Conquistador

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Conquistador
Uniform Title:
Conquistador (Canal Zone Junior College)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Canal Zone Junior College
Canal Zone College
Publisher:
Conquistador Staff
Place of Publication:
Balboa Canal Zone
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1972
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
School yearbooks -- Panama -- Balboa   ( lcsh )
Genre:
School yearbooks
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: 1936.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: 1972.
Issuing Body:
Student yearbook of the Canal Zone Junior College from 1936 to 1963, and the Canal Zone College from 1964 to 1972.
General Note:
Description based on: 1936; title from cover.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: 1972.
Statement of Responsibility:
Canal Zone Junior College.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 472468547
lccn - 2009229561
System ID:
UF00095973:00002


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Full Text














HISTORY


The


beautiful
opening


before


history


Roosevelt


Coil


its actual


THE


CANAL


Canal


Avenue


Zone


ZONE


Junior


in Balboa,


in September,


establishment,


JUNIOR


College,


begins


long


1933.


Junior


College


COLLEGE


situated
before


several


was


years
a sub-


ject


correspondence


between


various


Congressmen,


chiefly


Honorable


Dennison,


then


Governor


Panama


Canal,


Colonel


Harry


rgess.


survey


Canal


Zone


schools


Teachers


College


Columbia


University


resulted


in a recommendation


The
staff


Superintendent


made


that


a Junior


Schools


an exhaustive


, Mr.


College


Ben


estab-


Williams,


requirements


establishment


an institution,


was


concluded


not only that there was


a need for a Junior College,


but also that


number
provided


prospective


insure


students


success


facilities


as a college


that might
f standard


grade


and high reputation.


The


recommendation


Superintendent


Schools


establishment


Executive


Secretary,


Junior


College


was


Mcllvaine,


approved
Governor


Burgess,


both of whom were


sincerely interested in ope


nmng to the capable


ambitious young people of the community the doors of higher


education, and


sev


eral


years


been


working


constructively


toward the realization of


the ideal.


The


inaugural


assembly


Junior


College


was


held


the patio of


Balboa High School on September 26, 1933.


sses


were


given


Governor,


Colonel


Julian


Schley,


Executive


Secretary


Mcllvaine.


1 --


Superintendent


Wil-


THE


stu dy


su ch


would










ihorities,


was


aside


as a dormitory


men


students


from


the Atlantic side of


namely,


Hoecker,


Smith,


vicinity)
Ernest


Elinor


Charles


have


Cuesta,
Mullane


Wright,


SIsthmus.
attended


Thomas
Dolores


Elizabeth


Eleven students from Cristobal


College


Ebdon,


Harry


Palmer, Ruth


ayes,


a year
Egolf,


Pickett


Gordon


or more:
Mildred


SHarvey


Campbell.


After


one


year


in available


a eato


classrooms


Balboa


High


School


with


a class


sixty-five


students


well-qualified


teachers,


five


whom


came


to the


Canal


Zone


express


purpose


teaching


new


College,


nior College


was


moved


in September,


1934,


to its


new


$300,000


building.
proposed


This
school


structure


plant


Is S
four


section
units,


or the
which


science
Section


unit,


will con-


a library,


classrooms,


an administration


center,


action


a large


auditorium,


Section


vocational


shops


gymnasium.


The


new


science


equipment for


scientific,


commer-


cial,


cultural


courses


bought


building


represented


an initial


rary


can


expenditure


built,


more


five


than


thousand


$12,000.
or more


Until


volumes


new


available


use


School


1brary.


college


The


students


headquarters


are hou


sical


in the


education


Balboa
classes


cs is the


Balboa


Playshed.


e three


Junior


College


who planned


short


given


and worked


years


positive


existence


proof


that


Canal


efforts


so enthusiastically for its creation


Zone
those
were


well


justified.


These


three


years


have


seen


accrediting


College


in April,


1934,


as a standard


institution,


the Am-


erxcan
growth
spread


Association


Junior


enrollment


they


have


seen


V;ist


Colleges;


they


College


graduating


have


witnessed


as its reputation


class


June,


1935,


forth


to make


notable


records


at other


institutions


have


seen


Canal


one


Junior


College


become


a sound


fluence


upon


intellectual


community.


tain









tinue


their


pression


education


to attend


appreciation


Junior
College


College.


as a whole


an cx-


to these


organizations,


their


names,


with


a list


students who


have


benefited


by their generosity, are given below


Class of


1935


Joyner, Luis


Cristobal
Protective


Panama


tive


Canal


, Balboa High School


Noli,
Zone


Order


Canal


Order


Lodge


Elks


Reba Colberg, Mary


William Fleming, 1935-36.


Lodge


Elks


1542,


Thomas


1414


Edward


Benevolent


Ebdon,


Benevolent


Gormely,


1933-35


1934-35.
Protec-
Howard


Turner,


1934-36;


Canal Zone


Wom


William Fl
men's League


eming,


1935-36.


1933-35:


Robert Daniels


Geor


gia Reynolds,


1935-36.


addition,


two


scholarships


ave


been


awarded


Canal


Zone


Coll


Club


to Junior


College


students


now


con-


tinuing


their


studies


elsewhere.


The


recipients of


these


are Ruth


Walston


Ruth


Brooks.


THE


FACULTY


The


admini


strative


officers


faculty


Canal


Zone


Junior


here


Coll


the degr


are
ees


exc


eptionally


well


trained.


is given


each official and instructor has receive


fore


name c
taking


institution


present


at which


each


instructor


taught


position.


Ben


M. Williams, S1
Mercer University


superintendent


A. M.


Columbia.


tilt,


Barker,


assistant


Superintendent


Schools


, Missouri


State


teachers


College;


Columbia.


Fred


Hosler,


P rinc;pal


Junior College


IDenl,1,,,: ( g ~ c.& i,


Lillia Monsanto,


Schools


S *Sr









i., University
previously at
nent member


of Michigan


Western


summer


M., Harvard


reserve
faculty


University;


New


taught
perma-


York


Uni-


versity.


Leonard


Flowers


, Instructor


., Carnegie


Physi


Institute


Sciences
technology


taught last


at Carnegie


Institute of Technology.


Roger


Hackett,


Instructor


in Social


Science


:A.


Indiana


University;


Harvard


Univer


taught last


at Cristobal High


School .


George


Iowa


Lee,
State


versity


Instructor


College


Wyoming.


in Biological


taught


previously


Science


at the


Meadowcroft


, Instructor


in Mathematics


gineering


: A.B


Leland


Stanford


Univer


sity;


gineer, Leland Stanford University


at Leland Stanfcrd


Dorothy


taught previous-


University.


Moody, Instructor in English, Dean of Women


A.B.


, University


Kansas


A.M


Yale


taught


University


Kansas.


Miss


Louise


Hanna


tion), is instructor in


Baker


(A.B.,


(New


physical


University


Haven


School


Phy


education for women.


Minnesota),


sical
Mrs.


charge


Educa-
Helen
music,


and Mr. John O. Collins


(A.B,, Hamilton), is


lecturer on the Gov-


ernment and Constitutional History of the


United States.


Uni-



























Th~5


volume


Conquistador


first


what is hoped will be a long line of incre


aslngly lar


meritorious


by the following


Junior
staff:


Coil


annuals


I was


issued


Marjorie


Young


and


Woodrow


Castro-Co


-Editors.


Georgia
Thomas
Isabel S
Anne G
Miss Do


Reynolds--Business


Roth-Assistant
;chloming-Editor


ibson
frothy


Manager.


Business
-at-Large.


and Lois


Moody-Faculty


Manager.


Mater-Typists.


Adviser.










CALENDAR


THE


CANAL


ZONE


JUNIOR


COLLEGE


1933-1936


The


following


a re


asonably


complete record of


the ma,


jor and many of the


minor


events of the three


years


existence


Junior


College.


The


multiple


games,


field


trips,


lectures


that have


taken


place makes


it impracticable


to mention


them


all, however mt


erestmg.:


1933-34


September 25.


Coil


opens


four days


late on


account of hurri-


cane which delayed


the Crnstobal.


September 26,


Inaugural


assembly


Junior College in


patio


Balboa


High


School


at 8:30


A.M.


September 30.


Mr.


and Mrs. Spalding


entertain


Junior Col-


legc


October


e faculty'

Tea giv


y at tea.

en in honor of Junior College faculty by Canal


Zone Colle
Parmelee.


Club,


at home of


its president, Mrs.


October


Junior Colle


students organize.


October


Junior


College


defeats


Balboa


h in


swimming


mee


October


Reception


given


faculty


students


, their


rent


given
plays.


friends
College


Coil


women.


ege.


High


The


School


play


string


ehearsal
quartet


October


Coll


Arroyo


defeats
starring.


Cristobal


High


in soccer,


Rankin


November


Colle


vs. Balboa


High


In soccer.


College


wins.


I, I









November


at her


Miss
home.


Moody


entertains


College


women


a tea


ecember 4.


Dramatic


Society


organiz


december


Charle
Ebdon


seball t


earn


Arroyo,


ack Poole


chosen
enneth


Thomas


Coach Esser


Maurer,


Fred


David Sasso,


ead,


Rankin, Harry Egolf,


George


Howard


Walling,


John


Calhoun,


Jack


Dom-


browsky.


Organization


Flowers
Carson.


December


, and


Coll


cichmi


Spani


students


golf


stry


club


club


, Kappa


tournament at


i Sigma,
Epsilon,


Panama


Mr.
Mr.


Golf


Club.


January 3.


and College nines tie


in Pa


cific


Twilight Base-


ball League


series.


January


College


dance


, at


Club.


Music


's "Hot Shots.


January


January


Coll


College


defeats


"Hilltops


students form


Twilight League game.


softball


teams.


January 22.


Series of lectures on engine


nor Schley, J


Claybourn,


eering proj


ects by Gover-


Randolph,


others


announced


Mr.


ea d owcroft.


January


Marion
dance.


Dugan


entertains


College


students


sup-


January 29-February 3.


First


quiz


wee


of Junior College.


March


Junior


Coil


faculty


entertained


students


faculty of Cristobal High with


program and


rece


ption.


Nov


--


I









March 25.


College inspected, with a view to accreditation, by Dr.


Cox


President of


Gulf Park


College


member


executive


committee


American


Association


Junior Colleges.


April 6.


Presentation of Love-;n-a'IMist at Balboa Clubhouse,


lowed
of Dr.


by party at Alice Cook'


Wilson, and


attends as guest


praises the production in a review.


April


District


Attorney


cGuigan


addr


esses


Compara-


tive


Government


students.


April 24.


College wins


basketball


game


from Balboa High.


May 5.


Announcement of


accrediting of Colle


May


Junior College men defeat Cristobal High in basketball.


Ebdon


stars.


May


Mr.


Modern


Flowers
Physics.


addresses


students


"Glimpses


May


Mr.


Flowers


gives


a second


lecture, on relativity.


nior College


banquet and dance


at Golf Club.


June 14.


End of


Mon


sa nto,


examination period and of academic year


Ruth


Walston,


Fred


Banan


lead


. Lillia
honors


list.


1934-35


September


Opening


Junior Coil


in new


building,


with


Mr.


Fred


Hosler


replacing


Mr.


Spalding


principal.


October


Sophomore


Rules


Committee


places


restrictions


shmen.


October


Competitive swimming commences.


October


Junior Colle


girls


defeat Cristobal


High in


volley-


)LN.R.~~'


r-









October


Faculty and sophomores give reception for freshmen


parents


Dani


Fred


students.


Banan,


Jack


Musical
Brown,


program


others,


William
followed


dancing.


October


Kappa


Delta


Sigma


holds


initiation


party


new


members.


October


Debaters organize,


with Charles


Osborn at head.


October


Junior


Coll


girls


beat


Balboa


High


Seniors


eyball.


October


College


girls


again


defeat


Cristobal


High


girls


ball.


Nov
Nov


ember


Chess


club organized.


ember 2.


Open house


at College,


munity to inspect new


enable members


building and equipment.


of corn-
Musical


program


Akin,


under


Chief


direction


Quarantine


of Mrs.
Officer,


Baker
begins


Dr. Cl
a series


harles


talks


on p


personal


hygiene.


November


Many


guests


attend


Kappa


Epsilon s


program


folk


lore.


November


ebaters


meet


with


their


sponsor,


Harold


Wilson, instructor


history,


and Miss Moody.


November


Tea given


at home of


Amalia Mendez


by College


girls for


Misses Mood


and Wellman.


November


Sophomores


hold


Thanksgiving


prom


Yacht


Club.


November 29.


December


Miss

Tom i


Moody

Kromer


gives te

and Bru


a for Coil


Crook


girls.


made


managers of


freshman


sophomore


One-act lavys


a.


oivet


softball te

n aIt Littl1


~ams.

7Tbetr pr.


December


I










January


Mr.


Hackett


speaks


on Government


control


of indu


stry in


January


tures


February


entlss


on problems


Mr. Charl


Balboa High


agriculture


etersen, manager of th


School, lec-


transportation


Panama Golf


Club


february


, starts giving


"Harlem


.tud


Madcaps


ents


golf 1


play


lessons.


freshmen


dance


Yacht Club.


February


College


students


have


a glimpse


royalty


when


Duke


Glou


cester visits


Panama.


March


Steph


to dance


ens


w~th


College


girls


girls


arrive.


at the


College


Union


men


invited
Wilson


gives
Nazi


public


lecture


on political


Germany.


March
March


Kappa
More


Sigma


Steph


ens


pins


College


arrive.


girls


arrive


Coll


men


are again calle


d into


service.


March 20.


High


William G.


School,


addr


Akers
esses


, language teacher at the


community


"Some


Balboa


Features


erman


Social Life.


April


Ruth


Walston


Howard


Dani


s (affirmative)


Charles


before


Osborn


Coll


Lillia


Club meeting


Monsanto 4
g on the qu


negative)


estion


debate
e solved


that


Japan


granted


naval


parity


with


eat Britain


United States.


April 3.


Members


cast of


Coll


play


Just Like


Judy broad-


cast


scenes


from


comedy.


April


at Dice


Judy pre


sented


at Balboa


Clubhouse.


b(Iy4.Rii


Club.


economic


phases









May 3.


May


Dinner given for debaters


Science


by Dr. and Mrs.


Exhibit held in the College


Wilson.


building, for the gen-


eral


public.


May


Mrs.


Ben


Williams


talks


to literature


students


"Literary


England."


May


Spanish


play.


May


13-17


Cristobal High


teachers


visit College.


May


Cristobal
luncheon.


May


Speech


class.
Dugan


students


contest


Howard
second.


visit College


members


Daniels


wins


and are


Miss


first


entertained


Moody's Speech


prize


Marion


May


Rings


pins


for graduates


arrive.


June


Superintendent


and Mrs.


