Conquistador /

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Conquistador /
Uniform Title:
Conquistador (Canal Zone Junior College)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone College
Publisher:
Conquistador Staff
Place of Publication:
Balboa Canal Zone
Balboa, Canal Zone
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School yearbooks -- Panama -- Balboa   ( lcsh )
Genre:
School yearbooks
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: 1936.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: 1972.
Issuing Body:
Student yearbook of the Canal Zone Junior College from 1936 to 1963, and the Canal Zone College from 1964 to 1972.
General Note:
Description based on: 1936; title from cover.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: 1972.
Statement of Responsibility:
Canal Zone Junior College.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 472468547
lccn - 2009229561
System ID:
UF00095973:00007


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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1941


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1941
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PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
of the
CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE


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THE CONQUISTADOR RETURNS
DY DOROTHY CALLING

'Mid the distant noise of trumpets
And a rattling of spears,
A dusty old conquistador,
Emerges through the years.

There's a screech of rusty armor
As he comes to life again;
There is stiffness in his movements,
And an outward show of pain.

Soon a withered hand is lifted,
And the cobwebs on his face
Are brushed away; he seems to smile;
Perhaps he likes the place.

N.:, .'i fight for life is over;
Onwe again he's young and gay.
He waves his sword and cries aloud.
He's on the loose! Make way!


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE THREE









ADMINISTRATORS OF THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE


BEN M. WILLIAMS,
Superintendent of the Canal Zone Schools.


LAWRENCE JOHNSON,
Assistant Superintendent.


GEORGE HOWARD,
Assistant to the Superintendent.


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE FOUR









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CONQUISTADOR


PAGE FIVE

























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CHAIRMAN OF THE FACULTY

Last fall, on the resignation of Dr. F. W. Hosler as Principal
of the Balboa High School and Dean of the Canal Zone Junior College,
the Superintendent of Schools decided to make a change in the admin-
istration of the college. Thenceforth, the principal of the Balboa High
School would no longer have charge of the college. A new position,
that of Chairman of the Faculty, was created, and Mr. Roger C. Hackett,
instructor in social sciences, was appointed to fill it.
Mr. Hackett took his A. B. at the University of Indiana and his
M. A. at Harvard. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. In the summer
of 1937 he attended lectures at Oxford. He has published many articles
in labor, fraternal, philatelic, and academic journals.
Before coming to the Canal Zone, he had experience as a teacher
of social sciences and as an administrator in high schools and junior
colleges in Indiana and North Carolina. In 1935, he was transferred
from the Cristobal High School faculty to that of the Canal Zone
Junior College.
Mr. Hackett is noted for his examination-long detailed journeys
from Adam and Eve down to Hitler's latest atrocity; but he is also
remembered for never trying to embarrass a student; for the jolly
times he has inspired in the International Relations Club; and for the
kindly twinkle in his eye when he reads bonerss" in class, following
the return of a particularly bad set of papers!


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE SIX































Members of the FACULTY, left to right. Back row: Mr. Lyons, Dr. Prentiss, Mr. Mc-
Nair, Mr. Collinge, Mr. Franklin, Mr. Lanto, Mr. Starbuck, Mr. Carson, Mr. Grieser,
Mr. Strode, Dr. Howard. Front row: Mrs. Baker, Mr. Buckley, Miss Orr, Mr. Hackett,
Dr. Moody, Mr. Lee, Miss Swenson.


FACULTY
BEN M. WILLIAMS, Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools.
LAWRENCE JOHNSON, Assistant Superintendent.
GEORGE HOWARD, Assistant to the Superintendent.
ROGER C. HACKETT, Chairman of the Faculty, Instructor in Social Sciences.
HELEN C. BAKER, Instructor in Music.
FLOYD BUCKLEY, Instructor in Physical Sciences
CHALMERS S. CARSON, Instructor in Romance Languages.
ROGER W. COLLINGE, Instructor in English.
HERBERT CROWLEY, Instructor in Physical Education.
MAX C. FRANKLIN, Instructor in Metal Shop Practice.
H. J. GRIESER, Instructor in Swimming.
RUDOLPH J. LANTO, Instructor in Physical Education.
GEORGE O. LEE, Instructor in Biological Sciences.
JAMES A. LYONS, Instructor in Commercial Subjects.
MARGARET McLEOD, Instructor in Physical Education
JAMES S. McNAIR, Instructor in Mathematics and Engineering.
DOROTHY MOODY, Instructor in English, Dean of Women.
HERVEY P. PRENTISS, Librarian.
PERRY L. STARBUCK, Instructor in Commercial Subjects
HARRY STRODE, Instructor in Physical Education
MILDRED SWENSON, Instructor in Commercial Subjects


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE SEVEN


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CONQUISTADOR PAGE ELEVEN












Engineers' Club (1,2)
"Pablo," a skilled amateur photographer, who took
the group pictures for The Conquistador, plans to
continue his studies at Rhode Island State College
next year. He aspires to be an aeronautical engineer.
Quiet and dignified, he has as his favorite saying,
"The greatest river makes the least din."



THOMAS ALBERT BENDER, JR. CANAL ZONE
Water Polo (1,2) Swimming (1,2)
Orchestra (1) Softball (1)
Another quiet, likeable, engineer is "Tom Swift,"
who plans to follow his sister Natalia, one of our
alumnae, to the University of Minnesota next fall.
Besides being a motorcyclist and swimmer, Tom is
a violinist.




JEANNE BONWELL MONTANA
Student Assistant (2) Sans Pareil (1,2)
Kappa Delta Sigma (1,2) "What A Life"
President, Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
Literary Editor, Tropical Collegian
"Bonnie," the student assistant in English, and a
crack student in literature, belongs to an army
family, recently ordered to Georgia. She will attend
a college there next year.




RUBEN D. CARLES G. PANAMA
Kappa Epsilon (1,2) Glee Club (1)
Sans Pareil (1.2) Basket Ball (1)
Natural Science Society (2)
"Chinchorro's" favorite query is "Qu6 pasa?" A
commercial student, he plans to work next year,
but will eventually study accounting at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. He is Mr. Carson's right-hand
man.


CONQUISTADOR


PAUL D. BARNARD


MASSACHUSETTS


PAGE TWELVE











DORIS CLAIRE YEE CHAN


Kappa Epsilon (1) Conquistador (1,2)
Glee Club (1) College Orchestra (1)
Secretary, I. R. C. (2)
Flickers and Flashes (2)
When we hear the phrase, "Geez, I swear," we
know that "Do-do" is speaking. A commercial
student, she hopes to become a Panama Canal steno-
grapher.



DORIS-LEE COX CANAL ZONE
Swimming (1,2)
Kappa Delta Sigma (2) Conquistador (2)
Kappa Epsilon (2)
Tropical Collegian (2)
Vice-President, Sans Pareil, (2)
Reading Doris' column, "The Tropical Tramp,"
or listening to her happy-go-lucky "hiya!", one would
never take her for the serious student she really is.
She will either continue her liberal arts course or
get a job.



FRANCIS MATTHEW CRISTE, JR. MARYLAND
Football (2) Basket Ball (1,2)
Treasurer, Sophomore Class (2)
Treasurer, Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
Business Manager, Conquistador (2)
Criste is the lean, friendly chap who lounges about
our halls and frequently makes us laugh. His charac-
teristic phrase is "You ain't woofin'." He looks for-
ward to college in the States, and a career as a civil
engineer.




PATRICIA JEAN GETMAN ALABAMA
Kappa Epsilon (1,2)
Kappa Epsilon Play (1)
Flickers and Flashes (2)
"Pat" is cheerful and obliging. She has been an
asset to Mr. Starbuck's office, and we hop, she
realizes her ambitions: first, a secretarial job, then
a happy marriage!


PAGE THIRTEEN


CANAL ZONE


CONQUISTADOR












WALTER D. GORING
Basket Ball (2)
President, I. R. C. (2)


CONNECTICUT
Engineers' Club (2)


A. I'


GUILLERMO ENRIQUE GRAU B.
Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
Natural Science Society (2)
Kappa Epsilon (1,2)
Engineers' Club (1,2)


PANAMA
Sans Pareil (1.2)
I. R. C. (2)


"Willie," "that engineering student from Col6n,"
at the boys' dorm, hopes to go to Princeton or Stan-
ford, and would like to become a famous architect.
We will remember him for his saying, "No, man;
yes, man.


RUBY LA RUE KENT
Volley Ball (1)
I. R. C. (2)


CANAL ZONE
Swimming (1,2)
Conquistador (1,2)


Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
"The Ghost Fl'es South"
S-cretary, Sophomore CTass
Flickers and Flashes (1,2)
One of our most efficient student secretaries,
"Patsy" plans to work for the Canal next year. We
shall all remember her for her characterization of
a haughty Boston matron in "The Ghost Flies
South."


ELIZABETH LARKIN


JAPAN


Sans Pareil (1,2)
Flickers and Plashes (2)
President, Sans Pareil (2)
"Betty" has combined the liberal arts and com-
mercial courses, and despite a long vacation in the
States last fall, and an active social life outside of
college, has done well in both. She will probably
enter a college in the United States next year.


PAGE FOURTEEN


CONQUISTADOR


Walter, or "Hoiman," holds a reserve commission
in the Navy. With us, he has studied engineering.
His future plans are indefinite, but, as he says, "Thz
sky's the limit!"












Softball (1,2) Swimming (1,2)
Assembly Committee (2)
"Joe" says his motto is "Don't strain yourself."
He is taking a commercial course, and will work
after graduation. His little Ford, busily plying from
Panama to Balboa, is a familiar sight.


I


ELLEN ELIZABETH MEAD CANAL ZONE
Conquistador (2) Volley Ball (1)
Swimming (2) Flickers and Flashes (1,2)
Though an efficient commercial student who
looks forward to being a Canal Zone secretary,
"Bette" also has her more playful side, being a good
writer of humorous verse.





BEATRICE MARIE M. MONSANTO
CANAL ZONE
Swimming (1,2)
Flickers and Flashes (2)
"Bebe" is another commercial "gal" who wants to
work in a Panama Canal office. Tall, dark, and
pretty, she should be an ornament to any office. Her
favorite greeting is "Whadya know?"


I

JOHN MONTANYE, JR. PENNSYLVANIA
Kappa Epsilon (2)
Student Assistant, (1,2)
Vict-President, Sophomore Class
Treasurer, Student Association (2)
President, Natural Science Society (1,2)
Being a biology specialist, "Estufa" is given to
inquiring as to the state of one's liver. He has also
taken business courses, however, and is ambitious to
"be as good an accountant as Mr. Starbuck."


CONQUISTADOR


JOSEPH W. LUDLUM


NEW YORK


PAGE FIFTEEN













ARTURO MORGAN MORALES
Sans Pareil (1,2)


PANAMA
Glee Club (1)


JANET AMANDA NESBITT
Conquistador (2)
Kappa Epsilon (1,2)
Kappa Epsilon Play (1)
Assembly Committee (2)
Kappa Delta Sigma (1,2)
Treasurer, Sans Pareil ( 2
Natural Science Society (2)
Tropical Collegian (2)


TURKEY
Swimming (1,2)
Volley Ball (1,2.)
I. R. C. (2)


"Pifia," a lively resident of the girls dorm, has
combined liberal arts and commercial work, and
her ambition is to get a job. Believe it or not-she
intends to be a "bachelorette."


DOLORES SYLVESTER PIMENTO


Kappa Epsilon (2)
Conquistador (1,2)


CANAL ZONE
Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
Volley Ball (1)


Swimming (2)
Flickcrs and Flashes (1,2)
"Do" greets us with the words, "Hi, Cutie." She
has taken commercial subjects, and will shortly join
the ranks of the employed in Panama or the Canal
Zone.


CLAIRE ROSELIE QUINN


Kappa Delta Sigma (1)
Conquistador (2)
Tropical Collegian (2)
Natural Science Society (2)


CANAL ZONE
"What A Life"
Sans Pareil (2)
Swimming (2)


"Irish" Quinn is the youngest of a long line of
attractive sisters, well knowrr on the Zone. We re-
call her characterization of the hysterical band teach-
er in "What A Life." She plans to be, a steno-
grapher.


CONQUISTADOR


"5


PAGE SIXT EN


Kappa Epsilon (1,2)
"Don Arturo's" family must have a good library,
for he is full of literary lore. One of our few male
liberal arts students, he plans to transfer to George-
town University, where he will study law.











JAMES GAMMELL RIDGE


CANAL ZONE


I. R. C. (2) Baseball (1,2)
Basket Ball (1,2) Tennis (1,2)
Football (1,2)
President, Student Association (2)
Vice-President, Freshman Class
When he accepted a position as sports writer for
the Panama American, Jimmy had to drop his work
as Mr. McNair's assistant. His most frequent ques-
Stion this year has been "Have the rings come yet?"



CARLOS ROBINSON RODRIGUEZ PANAMA
Sans Pareil (1,2) Kappa Epsilon (1,2)
Tropical Collegian (1,2)
Treasurer, Sans Pareil (1)
Natural Science Society (1,2)
Carlos, the bronc-busting Chevvy driver from
Panama, has done everything from managing Kappa
Epsilon plays to lecturing on the San Bias Islands,
which he visited a few years ago. Some day he will
probably be the Rockefeller of Panama.


BERT JACK SHELTON V. PANAMA
Student Assistant (2) I. R. C. (1)
College Orchestra (1,2) Football (1,2)
Kappa Epsilon (1,2) Basket Ball (1,2)
Tropical Collegian (2) Swimming (1,2)
President, Sophomore Class (2)
Vice-President, Student Association (1)
Natural Science Scciety' (1,2)
Bert excels both in lessons and outside activities.
Coming from a family where both Spanish and
English are spoken, he is bilingual. Next year he
will attend Columbia University.


MARY LOUISE TRAEGER VIRGINIA
Sans Pareil (1,2) Volley Ball (1)
Engineers' Club (2)
Kappa Delta Sigma (2)
Student Assistant (2)
Assembly Committee (1)
Natural Science Society (1,2)
Secretary, Natural Science Society, (2)
"Judy" has been Mr. Buckley's faithful chemistry
assistant during 1940-41. She is going to Denison
S University in Ohio, and in a few years will probably
be deeply engrossed in chemical defense work!


PAGE SEVENTEEN


CONQUISTADOR













I. R. C. (2) Sans Pareil (2)
Kappa Epsilon (2) Swimming (2)
Engineers' Club (1) Basket E'a.l (2)
Vice-President, Engineers (1)
"Beans" plans to get a job next year, but may
eventually continue his study of engineering. He
looks like a languid chap, but you should see him
drive a car or swim!



RUSSELL ETHAN WELLS NEW JERSEY
Engineers' Club (1,2)
"Spooky," the red-headed engineer who usually is
to be found hanging out of a college window, in
company with Criste, wants to go to Randolph
Field, Texas, to prepare for the Army Air Corps.
As one of his friends says, "He's just part of the
college."




KATHRYN HALL PANAMA
"Kathy" is the serious little curly-head who has
spent most of her time this year in Mr. Buckley's
laboratory. She wants to help humanity by being
either a nurse or doctor, and will pursue her studies
at the University of Michigan next year.



JUANITA TAYLOR ILLINOIS
Flickers and Flashes (2)
Petite Juanita came from the States to attend
our college. She has been one of our most amiable
student secretaries, but her future, it seems, is to be
dedicated, not to the business, but to the domestic
world!


PAGE EIGHTEEN


MILTON LEE TURNER


FLORIDA


CONQUISTADOR












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PAGE NINETEEN


CONQUISTADOR



































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SMembers of the FRESHMAN CLASS, left to right. Back row: William Sherlock, Robert Wertz, Norman Matlowsky, John Anderson, Harry
Marchosky. Howard Rhodes Robert Turman. Third row: Otis Myers, Lee Dubow, Neal Small, Julio HernAndez, Arnold Terry, Raymond
Mid6nce, John Schnake, Edward Moore, John Lewis, William Monsanto, Donald Grimm, Harry Henderson, Georga Prindle, Charles Keck,
Warren Cain, Edgard Quintero. Second row: Eileen Cryan, Dolores Welch, Virginia Stewart, Gertrude McConaghey, Elizabeth Svihla,
Nancy Norton, William Gaines, Edwin Winter, Allan Monsanto, Hugh Norris, Julius Cheney, Maria Hernindez, Dorothy Ailing, Katharine
McMurr3i Dorothy Johnson, Mary Ann Hunt, Elsa Espener, Juanita Rosson. Front row: Russell Hoogland, Evelia Velarde, Margaret
Sulhlin Nancy Colby, John McGlade, Eloise Ramey, Robert Burkle, Mr. McNair (adviser), Aubrey Lewis, Margaret Whelan, Lolita
Power, Gloria Shelton, Carlyle Harvey.













