalit y ... Nice to know ADILIA ESTHER ARAUZ "Adilia" Panama City, Panama Balboa High School Basketball, 1-2: Volleyball, 1; Gamma Chi, 2; Natural Science Society 1-2 ; Spanish Club, 1 -2 ; Christmas Dance Committee, 2 ; Halloween Dance Committee, 2 ; Ad Seller, 2 ; Usher 1-2. "Plenty of rhythm .... Magic in her feer .. A n everlasting friend. CATHERINE EVA BUDD "Kit" Brooklyn, New York Cambridge High and Latin Contributing Editor of Tropical Collegian, 2; Faculty Editor of Conquistador, 2. Interesting conversationalist ... Nice to ever yone . Friendly . KATHRYIN JAYNE BUTLER "K" Washington, Pennsylvania Balboa High School Basketball, 1'-2; Softball. 2 ; Volleyball, 2 ; GammaChi,2; Delta Psi Omega, 2; "Death Drums, 2; "The Whole Town's Talking" 1; Popularity Chairman of Conquistado r 2; Humor Editor of Tropical Collegian, 2; Assistant Editor of Conquistador, 2 "The talkative type ... Loves to cut up . Lively wit ... 23

PAGE 30

24 SHIRLEY RUTH BUTLER "Shirl" Washington, Pennsylvania Butlet, High School Gamma Chi, 2; Cheerleader, 2; Christmas Dance Committee 2; Lounge Committee 2; Halloween Dance Committee 2. "Nicetoknow ... Fashion-wise .. Noted for her pretty red hair." RUTH NERY CANEPA "Mamy" Panama City. Panama Instituto Pan-Americana Spanish Club, 2. "Good things come in small packages ... Nice to knOW' ... Friendly. EDWARD JOAQUIN CASTANO "Big Ed" New York City, New York Jamaica High School Delta Psi Omega, 1-2; Natural Science Society, 2; Spanish Club, 1-2; "Death in the Junior College", 1; "Death Drums," 2; "The Whole Town's Talking," 1; Sophomore Banquet. 1; Christmas Dance Committee, 1-2; President of S. A. 2; Business Manager and Assistant Editor of Conquistador, 1. .. The boss . Polite ... Contagious laugh . KATHRYN ANN COLCLASURE "Kathy" Anadarko, Oklahoma Anadarko High School Basketball; 1'-2; Softball, 2'; Volleyball, 1-2'; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Delt4 Psi Omega, 2; Natural Science Society, 2; "The Whole Town's Talking", 1; ."Murder in the Junior College"" 1; "Death Drums". 2; Feature Editor of Tropical Collegian, 1 .. Talented ... Conscientious ... Sure to get ahead in life .

PAGE 31

MARIAN LEE DORRIS "Ma r ian" Norfolk Virginia Washington-Lee High School Gamma Chi, 1-2; "The Whole Town's Talking", 1; "Death D r ums". 2; Valentine Dance Committee, 1; Christmas Dance Committee, 2 "Has a smile for everyo ne ... Loads of fun ... Likeable. ANN RUSSELL EDWARDS Ann" P a n a ma C ty I Panama B a l b o a H ig h Schoo l G amma C h i 2; De lta Psi Omeg a 1-2; "Murde r in the J unio r Co ll ege". Ii "Tne Whole Town's Talking". 1; V ice-Pr esident of S op h omore Class, 2; Cha ir man of C hristmas Dance Committ ee, 2. "Has a q u iet charm ... S p a r k lin g eyes ... Alw ays willing t o h e lp, ELIAS ENTEBI Eli" Panama City. Panama Balboa High School Foot ball, 1-2; Class P resident, 2; Sophomo r e PictureCommittee. 2; C hrist mas Dance Committee, 2. "Easy-goi n g guy ... Fun to be with . Fits into any crowd e a sily ... ADA ELiZABtTH FLUMACH B e tty" New Yor k City, New Yor k Balboa H ig h Sc h oo l Softball, 2; Voll ey b all, 1-2; Gamma Chi 1-2; D elta Psi Omeg a, 2; "Murd e r i n th e Juni o r College", 1; "TheWh o l e Tow n 's Talki n g 1 ; Death Dru ms" 2; Tr o p ical Co llegia n Edit o r 2. "Neve r a t a loss for words ... F ull of vim a n d vigor ... Friendl y 25

PAGE 32

26 MA RGUERITE ELLEN FLYNN "Babe" Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa High School Basketball. 1-2; Softball. 2; Volleyball. 1-2; Gamma Chi, 2; Cheerleader, 1-2; Lounge Committee 2. "Personality plus ... Contagious laugh ... Outstanding sporlS ability. JOHN N. GORHAM "Nick" Ashland. Ohio Balboa High School "Football. 2; "Basketball. 2; "Baseball. 2 "Magnetic charm_ . Added to the girls' list of looks .. Someone to know ... GERALD LUND HENDRICKSON "Gerald" Chicago. lllinois Balboa High School Natwal Science Society; 2 Business Manager of Tropical Collegian 2; Make-up Editor of Conquistador 2. "Friendly manner . Casual ways ... A quiet lad." RALPH M. HULS "R alph" Washington. D. C. Balboa High School "Football. 1-2; "Basketball. 1-2; "The Whole Town's Talking" I 1: "Death Drums, 2; Class VicePresident, I; Valentine Dance Committee, l. "Good looking ... Slow and easy ... Quiet. likeable lad.

PAGE 33

VERNA ELAINE KELLY "Elaine" Los Angeles, California Balboa Hi gh S chool Basketball 1 '-2; Softball, 2; Volleyball, 1'-2'; Gamma C h i, 1-2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Christmas Dance Committee, 2; Halloween Danc e Committee, 2; Lounge Committee, 2; Contributing Edito r of Tropical Collegian, 2 .. Likes a goo d argument ... The gal with the "Brains" . A lively wit YVONNE KUPERMAN Ivoncit3 Cartag e na, Colombia Balboa High School Bask etball, 1-2; Softball, 1 ; V olleyball, 1-2'; Gamma Chi, 1-2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Natwal Science Society. 1-2; Class Secretary, 2; Halloween Da nce Committee, 2; Business Manager of Conquistador, 2; Business Manager of Tropical Collegian, I, "A d y nam o of vitality .. Always a smile for everyone ... Very sweet ... FELIX LARRlN AG A Lar ry" Ancen, Canal Zone Balboa High School 'Baseball, 1-2, Latin lad with charm ... Magnetic eyes that smile ,Swell friend, .. VINCENT LEAVER Vinnie" Colon, Panama Balboa H igh School "Death Drums", 2 "A friendly smile for everyone ... V e r y swee t . Winnin g ways. 27