Williams


entertain graduating


class


at tea-dance


Union


Club.


June


Banquet


period.
Osborn


at Century


Club.


End


The honor students of


Peter


Johnson,


Howard


final


examination


ar include Charles


Turner, Juan


Vallarino,


Jack
liam


Pater


son


Southard


, Marjorie


, Amalia


Young,


Mendez


Elizabeth


Ruth


'Hayes,


Wil-


Pickett,


sophomores listed under the


write-up of the class of 1935.


June


Baccalaureate
tist Church.


sermon


delivered


Mr.


at Bap-


June


College


faculty


rece


ives graduates and


their


parents


Miss


Moody


's home.


June


Commencement,


with


address


by Governor Schley.


1935-36









October


Sophomore


dance


at Yacht Club


in honor


fresh-


men.


October


President


Roosevelt visits Isthmus.


Students gather


him


pass


along"


Roosevelt Avenue.


October


International


Relationships


Club


formed


Mr.


Hackett.


October


Miss


Moody


annual


tea for


college


women.


November


splay


ancient


Indian


relics


lent


Smith-


sonian Institute through efforts of Mr.


A. Hess.


November 26.


Mrs.


Meyers,
Qu;jote
Manuel
masters


Program


Ernest


under
shown


Mendez.


chamber music


Baker


auspices of
to Spanish


, Hans


presented


Kohpcke,


College.


students


Art exhibition


Picture


through


Mr. and
Walter


Don


court


reproductions of


at College.


December


Coll


play, H


elena


Boys,


given


at Clubhouse.


Favor


December


ably reviewed.

Annual Spanish


Christmas luncheon.


December


Breakf


Miss


Mood


home


actors


produ


action


staff


play.


January


Freshmen


defeat


sophomores in


softball.


February 8.


Irene


Taylor


graduates.


february


Bernard


b.-Zaw


transit


Canal.


Eugene


Saphir


among


those


interviewing


him.


February


Coil


girls


give


tea for


Miss


at Panama


Golf


Club.


february


Coll


admitted


to membership in Department of


Business


Education


the National


Educational


Sso-


Ill *C + nt


see


Mosdy


*








February


Sophomore


rings


pins


arrive.


March 14.


Food sale, under the


auspices


of the Student Associa-


tion,


to finance


a dance.


March


Coll


formal


dance


Tivoli.


Gus


Schmidt'


estra.


Specialty dance


by Lena-mae


Howard.


March


Jean


Mitch


defeats


Patty


erce


pmng-pong


tournament.


Mar


ch 24.


Andrade


wins


ping-pong


tournament


over


Castro.


March


Junior College


men


disport


ems


elves


at the


Union


Club with


G olf


Park


girls.


April 25.


crossing
"Panama


Kirkpatrick add


ces


s Old Trails.


dresses
Trail


(Not on


Natural History Society at


Madden


"Old Tails


Dam


road


of Panama


"Panama


Trails,


as advertised.)


April 27


Junior Col


defeats Balboa High in


water polo.


Colberg


Hiram


Spanish one-act play,


Andrade


sponsor


dby


Mr.


notable
Carson.


work


May 9.


Annual


goes


press.


Remaining


Events


Se/i e du


May


ck Convention


at Balboa


Playsh


, sponsored


International


Dance


Relations


at Ya


Club.


Club.


May


Science


Exhibit


building.


One-act


plays


at Little


Theatre.


May 26.


Tea-dance


at Union


Club, given


Mr.


Mrs.


Wil-


liams


May


in honor


Speech


graduates.


contest.


May


May









omores:
Marjorie


Peter


Young,


Johnson, Howard Turner,


Juan


Vallarino.


and William Southard.


June

June


Banquet at


Baccalaureate


Century Club.


, at St. Mary


's Church


with the


Rev.


E.L.


Lawler as speaker.


Tune


Commencement.




t: .'


S. *


-I p


Top row:
Second r


Third


oV0


row:


Fourth row:


Fifth
Boltton


row:
n row:


Charles Malsbury, Joseph Ebdon.
r: Harvey Smith, Charles Arro


'Wili~m


Daniels,


John


(


Jack Dombrowsky, Josh


Dorothy


Becker,


Mary-Margaret


Dorothy


yo


.alhoun,
Sossa,


Erickson,


McCormack,


(honors),
William
Guillermo


Lillia


Harriet


William
De Vore,
Mendez.
Monsanto


Halvosa, Bruce Crook, Edward Gormely


Howard Walling, Fred Banan


(high honors), Ruth


(honors).


Walston


(honors).


(high honors)


I


Kalar, Marion Dugan


I


(honors), Elw


ii"
**h
x 1;;










THE CLASS OF


1935


On October


J6, 1933,


the first class of the Canal Zone


Junior


College


was


organized.


Thomas


Rankin


was


elected


president,


Alice


Westman,


vice-president,


Charlotte


Wahl,


secretary,


Charles


Arroyo, treasurer.


Wilson was chosen adviser.


On the 20th the faculty of


tion in honor of the
tre on Carr Street.


College were


hosts at a recep-


students and their parents at the Little


January


Thea-


12 an informal dance was held at


Balboa


Yacht


Club.


April


6 the


Dramatic


Society


pre-


sented


first


college


play,


Love-;n-a-Mlst,


under


auspices


of the whole


ege.


A banquet, followed by a dance,


was


held on


May 28 at the Panama


Golf Club.


In 1934, Fred Banan was elected preside


ent, Carol Palmer, vice-


president,


surer.


Marion


Dugan,


The Sophomore


secretary,


Rules


Committee


Charles


drew


Arroyo,
a set of


trea-
rules


requiring the freshman men to wear green skull caps and the fresh-


man


women


Sophomores


hair
were


ribbons
to have


same


precedence


color


until


at drinking


Thanksgiving.


fountains


freshman women


were


forbidden


use of


cosmetics.


June 4 a delightful tea-dance


was given at the


Union Club


Superintendent


graduating


Mrs.


Ben


class.


Williams,


June


in honor


annual


banquet


dance were held at the C


century Club.


June


12 the faculty of


College


were


hosts at a


reception in honor of the graduates and


their parents, held at the


home


of Miss


Dorothy


Moody, Dean of


Women of the


College.


morning


June


class


1935,


first class


Canal


Clubhouse,
occasion.


Zone


Governor


Junior


College,


Julian


Schl


was


graduated


ey being


at the
speaker


Balboa


r1r ,1


1 1* 11


r


r


1










Lillia Monsanto, the University of Iowa


Marion Dugan and Doro-


Erickson,


University


Minnesota


Ruth


Walston,


University


of North


Carolina


Howard Daniels,


University of


Texas


Guillermo Mendez,


University of Southern California


Fred


Banan


members


Worcester
class, Jack


Polytechnic


Dombrowsky,


Institute.


Edward


Three


other


Gormely,


Harvey Smith, have


apprenticeships


in the


Electrical Division


Panama Canal, while


William Daniels has one in the Mechani-


cal Division.


The following members


of the class hold


scholarships


Charles


Arroyo,


Canal


from


one


Republic


Call


Club


of Panama
Guillermo


Ruth
:endez


Walston,


, Fred


from


Banan,


Lillia Monsanto, from the institutions which they attend.






















-M a,._-


1it.


Ii rr


ft


Top row:, standing
Middle row, stand
Campbell


Seated:


Georgia


g:
ing:


Roberto Lopez,


William Sheehan, Juan


Vallarino.


Mr. Flowers, Robert Daniels, Eugene Saphir, Peter


, John Muller, Raymond Piper, Dale Boggs.
Reynolds, Hilda Keller, Gladys Shelton, M


uriel


Waters,


William Southard,


Johnson,


Edith


l-1o


Rowe,


William French,


Woodrow de Ca


ward Turner, Jack Brown,

Thomas Kromer, Marjorie


Robert

Young,


Marguerite Dryden, Inez Rhodes, Mildred Hoecker, Dolores King, Amalia Mendez.


r i
iC~











THE CLASS OF


1936


The


class


1936


held its first meeting


on October


3, 1934,


electing Frank Fitzpatrick, president, Elizabeth Hayes,


dent, Mary Elizabeth Osborn, secretary, Peter


vice-presi-


Johnson, treasurer,


and Mr. L.


Flowers, sponsor.


Green and


gold were chosen


class


colors.


The


Junior College


held open house


later


on in


month so that the new freshmen and their parents could meet the


sophomores
sophomores


requiring


faculty


continued
the men


custom


an unofficial


established


freshman


class


atmosphere.


to don


The


previous year
bright green


.skull caps


the women


to wear green hair ribbons


forego


rouge and lipstick until Thanksgiving.


A memorable occasion was


that of


the non-decision


water fight held on


the campus


between


men


each


class.


The


series


social


affairs


held during


school


year was brought


a climax by the


freshman-sopho-


more


banquet


at the


Century


Club


in June.


Before


school the freshmen elected


year


officers in


1935-36: Frank Fitzpatrick, preside


president ; Marjorie


surer.


Since


Young,


secretary


last-named


preparation for the


ent:


Thomas Kromer,


Charles


return


Wright,


school


vice-
trea-


sophomore


year, Marguerite


In September,


Dryden


1935


was


elected in his


those


stead.


freshmen


who


dropped


from


the ranks returned, halo


ed by


sophomoric


self- im-


portance-.
October


The class


gave


before


one dance at the Balboa


organization


Student


Yacht Club on


Association.


The


Association


then


took


over the main social functions of both


classes.


The


brought the two cl


completion


eshman-sophomore


asses


banquet


at the


Century


together socially for the last time.


Commencement


Exercises


Club
With


June


second


class to be graduated from the Canal Zone


Junior College


was disbanded, leaving behind it a notable record of achievement.










"~I:


i~ r.
1,1;; 4
4: , I


V


JT.


, -


-Un


Lt~


right, standing, top row: Willard Percy, Ignacio Fabrega, Henry Evers, Raymond Welch,
Mendez, Carlos Arze, Luis Noli, Dwight Shurtleff, Octavio FAbrega, Luis Vallarino, Thomi
row: Mr. Campbell, Roberta Johannes, Jane Ellen Norman, Patricia Palmer, Edith Bake
Horacio Alfaro, William Jones, Wells Brown, Donald Hutchison, Margaret Sealey, Harry
Joyce Rance, William Poole, Hiram Andrade, George Cowes, Augusto Boyd, Camilio Porras,
Walbridge, Patricia Pierce, and Helen Dudak.
Kathyleen Reed, Mathilde Brewerton, Jean Mitchell, Betty Louise Nolan, Lucille Dugan.
Mater, Eleanor Mullane, Dolores Palmer, Margaret McElhone, Edward Dombrowsky, France;
Dorothy Bray, Lena-mae Howard, Barbara Evans, Marjorie Bullock, Marie Gallivan, Mary


Rosario Spinella, Euge
as Roth.
!r, Isabel Schloming,
Wertz, Louis Schmidt
Octavio Mendez, Mar.

Marian Smith, Anne (
s Anderson, Jack Kro
Orr.


^f.* *a..*.


Left to

Middle



Seated:


~1


i =I


'''~ ;b~


B


9

tlsdPs
























THE


CLASS


1937


The


freshmen


came


down


on the


college


like


wolves


ready


conquer


less


numerous


sophomores.


The


initial


victories


went


to the


strategically


placed


,second-year


students,


who


creed green caps for the freshmen men and green ribbons


for the


freshmen


women.


Spurts


rebellion


at this


infliction


presaged


spirit


freshman


band.


(The


Amazon-women


band rebelled


them


particularly


the use of


against the


cosmetics.)


The


sophomore


band


elected


ruling'


Jack


prohibit-
Kromer


as leader,


Frances


Anderson,


Ted


Dombrowsky,


Margaret


McElhone as lieutenant leaders, and Mr.


Campbell,


mentor.


The


class


colors


are coral


gray.


"Be


Prepared'


is the


slogan


of the freshmen.


Therefore


, led by


Kromer and W


ertz, they have


a Hecklers
practice in


Amalgamated


the art of


Association,


original heckling,


, by


will be


dint


great


able to control the


freshmen of


1936-1937.


wh;ch

















THE


CANAL


ZONE


JUNIOR


COLLEGE STUDENT


ASSOCIATION


The


Student


Association


Canal


Zone


Junior


College


held its first official meeting on Dec


ember 29, 1935.


For several


weeks


prior


to this


meeting,


a committee


composed


students


and class officers from both classes had worked to


secure the co-


operative ispirxt


ducted
elected


a student
president,


necessary


ballot,


Jean


su ch.


through
Mitchell,


an association,


which


Kromer


vice-president,


con-
was


Thomaa


Roth,


secretary-treasurer.


almost


every


student


became


member of


influential


curricular


grou p


taking


ove3


Association established itself


Junior
r many


College


in social
functions


classes.


activity


at three dollars


tickets,


and fifty


bought


cents apiece,


Association


admitted


them


members


to the Col-


lege


dances


freshman-sophomore


banquet,


entitled


each member to a copy of the Conqu;stador.


The money obtained


from


elation.


sale


of these activity tickets served to finance the Asso-


The Association extend


ed certain privileges to the mem-


bers


Student


Association


Balboa


High


School,


received similar


privileges inm return.


When


students


planned


activities


year,


they


that


hoped


financing
geneous.


association


student


students


make


The Student Association has


the College


fulfill


ed these


facilitate


more


hopes.


T'homas


organization,


affairs,


in the


Student


extra-


projects, and


homo-


i



j
j
z
i:


would




















































Members of the group pictured are, from left to ri
Fabrega, Eugene Saphir, Rubelio Quintero,


ght, standing: Edith Rowe, Roberta Johannes,


Manuel Mendez


, Luis Noli,


William


Sheehan,


Mildred Hoecker,


Jane


Wocdroa


Ellen Norman,


E


I


FAbrega, and Mr.
Octavio Mendez,


Carson.
Carlos Arz


Middle row:


Jean Mitchell, Frances


Horacio Alfaro,


George


owes,


Anderson, Gladys


Hiram


Andrade,


Shelton,


Augusto


Boyd,


Mathilde
Luis V


Brewertor


tallarino


R


garet Sealey, Lucille Dugan,


Seated:


Mary


Maguire,


Mary


Colberg, Am alia Mendez,


Muriel Waters, and Helen Dudak.


Anne


Gibson,


Dolores


Palmer,


Marie


Gallivan,


Louis


Hilda Keller, Joyce Rance, Elinor Mullane, and Marguerite


De La Mater


Juan


Vallarino,


Dryden.


I










KAPPA


EPSILON


The


Kappa Epsilon Club, under the


sponsorship of Mr.


Carson,
knowled
lectures


came


into


being


1933,


purpose


Spanish language in


prominent


speakers,


being


to promote


Junior College through


plays,


social


events.