THE CLASS OF 1942


The freshmen organized in September, electing Robert Burkle
president, Aubrey Lewis vice-president, Eloise Ramey secretary, John
Schnake treasurer, and Mr. McNair adviser.

While it may seem that the freshmen have been inactive this
year, since they have had few or no formal meetings, and have spon-
sored no events as a group, they have, in fact, been far from idle. A
few examples will suffice to show how much they have contributed
to the life and spirit of the college. Sixteen out of nineteen men re-
ceiving football trophies are freshmen; ten members out of a cast of
eleven for the college play, "The Ghost Flies South," are freshmen.
The editor of the Tropical Collegian is a freshman; and, to cap the
climax, the editor of The Conquistador, which is supposed to be a
sophomore publication, is a freshman! In fact, it looks as if the "in-
active" freshmen have outplayed the sophomores in every field!

We trust that the members of the class of 1942 will keep up the
good work next year.


PAGE TWENTY-ONE


CONQUISTADOR



















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CONQUISTADOR






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CONQUISTADOR









CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1940-41

September:
17. First meeting of Sans Pareil.
18. First meeting of Kappa Epsilon.
19. Class elections.
20. First issue of Flickers and Flashes.
26. First meeting of Student Association.

October:
1. First meeting of Kappa Delta Sigma.
2. Reorganization of I. R. C.
3. Organization of College Orchestra.
4. Opening of ping-pong season.
5. Resignation of Dean Hosler, and appointment of Dr. Howard
as acting Dean.
18. Faculty reception and Student Association dance.
25. Sans Pareil luncheon.
27. First meeting of Natural Science Society.

November:
5. Beginning of mid-semester examinations.
First meeting of Assembly Committee.
14. First issue of Tropical Collegian, followed by special supple-
ment for American Education Week.
16. Football game with Cristobal High.
18. Local Civic Council elections, at which college students
served as clerks.
21. Thanksgiving football game with Working Boys.
23. I. R. C. outing at Gorgona Beach.
27. Football game with Balboa High.
Kappa Epsilon fiesta.
29. Kappa Delta Sigma party.


iAGE TWENTY--FOUR


CONQUISTADOR










December:
13. Kappa Epsilon banquet.
20. Christmas music assembly.
21. Formal dance at Tivoli.

January:
13. Appointment of Mr. Hackett as Chairman of the Faculty.
14. Speech class assembly.
21. Beginning of semester examinations.

February:
18. Play try-outs.

March:
15. Garden party for college girls given at Mrs. Ben Williams'
home, by Mrs. Williams and Miss Moody.
24. Beginning of mid-semester examinations.
26. Taking of pictures for The Conquistador.
29. Kappa Epsilon and I. R. C. picnic at Chorrera.

April:
2. Natural Science Society annual waffle supper.
15. Kappa Epsilon annual play and dance.
29. Date for The Conquistador to go to press.

May:
16. Kappa Delta Sigma play at the Balboa Clubhouse Theatre.
31. Beginning of final examinations.

June:
1. Baccalaureate services, at St. Luke's Cathedral.
4. Junior College banquet.
5. Commencement.


PAGE TWENTY-FIVE


CONQUISTADOR



































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Members of the STUDENT ASSOCIATION, left to right. Back row: Arnold Terry, Carlyle Harvey, William Sherlock, Robert Wertz,
Norman Matowsky, John Anderson, Harry Marchosky, Donald Gr;mm, Howard Rhodes, Warren Cain, Francis Cr.ste, Ruben Car:es.
Third row: Neal Small, Otis Myers, Russell Wells, Julio Hernindez, Guillermo Grau, Raymond Middnce, Robert Burkle, Edwin Winter,
John Schnake, Edward Moore, Julius Cheney, Joseph Ludlum, John Lewis, Harry Henderson, George Prindle, William Monsanto, Carlos
Rodriguez, Thomas Bender, Charles Keck. Second row: Paul Barnard, Bert Shelton, Eloise Ramey, William Gaines, Evelia Velarde, Margaret
Sullivan, Mary Louise Traeger, Nancy Colby, Gertrude McConaghey, Janet Nesbitt, John McGlade, Virginia Stewart, Elizabeth Svih'a,
Elizabeth Larkin. Lolita Power, Mary Ann Hunt, Patricia Getman, Beatrice Monsanto, Ellen Mead, Ruby Kent, Dolores Pimento, Katharine
McMurray, Juanita Taylor, Milton Turner, Doris Chan, Elsa Espener, Walter Goring, Lee Dubow, Allan Monsanto. First row: Russell
Hoogland, Doris-Lee Cox, Jeanne Bonwell, Hugh Norris, Nancy Norton, John Montanye, Mr. Lyons (adviser), Maria Hernandez, Aubrey
Lewis, Sara Shytle, Muriel Evans, Gloria Shelton, Margaret Whelan.


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THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION


The officers of the Student Association in 1940-41 were as follows:
James Ridge, president; Joseph Haggerty, vice-president for the first
semester; Hugh Norris, vice-president for the second semester; Nancy
Norton, secretary; John Montanye, treasurer. Mr. Lyons is the adviser.
By decision of the faculty, the Student Association was not to
be organized this year unless at least eighty percent of the students
joined the group and paid the dues of four dollars. To encourage the
students, the members of the faculty all paid the dues. Soon the neces-
sary number of members materialized, and the organization got under
way. The faculty gave a reception for the students on October 18, in
the music room. This was followed by a Student Association dance at
the Hotel Tivoli. On December 21, a Christmas dance was held at the
same place. The annual Junior College banquet will be held early
in June.
The Student Association, besides giving social functions, sponsors
the publication of the Tropical Collegian and The Conquistador. Mem-
bers of the group receive copies of these publications. Members may
also attend high school plays at a reduced rate. In return for coopera-
tion in producing the college play, Kappa Delta Sigma usually contrib-
utes a share of the profits of the play toward the expense of publishing
The Conquistador.
This year athletic trophies for men were purchased from Student
Association funds.


PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN


CONQUISTADOR

































Members of THE CONQUISTADOR STAFF, left to right. Eack row: Paul Barnard,
Dolores Pimento, Dolores Welch, Ruby Kent. Middle row: Doris Chan, Mary Ann Hunt,
Irene Chan, Eileen Cryan, Ellen Mead, Dorothy Ailing, Gloria Shelton. Front row:
Margaret Sullivan, Miss Moody (sponsor), Nancy Colby, Lee Dubow, Francis Criste.


THE CONQUISTADOR

Editor-in-Chief ................................................................ Lee D ubow
Business Manager ........................................................ Francis Criste
Illustrators ............................................ Margaret Sullivan, Irene Chan
Chief Photographer ..................................................... Paul Barnard
Assistant Photographers ............................ Neal Small, Robert Wertz,
Lee Dubow
Feature Editor ................................................................. Nancy Colby
Make-up Staff .............. Francis Criste, John Anderson, Robert Wertz
Typists ........................ Doris Chan, Dorothy Alling, Mary Ann Hunt,
Irene Chan, Gloria Shelton, Dolores Welch,
Eileen Cryan, Ellen Mead, Ruby Kent, Dolores
Pimento.
Contributors ............... Margaret Sullivan, Ruby Kent, John Anderson,
John Montanye, Marion Orr, Walter Goring,
Dorothy Ailing, Elsa Espener, Mary Ann Hunt,
Janet Nesbitt, Carlos Rodriguez, Doris Chan,
Jeanne Bonwell, Ellen Mead, Aubrey Lewis,
and others.
Faculty Sponsor ............................................................ Miss Moody


PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT


CONQUISTADOR












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Members of the TROPICAL COLLEGIAN STAFF, left to right. Back row: Doris-Lee Cox,
Margaret Sullivan, Lee Dubow, Harry Henderson, Carlos Rodriguez, Bert Shelton. Front
row: Jeanne Bonwell, Claire Quinn, Katharine McMurray, Janet Nesbitt, Neal Small,
Mr. Hackett (sponsor).


THE TROPICAL COLLEGIAN
(THE JUNIOR COLLEGE MONTHLY MAGAZINE)

STAFF
Editor-in-chief ..................................................... Katharine McMurray
Assistant Editor ........................................ ...................... Neal Small
News Editors ............................................ Claire Quinn, Janet Nesbitt
Literary Editor ............................................................ Jeanne Bonwell
Sports Editor ....................... ............................ Lee Dubow
Science Editor ................................................................ Bert Shelton
Columnist ....................................... ........................ Doris-Lee Cox
Art Editor ................................... ......................... Margaret Sullivan
Business Manager ................................................ Carlos Rodriguez
Assistant Business Manager ........................................ Harry Henderson
Faculty Sponsor ........................ ........................ Mr. Hackett


PAGE TWENTY-NINE


YYi~


CONQUISTADOR































Staff of FLICKERS AND FLASHES, left to right. Back row: Dor's Chan, Ruby Kent,
Mr. Starbuck (Fponsor), Fatricia Getman, Elizabeth Svihla Margaret Whelan, Elizabeth
Larkin. Front row: Ellen M:ad, Dolores Pimento, Pauline Sutheriand, Beatrice Monsan.o,
Juanita Taylor.

FLICKERS AND FLASHES
Flickers and Flashes is -the weekly mimeographed newspaper got
out by the Junior College Correspondence Bureau, otherwise known as
the Office Practice Class, taught by Mr. Starbuck. Each week one
member of this group is excused from classes, so that she can preside
over the office of the Correspondence Bureau. One of her duties is the
preparation of Flickers and Flashes. The paper is composed of one or
two sheets, of a different hue each week, and often has one or more
illustrations, symbolizing important events or celebrations of the week.
The main purpose of the publication is to remind students of coming
events, but, if space allows, jokes are published as well. The most
recent acquisition of the Correspondence Bureau is a book entitled
2088 Jokes, Toasts, and Anecdotes. This is for the benefit of those
poor secretaries who need jokes to use as fillers and cannot find any
students who know any.
The copy for Flickers and Flashes has to be prepared on the type-
writer, with the aid of the right-hand margin justifier. This, by dint
of hard work, enables the secretary to have an even right-hand margin
as well as an even left-hand margin. If it were not for this one little
machine, Flickers and Flashes would be a joy to put out.
All in all, though, we can hardly believe that the Junior College
would be what it is today if it were not for our master achievement,
Flickers and Flashes.


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE THIRTY































STUDENT ASSISTANTS, left to r'ght. Back row: James Ridge, Bert Shelton,
John Schnake, Carlos Rodriguez, Jonn Montanye. front row: Jeanne Bonwell,
Mary Louise Traeger.

STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIPS
The first Junior College student assistantships were created in
1935. The student assistant receives partial remission of his tuition in
return for a specified number of hours of service rendered each week.
This year there have been six official student assistants: namely,
Mary Louise Traeger, John Schnake, Jeanne Bonwell, John Montanye,
James Ridge, and Bert Shelton. In addition to these assistants, Carlos
Rodriguez has acted as Mr. Carson's unofficial assistant.
Mr. Buckley's assistants are Mary Louise (Judy) Traeger, the
chemistry assistant, and John Schnake, the physics assistant. Judy and
John can always be found in the afternoons down in the laboratory,
making up solutions, setting up apparatus, and arguing with each other.
Johnny Montanye proved to be such an excellent nursemaid to Mr.
Lee's guinea pigs last year that Mr. Lee retained him as his biology
assistant for a second year. Jeanne Bonwell, the English assistant, is
usually rushing through the halls delivering English themes, notebooks,
and notices to the students, or telling inquisitive students that she does
not know what their marks were on last week's theme. Mr. McNair
had two assistants in mathematics and engineering this year. His first
assistant, Jimmy Ridge, resigned to take the position of sports editor
of the Panama American. Since Jimmy's departure, Bert Shelton has
assumed the responsibility of taking care of the drawing equipment and
files for Mr. McNair.


PAGE THIRTY-ONE


CONQUISTADOR


























Members of KAPPA EPSILON, left to right. Back row: Arturo Morgan, John
Montanye, Janet Nesbitt, Claire Quinn, Dolores Pimento, Guillermo Grau,
Edgard Quintero, Aubrey Lewis, Neal Small, Russell Hoogland, Lee Dubow.
Middle row: Miguel Corc6, Eloise Ramey, Milton Turner, Bert Shelton, Doris-
Lee Cox, Ruben Caries, Patricia German, Julio Hernindez Harry Marchosky,
Irene Chan, Doris Chan. Jeanne Bonwell, Katharine McMurray, William
Sherlock. Front row: Evelia Velarde, Dorothy Ailing, Nancy Norton, Margaret
Sullivan, Carlos Rodriguez, Mr. Carson (sponsor), Polly Perkins, Maria
Hernindez, Margaret Whelan, Mary Ann Hunt, Gloria Shelton, Elsa Espener.


KAPPA EPSILON
Kappa Epsilon, the Spanish Club, sponsored by Mr. Carson, had
as its officers this year the following: Carlos Rodriguez, president;
Polly Perkins, vice-president; Maria HernAndez, secretary; and Margaret
Sullivan, treasurer.
In November, the Panamanian members of the club presented a
fiesta of typical Panamanian dances, at which native dresses were ex-
hibited. For the first time, the traditional Christmas dinner was held
at night this year, with Dr. George Howard as guest speaker; former
presidents Tomis Paredes and George Cowes gave toasts. At other
meetings, members of the club gave interesting talks. Edgard Quintero
talked on "Panama During Its Independence"; Mary Ann Hunt on
"My Impressions of the New Orleans Mardi Gras"; Ruben Carles on
the monuments of Panama; and Carlos Rodriguez on his visit to the
Darien Indian country. To illustrate Carles's speech, Dr. George Howard
showed slides, and Mr. Lee supplemented Rodriguez's talk by showing
color movies of the Darien Indians. At another meeting, Juan Garcia,
of Barcelona, spoke of his years at Oxford. In April, Kappa Epsilon
organized a picnic to Chorrera Falls, to which the members of the
International Relations Club were invited.
As the finishing event of a very enjoyable year, the Spanish Club
offered its annual farewell presentation-a short comedy sketch, "El
Juez de los Divorcios," at the Little Theatre. The play was followed
by a gala ball at the Balboa Playshed.


PAGE THIRTY-TWO


CONQUISTADOR






























Members of SANS PAREIL, left to right. Back row: Neal Small, Carlos
Rodrigucz, Guillermo Grau, Aubrey Lewis, Russ.ll Hoogland, Harry Hender-
son, George Prindle, Lee Dubow. Middle row: Ruben Caries. Milton Turrer,
Claire Quinn, Jeanne Bonwell Katharine McMurray, Harry Marchosky, Mary
Jane Campbell, Mr. Carson (sponsor), Arturo Morgan. Front row: Eleanor
Shcrman, Nancy Colby, Margaret Sullivan, Doris-Lee Cox, Elizabeth Larkin,
Janet Nesbitt, Polly Perkins, Elsa Espenr, Mary Ann Hunt, Dorothy Ailing.
Lolita Power.


SANS PAREIL

Entering its third lusty year of life, the French Club, Sans Pareil,
found the following students at the controls: Betty Larkin, president;
Doris-Lee Cox, vice-president; Margaret Sullivan, secretary; and Janet
Nesbitt, treasurer. The club is well sponsored by Mr. Carson.
The club opened its activities with a luncheon prepared by the
star cooks of the department of household arts of the Balboa High
School. At this luncheon, the club members had the pleasure of hear-
ing the promising voice of Nancy Colby, who sang the "Marseillaise"
and "Dark Eyes," in French. Special guests included Dr. Howard, Miss
Moody, and Mr. Hackett. After the luncheon, several of the members
presented a short dramatization in French of Guy de Maupassant's
short-story "La Parure," adapted by Bernardo Ortiz. The cast included
Alfonso Fibrega, Doris-Lee Cox, Eleanor Sherman, Jeanne Bonwell,
and Neal Small.
Another interesting meeting was held in March, at which a
musical and literary program was presented in French. A tea-party
followed.
Two additional meetings completed the year's program of Sans
Pareil: a program featuring the music of well-known French com-
posers, and the performance of a popular French comedy.


PAGE THIRTY-THREE


CONQUISTADOR
























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Members of the INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB, left to right. Back row: Guillermo Grau, Harry Marchosky, Edgard Quintero,
Otis Myers. Middle row: Milton Turner, Polly Perkins, Janet Nesbitt, Irene Chan, Dolores Welch, Neal Small. Front row: Eloise
Ramey, Nancy Norton, Bert Shelton, Walter Goring, Mr. Hackett (sponsor), Doris Chan, L e Dubow, Gloria Shelton, Ruby Kent.










THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB


The International Relations Club, founded in 1935 by Mr. Hackett,
is a Junior College organization affiliated with the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace. The objects of the club are to further
the work of the Carnegie Endowment for promoting international
peace, to foster an interest in international affairs, and to encourage
friendship among the students of different nationalities in the college.
At the head of this illustrious band of peace-makers and adven-
turers, we find Walter Goring, president of the club. His deputy is
Bert Shelton. Doris Chan keeps the records, and Lee Dubow has
charge of the finances. To Mr. Hackett goes the credit for an inspiring
sponsorship.
This year, the International Relations Club has again had a full
program. The first guest speaker to address the club was Mr. Carlos
Bosch Garcia, a refugee from Spain, who spoke about the Civil War
in Spain, and his opinion of the background of the present war in
Europe. Another speaker, Mr. James Triollo, explained the plan to
exchange students between the United States and countries of Central
and South America.
Like most other clubs, the I. R. C. has had social events. The
social events for this year all proved to be all-day picnic-trips to one
place or another. The first was to Gorgona beach. On the second trip,
the club members ventured farther into the Interior, to El Valle, where
hiking and swimming were the order of the day. Next, the club joined
the members of Kappa Epsilon on an expedition to Chorrera Falls.
This trip later turned into an "exploration," which took the whole
party across the plains to some colonial ruins on the outskirts of
Chorrera.


PAGE THEIR TY-FIVE


CONQUISTADOR








































.. .. -. .: ,. . ..

-




Members of KAPE, DELTA SIGMA, left to right. Back row: Robert Burkle, Harry Marchosky, Allan Monsanto, William Monsanto,
Hugh Norris, Roivrt Wertz. William Sherlock, Guillermo Grau. Middle row: John McGlade, Mary Jane Campbell, Janet Nesbitt,
Mary Louise Traeger, Ruby Kent, Mary Ann Hunt, Gloria Shelton, Aubrey Lewis. Front row: Miss Moody (sponsor), Lolita Power,
Doris-Lee Cox, Margaret Sullivan, John Schnake, Jeanne Bonwell, Maria Hernandez, Dolores Pimento, Elsa Espener.










KAPPA DELTA SIGMA


Kappa Delta Sigma, the college dramatic society, was founded
in 1933, the year the college opened, by Miss Moody. The main
activity of this group is the annual production of a three-act comedy
at the Balboa Clubhouse Theatre. In return for some assistance in
staging, business matters, etc., from the Student Association, Kappa
Delta Sigma usually contributes a share of the profits from the play
toward the publication of The Conquistador. This year Jeanne Bon-
well, John Schnake, Margaret Sullivan, and Francis Criste held the
offices of president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer, respec-
tively. In November an evening party was held at the home of Miss
Moody. Dramatic skits, theatrical games, the winners of which re-
ceived prizes, informal dancing, and refreshments comprised the enter-
tainment. Work on the long play, "The Ghost Flies South," a three-
act comedy by Frederick Jackson, got under way in March, and the
play was presented May 16. The cast included Nancy Colby and
William Gaines as leads, Marybelle Perkins, Hugh Norris, Ruby Kent,
Mary Ann Hunt, John Schnake, Maria Hernindez, Robert Burkle,
Gloria Shelton, and Margaret Sullivan. The play boasted a wide range
of characters: gay young lovers, a suspicious wife, a domineering
Boston matron, a mulatto maid, a cowboy, an Indian, and best of all,
a grandmother of eighty! Kappa Delta Sigma owes a debt to Mr.
Subert Turbyfill, Director of the Balboa Little Theatre, who generously
helped with the staging, to Mrs. Baker, who provided music, to Mr.
Lyons, who supervised the ticket sales, and to Mr. R. D. Moore, who
helped with make-up. On the production staff were Mary Louise
Traeger, Elsa Espener, Virginia Stewart, Jeanne Bonwell, Katharine
McMurray, Dolores Pimento, Ellen Mead, Francis Criste, William
Monsanto, Howard Rhodes, Warren Cain, John Anderson, Robert
Wertz, John McGlade, John Furman, Carlyle Harvey, Allan Monsanto,
and others. Miss Moody directed the play.


PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN


CONQUISTADOR


























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PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT


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CONQUISTADOR


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Members of the NATURAL SCIENCE SOCIETY, left to r:ght. Back row: Guillermo
Grau, B.rt Shelton, Julio Hernandez, Harry Henderson. Front row: Russell Hoogland,
Evelia Velarde, Aubrey Lewis, Mary Louise Traeger, Mr. Lee (sponsor), John Montanye,
Ruben Caries, Janet Nesbitt, Carlos Rodriguez.

THE NATURAL SCIENCE SOCIETY
In 1935, a group of students organized a club for the study of
the natural sciences, and asked Mr. Lee to sponsor it. Last fall this
society entered its seventh year, with John Montanye, Dan Kiley, and
Mary Louise Traeger as president, vice-president, and secretary-
treasurer. Vance Howard served as chairman of the program com-
mittee. Kiley and Howard are both alumni; indeed, it is an interest-
ing feature of this group that alumni as well as the present students
of the college may be members.
The society meets bi-monthly in the biology laboratory, usually
on Wednesday evening. Each month an outside speaker addresses the
society. The group specializes in a different branch of natural science
each year, the subject for 1940-41 having been the culture of the
Cuna and Choc6 Indians. Among the speakers this year were Captain
Louis Schmidt, who spoke on his fishing experiences in Panama Bay,
and Mr. Frederick McKim, an expert on the Indians of Panama, who
talked on his experiences among these Indians.
The meetings are usually followed by social periods, and some-
times refreshments are served.- I tiaddition, Mr. and Mrs. Lee-make a
practice of giving a waffle supper for the society at mid-year or soon
after. A farewell party was given at the home of the Lees on May 18.


PAGE THIRTY-NINE


CONQUISTADOR














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ENGINEERS, left to right. Back row: Carlyle Harvey, Walter Goring, Milton Turner, Robert Turman, Howard Rhodes, Francis Criste,
Russell Wells, Guillermo Grau, Norman Matlowsky, Donald Grimm, James Ridge. Middle row: Edwin Winter, John Schnake, Paul Darnard,
William Gaines, Bert Shelton, Julio Hernindez, Allan Monsanto, Hugh Norris, William Sherlock, Arnold Terry, Charles Keck, Julius
Cheney, Robert Wertz. Front row: Thomas Bender, Robert Burkle, John McGlade, Lolita Power, Mr. McNair (sponsor), Mary Louise
Traeger, Otis Myers, Raymond Midence.


AN^L^










THE ENGINEERS


The activities of the Engineers during the school year 1940-41
have centered around the Engineering Problems class, taught by Mr.
McNair. This course has been dormant for a few years, but it decided
to wake up last September. It meets on Fridays at one o'clock.
The first semester's work consisted of field trips and lectures.
The group made trips to the filtration plant and testing laboratory
at Miraflores, the telephone exchange in the Administration Building,
Madden Dam and the hydroelectric plant, the Clay Products Company
in Panama City, the new high school building, Albrook Field, and
the hydraulics laboratory at Miraflores. In the course of the first semester
two outside speakers addressed the group during class periods. Mr.
H. F. Marker, of the Safety Division, spoke on the work of the Safety
Engineer, and Mr. M. P. Superak, of the Structural Engineers' Office,
discussed the foundation work and piling for the new high school
building. Other class meetings were given over to discussions of field
trips and of magazine articles on engineering topics.
The work of the second semester has been elementary surveying.
The instructor assigns problems and the students take the surveying
instruments out on the field to collect their own data. When the
problem is solved, the solution is written up. (These writeups are
just as hard to get in as are those of physics and chemistry experi-
ments.) After the instructor had explained the use of the transits
and other surveying equipment, the students worked several different
types of problems showing the various uses to which the transit can
be put.
The first semester there were fourteen in the class, and the second
semester, twenty-three. We must conclude one of the three things:
that the class is a snap, that the one credit it offers is tempting bait,
or that the work is really interesting and worth while. The most likely
conclusion is the last.


PAGE FORTY-ONE


CONQUISTADOR











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FACE FOR TY-TWO


CONQUISTADOR


























Members of ORCHESTRA, left to right: D-nald Grimm, Wi'liam Hunter, O:is Myers,
Marie Haggerty, Marie Winkes, Gloria Shelton, Mrs. Baker (director), William Gaines,
Bert Shelton.

THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA
In spite of the difficulties of getting the members together, and
of finding a suitable practice room, the college orchestra, directed by
Mrs. Baker, afforded its public much enjoyment this year.
At the Christmas assembly, a particularly worth while program,
including the following numbers, was presented:
I.
"Allegro," by Beethoven.
"Gavotte," by Martini.
"Moon Dawn," by Friml.
II.
"He Shall Feed His Flock," from Handel's Messiah, and
"Cantique de Noel," by Adam, sung by Nancy Colby,
accompanied by the orchestra.
III.
Christmas carols, sung by audience, accompanied by the
orchestra.
At the performance of the college play at the Balboa Clubhouse
Theatre, May 16, the orchestra played these numbers for the overture
and entr'actes.
"Babies in Toyland," by Victor Herbert.
"Waltz of the Flowers," by Tschaikowsky.
"Andantino," by Lemare.
"Chanson," by Friml.
"By the Waters of Minnetonka," by Lieurance.
Members of the orchestra are Otis Myers, Donald Grimm, Murray
Wright, and Marie Winkes, (violins), Gloria Shelton and Joseph
Haggerty, (cellos), Bert Shelton (flute), William Gaines (French
horn), and Marie Haggerty (piano), student director.


PAGE FORTY-THREE


CONQUISTADOR


































Members of the ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE, left to r;ght. Back row: Joseph Ludlum
(sophomore), Miss Moody, Mr. Carson (faculty). Front row: Muriel Evans (freshman,
secretary), Mr. Hackett (faculty, chairman), Janet Nesbitt (sophomore). Absent: Norman
Matlowsky, freshman.


THE ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE

For the year 1940-41, the Assembly Committee planned to
schedule one general assembly and one Student Association meeting
each month, and to have class meetings called whenever, in the judg-
ment of the class advisers, there was need for them. Only six of the
possible seven general assemblies were scheduled, however. None was
held in February on account of the raucous noise made by the pile
driver engaged in the work of constructing the new building along-
side the Junior College. Parenthetically, it may be noted that this
noise seriously interfered with all the general assemblies, although it
failed to faze the leather-lunged orators of the Student Association;
in fact, it was said that the men doing the construction work outside
the Junior College complained that they could not hear their machinery
running when Student Association meetings were in progress.
A list of the general assemblies held during the year follows:
November-Address, "The Third Set of Locks" by Lt. Col. Thomas B. Larkin, engineer
in charge of the locks project.
December-Christmas Musical Program, directed by Mrs. Helen C. Baker.
January-Speech Class Assembly, planned by Dr. Dorothy Moody.
March-Address, "The World of Tomorrow," by the Right Reverend Harry Beal,
Bishop of the Panama Canal Zone.
April-Address, "The Influence of Vasco Nfiiez de Balboa on the Early History of
Panama," by Dr. C. L. G. Anderson, noted authority on the early history
of Panama.
May-Address, "The Work of the Personnel Bureau of the Panama Canal," by
Dr. J. M. O'Brien, Director of Employment and Training.


PAGE FORTY-FOUR


CONQUISTADOR










MEN'S SPORTS


Our sportsmen made a good showing this year, in football, track,
baseball, and basket ball.

The football line-up (Francis Criste, captain), consisted of that
underhanded, spiraling center, Bob Burkle; those heavily built guards,
Allan Monsanto, and Howard Rhodes; those tough tackles, Aubrey
Lewis and "Dynamite" Terry; the ends, speedy, glue-fingered Joe
Burgoon, and lanky Criste; the back field stars, tricky Russ Hoogland,
flashy Ed Corrigan, "Brick-body" McGlade, "Brains" Anderson, and
ace-kicker Ed Winter. Hugh Norris, Jimmy Ridge, Bert Shelton,
Warren Cain, Bill Gaines, Howard Moore, and Eddie Moore also did
yeoman service.

On November 6, this trusty team defeated the Cristobal High
School, 13-0. In the annual Thanksgiving day classic against the
Working Boys, Hoogland, Norwegian fullback, shot a bullet pass to
Criste over the goal-line for the only touchdown of the day. Winter
then split the uprights with an accurate kick for the 7-0 triumph.
Anderson's accurate passes throughout the game were responsible for
many a long drive. On November 27, the college team held the
staunch athletes of the B. H. S. to a scoreless tie.

Cristobal High defeated the college in track, though C. Z. J. C.
won many firsts. Hugh Norris, spring-legged high-jumper, cleared
the bar at five feet, ten inches, to set a college record. Eddie Moore
also starred, when he easily out-sprinted the Cristobal racers in a
440-yard dash.

Joe Burgoon hurled for the baseballers, while Bill Sherlock was
at the receiving end. Hugh Norris held down first base, Bob Thomas


PAGE FORTY-FIVE


CONQUISTADOR



















































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PAGE FORTY-SIX


CONQUISTADOR












second, and Lefty McGlade covered the first sack. The three ace fly-
catching fielders were Hoogland, left field, Aubrey Lewis, right field,
and Arnold Terry, center field. These lads played an exciting game
against Balboa High, losing 4-1.

Stars of the basket ball season, which began in April, were Eddie
Moore, the dead-eye swisher, Hugh Norris and Francis Criste, those
tall centers, and the dribbling aces, Winter, Sherlock, Lewis, McGlade,
Walter Goring, Hoogland, and Julio Hernindez.

The 1940 football players received as trophies small silver foot-
balls, paid for by the Student Association.


On& t"wo U
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PAGE FORTY-SEVEN


CONQUISTADOR
























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PAGE FORTY-EIGHT


CONQUISTADOR



































eatured


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE FORTY-NINE










ERA UN CONQUISTADOR
BY MARY ANN HUNT


I am that famous soldier of yore,
Known to posterity as "Conquistador,"
Seeker of gold, shedder of gore.
Oh, yes, era un conquistador!

I lived in Cadiz on the Spanish shore.
Day and night through my books I'd pore.
'Til possessed by tales of treasure lore,
Into fragments my books I tore-

Boarded a ship that southward bore
Me to a jungly, tropic shore,
Where books I conned nevermore,
In searching for a treasure store.

After battle, fever, hunger,
When the sky was roaring thunder,
At last I found my golden store-
Found it; grasped it; wanted more!

Killed and murdered; plundered, robbed,
For within me ever throbbed
The urge for riches, power, and fame-
It burned me like a living flame!

Now wealthy, without hesitation,
I left a land in desolation,
Wrecked and ruined, in spoliation.
Not until reaching civilization-


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE FIFTY











Spain-where I had glory, honor, laud,
And was worshipped like some demigod,
Did I find the greed which gnawed
To be deception, delusion, fraud!

I shivered and sweated; writhed, blasphemed,
Realizing that I had lived and dreamed,
Following a false and futile gleam.
Yet "Serd un conquistador!" I screamed.

Determinedly seeking my books once more,
Through jungles of wisdom I did explore.
Plundered the endless realms of pages
'Til Death called; enshrined me in the Ages....

On a pedestal condemned me to stand,
Oh, not by the ancient sages grand,
Renowned as was I for immorality,
But on the lowest plane of Immortality.

So it is from these heights I say:
"You are true conquerors of today;
You who study; strive; and pay
Tribute to Knowledge: Omni-Deity."


PAGE FIFTY-ONE


CONQUISTADOR

















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PAGE FIFTY-TWO


GET TO VWORK


CONQUISTADOR


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A TRIBUTE TO THE C. Z. J. C.
BY MARGARET SULLIVAN

The Canal Zone Junior College is indeed a small college, but
there are those who love her. They love her for her shining newness,
her lofty dignity (after all we are three floors up), her courage to
stand up against the ravages of the fierce jungle, etc. They love her
as one loves a mother, or they venerate her like a devoted teacher.
They think of her in terms of happy days, carefree classmates, friendly
and lovable instructors. Later they will love her with a nostalgic yearn-
ing to recapture old scenes, old memories.
When one passes by the college he sees little to remind him of
a typical college in the United States. Rather, he sees a beautiful
panorama with a sort of primitive charm. The college campus, on
the edge of Roosevelt Jungle, is green, wet, and muddy in the rainy
season, and dry and brown in the dry season. A graduate will cherish
the memory of the wisps of smoke and the cinders which float gently
from Sosa Hill when it is being burned over, of the proud roar of
the P-36's as they swoop and zoom overhead, of the steady throb of
the pile driver, and of the labored wheeze of the P. R. R., sounds
which often drown out the song of the crickets and the mild sounds
emitted by the undergraduates taking their siestas on tjie lawn of the
"Science Building."
What Canal Zone collegian will forget the halcyon days and the
exotic nights in moonlit tropical gardens (El Rancho, Atlas, Balboa),
the breathless suspense of the football games and of the publication
of the Tropical Collegian, the exhilarating bull-sessions in the "Clubby,"
the tick-hunting expeditions after jaunts to the interior, the proms
in the palatial Hotel Tivoli, the native jam-sessions of the Spanish
Club-oh yes, and the classes-lectures and labs-who will forget
them? (For further information on the courses send a self-addressed
envelope and ten cents in stamps, or ask your local dealer.)
Come one, come all, come to C. Z. Tech, and get adventure and
romance along with your education! Enjoy the athletics in our great
stadium, capacity five hundred, termites not included. Dance at our
dances to the wild rhythm of the Fifth Infantry Orchestra. Seize the
great educational opportunities (our engineers are so experienced
now that if an engineer stands at each end of the transit, the two
can survey each other perfectly). Come to the land where the waters
meet, where the sun sets backwards, and-nuts! (Resemblance of this
masterpiece to any gushing college catalogue is purely coincidental.)