PAGE 34

28 SONIA MENDlET A "Sony" Panama City. Panama Instituto Pan-Americana Basketball, 2; Gamma Chi, 2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Natural Science Society. 2; Spanish Club, 1-2: Halloween Danc e Committee, 2; Advertising Staff of Conquistador, 2; Tropical Collegian Artist, 1-2. "Fun to know . All-around artist ... A likeable Latin lass ... GEORGE MICHAEL METIVIER "Mac" Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa High School Manager of Football Team, 1; "Death Drums", I; Photography Editor of Conquistador 1; Cartoonist of Tropical Collegian, 1. "The read y eye b ehind many of our s napshot s ... Easygoing guy .. Friendly." SONYA MIGNON MORLEY "Sonya" Lincoln, Nebraska Balboa High School Volleyball. 2; Chief Artist of Tropical Collegian, 2 "Ac!'! in art .. Blond bombshell ... Sweet as sugar." WILLIAM JOHN NICKISHER "Spider McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania Balboa High School "Football, I; 'Basketball. 1; 'Baseball. 1; "Death Drums", 2 "So e asy on the eyes . Cheerful manne r, . Strong, silent t ype

PAGE 35

too JACK HERBERT PEARSON Herb Franklin, Tennessee Cristobal High School Natural Science Society, 2; Class Treasurer, 2 "A calm, quiet fellow ... Nice t o know ... Polire." MARKELA IRENE PEREZ "Macky" Panama City I Panama lnstituto Pan-Americana Basketball, 1: Volleyball, 1: Gamma Chi, 1-2: Phi Theta Kappa, 1-2: Natural Science Society, 2: Spanish Club, 1-2: Writet for Tropical Collegian, 1. "A helping hand anytime ... Well liked by all . A likeable SE}norita. RUSSELL EARL PIERSON "Russ" Ancon, Canal Zo ne Balboa High S c hool NaturalScienceSociety. 2; Feature W rit e r for Tropical Collegian, 1; Panama American Reporter, 1-2. Talent inhis fingertips . A pleasant guy to know . Sincere ... EDGAR EUGENE PLUMMER "Eddie" Grand Rapids, Michigan Wheaton College Academy Phi Theta Kappa, 2: Vers! Editor for Tropical CoIIegi an, 2, "Ever-present smile ... Warm friendliness ... Nice [0 know ... 29

PAGE 36

30 CARMEN ROSA RECUERO "Carm encita" Panama City. Panama COlegta de Maria Immaculada GammaChi, 2; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; Natural Science Society, 2; Spanish Club, 2; Christmas Dance Committee, 2 "Fi reball ... Friendly manner ... Good things come in small packages, GWRIELA ROSAS "Cuty" Panama City. Panama Balboa High School Basketball, I'; Volleyball, 1', Gamma Chi, 2; Spanish Club, 1-2; Halloween Dance Committee. 2; Christmas Dance Committee, 2; Assistant Advertising Manager for Conquistador, 2. "Naturally nice ... Sensational smile . Sweet to m ee t ... JlMEE SUE SEATE Jimee Springfield, Missouri Basketball, I'; Softball, 1 ; Volleyball, 1'-2; Gamma Chi, 1-2; Ph i Theta Kappa, 1-2; S p anish Club, 2; "Death Drums 2; S. A. Treasurer, 2; Art Editor for Conquistador, 2; Art Editor for Tropi cal Collegian, L "Captivating personality ... Alwayson the go ... Bright, sunny disposition. ROBERT CARL SIEVERS Bob" St. Louis, Missouri Cristobal High School -Football, 2; -Track, 1; Class tIea surer, 1. "Sharp wilted, .. Good looks ... Appealing charm.

PAGE 37

WENDALL N. SPREADBURY Wendy" "Football. 1; Track. 1; Delta Psi Omega, 1-2; Narural Science Sociery. 1-2; "Murder in the Junior College", 1 ; "The Whole Town' s Talking", 1 ; "Oeatb Drums". 2; Christmas Dance Committee, 1-2; Nocturnal Bird Migration Sociery, 2 .. As much fun as a barrel of monkeys .. Always with a sparkling grin . Very likeable fellow ... DOROTHY JANET STEARN Jan Cumberland, Maryland Allegany High School "Near as a pin .. A likeable friendly newcomer Fun-loving personaliry." WILLIAM GEORGE STEVENSON Bill"' Panama City. Panama Bolles High School .Football. 1; Basketball. 1-2; "Softball, 1; Water Polo, 1. ,. As crazy as the day is long .. Happy-go-lucky fellow .. Friendly smile for all." EDW ARD NICHOLOS STOKES Nick Chicago. Illinois Peekskill High School .Football. Ii "Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Christmas Dance Committee, 1. "Good looks plus .. He's got what it takes .. The answer (0 any girl's dream. 31

PAGE 38

Take a letter Will you please excust us to work on _---------....., .... --the yearbook? A plus B ; AB Sla ve dri ver 32

PAGE 41

8EI#I,.(0 THe WlfEN PICTuI2E$ wERE TIlK-/f,.J. RODRIGO A-LBARltA:CIN "Roy" Cartago, Costa Rica St. Mary's High School, California, A guy with a f riendly smile. JOHN ALBRITTON "Johnny" Honda, Colombia Balboa High School, Favorite of all ... Wonderful friend to have. S ALVADOR ALEGUAS "Sal" Colon, Rep, of Panama, -Cristobal High School. A ready smile for everyone ... A ladies' man, YOLA ISABEL ARIAS "Yolita" Panama, R. P.-Balboa H ig h School Mischievow laughter ... Fun to know. ERNESTO AROSEMENA "Kiko" Panama, R. P. -La Salle, Panama Short but b rainy ... Interesting fellow. MARTA IRENE BRID Panama, R. P. -Maria Inmaculada, Panama Quiet and friendly .... / .. 35

PAGE 42

36 JULIO CABALEIRO "Titi" Panama, R. P. Riverside Military Academy, Georgia. A shy and quiet fellow. THOMAS CAMERON "Rod" Long Be,ach. California, Western High Washington, D C Quiet but nice when you get to know him. GERMAN CASTILW "Mon" Ancon, Canal Zone Wherever there are sports there you find Mon TERESA CASTILW "Teresita" Panama, R. P. -Colegia InternacLonal de Maria Inmaculada, Panama Qu iet but friend ly ... N ice to know AURORA CHAN "Lolita" Oell, Panama-Instituto Pan-Americana Panama, R. P. Sweet. .. Nice to ever yone ADOLFO CHANG .. Adolfo" Sona, provincia de Veraguas, Panarna -Colegio La Salle Intelligent Friendly.