The


Club


meet


regularly, however,


until


next year,


when


Charles


Arroyo


was


elected


president, Marion Dugan,


vice-presi-


dent, Amalia M


endez, secretary, and Edith Rowe, treasurer


The


program


year


Selva, journalist and


Laurenza, Panamanian


included


lectures


Mr.


Salomon


educator, on Ruben Dario, Mr. Roque


poet,


on the


poets of


Panama, Mr.


Javier
Reyes


Spindola, the Mexican minister to Panama, on Mtexican literature.


and Mr. !Alfonso Hernindez


Cata


, Cuban minister to Panama and


prominent


novelist,


on Spanish


literature.


The


social


events


Club


were


a dance,


a Christmas


luncheon,


a program


folklore
fessional
panied b


presented by


schools


a lecture


a group


Panama


Mr.


girls


City.


Alberto


from


These
Mende:


normal


dances


were


pro-


accom-


motion


tures.


The


Club


for the year


chose


1935-36,


Juan
while


Ramon


Dale


Vallarino


Bog


was


to lead


its destinies


named vice-president,


Reba
first


Colberg,
lecturer


secretary,


and Lois


session


was


La Mater,


Victor


treasurer.
Maurtua,


rector


of the


University of San Marcos, Lima,


P'eru,


who


spoke on inter-


national


relations.


The


next


speaker


was


Baltazar


Isaza


Calder6n,


Vega.
from


tnrls


University


from


works


Panamanian


this


writer.


Panama,
schools
Lectures


who
read


were


spoke


Spanish


also


on Lope


selections


delivered


Octavio


endez


Pereira, rector of


the National Institute


University


Panama,


who


spoke


evolution


Spanish language and literature


by Dr. Camilo Leon, noted Span-


poet


Belisario


Porras,


ex-president


"Grand


Old Man


of Panama, who read a paper on


"Impressions of Italy.


44 -


U I I U U 't r T


n


'.1-


S


r


\Z


t


I





















































Present members of the society, as shown in the picture, left to right, sta
Edith. Baker, Lucille Dugan, Joyce Rance, Marian Smith, Frances


Dwight Shurtleff.
Muller, Lena-mae


ending:


Camilo


Anderson,


Seated: Miss Moody, Louis De La Mater, Kathyleen


Howard, Marjorie Bullock, Marie Gallivan,


Reed,


Porras


Patriciu
Isabel


a1


Woodrow


Pierce,


de Castro,


Marguerite


Schloming, Marjorie


J


Dryde


Young,


and Roba Colberg


r










KAPPA DELTA SIGMA


Kappa


Delta


Sigma,


or the


College


Dramatic


Society,


was


organized


on December


1933


with


Alice


Cook


as president,


June


Tilley


as vice-president,


Howard Daniels


as secretary, Pem-


broke


Banton


and Miss Moody


treasurer,
as sponsor.


(later


replaced


Marion


Dugan)


Membership is open to any student


dispel


ability in


acting


or any


other


phase


play produc-


who
tion.


On April 6, 1935, at the Balboa Clubhouse,


duced the romantic comedy


Lo~ve-n-a-M,~st,


this society pro-


the following students


having roles


Lillia Monsanto, John Calhoun, Alice Cook, Charles


Arroyo, Bernita Hale,


Jeannette Alexander, and Bruce


Crook.


The


officers


for the next year were Marion Dugan, president;


Eugene
Dorothy


Saphir,


vice-president


Erickson, secretary


Rebecca


Williams,


. On December


treasurer:


14 of this year three


one-act plays were


given


at the


Little


Theater:


The


Florist Shob,


with


Elwin


Neal, Marjorie


Young,


William


Halvo


Frank


Fitz.


patrick,


Marion


Dugan


Minu


with


Rebecca


Williams,


Eugene Saphir,


John Muller; and They


None of Them Per-


w~thi


Mary-Margaret


McCormack


, Dorothy


Erickson,


Anne


Brown,
Bruce


Marguerite


Crook.


The


Dryden,


chief


Dorothy


production


aessen,


rene


year


was


Taylor,


Just


LiK e


Judy,


an English comedy, given


at the B


alboa Clubhouse


on April


5, by the following players


Carol Palmer


Elwin N


Lillia Mon-


santo,
mack.


Charles


Arroyo,


Marjorie


Youn


Mary-Margaret


McCor-


Anne Brown.


year


1935-36


ese


officers


served


Marjorie


Young,


president


Isabel


Schloming,


vice-president


Anne


Gibson,


secre-


tary
was


John Muller,


a problem


Clubhouse
Anderson,


comedy,


on December


Eugene


treasurer.


Helena


with


Claudis


Saphir,


The major offering of the year


Boys,


a cast


presented


at the


composed


Howell, James


Balboa
Frances


Johnson, Mar-


iorie


Youn


George


Martin.


Marv-Marearet


. .


cCormack


. Lois


feet,


. *









Porras, Dwight Shurtleff, and Thomas Roth


and The Family Fail-


with


Kathyleen


Reed, Lucille


Dugan, Marjorie Bullock, Lois


La Mater,


Thomas Kromer, John Muller,


Woodrow de Castro,


Marian


Smith.


Among the students who have helped with


business man-


agement and
Fred Banan, J
Edith Baker,


staging of


plays, Elwin Neal,


ack Dombrowsky, Howard Wallin


Edward Dombrowsky,


Pembroke


Banton.


Elizabeth Hayes,


William Fleming, and Patricia


Pierce


reserve


special


mention.


The


plays


are directed


sponsor.


The greater


part of


proceeds


those


performances


to which admission was


charged has been given to the classes


the athletic teams, for the financing of


meritorious


projects, such


as the purchase of


uniforms and awards for athletes and gifts for


the College.








-4





"( 4
4>j<,
A / '<' *< > 0<
><' 4
V<~ /*
4 4>' A
~",~ ?" V


A,
4b "`' ~)<" ,;ii


<4
;Ut49

+4 <>
~~"* "'
h*\"* <



-' "`` V


)t4


it..~


---- -----------




I.~
w ..i
.74
w':j
N.?.


V4 Yt',pjh~'a.4~


491~


lmuw


I.;E


The members of the group as pictured,
and Anne Gibson.


Seated:


Patricia


Pierce,


Thomas


Roth


lehf' to right, standing:


, Dorothy


Bray,


Marjorie


Isabel


Schloming,


You ng,


and Inez


Mr. Hackett


Manuel


Mendez,


Eugene


Rhodes.


:*

"


t- *


r~2"'i;
v*


-7


rri

~1~1~4-






















THE


INTERNATIONAL


RELATIONS CLUB


The


existence


International


only


one


Relations


year,


exe


Club
rted


, although


an important


it has


been


influence


student


activities


in the


Junior College.


Mr.


Hackett


interested


several students in


the idea of


forming such


a club, and


first


meeting,


at which


Dorothy


Bray


was


elected


president,


Thomas


Roth,


vice-president, and Merjorie


Young, secretary and treasurer,


was


held


on October


1935.


Within


a short


time


inter-


national


Relations


Club


became


affiliated


with


the Carnegie


dowment for


International Peace.


From


this institution


Club


received


a number


books of


interest.


The Club has sponsored several lectures by prominent people


community,


discussed


matters


current mterna-


tional
which
annual


interest.


proved
event.


chief


to be


so succ


social


essful


function


that


was


a trip


promises


to El


Vail


to become


The


outstanding


event


sponsored


by the


Club


was


Republican Nominating Conventiodh


held


on May


1936, at


Balboa


Playshed, in


ch practically


all the students enrolle


d in


Junior


College


Balboa


High


School


participated.


This


aroused


great


community


interest.




















































As pictured, the members of the society are, standing: Dolores King, Frances Anderson, Patricia Pierce, Ignacio Fabrega, Geo
Arze, Robert Daniels, Augusto Boyd, Jack Kromer, Mildred Hoecker, Isabel Schloming, Edith Baker, Jane Ellen Nor


rino, Mr.


Seated:


Lee, Octavio Fabrega.


Kathyleen Reed,


ward


Dombrowsky,


Dorothy


Amalia


Bray, Lena-mae Howard, Muriel


Mendez,


Lucille


Dugan,


Hilda


Waters


. Dolores Palmer, Reba Colberg,


Keller, Gladys


Wells Brown


Shelton, Roberta Johannes, and Betty


J
N


~~^^~
rl r ~


,
























THE


NATURAL


HISTORY


SOCIETY


Under the


sponsorship of Mr.


Natural History


Society


was


founded


during'


latter


part


school


year


1935-36.
dents, its


A loosely organized


group of


purposes are three-fold


Junior College biology stu-


to sponsor lectures,


to promote


good fellowship, and


to organize field trips for the


furthering of a


general


understanding


science.


The Natural History Society


cers,
chell
surer.


Edward


Dombrowsky


as vice-president,


Under


their


Wells


direction


acted


Brown
efforts


elected any official offi-
as president, Jean Mit-


as secre


tary


trea-
such


speakers


as Mr.


George


Bunk


er, Mr.


Mrs. H.


Evans,


Mr.


Kirkpatrick.


The


social


events


Club


were


though


a beach


party


society


at Amador


been


Beach


in operation


a waffle


only


supper.
a short


time,


'--'ny


its aims have


been realize


club








KYI


2*


* -,ifW ,-
4^' *^


.1,,..


-- VgrI
rlw.*3
P1


Members of the group pictured
Hamlin, William Poole


Raymond Piper, Frank


Jack


Brown,


Robert


are, left
Willbrd


to right


ercy,


Fitzpatrick, Roberto


, standing: Rubelh
Donald Hutchison,


Lopez,


Howard


3 Quinter
Henry


Turner,


o0.


Octavio


Mendez,


Evers, Raymond Welch, Hiram Andr-de, H


Peter


Johnson,


Mr. Flowers,


Hazeldine, and Gordon Campbell.


j tu


"0.
*. .
4.


Arthur


Thompson,


\


Mr. Mead


c


'


r
h









THE ENGINEERS


It is their care in all


ages to take the


buffet and


cushion


shock.


It is their care


that thb gear


engages:


;t ;s


their care that the switches lock


It is their care that the wheels


run truly,


it is their care to embark a
y, transport, and deliver dui
of Mary by land and main.


nd entrain,
ly the Sons


- Rudyard Ki ling.


Though


group


present


consciousness.


formally


After


y organize


three


group


years


does


Junior


Coll


ege,


through 1
or in the


spirit of


ese


men.


drafting


engineer h
duty they


room.


du ty


definite


are found


ey may


ely manif


in the


seen


este


d its


laboratories


in study


in conferen


in room 310.


The


Junior


activities


Colle


engine


were


eers


carried


during t
through


first


their


two years


organizations


science club


, Tri Sigma,


engineering


club


, Sigma Rho


Tau


during


present


year,


throu


h the


ass


in Trips


and L


tures.


Speakers


Schley


brought to the


U.S.A.


, Major


Junior Colle


William


include


Covell


Colon
.S.A


Julian


Claybourn,


Hob


son,


Randolph,


Evans


Cornm-


mander


.Os


born


.S.N


. Granberry,


Byrd


Exp


edition


, Captain


John


Embick


Mr.


Floyd Bu


ckley of the Balboa High School.


trips have


been made to many places


engineering


terest,
Plant,


Dam


including


Miraflores


and its


Pow


Miraflores
Filtration


Hou


Locks


Plant
Hope


, the


Miraflores


Laboratories


Warehouses


madden
echani.


Division


Shops,


. Pennsylvania,


em nh


Cuts of the


Canal


Naval Radio Station


- -


Tallh


ec-


C


H


r


n
R(r,55











SPORTS


Men


Athl


During 1933-34, under the ae


e tics


of Coach S. E. Esser, the


Col-


lege


defeated


championship


number of


defeating


Cristobal
to Balboa


games


in the


"Hilltops


soccer,


High.
Pacific


The


inter-collegiate


College


Twilight Base


and tying with th


men


ball L


"Atlas


also


league


team


play


Seri


in add


tion


they


Schools.
formed.


won


games


Softball


was


from
play


both


Balboa


well


Cris


but no official


tobal


High


teams were


played


1934-35
against


Coil


Balboa


sketball


Cristobal


team


High


won all


School


games


s, and


defeated


teams from


sever


al army posts.


In an inter-scholastic track meet


Fred Banan won the


discus


throw,


high


Charles


jump, Jack Brown


Osborn


second


placed
in the


second in
half-mile


run.


Colle
Tom


men


relay team, composed of Bruce


Kromer


tennis


Robert H
awards.
presented


, pla


tournament


zeldine


At the


gold


seco


Gordon


Charl


College
trophies


banqu


in the


Campbell


sborn


et in


Ebdon


June


Crook


, John Calhoun,


dash.


singles


440-yard


won


double


following


ack Dombrowsky,


receiving
men were


Charles


Arroyo,
Crook.


Fred


Banan


, Jos


C:
3.ossa,


Howard


Walling,


Bru


In 1936-37


under Coa


ch H.


Ziert


en, who replaced Mr. Esser


this


position,


basketball


players


again


conflicted


with sev-


eral army teams,


emerging victorious.


Coil


ege also defeated


Balboa


High


in softball.


an inter-class


softball


contest


sophomore


bowed to the


freshmen.


baseball


It 1b,,


FH-T; -hnnl


Junior College de
/(Tb, R H .S


heated


Quarry


eights


CPu +I1V'~ IniAulv bur ptI


f z
PTt fhP


~iirn










defeated the men


team,


composed


Gordon Campbell,


George


Cow,


, Frank Fitzpatrick, and Robert Haze


Idine.


Gold


basketballs were awarded to Brown,


Tom Kromer


Fitz-


patrick,


Haz


eldin


Gordon


Campbell


was


awarded


a silver


cup for winning the tennis championship for two


successive


years,


while

B


George Cowes, the runner-up, received a silver tennis ball.

besides the official contests listed, many informal games a


held.


Golf


giving in


struc


swimming


tion in


are also


er to both


popular


men


SMr.


. Grieser


and women.


Women


A tM


e tics


The


Coil


women,


under


lead


ership


Hanna,


have


participated


a variety


sports


: basketball,


volleyball,


softball, archery, golf, and


bowling.


Most of


their games are un-


official.


Early in 1934, however, the


Collegians defeated the girls


stobal


games,


Elizabeth


erite Dryden,


Balboa
Hayes,


Marjorie


High


Ruth


allett


Schools
Pickett, G
, Marjorie


several


eorgia


Young,


volleyball


Reynolds,


Mar-


Dorothy Eri


son,
lege


and Edith Rowe


tennis


tournament


playing.


was


In March and April of 1936, a Col-


held, in


which


Edith Baker wa


win-


ner, and Roberta


Johannes runner-up.