PAGE FIFTY-THREE


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T/ TO


PAGE FIFTY-POUR


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CONQUISTADOR









THE HEN HOUSE


"R-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r ring-g-g-g-g- g-g-g!"
"Turn off that alarm clock!"
A hand springs forth from the warm bed, gropes wildly for the
alarm button, succeeds in finding it, and then disappears beneath the
covers. For a few minutes all is quiet. Then suddenly every one real-
izing that it is a school day, jumps out of bed. There is a sound like
that of galloping horses, as every one runs madly to the "Puzoozie."
"Hand me the pink towel with the blue dots, will you, Polly?"
Polly's answer sounds like the famous tobacco auctioneer's chant,
for she is hurriedly brushing her teeth.
Dot Johnson, in the meantime, has found her towel, and is half-
way down the hall leading to the breakfast room.
"Ting-a-ling," meaning "Come and get it," sounds, and there is
more rushing and stampeding.
After breakfast, every one goes to school, except one or two girls
who do not have classes until later.
Noon arrives. Everybody tries to wait patiently until Doris, the
culinary expert who helps Mrs. Magnuson in the kitchen, rings the
bell. After ringing the bell, Doris hurriedly makes her exit, to avoid
the inevitable rush.
"Pass the sugar, limes, butter, potato salad, and bread."
"Do you mind if I help myself first?"
"Of course not."
Then, for approximately ten minutes, bedlam reigns, as every one
busily tries to help herself to food while it is passed in a frenzied way
from one end of the table to the next.
Mrs. Magnuson, better known as "Gram," comes in to check on
the absentees and to see that every one eats three times as much as
she should.
"Where are Polly and Marybelle?" she asks.
"Oh, they're swimming again, Gram."
Polly and Marybelle come in, and the "vittles" are again circu-
lated around the table.
In the meantime, Dotty Ailing is convulsing every one at the table
with what she terms her "corny jokes."


PAGE FIFTY-FIVE


CONQUISTADOR









The afternoon classes are soon over, and every one settles dowr
to do a bit of studying.
"Hey, Janet, may I use your desk?"
"Sure, I'm not using it now."
"Dotte-e-e-e-e-e!"
Two voices in unison answer, "Yes?"
"I mean Dotty Ailing. May I use your nail polish?"
"Certainly!"
Presently someone drives up and whistles.
"Who's there?" someone challenges him.
"Bill."
"Which Bill?" echoes a chorus of feminine voices.
To make the confusion even worse, the telephone rings. If the
call is not for Polly or Marybelle, it is for Dotty Johnson. Let me
remark here that at the beginning of the school year every one would
drop what she was doing in order to reach the telephone first; now,
however, someone has to be coaxed to answer it.
Twilight comes and goes, and soon Mrs. Hamlin enters, trying to
appear stern.
"Who left the iron on, girls? It's red-hot!"
After the culprit has confessed, Mrs. Hamlin, who can no longer
refrain from smiling, cheerfully replies, "Well, be a little more careful
in the future, because you might burn the dormitory down."
A few minutes later Mrs. Hamlin again enters.
"Who left the hot water heater on? It's been on for hours and
is scalding hot."
When either of these misdemeanors has been committed, Dorothy
Johnson is usually the guilty person.
Night is now upon us, and as we prepare for bed, a final utter-
ance is heard from the two roommates, Dotty A. and Janet N.
"Turn out that light; we want to go to sleep."

Note: The "goon" who makes our dormitory life sound as placid
as it does in the foregoing account is really one of our most ram-
bunctious students. It couldn't, of course, be Janet Nesbitt. Need we
say more?


PAGE FIFTY.SIX


CONQUISTADOR



















5 | ESQU'iRE BUSH MANW
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SMALL TROUBLE









THE TH/INKER HEE /


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GIRL 8rE-S DOG


PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN


THREE MUSKETEERS






CUT DAVY


HARTY






MONKEY VS






C.1. JrC.


CONQUISTADOR














THE BULL PEN


As one approaches the end of Carr Street near the Balboa High
School building, the lone structure on the right, before one reaches
the high school, reveals itself as a rambling grey frame building be-
neath overhanging trees. A sign designates it as the "Little Theatre,"
and indeed, there is a theatre on the first floor. But this building is
far more than a theatre, for its second floor is a dormitory, where
dwell mental giants who would dwarf Archimedes and Buckley them-
selves. Yes, drab and inconsequential as the building seems to tour-
ists, the Canal Zone Junior College knows it as the scene of learned
disquisitions: intricacies of economics that would leave Mr. Hackett
agape with wonder; hypotheses of literature that would cause Dr. Moody
to gasp for air; doctrines of "math" that would stupefy Mr. McNair;
and principles of science that would make Mr. Buckley flounder like
a fish on the beach at low tide. So fatiguing are these cerebrations,
however, that the dormitory lads often find it necessary to restore
themselves with sleep. Indeed, what else is a dormitory for?
Almost any afternoon, if one ascends the stairway to the vesti-
bule on the second floor, and proceeds down the hallway with cautious
tread, being careful not to step on planks undermined by termites, one
comes upon four peaceful figures engrossed in the study of the cul-
ture of Morpheus. The first body one sees is that of William Grau,
a slender youth hailing from the interior of Col6n. One of the more
stable denizens of the place, having resided here for three years, he is
a student in engineering.
Next our visitor is disturbed by mutterings from the deep shad-
ows, and, upon investigation, finds that they originate with Harry
Marchosky, a freshman in commercial subjects, who comes from the
same "neck of the woods" as Grau. He is chiefly known for his
opinions on feminine pulchritude.
The third and most interesting member of the somnolent group
is Lee Dubow, potential journalist, whose oratorical gifts are known
far and wide. He is a native son (of a gun) from Wisconsin, who
came to our tropical college this year "just for experience." He can
orate by the hour on every subject, from the proper way to run a
government on how to make an angel cake with only one angel.


PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT


CONQUISTADOR
















And to make this group of lads resting from their midnight de-
bates complete, one must mention Walter Goring, sailor boy extra-
ordinary, and lieutenant (j. g.) in Uncle Sam's Naval Reserve. Easily
contented with his two-dollar corncob, he writes for hours to his one
and only-who's supposed to be a fair Connecticut Yankee. But love
or not, he still carries his arguments through to the end. Goring of
the Navy!
A recent arrival at the boys' dorm is Jim Finn, lately of the
University of Kansas, who is taking an L. A. course at C. Z. J. C.,
but may eventually become one of the brighter ornaments of the busi-
ness world.
The matron of the dormitory is Mrs. Powell, a kindly lady who
acts as a mother to all the residents, scolding, consoling, and praising
them, according to their deserts. They will always remember her.

Note: The author-did you guess?-is Goring. But he didn't
write the part about himself!


PAGE FIFTY-NINE


CONQUISTADOR

















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CONQUISTADOR


PAGE SIXTY


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TO A PILE DRIVER
BY ELLEN MEAD

To you, oh friendly driver,
More oil in your tanks!
'Twas you who gave off steam and noise
Which stifled J. C. pranks.

Fond memories you bring to me,
Of J. C.'s dusty walls,
Of Wells and Criste beating out
Their Conga in the halls.

Of Collinge, A-1 English prof.,
Hand flying with each hammer,
As checkmarks all across the theme,
Help engineers learn grammar.

The profs have shouted 'til they're hoarse;
The students love your jars;
The orchestra can play a march,
In pounding, strident bars.

A dozen other J. C. woes
By contrast now seem lesser:
But since you've left, the multigraph
Now reigns as your successor!


PAGE SIXTY-ONE


CONQUISTADOR











THROUGH THE COKE STRAW
BY LEE DUBOW

Our Collegiates are all talking about:
Bob Burkle's big ah-traction through a whole long year....his little
Weezy.
That April lecture one morning at 10-mostly applause.
Walter Goring's big attempts to Reno-vate his affair with a
certain Connecticut Yankee....rumor has it that it's Amador compe-
tition!
Lee Dubow Amador Beach-ing it with that little high school lass
every Sunday at 4. Hmmmmmm.
Charlie Keck's big ah-fair with his "Yost" in the woods lass-
ah, humbug.
Arnold (Bill) Terry's long trek to Rio Hato not so long ago-
and Andy Jackson's Whiz-icker sitting on his knee!
Bob Guthrie's constant attempts to get that little woo-man-
and getting stood up every time. Darnit!
Those daily "Ghost Flies South" rehearsals. If it flew much
farther, it'd have to be written in Spanish.
Howard Rhodes and Warren Cain trying to squeeze into the
Balboa Clubhouse every day at four-'cause Rhodes has that big white
collar job, you know....big business.
The school spirit that remained as dead as the trees in Gatun
Lake all year long-and as wanting as a waiter at the Tivoli.
The peculiar absence of so many well known faces-through jobs
-and otherwise!
That British Real-ief at the Panama Golf Club-and CZJC's
mighty tact-si girls. Wot women!
Those daily swims Claire Quinn takes every day at 12-My Mac
Abee. Gee.
Mr. Star-buck-ing every time he lost a penny accounting bet.
(How to get rich in a hurry!)
Irene Chan and Margaret Sullivan sketching everything and every-
body in school-'sketch on?


PAGE SIXTY-TWO


CONQUISTADOR











Betty Larkin-all day long.
Paul Barnard's shuttering so much that he did a swell job in
taking the yearbook pictures-who said he was an amachoor?
Dotty Johnson's "whaddyamean" cracks everytime somebody just
took a blissful look. Oh Varga!
Janet Nes-bitt hard on Johnny Montanye's long line at that El
Valle picnic. Ain't love funny?
Miss Moody-just that way when work on the yearbook really
got started.
CZJC's not so tact-full lassies who thought the only fellows worth
going with were the Looies-'cause a lot of civvies are just as good,
if not better. Oh for a uniform!
The sudden popularity of Old Panama. By night or by day,
Revere?
Muriel Evan-ings-at Pedro, and elsewhere.
Maria Hernindez-using every room in school as her beauty
parlor. Looky, look!
Marion's Orr-ful job in the office for nine whole months-and
maybe longer!
The big surprise when Juanita Taylor announced her middle-
aisleing it. Gee-some guys have all the luck!
Eloise Ramey and Nancy Norton finding a new way to study
their accounting-on the March-osky!
Midence's meddling in each and every date at each and every
opportunity-whadabum!
Jim Finn's quick introduction to Panama's higher educational
institutions-the gardens-well mixed with his bee-year!
Willy Grau having grau-ing pains.
Mr. Carson........and the movie of the same name.
Doris Co(a)x-ing all the boys. Whew-whada line.
Beans Turner-ing around that Ford of his-if there's anything
left.
Walter Winchell's definition of imitation: Plagiarism-with an
odor! That's us........so good buy!


; PAGE SIXTY-THREE


CONQUISTADOR

















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PAGE SIXTY-FOUR


CONQUISTADOR


















ODE ON THE TROPICAL COLLEGIAN
BY KATHARINE McMURRAY

(With Apologies to William Wordsworth)


.......................................For I have com e
To look on the Tropical Collegian, not as in the hour
Of its beginning; but hearing often-times
The harsh and grating cries of fellow students,
Nor soft, nor kind, but of sufficient power,
To anger and arouse. And I have felt
A presence that excites me with the urge
To pace the halls; an optimistic hope,
Of finding copy far more nearly finished,
Whose dwelling is the minds of many men,
And in the lockers, also in the office,
And everywhere, but in the editor's hands;
A weariness and effort, that impedes
My every moment, each object of my thought,
And lags through all the year.


PAGE SIXTY-FIVE


CONQUISTADOR












A MESSAGE TO C. Z. J. C.
BY MARION ORR

There are those who tell me I have no right
To complain of a single thing in my life.
There's no worry, no work, no effort, you see,
To being the secretary to C.Z.J.C.

The students come in to tell me their woes,
Wishing that time wouldn't stop in repose,
And say they envy me my hours of ease
With only themselves and the teachers to please.

Now sometimes I wonder if maybe they
Wouldn't like to look over a secretary's day.
So I hereby invite you one and all
To spend a day in the office instead of the hall.

Sharply at eight I arrive at the school;
Students are scattered on rail and on stool;
Books lie discarded while chatter holds sway:
This marks the beginning of another school day.

The door is barely opened,
When a tide of life pours in.
"Could I please have a paper clip?"
And, "Do you have a pin?"

"I need a piece of paper.
Ah! There is just the thing."
The buzzer sounds; it's almost eight.
The tide goes surging out again.

Mr. Hackett breathes a sigh of relief,
Revelling in the hope and belief,
That the storm is over and all is serene,
And peace will once more reign supreme.


CONQUISTADOR


PAGE SIXTY-SIX











But rudely the quiet is shattered once more
As a whimsical student comes through the door.
The building's not on fire, nor is the world at end,
But someone has just found that he's out of ink again.

And absences, I must confess,
Take precedence above the rest.
I once had hair of golden hue,
But now there's gray mixed in too.

For Johnny Smith will first explain:
"Oh, yes, but gee! I missed the train."
And little Abner saunters in,
"Oh my! I had a flat again."

And he who lives within the city,
Has other tales to stir my pity.
"I know I'm late," he whimpers low,
"I couldn't help it; I stumped my toe."

A rapid trot, a whirl of dust!
He'll get to class on time or bust.
There is no need for such a flurry,
His bus is twenty minutes early.

I try to keep my tongue in check,
Remembering days not too far back,
When I was bothering others too,
Thinking up foolish things to do.

But there are times in each man's life,
When, met by smiles of pure delight,
His happiness seems to overflow,
And counters the force of any blow.

These are the times in which I bask,
As, going about my humble task,
I meet with smiles and shouts of glee
As I pass out a pay check to each teacher I see.


PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN


CONQUISTADOR















So have your fun, you happy sophomores,
Laugh and be gay, the world around is yours,
You will go forward to lives that are bright,
Choosing the jobs that you feel to be right.

I shall always remember the friends that you've been,
Remember your laughter, your worries, your whims,
And when you've gone forth from these portals,
You'll realize that teachers and secretaries are mortals.

No, I have not forgotten our freshman class.
Next year you'll be sophomores in glory to bask.
Enjoy your vacation and have lots of fun,
I'll be looking forward to seeing you when summer days are done.


PAGE SI XTY-EIGHT T


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PAGE SIXTY-NINE


CONQUISTADOR






























PAGO SEVENTY


CONQUISTADOR


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Full Text

PAGE 2

ARCHIVES RESERVE THE CCNCUISTADOR 1 9 4 1 ---. I DATE DUE ---1 r----,---1 :r-__ __ : I 1II1 3040001051 1299

PAGE 6

' ..

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THE CONQUISTADOR 1941 Volume VI PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION of the CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE

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(j o Z Q c::: >-l > o o THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE FROM ANCON HILL

PAGE 9

THE CONQUISTADOR RETURNS BY DOROTHY ALLING 'I'vlid the distant noise of tmmpets And a ,'attling of spea..-s, A dusty old conquistador, Emer ge s through the yean There's a screech of rusty a1'nZO" As he comes to life again; The,'e is stiffness in his movements And an outwa rd show of pai'l. Soon a withal'ed hand is lifted And the cobwebs on his face Are bmshed away ; he seems t o smile; P erhaps he l ikes the place. Now" bis fight fa" life is over; O nce 'again he s young and gay. H e waves his sword and cries aloud. H e's on the loose! Make way! CONQUISTADOR P A G E THREE

PAGE 10

ADMINISTRATORS OF THE CANAL ZON E JUNIOR COLLEGE BEN M. WILLIAMS Superi ntendent of the Canal Z on e S c hool s. LAWRENCE JOHNSON, A ss i s t ant Superintendent. PAGE FOUR GEORGE HOWARD A ss i s t ant to the Superintendent.