PAGE 43

MABEL CHATBURN "Mae" Ecuador Balboa, High Full of life ... Athletic SUSIE CHAVEZ "Suzie" San Antonio, Texas-Sidney Lanier High School, ti. A. :exas "If you knew Susie!" JOYCE CHEN ALLOY "Cuquita" Panama, R. p, -Ba lboa High School Intellectual. .. Friendly ELVIA CHUNG Panama, R. P. Colegio Internacional de Maria lnmaculada, Panama, Talented ... Tranquil manner HENRY CRUZ "Pepe" Canal Zone Balboa High Wonderful personality ... Teasing nature. ERIC DELVALLE "Tuturo" Panama. R. P. -Colegia Javier, Panama Aneve r present smile and a charming personality. 37

PAGE 44

Q .. t-<.;"""a ...... d cI..'Y;vj"'3 (j( ...... .e ... 38 RICHARD DILLMAN .. Peaches" Ancon. Canal Z.one Balboa High School. High man in sports . A real.swell person. ROBERT DOLAN .. Bob" A sb ur y Pa r k New J ersey -Balb o a Hi g h School. Good things come in smal l packages. J OHN DROSTE "Johnny" St. Louis, Missouri Cristobal High School, A motorcycle enthusiast. MARILYN JEAN DUPUIS "Mimi" Woonsocket, Rhode Island-Mt. Vernon H igh S c hoOl, V irginia Lots of vim and vigor. CAMILO ENRIQU E FEUILLET "Popito" D enve r I Colorado -Colegia Javier, Panama. Pleasing ways and warm smile. HELlANA fILOS Panama, R. P. -Balboa School. Intelligent . Charming personality

PAGE 45

T"I'\. 4 6
PAGE 46

40 JANET GIBBS Detroit, Michigan Balboa High School. Quiet type. Really a wonderful girl to know, J O A N GIBSON "Joanle" A ncon, Canal Zon e B alboa !:Iig h School. C z. 1. Co top joker. HAZEL GRlFFITH Colon, R. P Balboa High School. Quiet ... Nice to know and loads of fun. IRENE GUIZADO Panama, R. P. Maria lnmaculada. A quiet and likeable lass. ERIC HAGBORG "P. B." B r itish Honduras-Balboa High School A quiet but nice guy. JERRY HALSALL Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-Balboa High School. Usually in a fog but otherwise charm ing.

PAGE 47

MOiSES HERES "Moe" Colon, R P . New Utrecht High School, New York Ready to work ... Friend ly, a nice guy. MANUEL HIDALGO Santiago de Chile, Chile-Instituto Nacional, Santiago. Chile. A nic e guy when you get to know him. LOWELL J ONES Jonesy Stevens Point, Wisconsin Balboa High School. Quite a joke r, . friendly andenthu siastic MARY STUART J ONES J onesy" Alexandria, Louisiana-Perry Central High School, New Yo r k A love r of horses, men and people in general. SHIRLEY KARST Bell ingham, Washington Balboa High S"chool. F riendly ... Well liked, nice to know. ARJANNE LIN ARES Panama, R. P. Celegia de Maria Inmac u lada. Panama. A spa rkle all her own. D .... tt k .... o ..... Wlooere So$a. is. , --If tl. ce 41

PAGE 48

yo-yo rl a.'y""Y . 42 ELIZABETH LOCKRIDGE "Beth" Ancon, -Canal Zone Balboa High School. Always willing tohelp ... Fullofpep, ale rt. DOLORES LOWE "Lolita" Panama, R. P. Our Lady of A ngels High School, I owa Conscientious ... quiet sort of charm nice gal. MARY MALLAN "Merry" Washington, D. C. Balboa High School. Mischievous, fun-loving ... A hot (od lover. VELMA MEDINA "Vel" Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa High School. Wonderful personality, cooperative ... never out of place. CARL MEISSNER "Tubby" San Francisco, California Bal b oa High School. A f riendly and nice guy. ROBERT METIVIER "Bo b Cana I Zone Balboa High Q uiet little guy, swell kid.

PAGE 49

'"&Is'l D"" r
PAGE 50

44 CHARLES RHEIN "Charlie" Elmhurst, Illinois -Army G. E. D. Terrific . An all around fellow who's tops with all. ENUS RIVERA EVELYN RINALDO E r ie Anco n, Canal Zone -Balboa High School. Sweet little girl. .. very polite .. P anama, R. P. -Colegio Intemadonal de Mar ia lnmaculada, Panarna Oneof Mr. Bowen's many admirers RUTHERFORD RIVET Sonny" Ancon Canal Zone Balbca High School. C. Z. J. C. Bing Crosb y ENITH ROMERO David, Panama Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles, David, Panama. A q uiet and vivacious newcomer. ADDY SANCHEZ Panama, R P. Colegio Internacional de Mar ia lnmaculada A suitable Latin appeal.

PAGE 51

KATHRYN SANDIDGE "Kathy" Canton, Mississippi-Hinds Jr. College, Mississippi. The girl with a friendly smile ... Nic:e to know. DORIS SIU Pese, Panama-Instituto Pan-Americana Panama. A little bundle of charm. GILBERT SMITH "Gil" Colon, Panama, R. P. -Balboa H igh School. The quiet and f r iendly type to know. GRAIGE SMYSER Butch Manila, Philippine-Texas Militar y Institute. Nice to all . quiet and friendl y J ACK TINNIN "Tanan" Ancon Canal Zone Griggs High Sc h ool, North Ca rolina. Weed fiend and a sport lover. SHIRLEY V AN DER DIJS Panama, R. P -Balboa High School. Charming .. magic in her feet. 45

PAGE 52

Vi s ito.". HUGH VANDERGRIFT New York City-Balboa High School. Full of fun .. A whiz at math. AUGUSTO VARELA "Chichi" Panama R. P. -Brown Milita r y Academy I California. Inte r esting conversationalist ... A subtle sense of humor. JOSE VARELA "Junior" Panama, R.P. -Brown Military Academy. California. Crazy but nice ... likeable. JOSE VELAZQUEZ "Ga b rielito" Panama, R. P -Colegio Javie r Panama, The guy with the subtle charms . always pleasing. W ILLIAM WAESCHE "Bill" Balboa High School. Gone but not f orgotten ... a f r iendly g uy. ANN WEST "Annie" San Diego. California-Balboa High School. Cute, witty red-head.

PAGE 53

ELIZABETH WILKINSON B e tty Ancon, Canal Zone Balboa H i gh School. Cute and likeable. ARDIS WILLOUGHBY "Ardie" Scottsbluff, Nebraska-Cristobal High School. The friendl y smile to all. WILUAM WILLOUGHBY W i ll Scottsbluff, Nebraska -Cristobal High School. Slow and easy . Outstand i n g s portsman. DUNCAN WONG Panama, R. P. -Augwta Military Academy I Virginia. Friendly, helpful. .. ane xp e n in an. EDGARDO YCA Z A "Lenny Panama, R. P. Jesuit H i gh School Florida. An eas y -going guy, well liked by all. N E W S TUDE N T S J ose A niba l Sille n Thomas A lberte Si u on Patt Walker 4 7