Marguerite


Dryden is


champion swimmer


the College.


ire











WHO'S WHO

IN THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE


TOMMY


(Gassy) RANKIN-Class president, 1933-34, famed for


superb'


ranking


as a


stoogent.


ERNEST CUESTA-Cuban composer of exotic


verse.


PEMBROKE BANTON-Butt of all the jests of the Mechanical
Drawing class.


FRED


BANAN-Class


player.


Noted for his


president,


snappy


1934-35,
jokes.


famous


college


sax


LIL


MONSANTO-Leading


actress
honors.


in Just Like


lady


Judy.


of Love-in-a-Mistf


Rival of Ruth


major


Walston for high


NEAL and HALVOSA-Incorrigible clowns.


The


"Rover Boys


reincarnated.


JOHN


CALHOUN-Punster and originator of the


mad for-


expression,


who,


with


Halvosa,


a monopoly


e bun


business.


BRUCE


CROOK-Of


"Yaaazooo


City, Mississippi.


Slew


girls with his drawling southern


accent.


"Fan ma brow!"


HARRIET KALAR-Only female engineering student in Junior


College~


Petite and piquant chemist.


JOSE SOSSA--Familiarlv known


"Harpo


" because of his re-


semblance to Harpo Marx.

ALAN (Dizzy) and JERVAS BALDWIN-Twin nephews of Miss
Wellman.

JACK DOMBROWSKY-Known as capable stage hand for Col-









"MARNY" DRYDEN-The Gracie Allen of the College.
tion diver and future Olympic star.


Exhibi-


CAROL


PALMER-Her


smile


just


dimple.


one


Replaced


Becky Williams in the lead of Just Like


Ju dy.


FRANK


FITZPATRICK- Class


president,


'34-35.


Tall,


loqu a-


clous orator.

ELIZABETH (Sis) HAYES--Te popular little athlete who looks


like


Janet Gaynor.


TOM


KROMER-President


Student


Association,


'35-'36.


Apollo of the


Junior College halls.


JACK


PATERSON-Christened


Wilson


"the


little


man


with the big' voice.


JUAN


RAMON


VALLARINO-Enthusiastic


communist


Junior College.


A passionate poet.


EUGENE (Sappy) SAPHIR-Big newspaper man of the college.


'You have to condone it because he is a genius.


WILLIAM SOUTHARD-"Babv mind."


in the chess


Defender of the L. A.


tournament.


MARJORIE


YOUNG-Personality girl


Junior


College.


editor of the annual and ingenue of


he college plays.


FRANCES ANDERSON-Mild, sweet, gentle, honor student, and
outstanding actress of the freshman class.


JACKIE BROWN-Famous for his cartoons.


Expects to have his


own
man.


"Mutt and


Jeff"


some day.


Is also athlete and chess-


IGNACIO (Ignatz) FABREGA-


"Hail fellow well met" to


every-


one.


WOODROW DE CASTRO-Co-editor of the annual


and garru-








MANUEL


MENDEZ-Known


Social


History


Class


"Soap and Candles.


JEAN


MITCHELL-Alw


willing


to oblige.


PATTY PALMER-


The light of Ignatz


and originator of the


crack


whip


episode on


Junior


Coll


lawn.


RAY


PIPER-Chief


wise-cracker


e College.


JOYCE RANCE-Outstanding


budger.


TOM


(Rosie,


essie


ROTH-Financier


prime


organizer of


Student A


association.


MR.


HACKETT-Sponsor of


luxe


and head of the


ping-pong tournament,


International


'chaperon de


Relations Club.


ISABEL


SCHLOMING-Writer


"skool"


notes


target


slams.


ses


crac


ked voice


when singing.


Is mis-


anthrope


- yeah!


SHEEHAN


SHURTLEFF-Colle


playboys


1935-36.


"IOC"


WILSON -B


eloved


"father-confessor


of


e Coil


ege,


Coil


sector of boners-had a good opportunity here.


"ART"


THOMPSON


ii) -


The


man


with


iron


stom-


ach and


perpetual


blush.


HARRY WERTZ-President


Fly Catchers


Cluh.


Also


member


Heckl


ers


' Club.


CHARLES ARROYO-Former martin


idol of th


Coll


ege.


Played


leading rol


in the


ay Night Over


Taos


at the


Univ


ersity


of California


year.


HIRAM


ANDRADE--Ping-pong


champ.


Known


as the


Cuban


Confusion.


REBA


COLBERG-Qu


een


the Latin


Quarter.


~'T rrl lnfcnflL I


hF r,_O


lilf TrCI'I)










JOKES


Mr. Flowers-


"What can you tell me about nitrates?"


"Reds


--" Well-- er--tnhey re


a lot cheaper than day rates.


The speaker was waxing eloquent, and after his peroration on


woman s


rights


said:


"When


they


take


our


girls,


they


threaten, away from


co-educational


colleges,


what will follow?


What


follow,


I repe


at?"


And a loud, masculine voice


in the audience replied


w~iil r'


tion


After
paper,
"Dear


terrific


then


teacher,


struggles,


wrote


Percy


at the


finally


finished


exammna-


end:


answers


to the


funny


paper


expect


split


with


me.


Doctor:


"I'm afraid


ave


bad news for you.


You will never


be able


to work


Shurtleff


"Whadda


mean,


bad news?"


The


Pedro


Miguel


student


just


driven


home


after


examination.


"Did


pass


everything?"


asked


mother


anxiously.


"Everything


but two Studebakers


a Packard.


Darned


they must t


have


airplane


motors


in them '"


gotta


some


culchur


said


Liberal


Arts


student


in the debate


as to whether or not one should take general training


before beginning to specialize.


"Oh, you can


t all of that you need


after you leave college,


countered the Engin


eer,


"from


the newspaper and movies!''


"Let me


see


hat your


your heart.
liver ?"


"Mr.


how


can


cut out my


kidney?'"


(Stenographic


report


a period


dissection


during


a bio-


I nri r


012 g~\


f; ft y-f;fty


"Yuh


r


a









































N~de.


4xJ as-k.


4r rP
..
S^ ,i


S ro~CtS


Npplt


\*. A-
\^ '*^^ '


pls~lr


*) yrl'


-0~
" ~V


C.~~a


tc 4eth tr


A 4..ttCtw an&6.4 *wetktt

N
Ia

C-
Fl


Vo4fl


L#4i, htre


a trre


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r4 St









FACULTY MINDS


AT WORK


Mr. Flowers-at the end of
me, I can't remember whether I


a night in his


was


going home


laboratory.


"Dear


to dinner or com-


ing back


to my


eight o'clock class!


Mr. Lee-


"That looks like my car, but what can those police-


men


prisoners


doing


in it?"


Mr.


Hosler-


superintendent


"When


retire


an orphan


from


asylum


eac


so that


shall
never


letters


from


parents,


or better


still,


warden


a prison.


Then the


alumni will never come back


to visit !'


Mr. Meadowcroft, to


a ho


stess


who had a


asked him if he must


take


his wife


away from


a rece


option with


him


unfortunate-


I'm afraid I


must.


BONERS


Engli


Tennyson wrote


Odyssey


was


an el


not written


entitl


"In M


Homer, but


memorandum "
another man


that name.


Being


a wee


k-end party,


Mild


went home on Sunday.


Michael


Angelo


painted


dome


Sistine


Ma-


donna.


cial History


Panama will aid in the defense


of the country


in time of war be


cause


the locks


will keep out enemy ships.


Math.
Comp.


:Geome


Gov't


try teaches


The


13th


'Sex


Amendment


angels.


abolishes the negroes.


COLLEGE


EXAMINATION


Multiple


Choice


Fill iln


blank


with


proper


number


The


most distinguished car in


the College


-


n. N


Objective


Test


us to b


? m


tl


I



























Yt M ehttrt


,. POl'oS4 at Wor


WVe bGW, the


see t'n5


NO crs r y c


I


-r-^*ac--t.


.-i- .'- ,.-


oetr


the 1t-cr.


C.


o tLeage


Mtn


Co ie latUtjaf fto zards


.-


I


I;gh+


~tSsw~%
~L~`!~k~


"~









The


student most notable for his (or her) slim form (


Patty
Reds
Augus
Joyce


Palmer.
Thompson.
;to Boyd.


"Budger


" Rance.


The


most


outstanding


it C0jl


couple


are (


John Muller


Lena-mae


Howard.


. Patty


Pierce


Roberto


Lopez.


Edith Rowe


"'Rosie'" Roth.


Eleanor Mullane and


"Soap and Candles


" Mendez.


True and False.


Place


or F


at the


each


statement.


The


escalator


satisfactory


rece


ntly


because


installed


in the


students desire


Colle
more


is un-


exercise.


Shocked


permit


td indignant,
installation c


students


a smoking


ave


room


refused


on the


third


floor.


The


orderly


conduct


halls


been


warmly


prais


ed by the


Because


faculty.


of the recent


heavy rains, all classes were sus-


pended for a


wee


By not


picking the


flowers


on the


campus,


students


observed "Flower


reservation


Week' in the true spirit.


Hecklers


curricular


have


activities


recently


resigned


from


so as not to interfere


other


with the


extra-
work


Hecklers


' Association.


Gordon


Campbell


was


severely


reprimanded


Superintendent of Schools


for his loud and obstr


eperous


Archibald


("Snowball"


Bostick


S


has been


elected


Pre-


m


conduct,









The


Anti-Beer-Garden


College


League


recently


estab-


lished


headquarters


in an alcove


at E1


Rancho in order


to conduct a


more


strenuous


campaign.


Randall'


The


Making of the Modern Mind has become


so popular with


students


that


library


found


it ne


cessary


to order one hundred additional copies.


a meeting of the colle


group,


Miss Moody declared


that


William


ever


Sheehan


had,


been


that


one of
wished


best


might


pupils


con-


tinue


as his instructor.


IlL


Matching


answer


matching


best


space


provide


Copper sulphate
Pete Johnson


Ten cents


Chemistry


plosion


Fly swatter


Harry


Eugene


Walking


Red


Sweet


Wertz


What
should


Saphir


encyclopedia


Eugene
Mary (


but ton


sophistication


every


young


person


know(


Hamlin
3sborn (


Hackett


Red


Mathilde


Dolores


Brewerton


Betty
Suspe


Palmer


B3oor


cted


Coca


Cola


Piper
I


Lois De

Frances


Jane


addict
"Toot


La Mater

Anderson


Ellen


Norman


toot


Sin 1ly

Perpetui


Irish
Bath


Sheehan


trumpet


horrified

il smile


grin


towel


shirts


Billy


French


ht Shurtleff


Edith Baker


Girlish


giagle


ex-


Ray


``S nowball`'


Dw;


n








"Down with everything!"


Campbell


Cavalryman


Southard


"Tall, dark, and


handsome


Jackie
Chess


Juan


Brown


(ty) Champion (


Vallarino (


"Did
you?"


over


"Pin


"H


Marjorie


"Where can I get a'date


tonight?"


Bullock


Bill Daniels (
Edith Rowe (


hair
"Oh


meant


comb


but-


, Nelse, mah luv !"


aze


Id;ne


































W ai
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st 9 Og e n +o


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LITERARY


POSTSCRIPTS


TAKING


OUR BURDENS -


BOOKS


Fam~thar


Essay,


Frances


Anderson


When


word


"burdens


is not


given


a strictly


limited


meaning'


a reader


mind is


likely to follow


a tangent of its own.


So that


there
mean


will


be no


mistaking


Burdens


ege.


purport of


Closely


"burdens,


associated


w~th


Burdens are the alliterative


Books.


first


two


teachers


days
say,


Books.


at college


"You


can


will need


epitomi
s Book.


in the


That Book


word


can


bought second-hand


"Have you


bought your


this Book is new


Books yet?"'


Where


year.


can


Pupils chat,
:t this Book


second-hand ?"


Parents


despair,


"John


needs


many


expensive


Books for


college.


Everywhere


I turn I hear Books.


to the


Administration Building,


eager, like


other


freshmen, to get my Books, I find numerous other students, mostly


freshmen-also


buying


Books.


!Lengthy


d scussions


about


p rice


of Books;
questions


detailed explanations of courses


about


Books


while


and needed Books


waiting in


line for


Books


Staggering


with


at least


Books


held


cradle-fashion


in my arms, I stumble and drop one.


As I reach to succor the one,


two or three others
at last achieved, and


escape my


we proceed.


protecting


arms.


escue


all is


Suddenly, looking at my similar-


burdened companions, I


laugh,


greatly amused by


the d;p arity


between


laughing


faces


many


serious-looking


Books.


Back


colle


building


we needs


must


have


lockers


our


Books.


I can not


escape the thought that little wheelbarrows


that could be


filled with Books and


pushed before one, something


like a certain type of baby bugyv


have


seen,


would be


great con-


veniences.


'Pursuing


whimsical


idea


further


entertained for a few minutes by my conjectures.


,1 i r


am greatly
instance, I


--- ~ ,, .,- -


AAI A*


Rush;n


Lll_ ~, ,f~_ ,t


11 1










ccle~ie


students,


grown-up now,


lowering


their


dignity


by use


devices!


In less


than


a week's time


I discover that exporting


and im-


porting the Books from college is as nothing when compared with


huge
With


Burden of


that


studying the


sobering realization


Books.


the word Books is chang ed


the word Study


- and College


started!


"THE MONEY FOR A MEAL


Short


Short


Story,


M arjorie


Bullock


Jimmie,


pathetic,


Was


a young


on his


man
wav


with
down


a heart


at times


into Panama


City


almost


one


too sym-


afternoon.


He had


just passed the Century Club when he saw a Mexican a


squalid-looking


creature


whose


f~1t~hy


clothes


hung


loosely on his


scrawny body. His red-rimmed eyes,


with dark circles like bruises


beneath them, appealed


to the passers-by with an


expression both


desperate


sad..


Seeing


that


man


was


nearly


starving,


Jimmie


stopped.


Down went


hand into his pocket, and


out it


came


with


two


dollars.


'"Here


man


, you


take


buy yourself


a good meal.


yourself


the way up to


here.


Jimmie


indicated hi


chin


with hi. finger.


Then he put the money into the


can


's hand,


smiled, and


week


went on his way.


later


Jimmie


was on


way


downtown


again.


He,


was passing the Century Club when a man rushed up to


him.


Sefinor, Sefior


"Do


know


me?"


man


asked


anxiously,


broached


a little closer


jimmi e


1oo kd


at the


newcomer


closely.


lie saw a


well-


such


.


.









]He reached


into the pocket of his new


pulled out


an immense roll of bills.


win first prize !'


"'Whv, that is fine.


"Verr fine.


Jimmie


But you finer.


s voice had a


truly pleased ring.


For what you do I buy you


this.