PAGE 11

Oacu{jy CONQUISTADOR PAGE FIVE

PAGE 12

CHAIRMAN OF THE FACULTY Last fall on the resignation of Dr. F. W. Hosler as Principal of the Balboa High School and Dean of the Canal Zone Junior College the Superintendent of Schools decided to make a change in the admin i tration of the college. Thenceforth, the principal of the Balboa High Schl'lol would no lon ger have charge of the college A new position, that of Chairman of the Faculty, was created, and Mr. Roger C. Hackett, instructor in social sciences, was appointed to fill it. Mr. Hackett took his A. B. at the University of Indiana and his M. A. at Harvard. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. In the summer of 1937 he attended le ctures at Oxford. He has published many articles in labor, fraternal, philatelic, and academic journals. Before coming to the Canal Zone, he had experience as a teacher of social sciences and as an administrator in high schoo l s and junior colleges in Indiana and North Carolina. In 1935 he was transferred from the Cristobal High School faculty to that of the Canal Zone Junior College. Mr. Hackett is noted for his examination-long detailed journeys from Adam and Eve down to Hitler's latest atrocity; but he is also remembered for never trying to embarrass a student; for the jolly times he Ilas inspired in the International Relations Club; and for the kindly twinkle in his eye when he reads "boners" in class, following the return of a particularly bad set of papers! PAGE SIX CONQUISTADOR

PAGE 13

Members o f the FACULTY le ft to right. Back row: Mr. Lyons, Dr. Premiss. Me.. McNair, Mr. Collinge, Me. Franklin Mr. LanIo, Me. Starbuck. Me. Car so n M r G n e s e r Mr. Strode, De. Howard FrOnI r o w : Mrs. Baker, Mr. Buckley, Miss Orr Mr. H ac k ert. Dr. Moody, Me. Le'!, Miss Swenson. FACULTY BEN M. WILLIAMS Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools LAWRENCE JOHNSON, Assistant Superintendent. GEORGE HOWARD, Assistant to the Superintendent. ROGER C. HACKETT, Chairm a n of the Faculty, Instructor in Socia l S ciences. HELEN C. BAKER Instructor in Music. FLOYD BUCKLEY, Instructor in Physical Sciences CHALMERS S. CARSON, Instructor in Rom a nce Languages. ROGER W. COLLINGE, Instructor in English. HERBERT CROWLEY Instructor in Physical Educ a tion. MAX C. FRANKLIN, Instructor in Metal Shop Practice. H. J. GRIESER In s tructor in Swimming. RUDOLPH J. LANTO, Instructor in Physical Education GEORGE O. LEE, Instructor in Biological Sciences JAMES A LYONS Instructor in Commercial Subjects MARGARET McLEOD, Instructor in Physic a l Education JAMES S. McNAIR Instructor in Mathematics and Engineering. DOROTHY MOODY Instructor in English Dean of Women HERVEY P. PRENTISS, Librarian. PERRY 1. STARBUCK Instructor in Commerci a l Subjects HARRY STRODE, Instructor in Physical Education MILDRED SWENSON Instructor in Commercial Subjects CONQUISTADOR PAGE S EVEN

PAGE 14

PAGE E.IGHT o f z c e n c 1 a CONQUISTADOR

PAGE 15

CONQUISTADOR PAGE NINE

PAGE 16

I EL LIBRAOOR PAGE TEN CONQUISTADOR

PAGE 17

c5Olhomores CONQUISTADOR PAGE ELEVEN

PAGE 18

PAGE TWELVE PAUL D. BARNARD MASSACHUSETTS Engineers Club ( 1 ,2 ) "Pablo, a skilled amateur photographer, who took the group pictures for The Conqu i stador plans to continue his studies at Rhode Island State College next year He aspires to be an aeronautical engineer. Quiet and dignified, he has as his favorite saying "The greatest river makes the least din." THOMAS ALBERT BENDER, JR. CANAL ZONE Water Polo (1,2) Swimming (1.2) Orche stra ( 1 ) Softball (1) Another quiet, likeable, engineer is "Tom Swift, who plans to follow his sister Natalia, one of our alumnae to the University of Minnesota next fall. Besides being a motorcyclist and swimmer, Tom is a violinist. JEANNE BONWELL MONTANA 5mdcm Assi s tant (2) San s Pareil (1.2) Kappa Delta Sigma ( 1 2 ) "\'V'hac A Life" Pre s ident Kappa Delta Sigma ( 2 ) Literary Editor Trop ic al Collegum "Bonnie, the student assistant in English, and a crack student in literature, belongs to an army family, recently ordered to Georgia. She will atten:l a college there next year. RUBEN D. CARLES G. Kappa Epsilon ( 1 ,2) San s Pareil ( 1 ,2) Natural Science Socie t y ( 2 ) PANAMA Gke Club (1) Basket Ball ( l ) "Chinchorro's" favorite query is "Que pasa?" A commercial student, he plans to work next year, but will eventually study accounting at the Univer s ity of Pennsylvania. He is Mr. Carson's right-hand man. CONQUISTADOR

PAGE 19

CONQUISTADOR DORIS CLAIRE YEE CHAN CANAL ZONE Kappa Ep s il o n ( 1 ) C onr/II; Ilado r ( 1.2) Gte! Club (I) Co lle ge Or cheStra ( 1 ) Secrcfar y. 1. R. C. (2) Fli c ker all d Fhu bes (2) When we hear the phrase, Geez swear, we know that Do-do" is speaking. A commercial student she hopes to become a Panama Canal steno grapher. DORIS-Ll):E COX CANAL ZONE Swimming ( 1 2 ) Kappa Delta Sig ma ( 2 ) C O l1qll;Jlador ( 2 ) Kappa Ep silo n ( 2 ) Tropical C oll eg ian ( 2 ) Vic ePre s ident San s Pareil ( 2 ) Reading Doris' column, The Tropical Tramp, or l istening to her happy-go-lucky "hiya!", one woui:l never take her for the serious student she really is. She will either continue her liberal arts course or get a job. FRANCIS MATTHEW CRISTE, JR. MARYLAND Football ( 2 ) Ba s k e t Ball ( 1 2 ) Trea sure r Soph o m o r-e Class (2) Tr e a s urer. Kappa Della Sigma (2) B usi ness Manag e r C O lUl ltiJl ador ( 2 ) Criste is the lean, friendly chap who lounges about our halls and frequently makes us laugh. His charac teristic phrase is "You ain t woofin ... He looks for ward to college in the Scates, and a career as a civil engineer. PATRICIA JEAN GETMAN Kappa Ep s ilon ( 1 2 ) K a ppa E ps il o n P l a y ( 1 ) F l i c k e r a lia FlaJbeJ (2) ALABAMA Pat is cheerfu l and obliging She has been an asset to Mr. Starbuck s office, and we she realizes her ambitions: first, a secretarial job then a happy marriage! PAGE THIRTEEN

PAGE 20

PAGE FOURTEEN WALTER D. GORING CONNECTICUT Basker Ball (2) Eng:neers' Club (2) President. 1. R. C. (2) Walter or H o im a n," holds a re serv e commission in the Navy. With us, he has studied engineering. Hi s future pl ans are indefinite but a s he says, sky's the limit! GUILLERMO ENRIQUE GRAU B. PANAMA Kappa Sigma (2) Sar.s P:Heil (1.2) Natural Sc ience Society (2) 1. R. C. (2) Kappa Epsil o n (1,2) Engineers Club ( 1.2) Willie," th a t engineering student from Colon," a t the boys' dorm hopes to go to Princeton or St anford a nd wou l d like to become a farnam a rchite ct. We will remember him for his saying "No, m a n; yes, man." RUBY LA RUE KENT Vel ley E'.II (I) 1. R. C. (2) Kappa D e lta Sigma (2) "The Ghost FlOes South" S"-cretary. Sophomore Class Flickc,'r! ana Flashes ( \ ,2) CANAl, ZONE S wimm; n g (1.2) COllqllislt.'dor ( 1,2) One of Our most efficient student secretaries, Patsy plans to work tor the C a nal next year. We s h all all remember her f o r h e r characterization o f a haughty B osto n matron in The Ghost Flies South ELIZABETH LARKIN Sans Par'! il (1,2) Fli ckers and Flashes (2) P r eside nt Sans P arei l (2) JAPAN Betry has combined the liberal arts and com mercial courses, a nd despite a long vacation in the States last fall and a n active social life outside of college, has done well i n both She will prob a bly enter a college in the United States next year. CONQUISTADOR

PAGE 21

CONQUISTADOR JOS E PH W. LUDLUM NEW YORK S o ftball ( 1 2 ) As s embl y Com m ittee (2) Swi01m : n g ( 1 ,2) J oe says hi s m o tt o i s D o n t s tr ai n yourself." H e i s taking a com merc ia l course, a n d w ill wor k a f ter grad u a ti on. His littl e F or d bu sily p lyin g f rom P a n a ma ro B a lbo a i s a f a mil iar s i g ht. E L LEN ELIZ A BETH n l EAD CANAL ZONE C(Jllfj ll iJl ado r (2) Volley Ball ( I ) Swimming (2) Fli ckers a nd F /aJbc J (1.2 ) Tho u g h a n e ffi c i e nt commercia l s tu dent w h o l ooks f orward to b e in g a Can a l Zo n e secr e t a ry, "Bett e a lso has h er m o r e p layful side, b e i ng a good wr ite r o f hum oro u s verse. B EATRI C E MARIE M. MONSANTO Swimmin g ( 1 2 ) F lickers d u d FlaJhes ( 2 ) CANAL ZONE B e b e i s ano th e r com m ercia l ga l w h o want s to wor k in a Pana m a Can a l office. T all, d ar k an d p retty s h e shou l d b e an o rn ame nt to a n y o ffice. H er f avori t e g reetin g i s "Wh a dya kn ow? JOHN MONTANYE, JR. PENNSYLVANIA K a ppa Epsilon ( 2 ) Stud ent ASSI Slaut, ( t 2 ) S op h o m ore Class Tr e a s ure r Stud e nt A ssociatio n (2) Pre s ident Natural Sc i ence S o ciety ( 1 2 ) Bei n g a bio l ogy s peci a li st, "Es tuf a i s give n to inq u i ring as to th e sta te o f o n e s l iver. He has a lso tak e n busi ness cou rses h owev er, a nd i s am b i ti o u s to b e as goo d a n a ccount ant as Mr. Sta rbu ck." PAGE FIFTEEN

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PAGE SIXT _EN ARTURO MORGAN MORALES PANAMA Sans P:l.reil ( 1,2) Glee Club ( I ) Kappa Epsilon ( 1,2 ) "Don Arturo's family must have a good library, for he is full of literary lore. One of our few male liber a l arts students, he plans to transfer to George town where he will study law. JANET AMANDA NESBITT COl1qllipador (2) Kappa Epsil on ( 1,2) Kappa Eps il on Play ( 1 ) A sse mbly Committe: (2) Kappa Dcha Sigma ( 1.2 ) Trea sure r Sans Pareil ( 2 I Natural Science S ociety (2) Trop ical Co:t egia n (2) TURKEY Swimming ( 1.2) Volley Ball ( 1 ,2 ) I. R. C. (2) Pifia," a lively resident at the girls dorm has combined liberal a rts and commercial work, an:! her ambition is to get a job. Believe it or not-s he intends to be a bachelorette. DOLORES SYLVESTER PIMENTO CANAL ZONE Kappa Eps: lon (2) Kappa Delta Sigma ( 2 ) Cr'::'f/lliJ ltldor ( 1 ,2) Volley Ball (1) Swimming (2) Fli c k e r s find F/(lIhcJ ( 1 2 ) "Do greets us with the words, "Hi, Curie." She has t ake n commercial subjects, a nd will shortly join the ranks of the em played in Panama or the Canal Zone. CLAIRE ROSELlE QUINN Kappa Delta Sigma (1.) ConquiJl a dor (2) Trop ical C ot/egian (2) Natural Science Society (2) CANAL ZONE "\Vhat A Lif-e" Sans Pareil (2) Swimming (2) Iri s h Quinn is the youngest of a long line of att rac tive sisters, well known -on the Zone. We reo call her characterization of the ).ysteric a l band teach er in "Wha t A Life Sht: pl ans to be a steno grapher. CONQUISTADOR

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CONQUISTADOR JAMES GAMMELL RIDGE CANAL ZONE 1. R. C. (2) Baske t Ball (1,2 ) Foot ball ( 1.2) President, Stud ent Assoc:arion (2) V ice Presid e nt Freshman Class ( 1.2) Tennis ( 1,2) When he acce pted a position a s sF0rts writer for the P anama American : Jimmy had to drop hi s work as Mr. McNa i r's ass i sta nt. His most frequent question this year has been H ave the rin gs come yet? CARLOS ROBINSON RODRIGUEZ PANAMA Sans Parei l ( 1,2) K appa Epsilo n ( 1,2 ) T apicai Coll egia n ( 1,2) Tr eas urer San s Parc H ( I ) Natural Science Society ( 1,2) Carlos the b roncbu st in g Chevvy driver fr o m P a n ama, has done everything from m anag in g K appa Epsilon plays to lecturin g on the S a n Bias Isl a nds which he visited a few y e a r s ago Some day he will proba bly be the Roc kefeller of P a n a ma. BERT JACK SHELTON V_ PANAMA Student Ass i s tant (2) College Orchestra ( 1 2 ) Kappa Epsilon ( 1 ,2) Trop i cal C ollegian (2) I. R C. ( I ) Fo o tball ( 1 2 ) Bask-:t Ball (t,2) Swimmi n g (t,2) Pre sident, S o phomore C lass (2) Vi cePre s i dent, Student As sociat i O n ( 1 ) Nat u r a l Scien ce S : c i ety ( 1.2 ) Bert excels both in lessons a nd outside actlvlt1es C oming from a f a mily where both Spanish and English ar e spoken, he is bilingual. Next year he will attend Columbia University MARY LOUISE TRAEGER VIRGINIA San s Par c H ( 1 ,2) V olley Ball (I) Engineers' C lub (2) K appa D e lta Sigm a (2) Student Assistant (2) Committee (1) Natural Scienc e Society (1.2) Secretary. Narural Science Society, (2) Judy" has b ee n Mr. Bu c kley's f a ithful chemistry ass istant during 1940-41. She i s go ing to Denison University in Ohio and in a few years w ill prob a bl y be deeply engrossed in chemical defense work! PAGE SEVENTEEN

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MILTON LEE TURNER l. R. c. (2) K a pp a Epsilo n (2) Eng ine e r s Club ( 1 ) Vic e-Pre sid:nt, Eng ine e r s ( 1 ) FLORIDA S a n s P areiJ ( 2 ) S wimming (2) Bask e t E'aJ ( 2 ) Beans pl ans to get a job next year, but ma y eventu ally continue his study o f engineering. He looks like a languid cha p, but you should see him. drive a car or swim! RUSSELL ETHAN WELLS NEW JERSEY Eng ine e r s Club ( 1,2) Spooky," the red-headed engineer who usu ally is to be found hanging Out of a college window in company with Criste w a nts to go to Randolph Field Texas to prepare for the Arm y Air Corps. As one of his friends says, He's JUSt part of the college. KATHRYN HALL PANAMA "Kathy is the serious little curly-head who h a s spent most of her time this year in Mr. Buckley s laboratory. She w a nts to help humanity by being either a nurse or doctor, and will pursue studies at the University of Michigan next year. JUANITA TAYLOR ILLINOIS F lick er a nd Flashes ( 2 ) Petite Juanita c a me from the States to attend our college. She h a s been one of Our most ami a ble student secretaries but her future it seems, is to be dedicated, not to the business but to the domestic world! PAGE EIGHTEEN C O NQUISTADOR

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c;; r e /; 771 e n CONQUISTADOR PAGE NINETEEN

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n o Z /:) c::: Members of the FRESHMAN CLASS, lett to right. Back row: William Sherlock Robert Wertz, Norman Mariowsky John Anderson, Harry Marchosky Howard Rhod-!!s Robert Turman. Third row : Otis Myers Lee Dubow, Neal Small Julio Hernandez, Arnold Terry, Raymond Midence, John Schnake, Edward Moore, John Lewis. William Monsanro, Donald Grimm, Harry Henperson, Prindle, Charles Keck. Warren Cain Edgard Quinrero. Second row: Eileen Cryan, Dolores Welch, Virginia S t ewart, Gertrude McConaghey Svihla. Nancy Norton, William Gaines, Edwin Winrer, Allan Monsanro Hugh Norris, Julius Cheney, Maria Hernandez, Dorothy Alling, Katharine McMurray Dorothy Johnson, Mary Ann Hunr, Elsa Espener, Jua nita Rosson. Fronr row: Russell Hoogland, Evelia Velarde. Margaret Sullivan, Nancy Colby, John McGlade, Eloise Ramey, Robert Bur kle Mr. McNair (adviser), Aubrey Lewis, Margare t Whelan, Lolira Power, Gloria Sheiron, Carlyle Harvey