PAGE 54

48 CATHERINE E. A. BUDD Hooksett. N. H. Education: Cambridge High and Latin School Louisiana State Univ. 2 y r s Enteted W. A. C. 8 Oct '48 until 22 Vec. '50. Stationed: Fort Lee, Virginia, Fort Myer, Va. I Fort Clay t o n C. Z Assignment as Gene ral Cashi er. Favo rite Sport: Pistol Target Shooting Future Plans: Sociologist. serge.n1 5G.."1! DONALD J. DlVNEY comes POist." 50 .. Columbus, Ohio Educat ion: Balboa High, 6 mo. Entered U .S.A.F. 26 Ma rch '51, Statio n e d Albro ok A. F B. C. Z Assignme nt : Provo st-Ma rshal. Favorite Sport: Football; Future Plans: Further Education at Ohio State No pho'\o 0\ DOH. WILLIAM K PARCHEN D enve r, Colorado Education: Linc oln High, Lincoln, Nebr. Uoiv. of Nebr. I y r. Entered U.S.A.F. Jan. 31 '51 Stationed Lackland A.F.B Texas, Tyndall A. F. B. Florida Albrook A. F. B Canal Zone, Assignment: Provost-MarshaL Favorite Sport: Jump Rope, Futur e Plans: U. S A F. Officers School, Texas. EDGAR EUGENE PLUMMER M uir, Michigan Education: Whearon College Academy. Mich. Ente r e d U. S. A F. 1 5 Aug. 46 until 1 5 Aug. '49, Station ed: Lackland A. F. B. Texas, Kessler A. F. B Mississippi. Chanute A.F.B. lIl. Howard A F.B. Canal Zone. Assignment: Airplane and Engine Mechanic Favorite Sport: Reading. prawing. Future Plan: Own a Home for e lderly folk.

PAGE 55

CHARLES L. RHELN 8ath, Maine Education: R i ndge Tech. Cambridge. Mass. En tered U. S. Army 13 Aug. '50, Stationed: Fort Dix, N J Camp Gordon, Ga., Fort Amador, Canal Zone. Assignment, Criminal Investigation. FaVori t e Spo rt, Snowball Fights Future Plans: Further Education at Hofstra College, Hempstead, N. Y. ST ANLEY ROMBAUM N. Y City, N. Y Lo!>t! Education: Sewa rd-Park High, N. Y., Fo rdham College, N Y 1 yr Entered U.S.A. F. 13 April'51, Stationed: Sampson A F. B N. Y., Camp Go r don, Ga., Albrook A F B Canal Zone; Assignment: OYle Provesl Marshal. Favo rite Sport: Football. Future Plans: To be one of N. Y. 's finest MICHAEL T. SUGRUE San Francisco Calif. Education: Lincoln High. San Fran City College of San Francisco, 1 yr. Entered U.S.A.F. 31 Jan. '51 Stationed: Lackland A. F. B. Texas, Tyndall A.F.B. Florida, Brookley A.F.B. Ala Albrook A F B Canal Zone, Assignment: Provost-Marshal, Favo r iteSport: Spear Fishing Future Plans: San Francisco Police Department. JAMES E WEBSTER Vallego, Californ ia Edu cation: Vallejo H ,gh Schoo l Vallejo J. C 1 yr. Enre r ed U. S. A. F. Jan 10, '51, Stationed: Lackland A.F.B. Teus, Tyndall A.F.B., Fla A l brook A. F B. Ca nal lone. A ssignment : P r ovost Mar shal Favo r i t e SpOrt: Football, fut ure Pl ans: Further Education a t Sa n J ose S t ate, Calif. 4 9 ( l. ;; 1./ 11 10 /I II. t} 1<6 I!!l :z 30 ",I /-.Sa j' b ? I .... t] IV. ,q ;)C :;1.1 271 %.'l

PAGE 56

The Results of Semes ter Exams! ",:"1,t:-1 ... . :t't,N 1 "X-. ',:1:11 -_I.e..: I '., ,'I' I,. i I', i '; ; : .. 1 11 ',1 --'''It''I';.; t .J' '. How pretty! It's empty. Wait Would be e ngineers. 50 Mr. Lee has their a ttention?

PAGE 59

THE STUDENT ASSOCIATIO N The president of the Student Association Edward Castano S. was elected at the end of the 1952 school year. The other officers, Ralph Huls, Vice-President; Anne Morrill and Betty Wilkinson Secreta r ies; Jimee Sue Seale, Treasurer; were elected at the beginning of this school year. Other regular Council members were elected at the beginning of this school year. Other regular Council members are the Sophomore Class President, Elias Entebi and the Freshman Class President, Dick Dillman. The Student Association's Faculty advisor is Mr. McNair. The first big event sponsored by the S. A. was a school piCnIC on Oct. 25 at the country home of Edward Castano at Coronado Beach. This party was given In honor of the faculty. who had given the students a beach party at A mador a short time before. The S. A. decorated the Lounge with a tree and ornaments during the Christmas season. The S. A. sponsored the Sophomore class Christmas Formal on Dec 23. at the American Legion Hall in Fon Amador. Ann Edwards was elected chairman of the Christmas Dance Committee. On Friday Feb. 13 the Spanish Club gave a Carnival Dance sponsored by the Student Association. a t the Tivoli Hotel in Ancon. The dance was a tremendous success due to the hard-working members of the Spanish Club. The Freshman Spring Dance is to be given on March 27 atthe A rmy-Navy Club at Fort Amador. The final affair of the year will be the huge Sophomore-Freshman Banquet which will be held in the Bella Vista room at the EI Panama Hotel, on May 16. 1953. 53

PAGE 60

54 Vearbook Staff Editor -in Chief Asst Edito r Business Manager Secretary Art Editor Make-up Adilia Arauz Catherine Budd Mabel Chatburn Pat Foster EDITO RIAL ASSISTANTS Beth Lockridge Sonia Mendieta George Metivier Hector Miranda FACUL TY ADVISO R S Literary Advisor Business Advisor Charles Rhein K. 1. Butlet Yvonne Kuperman Velma Medina Jimee Seate Gerald Hendrickson Sonya Morley Gloriela Rosas Micha el Sugrue Shirley Van Dec Dijs Dr. Moody M r Lyons

PAGE 61

"THE SPANISH CLUB" The purpo se of this Club is (0 pr omOte good relations between Panamanians and North American stUdents in th e Canal Zone Jun io r College. This Club held Its firs t meeting on October 9 1952. Th e officers e lect ed we re th e foll owing: Miss Sonia Mendieta, President; Mr. Edua r do Cas t ano, Vice-Presi dent ; Mr. Hector Miranda, T reasure r ; Miss Markela Perez, Secretary. At the beginning of the school semesterthe member s of this C lub had to elect a new president because Miss Mendie ta finished school in Januar y Later we had to e lect another treasurer because M r. Mira nda resigned The new preside nt is Mr. Morris Her es The new treasu r e r is Mr. German Castillo. Thi s Cl ub ha s h eld various activities durin g th e year. The first activity was an exhibition of Panamanian cos tumes. Ow second a ctivity was a Luncheon at EI Rancho, having as honor guests Mr. and Mrs. Hack e tt and Me. and Mrs. Ward. Our third activity was a p resentation of Panamanian Folklor e at a tea held b y the Cana l Zone C o llege Club. Our fourth activiry was anothe r p resentation (similar to the third one) at the Balboa Women's Cl ub. Our fifth and last activity was a Carnival Danc e which the Student Association put on thr o u gh us. Th e Carnival Danc e w a s held on F e bruary 13, at The Tivoli Hotel. We also had a Carnival Queen, who was Miss Markela Perez. The co urt was made up of Miss Shirley Van der Dijs, Miss Dolore s Lowe, Miss Beth Lockridge, and M iss Dupuis. 55