He handed


Jimmie a


beautiful watch.


here, I can't take


this.


only gave you that money


because 'you n


eeded it


abuse


were


hungry


- almost


starv-


ing."


- b~t


Jose


never


forget.


You


much


him.


The


Mexican


thrust the watch in


Jinmm


's hand and started off.


After


advancing


a few feet,


turned, grinned,


said


very


humbly,


"Adios, amigo mio


- y muchas gracias.


Always I shall remember


you.


He disappeared around the corner, leaving Jimmie standing


there with the watch in his hand.


see


"I3u t











NORTHERN CHRISTM


etrarc


on~e t,


by Caro


-i
at;,m er


There


is a white


Seace


in the


world


tonight,


if in pity God


had


wrakbed His


sweet


A nd


arms


about the


ear


,A1 to cheat,


one


burnt


hushed


and


stace


bitter


sorrow


lying


rule
tHgit


and right


Across the


drawn earth'


tiroat.


is it meet


name


night


d holy n


eight,


greet


Wit


f~salim s


ear


hard


cold


stars


and bright.


The


trees


stand 1


ean


and stiff with


arms


upraised


Bray r


, and


frau ght


with


ter dreams


Has


sett


ed softly down in w


endless val


"Oh Glory be to God,


and God be


kra;


sect


The


can


tKes


across


glints


earns


snow-thick roofs,


and calm


white


peace


prevails.


REVERIE


4Sha


kest


earean Sonnet,


argare


ormack


A ,i


ever


now the


memory


of your smile


found its way


again ;nto my room.


The


dreams


I thought w


ere


ead now by me


And all


lSast


joys


siring


up to


haunt


oom.


The
And


Your
And


pictures


every
echo


is crea


- I know it


out your


name.
rlace:
sam e.


* ~ ~~ .4 4 ,.


es.


wall reflect


board


softly r


your face


king


through


cannot be


s;7snce


Jl *


tM


on jt,




















A SONG FOR THE CANAL ZONE


Sing you your no


ern


JUNIOR COLLEGE


ege,


By mou


in, shore,


or bl


amn,


But dream of


mn.t


magic


Sbanish


islands
Main.


emera


hung with


magic


ours


gleaming reft

,e the far-off


snowstorms


jungles


Wlh'ere

Yours b


Where
Where


islands,
deeb,
orchids.
es creel


campus,
eck the bine.


spring renews


And


autumn g


ows


like wine:


eternal


summer.


us, the sat hfire


sea,


The
The


vivid


scar


frangi'ani


Chorus


anal


one


Junior


College,


No matter where


we rove,


Adorn the


oncea I
) trade


shores


the;r


winds


southern


cross


where


kiraCtes


treasure-trove


the tro 'cs,
above,


Commemordte


our sojourn,


In the


College that we


love.


Ours
And


are


ossom


tree.


hose




Full Text

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, C Z J C .. .. 193 6 CONQUIST ADOR -:: ..

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This vo l u m e of the Conquistador, the first ot w h a t is hoped wi ll b e a l o n g lin e of in c reasIngl y large and m eritorious Junior C ollege a nnua ls, "vas issued by t h e fo ll ow in g staff : Marjorie Young and Woodrow de Castro-Co-Editors. Georgia Reynolds-Business Manager. Thomas RothAss istant Business Manager. Isabel Schloming-Editor-at-Large. Anne Gibson and Loi s de la MaterTypists. Miss Dorothy Moody Faculty Adviser. _______________________________________________________ r.

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THE HISTORY OF THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE The his tory of the C a n a l Zone Junior College, situated o n beautiful Roosevelt Avenue in B alboa, begins long before tbe o p ening of the College in September, 1933. For several yean before its actual establishment, the Junior College was a subject of correspondence between various Congressmen, chiefly the H o norabl e E. E. D ennison, and the then Governor of the Panama C a n a l Colonel H arry Burgess. A survey of the Canal Zone schools by the Teachers' C o llege of C olumbia University resulted in a recomm endation that a Junior C o llege be established. The Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Ben M. Williams, and his staff made a n exh austive study o f the requirements for the establishment of such an institution and it was concluded not only t hat there was a need for a Junior C ollege, but also that the number of prospective students and the facilities that might b e provided would insure i t s success as a college of standard grade and hig h reputation. The recommendation of the S u perintendent of S chool. for t h e establishment of the Junior College was approved by the Executive Secretary, C A. M cIlvaine, and Governor Burgess, both of w h o m were sincerely interested in opening to the capable and a mbitious youn g people of the community t h e doors o f higher education, and for several years had been working constructivel y toward the realization of the ideal. The inaugural assembly of the J unio r C o llege was h eld in t h e p a ti o of t h e B alboa Hig h School on S eptember 26, 1933. Addresses were g iven by the Governor, C olonel J ulian L Schley, the Executive Secretar y, C. A. M cIlvaine, S u perintendent Willi a ms, and Mr. H. G. Spalding, Principal of the Balboa High S chool and the new Junior College. The u pper floor of t h e former Y. W. C. A. building, on Carr Street, B a lboa, which had been turned over to the school au-

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ihorities. was set aside as a dormitory for men students !rom the Atlantic side of the Isthmus. Eleven students from Cri.tobal a n d its vicinity have attended t h e C o llege for a year or morc: namely. Ernest Cuesta. Tho mas Ebdon. Harry Egolf. Mildred Hoecker. Elinor M ulla n e D o lores P almer. Ruth Pic kett Harvey Smith. Char les Wright. Elizabeth Hayes. and Gord o n C ampbell. After one year of o peration in available classrooms of the Balboa Hig h S c hool. with a class of sixty-five students and six well-qualified teachers. five o f w h o m cam e to t h e Canal Z one for the expre . p urpose o f teaching in t h e new C ollege. the J unior C ollege was moved i n September. 1934. to its new $300.000 building. This structure i s Secti o n B. or t h e science unit. of a proposed school plant of fOllr units. o f which Section A will contain a library, c lassrooms. and an administration center. Section C. a large auditorium. a n d Secti o n D. vocation a l shops and gymnasium The ne\v science equipment for s c i entific, commercial. and cultural courses bought for this building represented an initial expenditure of more than $12.000. Until the new libr a r y can be built. the five t housand or m o r e vol umes available f o r the use o f the colleg e students are housed in the Balboa S c hool ; brary. The headquarters for physical education classes and , c s is the B albo a Pla yshed. 1-. three short years o f its existenc e the Canal Zone Junior Colleg e has g 'iven positive proof t hat the efforts of those w h o planned and worked so e nthusiastically for i t s creati o n were well justified. These three years have seen t h e accrediting o f the C olle g e in April. 1934. as a standard instituti on. b y the American A s sociation of Junior C o lleges: they have witnessed the growth of the enrollment of the Co\leg' e as its reputation has spread: they have seen the first graduatin g c l ass of June. 1935. go f orth t o make notable records at other institutions: and they have seen t h e Canal Z one Junior College becom e a sound influence upon the i ntellectual life o f the c ommu nity. SCHOLARSHIPS A number of l o cal organizations have given scholarship. to e nabl e students who m i ght not otherwise have been able to con-

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tinue th e ir education to attend the Junior College. As an ex pression of the appreciation of the College as a whole to thele organizations, their names, with a list of the s tudent. who have benefited b y their generosity, are given below: Class of 1935, Balboa Hig h S c hool : Reba Colberg, Mary Joyner, Luis N o li, William Fleming, 1935. Cristobal Canal Z one Lodge N o 1542, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks: Thom. as Ebdon. 1934 Panama Canal Lod g e No. 1414. Benevolent and Pro.tec tive Order of Elks: E d w ard G orme l y 1933; Howard Turner. 1934-36; William Fleming. 1935-36 Canal Zone Women's League: Lillia Monsanto 1933-35 ; Robert Daniels. Georg i a R ey n o lds, 1935-36. In addition. t wo s c h olarships have been awarded by the Canal Zone Coll ege Clu b to Junior Coll ege students now co ntinuing their studies e ls w h e re. The r ecipients of t h ese are Ruth Walston and Ruth B roo k s. THE FACULTY The administrative off i cers a nd fa culty of the Canal Zone Junior C o ll ege are excepti o n a ll y wel! trained. A list i. given here of the degrees eac h official and instructor has received. and the name of the institution at which eac h instructor taught before taking hi s present p osi tion Ben M. Williams, S u p erintendent of S chool.: A. B M e r cer University; A M Columbia. Vir 1 il H. Barker, Assistant Superintendent of S dhool.: A. B . Missouri State Teach ers College; A M . Columbia. Fred W. Hosler, Principal o f the Junior College: B. S . 'Pennsylva nia State C o lleg e ; A. M., Columbia. W. E Campbell, Instructor in Commercial Education: B S . and M S., University of Illinois; taught lat .. t University of Illinois. Chalmers S. Carson. Instructor .n Romance Languages:

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A. B., University of Michigan; Ed. M Harvard; taug'ht preVi0115iy at Western Reserve University permanent member of summer faculty of New York Un i,"er.sity. Leonard C. Flowers, Instructor in Physical Sciences: B. S. and M. S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; taught last at Carnegie Institute of Technology R coger C. Hackett, Instructor in Social Science: A. B., Indiana University; A. M., Harvard University; taught last at Cristobal High School. George O. Lee, Instructor in Biological Science: B. S., Iowa State College; taug'ht previously at the University of Wyoming. A. J. Meadowcroft, Instructor in Mathematics and Enfiineering: A.B., Leland Stanford University; Engineer, Leland Stanford University; taught previously at Leland Stanfc rd University. Dorothy Moody, Instructor in English, Dean of W omen: A.B., University of Kansas; A.M., Yale; taught last at University of Kansas. Miss Louise Hanna (New Haven S chool of Physical Education), is instructor in physical education for women. Mrs. Helen C. Baker (A.B., University of Minnesota), has charg e of music, and Mr. John O. Collins (A.B .. Hamilton), is lecturer on the G overnment and Constitutional History of the United States.

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CALENDAR OF THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE 1933-19 36 The foll ow in g is a reasonably co mplete record of all the major a n d many of the minor even t s of the three years' existence of the Junior C o llege. The multipli c i ty o f g'ames, f i e l d trips, and lectures r hat have taken plac e makes it impracticabl e to m entio n them all. however interestin g : 1933-34 S e ptember 25. College opens f ou r days late o n accou n t o f hurrica n e wh i c h delayed the Cristoba7. S eptember 26. Inaugural ass e m b l y of Junior Coll eg e In patio of Bal boa Hig h S c h ool at 8 :30 A.M. September 30. Mr. and Mrs. Spa lding entertain the J unior C o l lege facul ty at tea. O ctober 7. Tea give n in h o nor of J u ni o r College faculty by Canal Zo n e Colleg e Cl u b, at h o m e of its president, Mrs. E. H. Parmelee. October 16. J u n ior C o llege students organize October 18. J un ior College defeats B a l b o a High In swimming meet. October 20. Reception give n by fa culty for s t u d e n t s, their p arents, and fri e nds of the Colleg e The pla y R e hearsa7 I l iven by C o ll e ge women. High S c h oo l strin g quartet p l ays. O ctober 2 1. C olleg e defeats C r istobal High In soccer, Ranki n and Arroy o s tarring'. November 1. College vs. Bal boa Hig h In soccer. C ollege Wln,. P oo l e st ars. November 11. College WlnS soccer ga m e with C ristobal Hig h. Novem ber 16. D r Ross, Wire l e s s Operator o n Admiral Byrd's expediti o n s h ip, th e B ea r of O ak7and, speaks to studenl3 o n L i ttle Amer i ca

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November 22. Miss Moody entertains College women at a tea at her home. December 4. Dramatic Society organized. December 6. Baseball team chosen by Coach Esser: David Sasso, Charles Arroyo, Kenneth Maurer, Fred ltead, Joe Ebdon, Jack Pool", Thomas Rankin, Harry Egolf, George Novey, Howard Walling, John Calhoun, Jack Dom'browsky Orga nization of chemistry club, T ri Sigma, by Mr. Flowers, and of Spanish club, Kappa Epsilon, by Mr. Carson. December 9. College students' golf tournament at Panama Golf Club. January 3. Atlas and College nmes tie m Pacific Twilight Baseball League series. J anuary 12. First Colleg" dance, at Yacht Club. Music by Riley's "Hot Shots." January 15. College defeats "Hilltops" in T wi light League game. January 18. College students form softball teams. January 22. Series of lectures on engineering project. by Governor S c hley, J. G. Claybourn, E. S. Randolph, and others announced by Mr. Meadowcroft. January 23. Marion Dugan entertains College student. at supper dance. January 29-Febrllary 3. First "quiz week" of Junior College. March 2. J lInior College faculty entertained by student. and faculty of Cristobal High with program and reception. M rch 5. Mrs. James Macfarlane of Havana, addresses .tudents on "Cuba Today." March 7. Baby Austin carried into patio by College "men." March 23. Gulf Park College girl. arrive on Isthmu$.

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1I-1arch 25. Colle ge i n spected, w ith a v iew to accreditati o n by D r. R G C ox Presi d e n t of Gulf Park C o llege a n d m e mber of ex ecuti ve co mmittee of t h e A merican Association o f J unior College s. April 6. Presentati o n of L ov e in a .. Mist at Balboa Clubhouse, followec! b y party at A l ice Cook's. "N.R. attends a s gues t of D r. Wilson and Faises the production i n a review. April 8. District Attorney J. J. M c G u i g an addresses Compara tive Govern m ent students. April 24. Co llege wins basketball ga m e from Balboa H igh. May 5. Announcemen t of acc:'ed iti n g of College. May 15. Jun ior C o llege m e n defeat Cristobal H igh in basketball. Joe Ebdon stars. May 21. M r F lowers addresses students O n Glimpses of Modern P hy s i cs." May 28. M r Flowers g 'ives a s eco n d lecture, o n relativity. J u ni o r College ban quet a n d dance at G olf Clu b. J une 14. End of exa m i n atio n p e riod a n d of ac adem ic year. Lillia M o nsanto, Ruth Walston a n d Fred Banan lead h o nors l is t 1 934 35 September 1 9. Openin g of Junior College I n new buildin g, with Mr. F r e d W. Hosler repl ac in g M r H. G. Spaldin g as principal. Octo'be r 2 Sophomore Relies Committee p laces restrictions o n freshm e n. O c tober 3. Competi tive swimmin g commences. October 7. J L1nior College g 'irl s defeat Cristobal H ig h in vo ll eyball. Girls go i n g out for vo lleyball : Elizabeth Hayes Ruth P i c kett, G eo r g ia R ey nolds, Margu e rite Dryden M a rj o ri e Hall e t t, Doroth y Erickson, Marjorie You n g, Irene T ay lor, and Rebecca Williams. October 8 T r i Sigma smoker.