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THE CLASS OF 1942 The freshmen organized in September electing Robert Burkle president, Aubrey Lewis vice-president, Eloise Ramey secretary J ohn Schnake treasurer, and Mr. M cNair adviser While it may seem that the freshmen have been inactive this year, since they have had few or no formal meetings, and have spon sored n o events as a group, they have in fact been far from idle. A few examples will suffice ro show how much they have contributed ro the life and spirit of the college. Sixteen Out of nineteen men re ceiving football trophies are freshmen; ten members Out of a c a st of e lev e n for the college play, "The Ghost Flies South are freshmen. The editor of the Tropical Collegian is a freshman; and, to cap the climax, the editor of The Conq u istador which is supposed to be a sophomore publication is a freshman! In fact it looks as if the in a ctive freshmen have outplayed the sophomores in every field! We truSt that the members of the cl ass of 1942 will keep up the good work next year. CONQUISTADOR PAGE TWENTY-ON E

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PAGE TWENTY-TWO CONQUISTADOR

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! CONQUISTADOR PAGE TWENTY-THREE

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS 1940-41 September: 17. First meeting of Sans PareiI. 18. First meeting of Kappa Epsilon 19. Class elections. 20 First issue of Flicken and Flashes. 26. First meeting of Student Association. October : 1. First meeting of Kappa Delta Sigma. 2. Reorganization of 1. R. C. 3. Organization of College Orchestra. 4. Opening of ping-pong season. 5 Resignation of Dean Hosler, and appointment of Dr. Howard as acting Dean 18. Faculty reception and Student Association dance. 25. Sans Pareil luncheon. 27. First meeting of Natural Science Society. November: 5. Beginning of mid-semester examinations. First meeting of Assembly Committee. 14. First issue of Trop ical Collegian, followed by special supple ment for American Education Week. 16. Football game with Cristobal High. 18. Local Civic Council elections at which college students served as clerks 21. Thanksgiving football game with Working Boys. 23. 1. R. C. outing at Gorgona Beach. 27. Football game with Balboa High. Kappa Epsilon fiesta. 29 Kappa Delta Sigma party. I' AGE T \XI E N T Y F 0 U R CONQUISTADOR

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December: 13. Kappa Epsilon banquet. 20. Christmas music assembly 21. Formal dance at Tivoli. January: 13. Appointment of Mr. Hackett as Chairman of the Faculty. 14 Speech class assembly 21. Beginning of semester examinations. February: 18. Play try-ours. March : 15. Garden party for college girls given at Mrs. Ben Willi a ms' home, by Mrs. Williams and Miss Moody. 24. Beginning of mid-semester examinations. 26. Taking of pictures for Tbe Conquistador. 29. Kappa Epsilon and I. R C. picnic at Chorrera. April: May: 2. Natural Science Society annual waffle supper 15. Kappa Epsilon annual play and dance 29. Date for Tbe Con q uistad01" to go to press. 16 Kappa Delta Sigma play at the Balboa Clubhouse Theatre. 31. Beginning of final examinations. June: 1. Baccalaureate services, at St. Luke s Cathedral. 4. Junior College banquet. 5 Commencement. CONQUISTADOR PAGE TWENTYFIVE

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U> (') o Z (:) C >-! > o o of the STUDENT ASSOCIATION, left to right. Back row: Arnold Terry Carlyle Harvey, William Sherlock Robert Wertz, Norman Matiowsky, John Anderson Harry Marchosky, Donald Gr:mm, Howard Rhodes, Warren Ca i n Francis Cr's te Ruben Car:es. Third row: Neal Small Otis Myers, Russell Wells, Julio Hernandez, Guillermo Grau, Raymond Midence, Robert Burkle Edw i n Wime r, John Schnake Edward Moore, Julius Cheney, Joseph Ludlum John Lewis Harry George Prindle, William Monsanto Carlos Rodriguez Thomas Bender Charles Keck Second row: Paul Barn ard, Bert Shelton Eloise R amey, William Gaines, Eve1ia Velard-e Marg aret Sullivan Mary Lou ise Traeger, Nancy Colby, Gertrude McConaghcy J ane t John McGlade. Virginia Stewart Elizabeth Svih a, Elizabeth Larkin. Lolita Power Mary Ann Hunt, Patricia Getma n, Beatrice Monsanto, Ell e n Mead, Ruby Kent, Dolores Pimento, Katharine McMurray, Juanita Taylor Milton Turner, Doris Chan Elsa Espen-er, Walter Goring, Lee Dubow, Allan Monsanto First row: Hoogland Doris-Lee Cox, Jeanne Bonwell Hugh Norris, Nancy Norton, John Montanye Mr. Lyons (adviser), Maria Aubre y LeWIS, Sara Shy tie Muriel Evans Gloria Shelton M a rgaret Whelan.

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THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION The officers of the Student Association in 1940-41 were as follows: James Ridge, president; Joseph Haggerty, vice-president for the first semester; Hugh Norris, vice-president for the second semester; Nancy Norcon, secretary; John Montanye treasurer. Mr. Lyons is the adviser By decision of the facuJcy, the Student Association was not to be organized this year unless at least eighty percent of the students joined the group and paid the dues of four dollars. To encourage the students, the members of the faculty all paid the dues. Soon the neces sary number of members materialized, and the organization got under way. The faculey gave a reception for the students on October 18, in the music room. This was followed by a Student Association dance at the Hoeel Tivoli. On December 21, a Christmas dance was held at the same place. The annual Junior College banquet will be held early in June. The Student Association, besides giving social functions, sponsors the publication of the Tropical Collegian and The Conqttistador. Mem bers of the group receive copies of these publications. Members may also attend high school plays at a reduced rate In return for coopera tion in producing the college play Kappa Delta Sigma usually contrib utes a share of the profits of the play coward the expense of publishing The Conquistadol. This year athletic trophies for men were purchased from Student Association funds. CONQUISTADOR PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN

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Members of THE CONQUI STADOR STAFF, l eft to r ight. L'dCk r ow: Paul Barnard. D o l o r es Pimento, Dolores Welc h Ruby Kent. Middle row: Doris C h an, Mary Ann Hunt, Iren e C h an, Eile:n C r yan, EIl<:n Mead, Dorothy Alling, Gloria Shelton Front r ow: Margaret Sullivan, Miss Moody ( sponso r), Nancy Colby. Lee Dub ow, Francis Criste. THE CONQUISTADOR EditOr-in-Chief Lee D ttbow Business M a na ge r ........................... ..... ........ . .... . ........... F ranc i s C riste IllustratOr s ...................... ...... ................. Margaret Sullivan Irene Chan Chief PhotOgrapher ...... .... .............. ............ ...................... P aul Bamard Assistant PhotOgrapher s .............................. Neal Small R obe,t t Vertz Lee D ubow F ea tur e EditOr ............ .... .............................. ...... ............ .... Nancy Colby M a ke-up St a ff ................ F1-ancis C,-iste, Anderson, R obert tVe rtz Typi s t s .......................... Doris Cban Dorotby Alling Mary H unt, k ene Chan, Gloria Shelton D olores lY/ elch Eileen Cryan Ellen Mead, R uby K ent, D olores PitlZe11to. ContributOrs .. ............. Margaret S ullivan R uby Kent, j ohn Andenon, j ohn Montanye Marion Or r lY/ alte r Goring, D orothy Alling, Elsa Espener Mary Amt H unt j u net Nesb i tt, Carlos Rodriguez, Doris Cha n j eanne Bon w ell Ellen Mead, Aub"ey Le'IJis, and others. Faculty Sponsor ................................ .... ..................... ........ M iss Moody PAGE TWENTYEIGHT CONQUISTADOR

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Membe r s of the TROPICAL COLL EGIAN STAFF left to r ight. Back row: Doris-Lee Cox. !l.h r garc[ Sullivan Lee Dubow Harry Hend erson, Carlos Rodriguez, Beer Sh:lton F r ont r o w: Jeanne Bonwell Claire Quinn Katharine McMurray Janet Nesbill, Neal Small. Mr. Hackett ( sponsor). THE TROPICA L COLLEGIAN (THE JUNIOR COLLEGE MONTHLY MAGAZINE ) STAFF Editor-in-chief Katharine McMtt rray Assistant Editor ......... .... . . . ..................... ................... ... ... Neal Small News Editors ......................... ........ ... . ..... Claire Q ttinn, Janet Nesbitt Literary Editor ... ........... .... . . .................. .... .... ..... . ..... Jeanne Bonwell SportS Editor ..... ...... .............. . . .... . ......... .... . ........ ........... Lee Dttbow Science Editor ................. ...... .... . .... .............. ..... . .... ........ Bert Shelton Columnist ..................... ................................................... D01'is-Lee Cox Art Editor ......... .......... .... ...................... ........ ............ Margaret S,dlivfI12 Business Manager Carlos Rodri gttez Assistant Business Manager . .......... ....... . .... ....... . . ... Harry Henderson Faculty Sponsor ......... ........ .... ....... . ..... . .... ............... .... ... 1111-. Hack ett CONQUISTADOH PAGE TWENTYNINE

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. io ;-:: .-:-: fi .---< -' "r ----_.,. Slaff o f fLICKERS AND FLAHES left 10 right row: DO:"5 Chan, Ruby KEn:, Mr. Sialb uck Fatric:a Getman Elizab e th Svihla, Margar e t Whel an Elizabeth Larkin. From r ow: Ellen M : ad, Dolores Pimento, Pauline Suthcr:and, Beaerice Monsan o, Juanita Taylor ; FLICKERS AND FLASHES Flicker! and Flashes is 1:he weekly mimeographed newspaper gOt o ut by the Junior College Correspondence Bureau otherwise known as the Office Practice Clas s taught by Mr. Starbuck. Each week n:ember of this group is ex cused from classes, so that she can pre s ide over the office of the Corresp on dence Bure au. One of her duties is the preparation of Flickers and Flashes. The paper is composed of one or twO sheets, of a different hue each week, and often has one or more illustrations, symbolizing important events or celebrations of the week. The main purpose of the publication is to remind students of coming events, but, if space allows, jokes are published as well. The most recent acquisition of the CorresFondence Bureau is a book entitle:! 2088 Jokes ; Toasts and Anecdotes. This is for the benefit of those poor secretaries who need jokes to use as fillers and cannot find any students who know any. The copy for Fli cker s and Flashes has to be prep ared on the typ:;writer, with the aid of the right-hand m a rgin justifier. This, by dint of hard work, enables the secretary to have an even right-hand m a rgin a s well as an even left-hand margin. If it were not for this one little machine Flickers and Flashes would be a joy to pur our. All in all though, w e can hardly believe that the Junior Colleg e "'ould be what it is today if it were not for our master achievement Flicke1"S and Flashes. PAGE THIRTY CONQUISTADOR

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STU DE N T ASSIST ANTS, l e ft to r ght Bac k r o w : Jan:e s Rid g e Bert Shelt o n J o hn Sc hl l a k e, Carlos J O hn MOnlanye hunt r o w : Je a nne B o n w ell { v I a r), L ouise T r a eger. STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIPS The first Junior College student assistantships were created in 1935 The student assistant receives partial remission of his tuition in return for a specified number of hours of service rendered each week. This year there have been six official student assistants : namely, Mary Louise Traeger John Schnake Jeanne Bonwell, John Montanye James Ridge and Bert Shelton In addition to these assistants Carlos Rodriguez h a s acted as Mr. Carson s unofficial assistant. Mr. Buckley s assistants are Maty Louise (Judy) Tra eger, the chemi s try a s sist a nt a nd John S c hnake, the physics assistant. Judy and J o hn c a n a lw ays be found in the afternoons down in the laboratory up solutions, s etting up apparatus, and arguing with each other. Johnny Mont a nye proved to be such an excellent nursemaid to Mr. Lee' s g uinea pigs last year that Mr. Lee retained him as his biology assistant for a seco nd year. Je a nne Bonwell the English assistant, is usuall y ru s hin g through the halls delivering English themes notebooks and notices to the s tudents or telling inqui s itive students that she does not kn o w wh a t their marks were on la st week s theme. Mr. McNair h a d two a s s ist a nts in m a them a tics and engineering this year. His first assistant Jimmy Rid g e resigned to rake the position of SpOrts editOr of the P antlm a A merican. Since Jimmy's departure Bert SheltOn has a ssumed the responsibility of taking care of the drawing equipment and files for Mr. McNair. CONQUqTADQR, PAGE THIRTYONE

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Member s o f KAPP A EPSILON, l efe to ri8hr. Back row: Arturv M o r ga n, Jo hn Mont a ny e, Janet Nes b iu, Claire Quinn. D o l ores P i men to, Guillerm o G r au, Edgard Quint ero, Aubr ey Lewi s Neal Small. kussdl H oog lan d, Lee Dubow Middle r o w: Miguel Cor co Elo i s e Ramey Milton Turner, Bere Shelt o n 0 0ri5-Lee Cox, Rub en Carle s, Pa[ficia Gelman, Julio H erna ndez H arry Marcho s ky Iren': C h a n D oris C h a n J eanne I1;:>nwell Katharine M cMurray, William Sherl ock. Front r ow: Evelia Velarde Dorot h y Allin g Nancy Norron, Margaret S ulliv an, Carlos R o dri guez, Mr. Carson (sponso r). Polly Perkin s, Maria H ern:ind ez, Margaret W h c l an, Mar y An n Hunt, G l oria Shehon Els a Espencr. KAPPA EPSILON K a ppa Epsilon, the Spanish Club sponsored by Mr. C a rson, had as its officers this year the following : Carlos Rodriguez, president; Polly Perkins, vice-president; Maria Hermtndez, secretary; and Margaret Sulliv an, treasurer. In November, the Pan a manian members of the club presented a f iesta of typical Panamanian dances, a t which native dresses were exhibited For the first time, the traditional Christmas dinner was held at night this year, with Dr. George Howard as guest speaker; former presidents Tomas Paredes and George Cowes gave toasts. At other meetings members of the club gave interesting talks. Edgard Quintero talked on Panama During Its Independence "; Mary Ann Hunt on "My Impressions of the New Orleans Mardi Gras ; Ruben Carles on the monuments of P a nama ; and Carlos Rodriguez on his visit to the Darien Indian country To illustrate Carles s speech Dr. George Howard showed slides, and Mr. Lee supplemented Rodriguez's talk by showing color movies of the Darien Indians. At another meeting, Juan Garda, of Barcelona, spoke of his years at Oxford. In April, Kappa Epsilon organized a picnic to Chorrera Falls, to which the members of the International Relations Club were invited. As the finishing event of a very enjoyable year, the Spanish Club offered its annual farewell presentation-a shorr comedy sketch El J uez de los Divorcios," at the Little Theatre. The play was followed by a gala ball at the Balboa Playshed. PAGE THIRTYTWO CONQUISTADOR

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Mcm?? r s o f P AREIL, l e f t c o rig ht Back r o w : Neal Small C arlos R odng ucz Gud.lermo Grau Aubre y L ewis, H oog l a nd, Harry Hend erso n : Gcoq::c Prindl e, L ee Dubo w. Middle r o w : Rub e n Carles. Milt o n Turrer Claire QUinn B o nw ell, Kalharin e M cMurray, H arry Mar c h os k y .. Mary Jan.: C ampb e ll Mr. Carso n (sp o nsor). Art u r o M orga n. Franc r ow: Elean o r Shuman, Nancy Co lby Mar garet Sulli van, D oris Lee Co x E i izabeth Larki n Nesbitt Poll y Perkin s, Els a Mary Ann D o rothy All i ng. Loll1a P o wer. SANS PAREIL Entering its third lusty year of life the French Club Sans Pareil, found the following students a t the controls: Betty Larkin president; Doris-Lee Cox, vice-president ; M a r g aret Sulliv a n s ecretary ; and Janet Nesbitt treasurer. The club is well spons ored by Mr. C a rson. The club opened its activities with a luncheon prepared by the s tar cooks of the department of household a rts of the Balboa High School. At this lun c heon, the club memb ers h a d the ple a sure of hear ing the promising voice of N ancy Colby, who s a ng the Marseill aise" a nd "Dark Eyes," in French. Special guests included Dr. Howard Miss Moody, and Mr. Hackett. After the luncheon, several of the members presented a short dr a matiz a tion in French of Guy de Maupassant s s hort-stOry "La Parure, adapted by Bern ardo Ordz The c a st included Alfonso Fa.brega Dori s-Lee Cox Eleanor Sherm a n Je a nne Bonwell and Neal Small. Another interesting meetin g was held in M a rch at which a musical and liter ary program w a s pre s ent e d in Fren c h A tea-parry followed. Two additional meetings completed the year s program of S ans Pareil: a program featuring the music of well-known French com posers and the performance of a popul a r French comed y C O N Q U I STAI)Q I\ PAGE THIRTYTHREE

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'1:l > Cl tT1 >-l ::c ...... >-l >-< "l'1 0 c () o Z /:) c Ul 1 Members of rhe INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS C LUB left ro right. Back row : Guillermo Grau, Harry Marchosky Edgard Quintero, Oris Myers. Middle row: Milron Turner, Polly P-erkins Janer Nes birr Irene Chan Dolores \'V'elch Neal Small Front row: E loise Ramey, Nancy Norron, Berr Sheiron WaJrer Goring, Mr. Hackett (sponsor), Doris Chan Dubow, Gloria Shelton Ruby Kent. ..