PAGE 62

President ... Vice-President First Semeste r Second Semester Secretary Treasurer ... GAMMA CHI The Gamma Chi soro r ity i s both a social and service club. Jimee Seate Sonia Mendieta Bab e Flynn Marian Dorris Elaine Kelly The Sophomore girls formed a soro r ity with thirteen members in November, 1945 it received officia l recognition and i t was named Gamma Chi, The aims are to perform service and to promote social life. Throughoutthe yearthe membe r s have sold sodas at the games, ushered at activities, and have done other service for the college. The main service Gamma cni has taken upon itself is the re-decorating of the lounge In th e beginning of the ye ar a tea was held for all the wome n attending Canal Zone Jun io r College. New member s of Gamma Chi were initiated a s a r esult of this tea, On Novembe r first the Halloween dance was held in the upper gym. The dance was conside r ed ve r y successf ul by man y although very little profit was made Anothe r tea is planned in th e near future. 56 Marguerite Flynn Betty Flumach B eth Lockridge Sonya Morley CAMERA-SHY GAMMA CHI MEMBERS Anne Morrill Markela Perez Carmen Recue r o limee Seare

PAGE 63

GLORIELA ROSA S MA RIA N DORRIS MA RIL YN DUPUIS MARY ADELIA MORLEY SHIRLEY BUTLER ELAINE KELLY YVONNE KUPERMAN VELMA MEDINA -- ADlLlA ARAUZ ANN EDWARDS KATHRYN SA NDlDGE K JAYNE BUTLER JOYCE CHEN ALLOY SONIA MENDIETA MARY MALLAN 57

PAGE 64

58 THE NATURAL SCIENCE SOCIETY Founded in 1933. the Natural Science i s sponsored b y Mr. and Mrs. Lee, The officers are Yvonne Kupe rman, P resident; Edward Castano, Vice-President; and Kathryn Colclasure. Secretary. Meetings are scheduled monthly. and the activities have been varied. Films of the San BIas lslands. the marine gardens in Florida, and other scenes have been presented by Wenrlall Spreadbury and Kathryn Colc1aswe. A lecture concerning scientific names, their derivation, classifica tion, and origin was admirabl y presented by Dr. Graham Bell Fairchild, a noted entomologist. There was a meeting in the home of Mr. Karl P. Curtis, a widely known archaeologist, who showed the members his collection of interesting artifacts. Recently, a tIip was made to (be National Museum of Panama, where members had an opportunit y to observe historical relics of the 16th and 17th centuries The tentati ve future plans of the Society include the following: an account of a voyage through India, by Colonel Mallan; a talk about some phase of public health by Dt. Hetald Trapido; a trip to Barra Colorado, an ideal Isthmian island to observe nature in its full bloom; and a tour through the Panama Canal. To conclude the year's activities, the members are invi ted to a won derful waffle party offered b y the sponsors at their home. The members are the following: Yvonne Kuperman, Edward Castano. Kathryn Colclasure, Wend all Spread bury, Gerald Hendrickson, Jack Pearson, Russel Pierson, Markela Perez, Janet Gibbs, Adili a Arauz, Sonia Mendieta, Carmen Recuero. Gloriela Rosas, and Craig Smyser.

PAGE 65

T R OPIC A L COLLEGIAN One of the Canal Zone Juniot College publications is the Tropical Collegian. This literary magazine, published five times a year, presents articles, sto r ies, poem. and news of the college written by its capable staff members and also contains selections written by outside conuibuters Under the guidance of Dr Dorothy Moody the staff of the Tropical Collegian met each Tuesday noon of the school year to discuss and solve problems, make assignments, and consider suggestions for future issues. As Editor of the Tropical Collegian, it was Betty Flumach's responsibility to set deadlines, disU'ibu te assignments, confer with staff artists, and canuol the assembling and publishing of the m agazine. In charge of the technical and business managing was Gerald Hendrickson, whose capab l e handling of mimeographing and assembling helped me Tropical Collegian to a successful year The members of the staff, artists, and typists all played important parts in bringing forth the magazjne. A special vote of thanks is due to Dr. Moody and Mr. Lyons' secretarial class for (nei! capable g U idance and help throughout the year. 59

PAGE 66

DELTA PSI OMEGA Cast No. 138 of Delta Psi Omega was organized in 1943. and is a part of the largest national honorary dramatic fraternity for junior colleges. Its pwpose is to cultivate inter est and improvement in college dramatics. To be eligible for Delta Psi Omega, one must have worked in three fields of dramatics: acting. staging. and producing. One must also have completed one year of dramatics with acceptable grades. This year's social activities included a Christmas dinner at the Tivoli Hotel, a dry -season picnic, and the "Baccalaureate Breakfast" in honoI of the graduating sophomore members. Mr. Turbyfill is the faculty sponser. Dr. Moody is a faculty member. and Mrs. Turbyfill is an honorary member. Officers for the year were Cast Director. Wendall Spreadbury; Stage Manager. Edward Castano ; and Business Manager, Ann Edwards. The other first semester members were Ronald Angermuller, Kay Butler. Kathryn Colclasure. and Betty Flumach. There will be another initiation in the .\pring. when many more students will be eligible to jOin. 60

PAGE 67

PHI THETA KAPPA HONORAR Y SCHOLASTIC SOCIET Y On September 18. 1952. a meeting of Phi Theta Kappa members was called for the purpose o f electing the officer s for the school year. The officers elected were: Edgar E. Plummer, President; Jimee Sue Seate, Vice-President; Sonia Mendieta, Secretary; Ca r men Rosa Recuero, Treasurer, with M r. Suber! Turbyfill as faculty sponsor. October 3 1952 a closed initiation was held for all those who had accepted invitations for membership in Phi Theta Kappa Katherine Colclasure Elaine Kelly. Yvonne Kuperman, and Markela Perez wer e initia ted at the closed initiation ceremony. The pledges will be welcomed into full fellowship at a public initiation ceremony to be held Februa r y 27. 1953. Judge Guthrie F. Crowe will be our guest speaker. Ten new pledges. eligible for membe r ship at the beginning of the second semester will also be initiated. They are Betty Flumach, Rut h Canepa. He}en Oster. Heliana Filos. Elvia Chung. Joyce Chenalloy. William Willoughby. Mabel Chatburn, Hector Miranda and Charles Rhein. Wednesday. March 25. the annual Phi Theta Kappa 8anquet will be held at the Tivoli Hotel for old and new member s of Phi Theta Kappa. In April, National Fraternity Day will be celebr ated with a picnic. A joint picnic will be held with Delta Psi Omega. Plans a r e undeI"W'ay for celebrating the anniversa r y of Phi Theta Kappa next November. 61