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October 12. Faculty and soph omores g ive recep t i o n fo r freshmen a n d parenis of stude nts. Musical p-rog'ram by William Daniels. Fre d B a n a n Jack Brown and others, followed by dancin g October 16. Kappa D elta Sig m a holds initiation part y for new m e mbers. October 17. Debat ers org' anize, with Charles O s b orn at head. October 24. J unior C o llege girl s b eat B a lboa Hig h Seniors 111 volleyball. October 27. College girls again defeat Cristobal H "gh g 'irls m volleyball. ovember 1. Chess club organized. November 2 Ope n house at C olle ge, to enabl e m e mbers o f comm unity to in spect new buildin g and equi p ment. Musical program under direction of Mrs. Baker. D Charles V. Akin, Chief Quarantine Officer, begins a series of t alks o n p erson a l hyg' i e ne. Novem b el' 13. M a n y guests attEnd Kappa Epsil on's program of folk lore. November 14. Debaters meet with their s p o nsor, D r Harold Wilson, instructor o f history, a n d Miss Moody. November 20. Tea g iven at h o m e of Amali a M e ndez by C o llege g 'irls for Misses Moody a n d W ellman. Novembe r 2B. Sophomores h o l d Thanksgi ving prom at Yacht Club. November 29. Miss Moody gIves tea fo r C o llege girls. December 5. T o m Kromer a n d Bruce Crook made m a nagers o f freshma n and sophomore softball teams. December 14. One -act p lays g iven at Little Theater. Decem ber lB. Kappa Epsil o n's Christmas l u n c heon served by Househ o l d Arts D e partm e n t of Hig h School. J a nuary B Dr. Wilson g ives the first of a series o f public lee-tures o n the N R A., speakin g of its financia l side.

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January 15. Mr. R. C. Hackett speaks on Government control of industry in the N. R. A January 22. Dr. H. P. Prentiss of the Balboa High School, lectures o n problems of agriculture and transportation in the N. R. A. February]8. Mr. Charles Petersen, manager of the Panama Golf Club, starts givin g the students golf lessons. February 22. "Harlem M2dcaps" play for the freshmen dance at the Yacht Club. February 23. College students have a glimpse of royalty, when Duke o f Gloucester visits Panama. March 12. Stephens College girls arrive. College men invited to dance with the g "irls at the Union Club. Dr. Wilson gives public lecture o n political and economic pha5e. of Nazi Germany. March 18. Kappa Delta Sigma pms arnve. March 19. More Stephens College girls arrive and College men are again called into service. March 20. Dr. William G. Akers. language reacher at the Balboa High S chool, addresses community on "Some Features of German Social Life." April 1. Ruth Walston and Howard Daniels (affirmative) and Charles Osborn and Lillia Monsanto (negative) debate before College Club meeting o n the question: "Re.olved that Japan be granted naval parity with Great Britain and the United States." April 3. Members of cast of College play JlIst Like Judy broadcast scenes from the comedy. April 8. Just Like J udy presented a t Balboa Clubhouse. "N.R." makes the play the subject of a complimentary editorial. April 23. Debate on Japan's naval parity repeated for general public. April 30. Bill Southard upholds the honor of the L. A:. by defeating Jack Brown at chess.

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May 3 Dinner given for debaters by Dr. and Mrs. Wilson. May 7. Science Exhibit held in the C olleg' e building, for the general public. May 8. Mrs. Ben M. Williams talks to literature students on "Literary Eng'land." May 10. Spanish play. May 13-17. Cristobal High teachers visit College. May 17. Cristobal students visit College and are entertained at luncheon. May 28. Speech contest for members of Miss Moody's Speech class. Howard Daniels wins first prize and Marion Dugan second. May 29. Rings and pins fOt' graduates arrtve. June 4. Superintendent and Mrs. Williams entertain graduating class at tea-dance at Union Club. June 8. Banquet at Century Club. End of final examination period. The honor students of this year include Charle. Osborn, Peter Johnson, Howard Turner, Juan Vallarino, Jack Paterson, M arjorie Young' Elizabeth Hayes, Willi a m Southard, Amalia Mendez, Ruth Pickett, and the sophomores listed under the wri te-u p of the class of 1935. June 9. Baccalaureate sermon delivered by Mr. Hosler at Baptist Church. June 12. College faculty recetves graduates a n d their parents at Miss Moody's home. June 14. Commencement, with address b y Governor Schley. 1935 September 19. C ollege o p ens. Mr. W. E. Campbell replaces Miss W ellman On facuity and M r. R. C. Hackett, Dr. Wilson. October 5. Kappa Delta S;gma initiatio n party.

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October] 1. Sophomore dance at Yacht Club, In h o nor of frest,-men. October 16. Preside n t Roosevelt vi s its Isthmus. Students gather to see him pass alon g Roosevelt Avenue October 18. Internatio nal R e lationships Club formed by Mr. Hackett. October 31. M iss Moody's annual tea for college women. November 19. Display of ancient India n relics lent by Smithsonian Institute through efforts of Mr. J. A. Hess. November 26. Program of chamber music presented by M r an:! Mrs. Ernest S. Baker, H ans Kohp c ke, and Walter Meyers, u nder auspices of the College. Picture of Don Qu. ijote s hown to Spanish students thro u g h courtesy o f Manuel M endez. Art exhibition of reproducti ons of old masters at College. December 13. College play, H e l e na's Soys. g iven a t Clubhouse. Favorabl y reviewed. December 17. Annual Spanis h Christmas luncheon. December 22. Breakfast at Miss Moody's home for actors and production staff of the play ] a nuary 31. Freshme n defcat sophomores in softball. Februa r y 8. Irene Taylor graduates. February 12. B ernard Shaw transits C a n a l. a m o ng' those inter-v iewing him. Eugen e Saphie February 13. College g i r l s give tea for Miss Moody at P a n a m a G olf Club. February 19. College admitted to membership in Department of Business Education of the National Educational AS3ociation. February 20. Dinne r g iven by Mr. Carson for h i s Fren"h students a n d other iuests. February 21-23. International R e lationships Club goes o n trip to EI V a lle.

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February 27. S o ph o more ring s and p,ns arnve. March 14. Foo d sale, under the auspices of the Studen t Association to finance a d ance. Marc h 20. Colleg e formal dance at Tivo li. Gus Schmidt's or c hestra. Specialty dance by Lena-mae Howard. March 23. Jean Mitc h e ll defeats P atty Pierce in ping-pong tournament. Marc h 24. Andrade wins ping -pong tournamen t ov e r de Castro. M a r c h 27. Junior College men disport themselves at the Union C lub with G ulf Park girl s. April 25. R Z. Kirkpatrick addresses Natural History Society at crossin g of Las Cruces Trail and Madden D a m road on P a namas Old Trails." (Not o n "Old Tails of P a n a ma" or "Panama Oil Tra il s," a5 advertised.) April 27. Junio r College dEfeats Balboa Hig h in water p olo. May 1. R eba Colberg and Hira m Andrade do notable work 10 Spanish o n e -act pla y, sponsored b y Mr. Carson M ay 9. Annual goes to press. Remaining Events ScJ,eduled May 13. Mock Conventio n at Balboa Playshed, sponsored by Internation a l Relation s Club. May 15. D a nce at Yacht Club. M ay 19. S c i e nce Exhibit in College bu ildin g. May 22. One -act pl ay s at Little Theatre. May 26. Tea-dance &t U ni o n Club, g iven by Mr. and Mrs. Wil liams in honor of graduates May 28. Speech contest. June 3-8. Fina l examination period. At t h e end of the third quarter, the fcllowing promise to be h c nor s tudents: freshmen: Frances Anderson, Mary Orr, Lois De La Mater, Mary Maguire, Eug e n e H a m lin, and William Poole; soph-

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Offiores: Peter Johnson. Howard Turner. Juan Vallarino. Marjorie YOllng'. and William Southard. June 6. Banquet at Century Club. June 7. Baccalaureate. at St. Mary's Church with the Rev. E. L. Lawler as speaker. Tune 12. Commencement.

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" Top row: Charles Malsbury, Joseph Ebdon. Second row: Harvey Smith, Charles Anoyo (honors), William Halvos'a, B.uce C.ook, Edward Gormely (honors), Elwin Neal. Third row: Daniels, John Calhoun, William De Vore, Howard Walling, Fred Banan (honors). Fourth row: Jack Dombrowsky, Jose Sossa, Guillermo Mendez. Fifth row: Dorothy Becker, Dorothy Edckson, Lillia Monsanto (high honors), Ruth Walston (high honers) Bottom row: Mary-Margaret McCormack, Harriet Kalar, Madon Dugan (honors).

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THE CLASS OF 1935 On October 16, 1933, the first class o f the Canal Zone J unior College was organized. Thomas R ankin was elected president, Alice Westman, v ice-president, Char lotte Wahl, secretary, and Charles Arroyo, treasurer. Dr. Wilso n was chosen adviser. On the 20th the faculty of the College were hosts at a reception in honor of the students and their parents a t the Little Theatre o n Carr S t reet. o.n January 12 a n informal dance was held at the Balboa Yacht Club. On April 6 the Dramatic Soc iety presented the first colleg' e play, Lo ve -;na-M;st. under the aus pices of the whol e college. A banquet, followed by a dance, was h eld on May 28 at t h e P anama Golf Club. In 1934, Fred Bana n was e lected president, Caro l Palmer, v icepresident, Marion Dug an, secretary, and Charles Arroyo, treasurer. The Sophomore R u les C ommittee drew up a set o f rules requirin g the freshman men to wear green skull caps and the freshm a n wOmen hair ribbons o f the same color until Thanksgiving. Soph o mores wer e to have precedence at drinking fountains and freshman women were forbidden the use o f cosm etics. On June 4 a delightful tea-dance was given at the Union Club b y Superintendent and Mr". Ben M. W illia m s in h o n o r of the graduating' class. On the 8th o f June the annual banquet and dance were held at the Century Club. On J u n e 12 the faculty of the C o llege were hosts at a recepti o n in h o nor of the graduates and t heir parents, held at the hom e of Miss D o roth y Moody, Dean of W o m e n of the College. On :he m orning' of June 14, the class of 1935, the first class o f the Canal Zone Junior College, was g r aduated at the B alboa Clu b h ouae, Governor J u li a n L. S c hley being the speaker of the occasion. Of this class, thirteen members are now attending colleges or universities in the Unite d States: John C alhoun, Assumptio n C o l lege of t h e University of W estern Ontario: J o s eph Ebdon, the Georgia Institute of Techno logy: Harriet K alar, Pennsylvania State College: Howard W alling Purdue University: Elwin Neal, T u l ane University : Cha r les Arroyo, t h e Universit y o f C alifornia:

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Lillia Monsanto, the University of Iowa; Marion Dugan and Dorotry Erickson t h e University of Minnesota; Ruth W a lston, the University of North Carolina; Howard D anie l s the University of Texas; G uillermo Mendez, the University of Southern California; and Fred Hanan, Worcester P o lytechnic Institute. Three other m embers o f the class, Jack Dombrowsk y Edward Gorm e l y a n d Harvey Smith, have a pprenticeships in the Electrical Division of the Panama Canal, while William Daniels h a s o n e i n the Mech anical Divisio n The following members of the class h o l d scholarships: Charles Arroyo, fro m the R e publi c o f P anama; Ruth W a lston from t h e Canal Zone CoHege Club; Guillermo Mendez, Fred H a nan, and Lillia Monsanto, from the institutions which they attend.

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Top row:, standing: Roberto Lopez, William Sheeh, an, Juan Vallarino. William Southard William French, Woodrow d e Castro. Middle row, standing: Mr. Flowers, Robert Da,niels, Eugene Saphir, Peter Johnson, Howard Turner, Jack Brown, Robert Hazeldine, GOt "don Campbell, John Muller, Raymond Piper, Dale Boggs. Seat e d : Georgia Reynolds, Hilda K e ller, Gladys Shelton, Murie l Waters, Edith Rowe, Thomas Kromer, Marjorie Young, Frank Fitzpatrick, Marguerit e Dryden, Inez Rhodes, Mildred Hoecker, Dolores King, Am ... lia Mendez.

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THE CLASS OF 1936 The class of 1936 h eld its first meeting o n October 3, 1934, electing Frank Fitzpatrick, president, Elizabeth Hayes, vice-president, M a r y Elizabeth Osborn, secretary, P e ter Johnson, treasurer, and Mr. 1. C Flowers, sponsor. Green and gol d were chosen as class colors. The J u nior College h e l d open house later on in t h e m onth so that the new heshnlen and their parents could meet the sopho mo"es and the facul t y in an u nofficial atmosphere. Toc sophomores continued the custom establi s hed t h e previous year o f requirin g the m e n of the freshman class to don bright green skull caps and t h e women to wear green hair ribbon s and forego rouge and lipstick u n til Thanksg' i ving. A memorable occasion was that o f the n on-deci s i o n wdter fight held on the campus between the men o f each class. The series of social affairs h e l d durin g the s c hool year was brought to a climax by t h e freshman-sophomore banquet at the Century Club in June. Before t h e end of school the freshme n e lected officers in preparation for the school year 1935-36: Frank Fitzpatrick, president: Tho mas Kromer, vicepresident: Marjori e Young, secretary: and Charles Wrig ht, treasurer. Since t h e last-na med did not return for the s"phomor" year, M a rguerite Dryden was e lected in his stead. In September, 1935, those of the freshmen w h o had not dropped 'rom t h e ranks returned, h a loed by sophomori c self-imp ortance. The class gave one dance a t the B alboa Yacht Club on October 11, before the org' anization o f the Student Association. The Association then took over the main social functi o n s of both classes. The freshman-sophomore banquet at the Century Club brought the two classes together socially for the last time. Wit h the completion of Commencement Exercises on J une 12, the second class to be graduated from t h e C a nal Zone Junior College was disbanded, leavin g behind it a notable record of achievement. Two m embers o f this class have already received scholarships to hi g her institutions: Amalia Mendez, a n award to Mount Holyoke, coverin g her room, board, and tuition Jua n V a llarino. a scholarship to t h e college of his choice g iven by the M unici pal Counc il o f P a n ama.