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THE iNTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB The Inrernational Relations Club founded in 1935 by Mr. Hackett is a Junior College organization affiliated with the Carnegie Endow ment for International Peace. The objects of the club are to further the work of the Carnegie Endowment for promoting international peace, to foster a n interest in international affairs, and to encour ag e friendship among the students of different nationalities in the college. At the head of this illustrious band of peace-makers and adven turers, we find Walter Goring, president of the club. His depnry is Bert Shelton. Doris Chan keeps the records, and Lee Dubow has charge of the finances. To Mr Hackett goes the credit for an inspiring s ponsor s hip. This year, the International Relations Club has again had a full program. The first guest speaker to address the club was Mr. Carlos Bosch Garcia a refugee from Spain, who spoke abonr the Civil War in Spain, and his opinion of the background of the present war in Europe Another speaker, Mr. James Triollo, explained the plan to exchange students between the United States and countries of Cer.tral and South America. Like most other clubs the I. R. C. has had social events The wcial events for this year all proved to be all-day picnic-trips to one place or another. The first was to Gorgona beach On the second trip, the club members ventured farther into the Interior to E I Valle where hiking and swimming were the order of the day Next the club joined the members of Kappa Epsilon on an expedition to Chorrera Falls. This trip later turned into an exploration, which took the whole party aCrOss the plains to some colonial ruins on the outskirts of Chorrera. CONQUISTADOR PAGE THIRTYFIVE

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() o (:) c >-l > t:I o ., ... ; .. t j . . .: . .;;;. Members of KAPJ; DELTA SIGMA, leEr to right. Back row: Robert Burkle, H a rry Marchosky Allan Monsanto William Monsanto, Hugh Norris, ROlJ': rt Wenz. William Sherl o ck, Guillermo Grau. Middle row : John McGlade Mary Jant. Janet Nesbitt. Mary Loui s e Traeger Ruby Kent, Mary Ann Hunt, Gloria She : ton Aubrey Lewis Front row : Miss Moody ( spon sor), Lolita Power Cox M a rgaret Sullivan John Schn a ke, Jeanne Bonwell Maria Hernandez, Dolores Pimento, Elsa E optner.

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kAppA DELTA SIGMA Kappa Delta Sigma, the college dramatic society, was founded in 1933, the year the college opened, by Miss Moody. The main activity of this group is the annual production of a three-act comedy at the Balboa Clubhouse Theatre. In return for some assistance in staging, business matters, etc., from the Student Association, Kappa Delta Sigma usually contributes a share of the profits from the play toward the publication of The Conquistador. This year Jeanne Bon well, John Schnake, Margaret Sullivan, and Francis Criste held the offices of president, vice-president secretary, and treasurer, respec tively In November an evening party was held at the home of Miss Moody. Dramatic skits, theatrical games, the winners of which re ceived prizes, informal dancing, and refreshments comprised the enter tainment. Work on the long play, "The Ghost Flies South, a three act comedy by Frederick Jackson, got under way in March, and the play was presented May 16. The cast included Nancy Colby and William Gaines as leads, Marybelle Perkins, Hugh Norris, Ruby Kent, Mary Ann Hunt, John Schnake, Maria Hernandez, Robert Burkle, Gloria Shelton and Margaret Sullivan. The play boasted a wide range of characters: gay young lovers, a suspicious wife, a domineering Boston matron, a mulatto maid, a cowboy, an Indian, and best of all, a grandmother of eighty! Kappa Delta Sigma owes a debt to Mr. Subert Turbyfill, Director of the Balboa Little Theatre, who generously helped with the staging, to Mrs. Baker, who provided music, to Mr. Lyons, who supervised the ticket sales, and to Mr. R. D. Moore who helped with make up. On the production staff were Mary Louise Traeger, Elsa Espener, Virginia Stewart, Jeanne Bonwell, Katharine McMurray, Dolores Pimento, Ellen Mead, Francis Criste, William Monsanto, Howard Rhodes, Warren Cain, John Anderson, Robert Wertz, John McGlade, John Furman, Carlyle Harvey Allan Monsanto, and others. Miss Moody directed the play CONQUISTADOR PAGE THIRTYSEVEN

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PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT CONQUISTADOR

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Members o f the NATURAL SCIENCE SOCIETY, left to r:ght. Back r ow: Guill ermo Grau, Shehan, Juli o Harry Henderson. Front row: Russell H oogla n d, Evelia V e larde, Aubrey Lewis, Mary L ouise Traege r Mr. L ee (spon sor ) J o hn Montanye Ruben Cades, J a ner Nesbitt, Cados Rodrigu-:z. THE NATURAL SCIENCE SOCIETY In 1935, a group of students organized a club f o r the study of the natural and asked Mr. Lee to sponsor it Last f all thi s society entered its seventh year, with John Montanye Dan Kiley a nd Mary Louise Tra eger as president, vice-president, and secretary treasurer. V a nce Howard s erved as chairman of th e pro gra m com mittee. Kiley a nd Howard are both alumni ; indeed, it is an interesting feature of this group that alumni as well as the present students of the college may be members. The sociery meets bi-monthly in the biology laboratory u s u ally on Wednesday evening Each month a n outside speaker a ddresses the The group specializes in a different branch of natural science each year, the subject for 194 0-41 having ceen th e culture of the Cuna a nd Choco Indians. Among the speakers this year were C a ptain Louis Schmidt, who spoke on his fishing experiences in Pan ama Bay, and Mr. Frederick McKim an expert on the Indians of Pan a ma w ho talked on his experiences among these Indians. The meetings are usually by periods, and some times refreshments are served. Iii -aaaitioh Mr. and Mrs. Lee.m ake a practice of giving a w a ffle slipper for the society a t mid-y ear Or soon after. A farewell party was given at the home of the Lees on May 18. CONQUISTADOR PAGE THIRTYNINE

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n o Z t) c:::: en :> tJ o ENGINEERS, left to right. Back rOw: Carlyle Harvey, Walter Gor ing Milton Turner, Robert Turman, Howard Rhodes, Francis Criste, Ru. ssell Wells, Guillermo Grau, Norman Matlowsky Donald Grimm, James Ridge. ,Middle row : EdwIn John Schnake, Paul Eoarnard, WIlliam Gaines Bert Shelton Julio Hernandez, Allan Monsanto Hugh Norris, William Sherlock Arnold Terry, Charles Keck, Julius Cheney Robert Wertz. Fronc row: Thomas Bender Robert Burkle, John McGlade Lolita Power, Mr. McNair (sponsor), Mary Louise Traeger, Otis Myers Raymond Midence.

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THE ENGINEERS The act!vltles of the Engineers during the school year 1940-41 have centered around the Engineering Problems class, taught by Mr. McNair. This course has bem dormant for a few years, bur it decided ro wake up last September. It meets on Fridays at one o clock The first semester's work consisted of field trip s and lectures. The group made trips ro the filtration plant and testing laborarory at Miraflores the telephone ex change in the Administration Building, Madden Dam and the hydroel ec tric plant, the Clay Products Company in Panama City, the new high school building, Albrook Field, a nd the hydraulics laborarory at Miraflores. In the course of the fir s t semester two o ut s ide speakers addressed the group during class periods. Mr. H. F. Marker of the Safety Division, spoke on the work of the Safety Engineer, and Mr. M. P. Superak, of the Stru c tural Engineers' Office, discussed the foundation work and piling for the new high school building Other class meetings were given over ro discussions of field rri ps and of magazine articles on engineering ropics. The work of the second semester has been elementary surveying. The instrucror assigns problems and the students t ake the surveying instruments out on the field ro collect their own data. When the problem is solved, the solution is written up. (These writeups are JUSt as hard ro get in as are those of physics and chemistry experi ments.) After the instrucror had explained the use of the tr a nsits and other surveying equipment, the students worked severa l different types of problems showing the various uses ro which the tr a n sit can be pur. The first semester there were fourteen in the class, and the second s emester, twenty-three. We must conclude one of th e three things: that the class is a snap, th at the one credit it offers is tempting b a it Or that the work is really interesting and worth while. The most likel y conclusion is the last. CONQUISTADOR PAGE fORTYONE

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-"."". : ,I! \""" 'f1ii ( l -It i I' . I ROOMAN TIMBER WOLF .. 11 . oq" .. .. : <:l q . Q ? ..... .. I WORK OF THE ENGINEERs "" ......... :.'JI ." ENGINEER r-,\CE fORTYTWO CONQUISTADOR

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Members o f OR C H EST RA left to right: D':nald Griwm, \'(!i1Iiam Hunter. O:is Mycrs. Maric H aggerty, Mari.e W ink cs, Gloria Shelton, Mrs. Baker William Ga i nes, B ert THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA In spire of rhe difficulries of geccing rhe members cogerher, and of finding a s uitable pracrice room, rhe college orchesrra, direcced b y Mrs. Baker, a fforded irs public much enjoymenc rhis y e ar. Ar rhe Chri srmas assembly, a p a reicul a rly woreh whil e progr am, includin g rhe follo w ing numbers was 1. II III. Allegro," b y Beerhoven. "Gavocce," b y M a reini. Moon D awn," by Frim!. "He Sha ll Fe e d His Flock," from H a ndel's MeSJiah, a nd "Ca ncique de Noel," by Adam sung by Nancy Colby accompa nied by rhe orchesrra. Chrisrmas carols, s un g by audience, accompanied by rhe orchesrra. Ar rhe performance of rhe college play ar rhe Balbo a Clubhouse The a rre May 16 rhe orchesrra pla yed rhese numbers for rhe overCUre and encr acres. B a bies in Toyl a nd, by Viccor Herbere. "Walrz of rhe Flo wers," by Tschaikow sky. And a ncino," by Lemare. Chanson," by Frim!. "By rhe W a rers o f Minneconka, by Lieur ance. Members of rhe orchesrra are Oris Myers, Don ald Grimm Murray Wrighr, and Marie Winkes, (violins), Gloria Shehon and Joseph Haggerey, (cellos), Bere Shelcon (fluce) William Gaines ( French horn), and Marie Haggerey ( piano), scudenc direccor. CONQUI STADOR PAGE FORTYTHREE

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Members of the ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE IeEe to r;ght. Back r ow: Joseph Ludlum (sophomore) Miss Moody, Mr. Carson (faculty). Front row: Muriel Evans (freshman. secretary), Mr. Hacke n ( faculty chairman), Janet Nesbitt (soph omore). Absent: Norman Madow sky, freshman. THE ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE For the year 1940 -41, the Assembly Committee planned to schedule one general assembly and one Student Association meeting each month, and to have class meetings called whenever, in the judg ment of the class advisers there was need for them. Only six of the possible general assemblies were scheduled, however. None was held in February on account of the raucous noise made by the pile driver engaged in the work of constructing the new building along side the Junior College Parenthetically, it may be noted th a t this noise seriously interfered with all the general assemblies, although it failed to faze the leather-lunged orators of the Student Association; in fact it was said that the men doing the construction work outside the Junior College complained that they could not hear their machinery running when Student Association meetings were in progress. A list of the general assemblies held during the year follows: November-Address, "The Third Set of Locks" by Lt. Col. Thomas B. Larkin, engineer in charge of the locks project. December-Christmas Musical Program, dir :cted by Mrs. Helen C. Baker. January-Speech Class Assembly. planned by Dr. Dorothy Moody. March-Address, "The World of Tomorrow," by t he Right Reverend Harry Beal. Bishop of the Panama Canal Zone. April Address "The Influence of Vasco Nunez de Balboa on the Early History of Panama," by Dr. C. 1. G. Anderson, noted author ;ty on the early history of Panama. May-Address, "The Work of rhe p.ersonnel Bureau of the Panama Canal," by Dr. J. M. O'Brien Direccor of Employment and Training PAGE FORTYFOUR CONQUISTADOR

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MEN'S SPORTS Our sportsmen made a good showing this year, in football, track baseball, and basket ball. The football line-up (Francis Criste, captain), consis ted of that underhanded, spira lin g center, Bob Burkle; those heavily built guards, Allan Monsanto, and Howard Rhodes; those tough tackles Aubrey Lewis and "Dynami te Terry; the ends, speedy, g lue-fin gered Joe Burgoon, and lanky Criste; the back field stars, tricky Russ Hoogland, flashy Ed Corrigan, "Brick-body" McGlade, "Brains" Anderson, and ace-ki cker Ed Winter. Hugh Norris, Jimmy Ridge, Bert Shelton, Warren Cain, Bill Gaines, Howard Moore, and Eddie Moore also did yeoman service On November 6, this truSty team defeated the Cristoba l Hig h School, 13-0 In the annual Thanksgiving day classic against the Working Boys, H oog l and, Norwegian fullback, shot a bullet pass to Criste over the goa l line for the only touchdown of the day. Winter then sp lit the uprights with an accurate kick for the 7-0 t riumph. Anderson s accurate passes throughout the game were responsib l e for many a long drive. On November 27, the colle ge team h eld the staunch athletes of the B. H. S. to a scoreless tie. Cristobal High defeated the college in track, though C. z J. c. won many firsts. Hugh N orris, spring-legged high-jumper, cleared the bar a t five feet, ten inches, to set a college record. Eddie Moore also starred, when he easily our-sprinted th e Cristobal racers in a 440-ya rd d ash. Joe Burgoon hurled for the baseballers, while Bill Sherlock was at the receiving end. Hugh Norris held down fir st base, Bob Thomas CONQUISTADOR PAGE FORTYFIVE

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PAGE FORTY-SI X CONQUISTADOR

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and lefty McGlade covered the first sack. The three ace flycatching fielders were Hoogland, left field Aubrey lewis, right field, and Arnold Terry, center field. These lads played an exciting game against Balboa High, losing 4-1. Stars of the basket ball season which began In April were Eddie Moore, the dead-eye swisher, Hugh Norris and Francis Criste, those t a ll centers and the dribbling aces, Winter, Sherlock lewis, McGlade, Walter Goring, Hoogland and Julio Hernandez The 1940 football players received as trophies small silver foot b a lls paid for by the Student Association. CONQUISTAOQR. PAGE FORTYSEVEN

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PAGE FORTY-EIGHT CONQUISTADOR

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Veatures CONQUISTJl.DOR PAGE FORTY-NINE

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ERA UN CONQUISTADOR BY MARY ANN HUNT I am that famous soldier of yore, Known to posterity as "Co nquistador, Seeker of gold, shedder of gore. Oh, yes, era 1m conqttistado1'/ I lived in C a diz on the Spani s h shore. Day and night through my books I'd pore. 'Til possessed by tales of treasure lore, Into fragments my books I tOre-Boa rded a ship that southward bore Me to a jungly, tropic shore, Where books I conned nevermore In searching for a treasure stOre. After batrie, fever hunger, When the sky was roaring thunder, At last I found my golden stOreFound it; grasped it ; wanted more! Killed and murdered; plundered robbed, For within me ever throbbed The urge for riches, power, and fameIt burned me like a living flame! Now wealthy, without hesitation I left a land in desolation, Wrecked and ruined, in spoliation. Not until reaching civilization-PAGE FIFTY CONQUISTADOR

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Spain-where I had glory honor, l aud, And was worshipped like some demigod, Did I find the greed which gnawed To be deception delusion, fraud! I shivered and sweated; writhed, blasphemed, Realizing that I had lived and dreamed Following a false and futile gleam. Yet Ser e mz conq"istado1"l" I screamed Determinedly seeking my books once more, Through jungles of wisdom I did explore. Plundered the endless realms of pages Til Death called; enshrined me in the Ages ... On a pedestal condemned me to st and, Oh not by the ancient sages grand, Renowned as was I for immorality But on the lowest plane of Immortality S o it is from these heights I s a y : "You are true conquerors of tod a y ; You who study; strive ; and pay Tribute to Knowledge: Omni-Deity. CONQUISTADOR PAGE FIFTYONE