PAGE 68

6"-GLORIELA ROSAS will give the s horthand ability back to MR. LYONS. flMEE SEATE will leave her all-around abilities to SHIRLEY KARST. BOBBY SIEVERS will leave his bitter love life to JERRY FOX. WENDALL SPREAD BURY will leave half of his wit (which will leave him with none) to K. JAYNE BUTLER. JANET STEARN will leave her millionaire boy friend to MERRY MALLAN. BILL STEVENSON will leave his tabula rae a (empty head) to HENRY CRUZ. EUGENE NICK STOKES will leave his girl friends to JOHN ALBRITTON. ELAINE KELLY will leave her miniature Einstein brains to HELEN OSTER. LARRY LARRINAGA will leave his care for nothing attitude to CAROLYN FITZPATRICK VINCENT LEAVER will leave his friendliness to DOLORES LOWE. SONIA MENDIETA will leave her string of "amigos" to ADDIE SANCHEZ. SONYA MORLEY will leave her artistic talents to GEORGE METIVIER. JACK PEARSON will leave his secluded little world to GILBERT SMITH. RUSSEL will leave his JC column in the Panama American to PAT FOSTER. MARQUELA PEREZ will leave her Phi Theta Kappa membership to JOYCE CHENNALOY. EDGAR PLUMMER will leave his intellectual abilities to EUGENE LA U. CARMEN RECUERO will leave her ability to make friends easily to EVELYN RINALDO. leaves her sportrnanship ability to MABEL CHATBURN. SHIRLEY BUTLER leaves her dancing ability to SHIRLEY VAN DER DUS. ANN EDWARDS will leave her librarian's job to GERALD HENDRICKSON. BETTY FLUMACH will leave her never-ending quest for new words to MARY ADELIA MORLEY. ED CASTANO will leave his ability to give orders to HECTOR MIRANDA. FRED ALEGUAS will leave his Latin sex appeal to his brother SALVADOR ADILIA ARAUZ will leave her pretty clothes to BETTY WILKINSON. CATHERINE BUDD will leave her reserved lounge seat during lunch hour to TERESA CASTILLO. ELIAS ENTEBI will leave his ability for doing evetything to little DICK DILLMAN. MARIAN DORRIS will leave her ability to cut class effectively to MARY STUART JONES. NICK GORHAM will not leave anything; he insists on taking it all with him. RALPH HULS will leave his super good looks to MIKE SUGRUE. YVONNE KUPERMAN will leave her co-operativeness to ANN MORRILL.

PAGE 71

BASKETBALL Many of th e men w ho re pr ese nted college durin g th e football season turned to the hardwoods for the Green and White in the Interscholastic Basketball League. Placing second in the final count, the unde r dog J unior College trounced th e s trong e r high school of Balboa two limes out of the truee games pla ye d. Freddie A leguas. top point-maker for the G reen Devils, put the hall into the basket consistently, and was chosen a member of the Honorary All-Zone Team at the end of the season In review, it w as a very success ful season for the Juni o r College Five and their superior coach, James Wolf. TEAMS Cristobal CZJC BHS Standings w 4 Basketball is the last girl's. intramural spo rt of the year. The intramural' s captain s chose n from ]e we re Janet Gibbs, Kathryntolclasure, and Mabel Chatburn. Basketball is just getting sta rr ed as the Conquistador goes to Press, and the All-Star t eam that will rep resent Jun io r College wiIl be chosen on March 28. Here 's to a victorious season, girls! BASEBALL The baseball seaso n ha s just begun as th e CONQUISTADOR goes to press, and the College Nine has again shown their fighting spirit in the two games th ey hav e played, although, they have lost both of them. The third sCheduled game has be e n cancelled because fiv e of the Green Devil slugge r s a r e in bed fighting against the fiu Goo d result s are expected in the near fu[ure and the team is more determined t han ever to snow all comers just how to win a baseball game. 65

PAGE 72

66 VOLLEYB ALL Int r amurals began a few weeks after school started and volleyball was the first sport on the agenda. Enough girls signed up so that it was possible for ,Junior College to have two full teams. Tbe 1. C team, captained by Joan Gibson placed second in the inuamwal league. The all-star team was chosen at the end of the season and although the rep resentatives of the G reen and White did not win any of their games, they were especially proud when the final score was 24-20. TEAMS CHS BHS CZJC All-Star Standings w 4 2 L 4

PAGE 73

Softball was the second span event of the school year This year's peculiar rain y season canceled e:s Tournament was held. Shirl ey Karst's team got into the semiBecause of the condition of the Pan-Canal Train system, the softball all-stan did not travel to Cristobal but played tWo games against Balboa; one against the high schoo l A-League, and another against the high school B-League, All-Star Standing TEAMS BHS (A -League) BHS (B-League) CZJC w L 2 67

PAGE 74

68 FOOTB ALL This yea r was not ve r y profitable for the Qumumhered ]ooior College Football Team; something to brag about, however, was the fact that they scored twice, a feat which the stronger team of la s t year did not accomplish. In the first game, against Cristobal, Carl Meissner, backed up by a strong line, blocked a Cristobal punt which went in to the end zone, bringing home two points to College. The second game against Balboa provided no such opening, however. and College received a 20-0 defeat. The scrappy Green Devils sco red again in their third game with Cristobal. Two minutes were all that remained between College's scoring and the ending gun. Bob Dolan came through by catching a pass thrown b y Freddie Aleguas. and driving into the end zo n e to complete the mo s t exciting play of the season. Top coach, James Wolf, a ssis t e d by Bill "Get me India" Zemer, were the men responsible for th e fight in the team, and it was their true spirit that kept the team going against insurmountable odds. This is the team future generations of Junior College s h ould not forget; they only had thirteen men. Team BHS CHS CZJC STANDINGS w L 4 2 4

PAGE 75

Cheer Leaders "C-O-L-L-E-G-E, YEA, COLLEGEI" was the constant cheer we heard from the throats of our eight tireless cheerleaders at every football and basketball game. Whether College was winning or losing. these faithful girls were behind OUI teams, cheering them on, every minute of tbe games. Although the attendance of college students at the games was small, our cheering eight were not discouraged, but kept right on yelling to prove to all what true spirit really is: It is not the size of the dog in the fight. but the size of the fight in the dog I 69

PAGE 77

71

PAGE 78

Lookino QoJ"t-"-' -;w.Lv 72.