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Left to Middle Seated: right, standing, top row: Willard Percy, Ignacio Fabrega, Henry Evers, Raymond Welch, Rosario Spinella, Eugene Hamlin, M anuel 'Mendez, Carlos Arze, Luis Noli, Dwight Shurtleff, Octavio Fabrega, Luis Vallarino, Thomas Roth. row: Mr. C ampbell, Roberta Johannes, Jane Ellen Norman. Patricia Palmer, Edith Baker, Isabel Schloming, Arthur Thompson. Horacio Alfaro, William Jones, Wells Brown, Donal' d Hutchison, M ,argaret Sealey, Harry Wertz, Louis Schmidt, Rubelio Quintero, Joyce Rance, Willia m Poole, Hiram Andrade, George Cowes, Augusto Boyd, Camilio Porras, Octavio Mendez, M ary Maguire, Bar bara Walbridge, Patricia Pierce, and Helen Dudak. Kathyleen Reed, Mathilde Brewerton, Jean Mitchell, Betty louise Nolan, Lucille Dugan. M arian Smith, Anne Gibson. Lois D e L a M a ter, Eleanor Mulla n e Dolores Plalmer, Margaret McElhone, Edward Dombrowsky, Frances Anderson, Jack Kromer, Reba Colberg, Dorothy Bray, Lena-mae Howa, r d Barbara Evans. Marjorie Bulloc k Marie Gallivan, Mary Orr.

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1 HE CLASS OF 193 7 The fre s h m e n cam e down o n the college like wolves ready to conquer t h e less n u merous sophomores. The init i a l victorie6 went t o the strategically p laced .second-year students, w h o de creed green caps for t h e freshme n m e n and green ribbons f o r t h e freshme n wom e n Spurts of rebellion at this infliction presaged the spirit o f the freshma n b and. (The Amazon-wom e n o f th. b and rebelle d particul arly against t h e sopho m o r e ruling prohibiting the m t h e use of cosmetics.) The band e lected] ack Kromer as leader, Fra n c e s A nderson T e d D o mbrowsk y a n d M a rgaret ?v1cElho n e as Iieut e.,:mt leaders, and Mr. C ampbell, m e ntor. The class colors are coral u n d g ray. B e Prepared" i s the s l o g a n of the freshme n The refo.''', l e d by Krom e r and W erh, t hey have a Hecklers Ama lgamated Associatio n w hich by d int of g reat p ractice in t h e a r t of origin a l heckling, will b e abl e to control t h e freshme n o f 1936-19 37

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THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENT ASSOCIATION The Student Association o f the C a n a l Zone Junior C ollege held its first official meeting o n December 29, 1935. For several weeks prior to this meeting a committee composed of student s and class officers from both classes had w o rked to secure the cooperative Ispiri t necessary for SllCh. a n associati on, and had conducted a stu d e n t ballot, through w hi c h T ; h o mas Kromer was e lected presiden t Jean Mitchell, vice-president, and Tho m a,; Roth, secretary-treasurer. As almost ever y student became a member of the o rganization, the Associati o n established itself aG the influential group in the J unior Colleg e in social and extracurricular affairs, taking over many of the functions of the two classes. Studen t activity tickets, bought by the Associati o n m e mbers at three dollars and f ifty cents apiece, admitted t h e m to t h e Col lege dances and the freshman-sophomore banquet, and entitled each member to a copy of the Conquistador. The m o ney obtained from the sale of these activity t i c kets served to finance the Associati o n The Association extended certain privileges to the members of the Student Associati o n of the B alboa Hig h S c hool, and received similar privileg'es in return. Whe n the students planned the activities for the year, they hoped tha t a n association of the stud ents would facilitate the finan cing o f student projects, and make t h e C o llege more h o m o gen eou.. The Student Association has fulfille d these hopes.

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Members of the group pictul'ed are, from left to I 'ight, standing: Edith Rowe, Roberta Johannes, Mildre d Hoecker, Wocdrow de Castro, Ignacio Flibrega, Eugene Saphir, Rubelio Quintero, Manuel Mendez, Luis Noli, William Sheehan, Jane Ellen Norman, Edith Baker, Octavi::l Fabl'ega, and Mr. Carson, Middle I'OW: Jean Mitchell, Frances Anderson, Gladys Shelton, Mathilde Brewerton, Patricia Palmer, O ctavio Mendez, C a r los Arze, Horacio Alfaro, George Cowes, Hiram Andrade, Augusto Boyd, Luis Vallarino, Roberto Lopez, Margaret Sealey, Lucille Dugan, Muriel Watel's, and Helen Dudak, Seated: Mary Maguire, Mary Orr, Anne Gibson, Dolores Palmer, M .3rie Gallivan, Louis De La Mater, Juan Vallarino, Dale Boggs, Reba Colberg, Am' 3 li a M endez, Hilda Keller, Joyce Rance, Elinor Mullane, and Marguerite Dryden,

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KAPPA EPSILON The Kappa Epsi l o n C lub, u nder t h e s p o nsorsh i p o f Mr. C S Carson cam e i nto being in 1 9 33 its purp o s e b eing t o promote k nowledge of t h e Spanis h language i n t h e J u nior C ollege through lectures by prom.inen t speakers, p lays, a n d social events Th" Club d i d not meet regularly, however, u ntil t h e n"xt year, whe n Charles Arroyo was e lected presiden t Mari o n Dugan, v ice-presiden t, Amali a M e ndez, secretary, a n d E d i t h Rowe, treasurer The program for t h e year i ncluded lectures by Mr. S a l o m o n de l a Selva, jOl!r nalist a n d educator, o n Ruben Dari o M r Roque Jav i e r Laurenza, P a n a m ania n poet on t h e poets o f P a n a ma, Mr. Reye& S pi ndol a t h e Mexican minister to P a n a ma, o n M 'exican literature. a n d Mr. ,Alfonso Hern a ndez Cata, Cuban m inister to Pan a m a a n a prom i nent novelist, o n Spanish literature. The social events of the Club were a dance, a C h r istma. l u n c heon and a program oi folklore presented by a group of girl s from t h e n orma l a n d profession a l school s of P a n a m a City. These dances were accompanied by a lecture by Mr. A lberto M e ndez, a n d b y moti o n p i c tures. The C lub chose Juan R a m o n Vallarino to lead its destinics for the year 1 9 35 -36, w h i l e D a l e Boggs was n a med v ice-presiden t Reba C o lberg, secretar y a n d L o i s D e L a Mater, t reasurer. The first lecturer of t h e session was Dr. Victor M. Maurtua, rector of the University o f San Marcos, Lima Peru, w h o s p o k e o n i nter nati o n a l relation s The next speaker was Dr. B a ltazar Isaz3 y Calderon, of t h e University of P a n a m a w h o s poke on L o p e de Vega. Girl s from P a n a m ania n schools read Spanis h selectio n s from t h e works o f t his writer. Lectures were a lso delivered by D r Octavio Mendez Pereira, rector o f the Nati o n a l Institute a n d the Univ<-rsity of P a n a m a w h o s p o k e o n t h e evoluti o n o f Spanish language a n d literature; b y Dr. C a m i l o Leon, noted S panish poet; a n d by D r Belisario Porras, ex-president and "Gran d O l d M a n of Panama, w h o read a pa per o n "ImpresEion s of Ital y." The o f lectures was concluded b y Mr. Roque Javier Laurenza, poet, a n d D r Narciso Garay, M inister o f Educati o n in Panama, a n d former representative to t h e League of Niati o n s The social program of t h e year was s i g n alized by t h e Chri stmas luncheon, and t h e presentati o n o n May 1, o f the Q uintero Brothers play, M nana de 5 0 7 followed by dan cing.

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P,"esent membel's of the society, as shawn in the picture, left to right, standing: Camilo Porras, Woodrow de Castro, Jane Ellen Norman, Edith Baker, Lucille Dugan, Joyc e Rance, Mari a n Smith. Frances Ander30n, P atricia Pierce, Dryden, Thomas Roth, Dwight Shu."tle f. Seated: Miss Moody, Louis De La Mater, Kathyleen Reed, Isabel Schloming, Marjorie Young, Anne Gibson, John. Muller, Lena-mae Howard, Marjorie Bullock, Marie Gallivan, and Reba Colberg

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KAPPA DELTA SIGMA Kappa Delta Sig m a or the College Dramat ic Society, was org"anizcd o n December 4, 1933, with Alice Cook as president. June Tilley as vice-president, Howard Daniels as secretary, P embroke Banton as treasurer, (later rephced by Marion Dugan) and Miss Moody as sponsor. )vIembershi p is open t o a n y student who displays ability in acting or any other phase of play produc tion. On April 6, 1935, a t the Balboa Clubhouse, this society produced the rom a n t i c comedy Love-in-a-Mist, the following students having r oles: Lillia Monsanto, John C alhoun, Alice Cook, Charles Arroyo, Bernita H a l e Jeannette Alexander, and Bruce Crook. The officers for the next year were Marion Dugan, president: Eugene Saphir, vice-president: Rebecca Williams, treasurer: and Dorothy Erickson secretary. On December 14 of this year o n e -act plays were given at the Little Theater: TJle Florist Shop, w ith Elwin Neal, Marjorie Young, William Halvosa, Frank Fitz patr ick, and Marion Dug"an: A Minuet, with Rebecca Williams, Eugene S aphir, and John I v Tuller: and They' r e Non.e of Them P er f ect, with MaryMargaret McCormack, Dorothy Erickson, Anne Brown, Marguerite Dryden, Doroth y Maessen, Irene Taylor, and Bruce Crook. The chief producti o n of this year was Just Like Judy, a n English comedy, g"ive n at the B alboa Clubhouse on April 5 b y the following players: Carol Palmer, Elwin Neal, Lillia Mon. santo, Charles Arroyo, Marjorie Youn g, Mary.Margaret McCormack, Anne Brown. For the year 1935-36 these officers served: Marjorie Young, president: Isabel Schloming, vicepresident: Ann e Gibson, secretary; and John Mulle r, treasurer. The major offerin g o f the year was a prcblem comedy Helena s Boys, presented at t h e B a lboa Clu b house on December 13, with a cast composed of Frances A nderson, Eug"ene Saphir, Claud is Howell, J a m e s Johnson, Marjorie Young, George Martin, MaryMarg"aret McCor mack, Lois De L a Mater, and Thomas Roth. On April 24, 1936, the society had a party at the Yacht Club. On May 22, at t h e Littl e Theater, a program of one-act plays was given: Pink and Patches, with L e na-mae Howard, Stanley Whaler, Edith Baker, and Frances Anderson: Blue S ea and R e d Rose, with M arjorie Young, Camilo

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Porras, Dwight Shurtleff, a n d Tho m a s Roth: and The Family Failing, with Kathyleen Reed, Lucille Dugan, Marjorie Bullock, Lois D e La M ater, Tho mas Kromer, J ohn M u ller, Woodrow de Castro, and Marian Smith. Among the students who have h elped with the business managem ent and stag'ing of the plays, Elwin Neal, P embro k e Banto n Fred B a n "n, Jack D o mbrow.k y, Howard W alling Eli:oabeth Hayes, Edith Baker, Edward D o m b rowsk y Willia m Fleming and Patric i a Pierce deserve special m ention. The plays are directed b y the ."onsor. The g 'reater part o f the proceeds of those performances to which admission was charged has been given to the classes and the athletic teams, for the financing of meritorious projects, suc h as the purchase of uniforms and awards for athletes and gifts for the C ollege.

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I I '1 I The members of the g"oup as pictur d, to right, standing: Isabel Schloming, Mr. Hackett, M anuel M endez, Eugene Dale Boggs. and Anne Gibson. Seated: P atricia Pierce, Thomas Roth, DO"othy Bray, Marjor i e You ng, and Inez Rhodes.

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THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB The International Relation s Club. a l t hough it has been in existence only o n e hg5 exerted a n importan t influence on student activities in the Junior College. M r. Hackett interested several students in the idea o f forming such a club. and the first meeting. a t which Dorothy Bray was e lected presi.lent. Thomas Roth. vice-president. and M ujorie Young secretary a n d treasurer. was held on October 23. 1935. With in a short time t h e i nternational Relations Club beca m e affiliate d with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. From this in stitdion the Club has received a number of books of interest. The Club has sponsored several lectures by prominent people of the community, and has discusse d matters of current international interest. Its chief social functio n was a trip to El Valle which proved to 'De so successful that it promises to become a n annual event. The outstanding event sponsored by the Cluo was the Moc k Republican Nominating ConventiOh held o n May 13. 1936. at the Balboa Playshed. in which practically a ll the students e nrolled in the Junior College and Balboa Hig h School pa rticipate d This aroused g 'reat community interest.

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As pictured, the members o.f the Eociety are, standing: Dolores King, Frances Anderson, Patricia Pierce, Ignacio Fabrega, George Cowes, Cado. Arze, Robert Daniels, Augusto Boyd, J ack Kromer, Mildred Hoecker, Isabel Schloming, Edith Baker, Jane Ellen Norman, Luis Vallarino, Mr. Lee, Octavio Fabrega. Seated: Kathyleen Reed, Dorothy Bray, Lena-mae Howard, Murie l Waters, Dolores Palmer, Reba Colberg, Wells Brown, Jean Mitcbell, Edw ard Dombrowsky, Amalia Mendez, Lucille Dugan, Hilda K eller, Gladys Shelton, Roberta Johannes, and Betty Nolan.

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THE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY Under the sponsorship of Mr. G. O. Lee, the Natural History Society was founded during the latter part of the school year 1935-36. A loosely organized group of Junior C cllege biology students. itt; purposes are three-fold: to sponsor to promote good fellowship, and to organize field trips for the furthering of a general understanding of science. The Natural History Society has n o t elected a n y official officere, but Edward Dombrowsky has acted as president, Jean Mitchell as vice-president, and Wells Brown as secretary and treasurer. Under their direction and efforts the club has had such speak ere as Mr. George G. B"r>ker Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Evans, and Mr. R. Z. Kirkpatrick. The two social events of the Club were a beach party at Amador Beach and a waffle supper. Although the eocily has been in operation for only a short time . cf its aims have been realized.