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I WHAM! PAGE F IFTY-TWO ';, r.....c.=-... CANPVS STROlL ,.i.;"j .. ,. (JET TO /NORIC J .......... --SWTSTVFF -I'fOBSCEN ALL WET CONQUISTADOR

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A TRIBUTE TO THE C. Z. ]. C. BY MARGARET SULLIVAN The Cana l Zone Junior College is indeed a small college, but there are those who love her. They love her for her shining newness, her lofty dignity (after all we are three floors up), her courage to stand up against the ravages of the fierce jungle, etc They love her as one l oves a mother, Or they venerate her like a devOted teacher. They think of her in terms of happy days, carefree classmates, friendly a nd lovable instructOrs. Later they will love her with a nostalgic yearn ing to recapture old scenes, old memories. When one passes by the college he sees little to remind him of a typical college in the United States. Rather, h e sees a beautiful panorama with a SOrt of primitive charm. The college campus on the edge of Roosevelt Jungle is green, wet, and muddy in the rainy season, and dry and brown in the dry season. A gradua te will cherish the memory of the wisps of smoke and the cinders which float gently from Sosa Hill when it is being burned over, of the proud roar of the P36's as they swoop and zoom overhead, of the steady throb of pile driver, and of the labored wheeze of the P. R. R., sounds which often drown out the song of the crickets and the mild sounds emitted by the undergraduates raking their siestas on tpe lawn of the "Science Building. What Canal Zone collegian will forget the halcyon days and the exotic nights in moonlit tropical gardens (El Rancho, Atlas, Balboa) the breathless suspense of the football games and of the publication of the Tropical Collegian, the exhi larating bull-sessions in the "Clubby," the tick-hunting expeditions after jaunts to the interior the proms in the palatial Hotel Tivoli the native jam-sessions of the Spanish Club-oh yes, and the classes-lectures and labs-who will forget them? (For further information on the courses send a self-addressed envelope and ten cen t s in stamps or ask your local dealer.) Come one, come all, come to C. Z. Tech, and get adventure and romance along with your education! Enjoy the athletics in our great stadium, capacity five hundred, termites not included. Dance at our d a nces to the wild rhythm of the Fifth Infantry Orchestra. Seize the great eduQltional opportun ities (our engineers are so experienced now that if an engineer stands at each end of the transit, the twO can survey each other perfectly). Come to the land where the waters meet, where the sun sets backwards and-nurs! (Resemb lance of this masterpiece to any gushing college cata l ogue is purely coincidental.) CONQUISTADOR PAGE FIFTYTHREE

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PAGE. FIFTY-FOUR CONQUISTADOR

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THE HEN HOUSE "R-r-r-r r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r rin g-g-g -g-gg-g-g!" "Turn off th a t alarm clock!" A hand springs forth from the warm bed gropes wildly for th<> alarm butron, succeeds in finding it, a nd then disappe ars beneath covers. For a few minures all i s quiet. Then suddenly everyone real izing that it is a school day, jumps out of bed There is a sound like that of galloping horses, as everyone runs madly to the "Puzoozie." "Hand me the pink towel with the blue dots, will you, Polly?" Polly's answer sounds like the f a mous tobacco auctioneer's chant, tor she is hurriedly brushing her teeth Dot Johnson, in the meantime, has found her towel, a nd is h a lfway down the hall leading to the breakfast room. "Ting-a-ling," meaning Come and get it, sounds, and there is more rushing a nd stampeding. After breakfast, everyone goes to school, except one or twO girls who do not h av e classes until later Noon arrives Everybody tries to wait patiently until Doris, the culinary expert who helps Mrs Magnuson in the kitchen, rings the bell. After ringing the bell, Dori s hurriedly makes her exit to avoid the inevitable rush Pass the s ugar, limes burter, potato sal ad, a nd bread." "Do you mind if I help myself first?" "Of course not. Then, for a pproxim a tely ten minutes, bedlam reigns, as everyone busily tries to help herself to food while it is passed in a frenzied way from one end of the t a ble to the next. Mrs. M ag nuson better known as "Gram," comes in to check on the a bsentees and to see th a t everyone eats three times as much as s he should. Where a re Polly and M a rybelle?" she asks. "Oh, they're swimming aga in Gram. Polly a nd Marybelle come in and the "vittles" a re aga in circu lated around the table. In the me a ntime Dotty Alling is convulsing everyone at the t a ble with what she terms her "corny jokes. CONQUISTADOR PAGE FIFTYFIV!!

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The afternoon classes are s60n over, a nd everyone setties dowri to do a bit of studying. Hey Japet may I use your desk?" "Sure, I'm not using it now " Dotte-e-e-e-e-e! Two voices in unison answer, "Yes?" '] mean Dotty Alling May I use your nail polish?" "Certainly! Presently someone drives up and whistles. "Who's there? someone challenges him "Bill." "Which Bill?" echoes a chorus of feminine voices To make the confusion even worse, the telephone rings. If the call is not for Polly or M a rybelle it is for Dotty Johnson Let me remark here th at at the beginning of the school year everyone would drop what she was doing in order to reach the telephone first; now, however, someone has to be coaxe d to answer it T w ilight comes and goes, a nd soon Mrs. Hamlin enters, trying to appear stern. "Who left the iron on, girls? It' s red-hot After the culprit has confessed, Mrs Hamlin who can no l onger refrain from smiling, cheerfully replies, "Well, be a little more careful in the future, bec ause you might burn the dormitory down. A few minutes later Mrs Hamlin aga in enters. "Who left the hot water heater on? It's been on for hours and is scalding hot." When either of these misdeme a nors has been committed, Dorothy Johnson is usually the gui l ty person Night is now upon us, and as we prepare for bed a fina l utter a nce is heard from the twO roommates, Dotty A. a nd Janet N "Turn out that light; we want to go to s leep." Note : The goon" who makes our dormitory life sound as placid as it d oes in the foregoing account is really one of our most ram bunctious students It cou l dn 't, of course, be Janet Nesbitt Need we say more ? PAGE FIFTYSIX CONQUISTADOR

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ERS iii > ........ ", .' f I 'M CVT OAY SMALL TROUBLE: . I .--THE THINKER CONQUISTADOR -$TVKA RE,.V$ILLE , I \ 11, .. 21,:;i"". '_ \' t'-C:.5QVI/iE BUSH,MAN IV02 PAGE FIFTYSEVEN

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THE BULL PEN As one approaches the end of Carr Street near the Balboa High School building, the lone structure on the right, before one reaches the high school, reveals itself as a rambling grey frame building be neath overhanging trees. A sign designates it as the "Little Theatre, and indeed there is a theatre on the first floor. Bur this building is far more than a theatre, for its second floor is a oormirory, where dwell mental giants who would dwarf Archimedes and Buckley them selves Yes, drab and inconsequential as the building seems ro rourists, the Canal Zone Junior College knows it as the scene of learned disquisitions: intricacies of economics that would leave Me. Hackert agape with wonder; hypotheses of literature that would cause Dr. Moody to gasp for air; doctrines of "math" that would stupefy Me. McNair; and principles of science that would make Me. Buckley flounder like a fish on the beach at low tide. So fatiguing are these cerebrations, however, that the dormitory lads often find it necessary ro resrore themselves with sleep. Indeed, what else is a dormirory for? Almost any afternoon, if OIlC ascends the stairway ro the vesti bule on the second floor, and proceeds down the hallway with cautious tread, being careful not ro step on planks undermined by termites, one comes upon four peaceful figures engrossed in the study of the cul ture of Morpheus The first body one sees is that of William Grau a slender youth hailing from the interior of Col6n One of the more stable denizens of the place, having resided here for three years he is a student in engineering. Next our visitor is disturbed by mutterings from the deep shadows, and, upon investigation, finds that they originate with Harry Marchosky, a freshman in commercial subjects, who comes from the same "neck of the woods as Grau. He is chiefly known for his opinions on feminine pulchritude. The third and most interesting member of the somnolent group is Lee Dubow, potential journalist, whose orarorical gifts are known far and wide He is a native son (of a gun) from Wisconsin, who came ro our tropical college this year "just for experience He can orate by the hour on every subject, from the proper way ro run a government on how ro make an angel cake with only one angel. PAGE FIFTYEIGHT CONQUISTADOR

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And to make this group of lads resting from their midnight debates complete, one must mention Walter Goring sailor boy extra o rdinary, and lieutenant (j. g.) in Uncle Sam's Naval Reserve Easily co ntented with his two-dollar corncob, he writes for hours to his one a nd only-who's supposed to be a fair Connecticut Yankee. But love or not, he still carries his arguments through to the end. Goring of the Navy! A recent arrival at the boys dorm is Jim Finn, lately of the University of Kansas who is taking an 1. A. course at C. Z. J. c., but may eventu ally become one of the brighter ornaments of the busi ness world. The matron of the dormitory is Mrs. Powell a kindly lady who acts as a mOther to all the residents, scolding, consoling, a nd praising them, according to their deserts. They will always remember her. Note: The author--did you guess?-is Goring. But he didn t write the part a bout himself! CONQUISTADOR PAGE FIFTYNINE

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THE ADMIRAL PAGE SIXTY .' . (el .... .. HOT WIRES ACTION. DOG CONQUISTADOR

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TO A PILE DRIVER BY ELLEN MEAD To you, oh friendly driver, More oil in your t a nks! 'Twas you who gave off steam and noise Which' s tifled J. C. pranks. Fond memories you bring to me, Of J. C:s dusty walls, Of Wells a nd Criste beating Out Their Conga in the halls Of Collinge, A-I English prof., H and flying wit h each h a mm er, As checkmarks all across the theme, Help engineers Jearn grammar. The profs h ave shouted til they 're ho a rse; The students love your jars; The orchestra can play a march, In pounding, strident bars. A dozen Other J. c. woes By contrast now seem l esser: But since you've left the multigraph Now reigns as your successor! CONQUISTADOR PAGE SIXTY-ONE

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THROUGH THE COKE STRAW BY LEE DUBOW Our Collegiates are all talking about: Bob Burkle s big ah-traction through a whole long year ... his little Weezy. That April lecture one morning at lO-mostly applause. Walter Goring s big attempts to Reno-vate his affair with a certain Connecticut Yankee .... rumor has it that it s Amador compe tition! Lee Dubow Amador Beach-ing it with that little high school lass every Sunday at 4. Hmmmmmm. Charlie Keck's big ah-fair with his "Yost in the woods lassah, humbug. Arnold (Bill) Terry s long trek to Rio HatO not so long agoand Andy Jackson s Whiz-icker sitting on his knee! Bob Guthrie's conStant attempts to get that little woo-manand getting stOod up every time. Darnit! Those daily "Ghost Flies South" rehearsals. If it flew much farther, it'd have to be written in Spanish. Howard Rhodes and Warren Cain trying to squeeze into the Balboa Clubhouse every day at four-'cause Rhodes has that big white collar job, you know .... big business. The school spirit that remained as dead as the trees in Gatun Lake all year long-and as wanting as a waiter at the Tivoli. The peculiar absence of so many well known faces-through jobs -and otherwise! That British Real-ief at the Panama Golf Club-and CZJCs mighty tact-si girls WOt women! Those daily swims Claire Quinn takes every day at 12-My Mac Abee. Gee Mr. Star-buck-ing every time he lost a penny accounting bet. (How to get rich in a hurry! ) Irene Chan and Margaret Sullivan sketching everything and every body in school-' sketch on? PAGE SIXTYTWO CONQUISTADOR

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Betty Larkin-all day long. Paul Barnard s shuttering so much that he did a swel! job in taking the yearbook pictures-who said he was an amachoor? Dotty Johnson s "whaddyamean" cracks every time somebody just took a blissful look. Oh Varga! Janet Nes-bitt hard on Johnny Mont anye' s long line at th a t El Valle picnic. Ain't love funny? Miss Moody-just that way when work on the yearbook really got started. CZJCs not so tact-full lassies who thought the only fellows worth going with were the Looies-'cause a lot of civvies are just as good, if not better. Oh for a uniform! The sudden popularity of Old Panama. By night or by day, Revere? Muriel Evan-ings-at Pedro, and elsewhere. Maria Hernandez-using every room in school as her beauty parlor. Looky, looky! Marion's Orr-ful job in the office for nine whole months-and maybe longer! TIle big surprise when Juanita Taylor a nnounce,! her middle aisleing it Gee-some guys have all the luck! Eloise Ramey and N ancy Norton finding a new way to scudy their accounting-on the March--osky! Midence s meddling in each and every date at each and every opportunity-whadabum! Jim Finn s quick to Panama s higher educational institutions-the gardens-well mixed with his bee-ye ar! Willy Grau having grau-ing pains. Mr. Carson ........ and the movie of the same name. Doris Co(a)x-ing all the boys. Whew-whada line Beans Turner-ing around that Ford of his-if there s anything left Walter Winchell s definition of imitation: Pl agiarism-with an odor! That 's us ........ so good buy! CONQUISTAPOR, PAGE SIXTYTHREE

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PAGE S IXTY-FOUR CONQUI STADOR

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ODE ON THE TROPICAL COLLEGIAN BY KATHARINE McMURRAY (\'Q ith Apologie s to William Wordsworth) .... . .... . ... .... .... . ........ .... For I have come To look on the T "opical C ollegian, not as in the hour Of its beginning; but he a ring often-times The harsh and grating cries of fellow students, Nor soft, nor kind but of sufficient power, To anger and arouse. And I have felt A presence that excites me with the urge To pace the halls; an optimistic hope, Of finding copy f a r more nearly finished, Whose dwelling is the minds of many men, And in the l ockers, also in the office, And everywhere, but in the editor's hands; A weariness and effort that impedes My every moment, each object of my thou ght, And lags through all the year. CONQUISTADOR PAGE SIXTYFIVE

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A MESSAGE Tb t. Z ]. C. I1Y MARION ORR There are those who tell me I have no right To complain of a single thing in my life There's no worry, no work, no effort you see, To being the secretary to C.Z.J.c. The students come in to tell me their woes, Wishing that time wouldn't stop in repose, And say they envy me my hours of ease With only themselves and the teachers to please Now sometimes I wonder if maybe they Wouldn t like to look over a secretary s day. So I hereby invite you one and all To spend a day in the office instead of the hall. Sharply at eight I arrive at the school; Students are scattered on rail and on stool; Books lie discarded while chatter holds sway: This marks the beginning of another school day. The door is barely opened, When a tide of life pours in. Could I please have a paper dip?" And, "Do you have a pin?" "I need a piece of paper. Ah! There is just the thing." The buzzer sounds; it s almost eight. The tide goes surging out again. Mr. Hackett breathes a sigh of relief, Revelling in the hope and belief, Tint the storm is over and all is serene And peace will once more reign suprem'e. PAGE SIXTYSIX CONQUISTADOR

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13ut rudely the quiet is shattered once more As a whimsical student comes through th e door. The building's not on fire nor is the world at end But someone has JUSt found th a t he s o ut of ink again. And absences, 1 must confess, Take precedence above the rest lance had hair of golden hue, But now there's gray mixed in roo. For Johnn y Smith will fir s t explain: "Oh, yes, but gee! 1 missed the tr a in. And little Abner saunters in "Oh my! 1 h a d a fla t again." And he who lives within the city, Has other t ales ro stir my pity. 1 kn ow I'm l ate," he whimpers low, 1 couldn't help it; 1 stumped m y roe." A rapid trot, a whirl of du st! He' ll get ro class on time or bust. There is no need for such a flurry, His bus is twenty minutes early. 1 try ro keep my tongue in check Remembering days not too f ar back When 1 was bothering others roo, Thinking up foolish things to do. But there are times in each m a n s life, When, met by smiles of pure delight, His happiness seems ro overflow, And counters the force of any blow These are the times in which 1 bask As, go ing abo ut my humbl e task, 1 meet with smiles and shouts of glee As 1 pass Out a pay check ro each teach er 1 see. CONQUISTADOR PAGE SIXTYSEVEN

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So have your fun you happy sophomores, Laugh and be gay, the world around is yours, You will go forward ro lives that are bright, C h oosing the jobs th a t you feel to be right J shall always remember the friends that you've been Remember your laughter your worries, your whims, And when you've gone forth from these portals, You'll realize that teachers and secretaries are morta ls. No, I have not forgotten our freshman class. Next year you'll be sop homores in g lory to bask. Enjoy your vacation and have lots of fun, I'll be l ooking forward to seeing you when summer days are done PAGE SI'(TYEIGHT CONQUISTADOR

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PAGE SIXTY-NINE

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() .. y Vinis PAC); ... CONQUISTADOR