PAGE 79

73

PAGE 80

74 Most to Succeed -.

PAGE 81

Most f<.,.. (?...Q... "ttMV 75

PAGE 82

76

PAGE 83

M D J ,. R II-Rroullci 77

PAGE 84

76

PAGE 85

79

PAGE 86

80 Most Tale..nte.d I

PAGE 87

F o o T 8 R L. L .. 81

PAGE 88

COLLEGE LOUNGE Big night last night Get a light? Don't wor k too hard I Law test What did you s a y We'll win! 82

PAGE 89

83

PAGE 91


PAGE 95

COL LEGE L OUNGE Pat Foster Qur lounge is a wonderful -place Where cokes can be drunk by the case Where lunches and snacks Are consumed amid facts Of history and who sets the pace. This lounge can be bothersome too When we raise up a hullabaloo The teachers complain While the students r efr ain And are quiet a moment o r two. In all, it's OUI very own lair Where smoke take s the place of the air Where we study and strain And work 'til we gain A knowledge of life's wear and tear FRUSTRA liONS OF A STUDENT Kathryn Ann Colclasure She started to c r y As I passed by. So I stopped to see what had happened She pulled her hair And s tart ed to SW'ear. And her spirits, I gathered, were dampened She began to weep And tears, in a heap. Fell at her feet on the floor. She utt ered a sob As she turned the knob And beat on her locker door. She shouted a curse (Which was most adverse) Hers was a state of frus tration But 1 under s tood As most anyone should; She'd forgotten h e r combination! Both of th ese poems we re published in the 1952 of college Poetry. edited by the NuionaI Poetry Association. 89

PAGE 96

ABC /) [ F -A 13 o e f 90 The Snooping Conquistador I just went snoo p ing into the annuals of the past and found so m e things that are going to interest u s now in the present I was not al10red eno u g h s pac e to tell all the things that happened to the graduates of 1953 so I just picked a few c hoice bits from the ir biographies: KINDERGARTEN: Vinnie Lea ver's mothe r gOl partial relief -V in starred kinderga rten, , Ralph Huls'steache[ picked him up and set him on her knee because she thought he was just too cute for words ... FIRST: Ed Castano had a big letter" A" hung o n his ear so that he would learn the alphabet" Shirley Butler cried and cried when she found out that the re w aso' t any Easte r Bunny ... Elias Entebi got a blackeye from a girl because he didn'thave the arithmetic homework ... THIRD: Betty Flumach wrote backwards, sta rtin g at the left e dge of her paper, Sonia Morl ey had to sit in the wastepaper basket for talking ... Adelia Arauz had to stand in the corner for eating peanuts dwing the reading class and she got a ttiangular forehead ... FOURTH: Ann Edward s was the daisy in the annual school play_" Kathy Colclasure got pushed in a gar bage can head first Jack Pearson put a c ricket in the teacher's inkwell. Elaine Kelly asked the teacher if she had false teeth, FIFTH: Freddie Aleguas had to stay in for imitating Don Juan in a sword fight because Freddie was u sing his rul e r ... Yvonne Kupe r man tried to hide her dog under her desk . SIXTH: Russell Pierson got a spa nkin g whe n else should have. Ma rkela Perez got punished for sticking her blackjack gum on h e r teeth and then g ri nning at her c la ssmates ... Bill Stevenson w a s made janito r of the third an d fourth grade r ooms ... SEVENTH: Nick Stokes c ri ed when a little girl kissed him ... Jimee Seate alway's was terrifically ill until after it was too la t e to go t o school. ..

PAGE 97

EIGHTH: Gloriela Rosas got caught sliding down the school banister. Edgar Plummer found out that he was going (0 be commencement speaker so he threatened to quit school. NINTH: Will Nickisher was well known as the current dream hoy of the junior high set . catherine Budd did a ballet off the end 01 the stage in the school play TENTIi: George Metivier's name was misspelled as Georgia on the teacher's list so he was seated with the girls on the first day .. Sonia Mendieta got lost in the big high school building and ended up in the principal's office . ELEVENTH: Wendall Spread bur y was all read y to lead the flag salute when he forgot it .. K. Butler got caught reading a comic bOOK under her copy of Evangeltne. TWELFTH: Gerald Hendrickson had the last of his baby diseases--the measles Babe Flynn had a specialseat reserved in front of the princlpal"s office for throwing toy lizards in the study hall Marian Donis wrote a revised edition of ROMEO AND JULIET. featuring herself as Juliet COLLEGE FRESHMEN: Merry Malian got a note from the dean for taking 13 class cuts . Larry Lartl naga got his schedule mixed up and appeared at the girl's gym class the first time it met ... Jane t Stearn tried to reserve a room in the boy's dorm, no soap ... Nick Gorham was afraid of all the college girls so he tried to blow himself up in the lab. COLLEGE SOPHOMORES: Vinnie. Ralph Carmen. Bob. Betty. Sonia Morley. Ed. Shirley. Elia s Ann. Russell, Adiiia. Kathy. Jack. E laine. Fred. Yvonne. Markela. Bill. Nick, Jimee, Gloriela, Edgar. Will. Kathyrn. George Sonia. Wenda II. K. Jayne. Gerald. Babe. Marian. Larry. Nick G . Janet and Merry all signed their own diplomas . 91

PAGE 98

Miscellaneous Pi ct ure of me 92

PAGE 99

Classroom shots Two minutes left School of hard knocks Culture Cheese You wo uldn't dare 93

PAGE 100

Girl's Dorm. I don't want to go to schoolt I like thatI How wonderful. .. really? Last minute rush. "Luke the spook

PAGE 101

No .. that's for me! G etting ready for Enghsh Composi tion Tell me that story

PAGE 102

BOYS DORM Pi gs!

PAGE 103

Death Drums 97

PAGE 105

On stage everybody, for LOST HORIZON.

PAGE 106

A mador Beach outing Oh! Oh! Let' s g e t another soda' What scen e ry! Happ y thr o ng! 1 ain't got nobodyl Guess w h o? It' s rainingr Don t you want another soda? Hlyal there,

PAGE 107

Ah! Amador beach. Ah! Ah! Wha [ are you doing Johnnie? They paid for it. I like it! Que bien! Which end is UP? You want a bite?

PAGE 108

That's a dance? 10Z

PAGE 111

.. 6 I CLEAN I ; SNOIlItEL PEN .. .. Tube No mop-up,nomesswilh SheaRer's extends new Snorkel Pen because its poinl never touches ink! Magic filling .. to nil lube eXlends 10 drink up ink, then relracts when pen is lull. II's Ihe only "no-dunk" pen in Ihe world. retracts You'll wanl one lor yourself! II's perlect lor gifts. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Sheaffer's Sentinel .., Snorkel Pen s .. '" \\\ \ Q .. .. Ballpoint Pencil .. .. .. .. .. 6 .. .. .. .. 6 .. 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 Q .. 6 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Compl iments of the .. .. .. CANAL ZONE CENTRAL LABOR UNION .. .. and the .. .. .. METAL TRADES COUNCIL .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. '" 105 A ..

PAGE 112

., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. e .. .. .. .. .. Compl i ments of .. .. Compliments of ELECTRIC SERVICE CO. .. .. ANGELINI EI ectri c Contr.actors .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 179 Central Ave Tel 2-0356 or 99 Central Avenue Tel 2-2208 2-0359 .. Panama, R P. .. P R P .. .. "anama, . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444a444444444444444 A .. .. .. .. .. .. ., .. ., .. ., .. ; Best W ishes ., .. ., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ., .. .. .. .. i KODAK PANAMA, LTD. .. .. .. .. FILM SUPPLIES .. CAMERAS .. .. ; PRINTING MATERIALS .. .. .. .. ; FILM COLORED GUIDES .. .. FLASH GUNS .. .. .. .. .. fi .. .. .. i ,,':.'1. Arboix Building-Colon i ""' 98 Centra l Ave., Panama A .. .. ; 12 Tiv oli. Ave., Panama : .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 106

PAGE 113

A I>' Ii' A Ii' I':' 'i' A Ii' Ii' Ii' Ii' ,.... A '"' ":' Ii' a A Ii' ":" Ii' ..... A Ii' ":' 'i' a; A : 0::1 a.. a... iii' "" V") ":' 'i' 0 ).... A d>- -1:-Ii' Q,) co ..:. -0 Ii' Vl U A Q(1)_ Z5:; U 0 O!: a..: J2 co V") Ii' ::0 > w a.. .:, at: C A :)V')2 I-U Ii' Vl ":' O...Jo Ii' a..u.f'... ,E11.I A Ii' cO ';I u.. N 'i' N ::Ie A 'i' o a.. U ":' UI 'it :; ...0 0 A uV'l ; N >-0 t? .... Ii' If) A 0 : Ii' ., Ii' A Ii' ":" Ii' A Ii' -'i' A V .;, 'i' A :;: A .. .. A .. A = 'it = Ii' A Ii' 0 Ii' A 'i' CI) 'i' A Q;) :;: .. = v=:.. I. A -= ;;l <.J.. Si A Q t: .. .. -.; .. 0 = 5! A r:!S tit J :;: J T .,. Eo;; ...... A E"";; .:;'"1 A 5 5 : 0..... .. .. = :;; Eo< = < .. A Eo... co.., A A .. .. A A ...... ........................................... ...................................................

PAGE 114

e To sove wi th the sl igh test effort : For the euphoria that accompanies financial independence Watch your pennies grow into dollors In on account at the : CAJA DE AHORROS 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 Compliments of CRAWFORD AGENCIES : UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA Tel 2-3265 No. 18 J Street: A A Marketers ELECTROLUX A Petroleum Products Vacuum Cleaners---Floor Pol ishers A Refrigerators---Gas---Keroserie A A Balboa Cristobal Hearing Aids---Non Crystal Life-: time Microphone IIRadioeorll : A A A Washing Machines 25 or 60 Cycles "SPEED QUEEN" A A A Rogers Plastics & Other Novelties A A ; Panama City : A A A A A ; 108

PAGE 115

.44444444444444 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 .. " .. SECURITY STABILITY SERVICE " " ; THE GIBRALTAR LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA .. .. .. Congratulotes .. THE GRADUATING CLASS .. Q Q OF THE .. Q .. Q CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE .. Q .. Q .. Q CLASS OF '53 .. .. Q .. Q .. Q .. Q ; Canal Zone Agenc y Offi c e ; Bldg. 5142 Diablo James G Ridge ; Tel: Balboa 3648 (C.Z J .e. '41) .. Q ; P.o.. Box L, Balboa, C Z General Agent .. Q .. Q Q Q A A ; BEST Compliments of .. Q ; WISHES ; ::: PETRONIO TAILOR SHOP .. A ; "J" Street No. 10 and ; Estudiante .. A .. Q .. Q ; Our Specialty .. .. ; Ladies' and Gentlemen's :;: '1 .., A 'I ., A ; ;; Suits :;: : ..., Uniforms made t o order .., A : 'I ., A .. Q : t .. A : ; MUEBLERIA EL DIABLO "'? 4 .. 7 A .. Q Leaders in the Furniture : .. Business Since 1909 Q .. A .. Q '1 A ., ., A .. A .. 7 A : :; 1 0 9

PAGE 116

)Tj0.235 0.196 0.11 rg0 Tc 4.8001 0 0 4.8001 85.41 497.53 Tm(4444 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444. .. A .. A .. A .. A .. A .. A .. A Comp l iments : .. of : e A .. A .. A i Compania S. A. i .. A .. A PANAMA COLON : i I .. A .. SYLVANIA : .. A .. A?'s ill See us for the best in lighting .. .. Productos FI uorescentes : Vio Espono No.1, Tel 3-0383 l Aportodo 617, Ponomo R. P l .. .. .. 4444444444 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 44444444444 4 4444 : .. A HENRIQUEZ Y GORNELL, INC. : : Congratulate : : The graduating class of 1953 : Joyeria y Relojeria : .. .. A .. LA MINA DE ORO : .. or .. : Pascual Ditrani-Propietario : .. .. or .. or .. Avenida Central No. 41 Tel. 2-2879 : : : or .. : : A or .. or .. : : .. or .. .. : Compliments of or .. .. .. TROTT THE CLEANER or .. .. .. .. .. .. JARDIN NACIONAl 41 J Fco. de 10 Osa i Next to the Firestone Building i P.O.Box1172 Tel. 3-4968 .. .. A ; 1 1 0 Panama, R P. :

PAGE 119

.., " " t. " ... "? A 7 .., A SALON DE BELLEZA Compliments of F ILOS SEDERIA MIRAMAR "? Y A Colle "J" No 4 Tel. 2-3266 'it A "? '? A " " "? :;> A 'it '71 A " "? ';I " " " " " Compliments of " ALMACENES 5 & 10 Centavos, S A. " : A v enida Central 44, Tel. 2-1709 " " " " " " 'it A " " " "? A " "I A ; Compliments of y A y A .. " THE AMERICAN CLUB "Down By the Tivoli Hotel" ; :;: .. You will find this a 'W' "'P A : del ightful place to : c hat, meet friends : C ompli ments o f and enjoy refresh-: ments :;: .. 7 : COLPAN MOTORS Del ightful lunches dail Y 'from 60 cents. " " "I 'T' ;i; : SERVING : "I A "I '71 A THE FINEST STEAKS IN :;: "I A : : TOWN : : : ... 113 A .. "

PAGE 120

A A A ,a::attbin i A A e A A A A A : A .. A Co n g rat u l ations from th e Make r s 0/ .. .. .. : A i America's finest Cigarette A .. A A : tathe .. .. .. .. .. .. GRADUATING A : CLASS i A A A A A A A A A A A .. A .. A .. .. : Compliments of : .. : Compliments of : NUEVA INDIA EUREKA, S. A. : 115 Central Avenue 115 .. Avenida Central, 133 Specialists in linen, furniture and all ori ental goods '? to' '? : : e .. Compliments of i AUTO SERVICE CO., INC. Corner of Ancon Avenue and H St 114 Panama City .. & &