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M embe .os of the gtOOUp pictured a.oe, left to r i ght, s t a n ding: Rubeh o Quintero, Octavio M endez, Arthu.o Thompson, V,'ilJiam Jone, H amlin, William Poole, Wilhrd P ercy, Donald Hutchison, Henry Evers, R3ymonrl W elch, Hira m Horacio ALa.ooo Raymond Piper, Frank Roberto Lopez, Howard T u r ne.o, Peter Johnsoll, M r o Flo welo5, Mro Meadowcroft, Jolon Jack Brown, Robert Hazeldine, and Gordon Ca.mphell. Eugen Seat d: Muller,

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THE ENGINEERS It is their care in all the ages to take the buffet and cushion the shock. I t is their care that t71e gear engages: it is tlle;r care tllat the switches lo ck; It is thei, care that the wheels run truly. it is tlleir care to embark and entrain, Tally. transport, and deliver duly the Sons of Mary by land and main." -Rudyard Kipling. Though not at present formally organized, this grou p does not l ac k group consciousness. After the three years of th e J u n ior College, t h e spirit of the engineer has definitely m anifested itse l i through these m.e n. On duty they are fou n d in the or in t h e drafting room. Off duty they m ay be seen in study or in confer e nce in rOQITI 310. The activities of the e n g ineers durin g the first two years of the J unio" C o llege were carried O n through t h ei r organizatio'ls: the science club, T ri Si gma, the engineerin g club, Sigma Rho T au, and during the presen t year. t hrough the class in Trips a n d L e c tures. Speakers brought to th" Junior College i nclude Col o n e l J ulian 1. Schley, U.S.A., Major William E. R. Cove ll, U.S.A. J. G Cl ayboUl"", A. J Hobso n, E S Randolph H H Evans, C o m m ander C F Osborn, U.S.N., D E Granberry, Dr. Ross of the B yrd Expediti o n, Captain John Embick, U.S. A., and Mr. Floyd Buck l ey of the Balboa Hig h Schoo!. Field t r ips have been made to many places of e n g ineerin g interest, includin g the Miraflores Locks, t h e Miraflores Diesel P la n t, the Miraflores Filtration Plant and Laboratories, Madden D a m anJ its Power HOClse, Mt. Hope Warehouses, the Mecha nical Division Shops, the U. S S. Pennsylvania, the U. S. S M emph;s, t h e Cuts of the Canal, the Naval Radio Station, and the T e l ep hone Exchange. S oct):ll activities, tt.o ugh not n u merous. have not been negu lected. RendEZVOUS h ave b"en at t h e Beer Garden s, Taboga, and the faculty homes, where annu.al dinners have been given. Paat presidents are Fred Banan and Edward Gorme l y

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SPORTS Men's Athletics During 1933-34, under the aegis of Coach S E Esser, the College defeated Cristobal in soccer, but lost the inter-collegiate c hampionship to Balboa Hig h The College men also played a number of games in the Pacific Twilight BasEball League Series, defeating the "Hilltops" and tying with the "Atlas" team; in addition they won games from both the Balboa and Cristobal High Schools. Softba ll was played as well, but no official teams were formed. In 1934-35 the College basketball team won all the games it played against Balboa and Cristobal Hig h S chools, and defeated teams from several army posts. In an inter .. scholastic track meet Fred Banan won the hig' h jllmp, Jack Brown placed second in the discus throw, and Charles Osborn second in the half-mile run. The College relay team, composed of Bruce Crook, John Calhoun, and Tom Kromer, placed second in the 440-yard dash. In the men's tennis t Ollrna m ent Gordon Campbell won the singles and Robert Hazeldine and Charles Osborn the doubles, "II receiving' awards. At the College b,nquet in June the following men were presented gold trophies: Jo" Ebdon, Jack D ombrowsky Charles Arroy o, Fred Banan. Jose sossa, Howard Walling', and Bruce Crook. In 1936-37, under Coach H. J. Zierten, who replaced Mr. Esser In this position, the basketball players again conflicted with several army teams, emerging victorious. The College also defeated Balboa High in softball. In an inter-class softball contes:, the sophomores bowed to the freshmen. In b aseball the Junior College d efeated Quarry Heights and Balboa High School. (The B. H. S. faclllty however, turned the table. a gainst the Junior College, defeating' them in a series of games.) In tennis, Gordo n Campbe ll won the men s singles championship, while George Cowes was runner-up. The faculty tennis team, composed of Messrs. Hosler, Campbell, Hackett, and Lee,

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defeated the men's team of Gordon Campbell, George Cowes, Frank Fitzpatrick, and Robert Haze l dine Gold basketballs were awarded to Brown, T o m Kromer, Fitzpatrick, and Hueldine. Gordon Campbell was awarded a silver cup for ,innin g the tennis champio nship for two successive yeai:S, while George Cowes, the runner-up, received a silver tennis ball. Besides the offici a l contests listed, many informal games are held. Golf and swimming are also popular, Mr. H. J. G riese r g iv i n g instruction in the latter to both men and women. Women's Athletics The College wom en, u nder the leadership of Miss Hanna, have participated in a variety of sports: basketball, 80ftball, archery, golf, and bowling. Most of their games are unofficial. Ear l y in 1934, however, the Collegians defeated the girls of Cristo b a l a n d Balboa Hig h Schools in several volleyball games, Elizabeth Hayes, Ruth Pickett, Georgia Reynolds, Marguerite Dryden Marjorie H .llett, Marjorie Young D orothy Erickson, and Edith Rowe playing. In March a n d April of 1936, a College tennis tournament was held, in which Edith Baker was winner, and Roberta Johannes runner-up. Marguerite Dryden is the champion swimmer of the College.

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WHO'S WHO IN THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE TOMMY (Ga ss y ) RANKIN-Class president, 1933-34, famed for his superb" ranking as a ER N EST CUESTA-Cuban c omposer of exotic verse. PEMBROKE BANTON-Butt of all the jests of the Mec hanical D rawing cl a ss. FRED B ANAN-Clas s pre sid e nt, 1934-35, famous colle g e sax player. N o t e d f o r his "snappy" jokes. LIL MONSANTO-Lea din g lad y of Love-in-a-Mist and majo r act r es s in Just Like Judy. Rival of Ruth Walst on for hig h h on o rs. NEAL a nd HALVOSA-Incorri g ibl e clo w ns. The "Rover Boys" r eincarna t e d JOHN CALHOUN-Punslf' r and originator of the "ma d for-" exp r e ssi on, wh o with Halvosa, had a mon opoly o n the bun busine s s BRUCE CROOK-Of "Y a a awoo Cit y Missis sippi. Slew the g irl s with his drawling s o uthern accent. "Fan rna brow r' HARRIET KALAR-Only f e mal e engin e erin g stude nt in Junior Collcg c Petite a nd piquant chemist. JOSE known as "Harpo" becaus e of his re se mblan ce t o Harpo :/IIIa rx. ALAN (Dizzy) a nd JERVA,S BALDWIN-Twin n ephews of Miss W e llm a n. JACK DOMBROWSKY-Known a. capable stag e hand for Col J e:; e plays. BOB DANIELS--Outsta ndin g be c ause of his ducky parasol and stripe d shir ts. HOWARD DANIELS-Well known "battered"-half of Ruth. Great d e bat e r.

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"MARNY" DRYDEN-The Gracie Allen of the Coll eg'e. Exhi bi tion diver and future O!y m p i c star. CAROL PALMER-Her smde ju s t one b i g dimp l e Repl aced B ec k y Willia m s in th e l ead of Just Like Judy. FRANK FITZPATRICK-Class pres i de nt, '34 3 5 T a ll. l oqua cious o rator. ELIZABETH (Sis) HA YES-The popu l a r littl e a t hl e t e who l o oks lik e J a n e t Gayn or TOM KROMER-Pres ident of S tu d e nt A ssociat i o n, '35 .'36. Apollo of the Junior C olleg' e hall s JACK PATERSON-Chr ist e n ed by D r. Wilso n "the lit tl e m a n with t he big' voice:' JUAN RAMON VALLARINO-Enthusiastic comm unis t o f t h e Junior C o ll e g e. A p assionate poet, EUGENE (Sapp y ) SAPHIR-Big n ew s paper man of the col l e ge hyou have to condone it because h e i s a g'enius." WILLIAM SOUTHARD-"Bab y mi n d." D e f Ender of th e L. A.' a i n the chess tourna m ent. MARJORIE YOUNG-Pe r s o n ality girl of Junior Co!l ege C o editor of the a nn ua l a nd in g e n u e of the college pla y s. FRAT\CES ANDERSON-Mild, sweet, g'entl e h o n or stude n t, a n d out s ta ndin g actress of t h e fre sh m a n class JACKIE BROWN-Famous for h i s cartoo ns. E x pects t o h ave his own "Mutt and Jeff" som e da y I s a ls o athlet e a nd c h e ss-m an. IGNACIO (Ig natz) FABREGA-" Hail f ellow well met" to every -one. WOODROW DE CASTRO-Co editor o f th e a nn ua l a nd g>r r n lous student. PETE JOHNSON-Stron g silent m a n JACK KROMER-Freshman clas s presid e n t, 1935%. M e mber of th e Heckler s Ci u b

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MANUEL MENDEZ-Known to the Social History Class '<5 Soap and Candles." JEAN MITCHELL-A)."ays w illing to oblige. PATTY PALMER-The lig ht of Ignatz's eye and originator of the "crack the whip" episode on Junior College lawn RAY PIPER-Chief w ise-cracker of the College JOYCE RANCE-Outstanding bud ger. TOM (Ros ie, Bess ie) ROTH-Financ ier and prime or g anizer oi S tude n t Asso c iation. MR. HACKETT-Spo nsor of ping-p o n g tournament, "chaperon de luxe ," a nd head of th e International Relations Club ISABEL (Izzie) SCHLOMING-Writer of skool" notes and ta r get for slams. Uses cracked v oic e when sin ging. Is mis anthrope yea h! SHEEHAN an d SHURTLEFF-College pla y bo y s for 1935-36. 'TOC" WILSON-Be loved "father-confessor" of th e Colle g e, Collector o f boners-had a goo d opportunity here. "ART" THOMPSON CReds")-The man with the "iron" stomach a nd the p e rp e t ua l b lush HARRY WERTZ-President of the Fly Catc hers' Club. Also a member of t he H eck lers' Club. CHARLES ARROYO-Former m atinee idol of the Coll ege Pla ye d a l ead in g role in the play N i ght Ove r Taos at the University of California this year HIRAM ANDRADE-Ping-po n g cha mp. Known as the Cuban Confusion. REBA COLBERG-Queen of the L at in Quarter. "KIT" CARSON-Arte por a rte. N' est ce pas'! OCTAVIO MENDEZ-The suave sophisticate. LOIS DE LA MATER-Betty Boop t he second ANNE GIBSON (Gibby)-Star typist and biz expert of commer cia l stoo g ents. Goes steady" with Edith Rowe.

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JOKES Mr. Fiowers-"What can you tell m e about nitrates T "Reds "-"W ell-er-they 're a lot c heaper than day rates." The speaker was waxing eloquent, and after his peroration o n woman '5 r i g 'hts he said: "When they take our girl s as the y threaten, away from t h e c o -education a l colleg'es, what will follow? What will follow, I repeat?" And a loud, masculine voice in t h e audience replied: "I will \" After terrific strug' g les, Percy fi n ally finished his examination paper, a n d then wrote at the end: "Dear Teacher, if you sell a n y of m y answers to the funny paper I expect you to spli t fifty-fifty with me." Doctor: "I'm afraid I h ave b3d r,ews for you. You will n e\'er be abl e t<' work again." Shurtleff: Whadda you mean, bad news?" The Pedro Mig 'uel studen t had just driven home after his last exarnination "Did you pass everything?" a s ked his mother a nxio.lsly E v-orything but two Studeba k el's and a Packard. Darnec if t hey mustn"t have airptu:le motors il1 the m '" "Yu h goaa get som e cul c hur," said t:,e Liberal Arts stu ,lent in t h e deb,te as to w hether or not o n e shouid take genera l training before beginning to specialize. Oh, you can gEt all of that you need afte r you leave coll e ge," countered the Engineer, '"fron1 the newspaper and movies l" U Let me see your "Is your liver?" "Mr. Lee, how can I cut out m y kidney?" (Stenographic report of a period of dissection during a biology clao5. ) Copy of a n excuse for" bsence : \'Please excuse my son Canlilo POlT2'5 for his absence In Speech yesterday. I was sic k and could not get there."

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FACULTY MINDS AT WORK Mr. F lowers-at the end o f a nig'ht in his laborator y "Dear I can "t remember whether I wa::; going home t o dinner or ing back to m y eigh t o'clock clas s!" 1'-1.. Lee-"That looks l ike m y car, but what can those policemen a n d pr ison e r s b e doing i n it?'" Mr. Hosler-"When I retire from teaching I shall be the superintendent of a n orphan asylum so that I'll never get a n y letters from parents, or better s till, I'll be ward e n o f a prison. The n t h e a l umni will never come bac k to visit!" M r. Meadowcroft, to a hostess who had asked him if h e mast take h i s w ife away frotn a reception with him: HYes, unfortunately, I'm afraid I must." BONERS Engl i s h : T e n nyson wrote an e leg' y entitled "In Memorandum." The Odyssey was not written b y H o mer, but by another man of t hat name. B e ing a week-end p u t y Mildred w ent home on Sunday. C. C.: Michael Angel o painted the dome of the Sistine Madonna Soci a l History: Panama wi ll aid in th e defense o f the country in ti m e of war because the locks will keep out enem y ships. Math. :Geometry teaches us to bisex angels. C o m p o Gov't: The 13th Amendment abolishes t h e negroes. COLLEGE EXAMINATION Objective T est I. M u l tip l e Choice: Fill it: b lank with proper n umber: A The most distinguished car in the Colleg' e i s ( ). 1. Percy's R e d T e rro,. 2 Dombrowsky's F aile" Arcl1. 3. Reyn o lds's Public M e nac e. 4 Wertz's H earse. 5 Hutchy's Green Strcal"

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..

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B The studen t most notabl e for his (or her) slim form ( ). 1 Patty P a lmer. o 3. 4. Reds Thompson. Augusto Boyd. Joyce "Budger" R a nce. C The most "outstan ding College coupl e are ( ). 1. J ohn M u ller a n d L e n a -mae Howard. 2. Patty Pierce and Roberto Lopez. 3. Edith Rowe and Rosie" Roth. 4. Eleanor Mull a n e a n d "Soap and Candles M endez. II. True and False. Place T or F at the End of each statement. 1 The escalator rece ntly i nstalled i n the College is unsatisfactory becau5e t h e students desire more exerCIse. 2. Shocked and i ndig n ant. t h e .t"dents h ave refused to permit the installation of a s mokin g room o n the t hird floor. 3 The orderl y conduct i n the hall s has been warmly praised by the faculty. 4 Because of the recen t heavy r ains all classes were suspended for a week. 5 By not picking the flo"'e,'s on the campus, the students observed "Flower Preserva t ion Week" i n t h e true spirit. 6. All H e cklers have recently rcsi g ned from other extracurricular activities so as not to i nterfere 'wit h the work of the Hecklers Associ a tion 7. Gordon C ampbell was severel y rep"imanded by the S u perintenden t o f School s for his loud a n d obstreperous conduct 8. Archibal d ("Snowball") Bostic k has been elected Presiden t of the Society-for-the-Extermination-of-Doormats. 9. The C o llege ChitChat Afternoon Club will discontinue its dail y session s at the Clubhouse with the close of school.

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10 The Anti-Beer-Garde n College League recently established headquarters in an alcove at El R ancha in order to conduc t a more strenuous campaig n 11. Randall's The M aking af the "fade rn Mi"d ha" become so p opu lar with the students tha t the librar y has found it necessary to order o n e hundred additiona l copies. 12 At a meetin g of the co llege g rOup, Miss M oody declared that William Sheehan h a d been one of the best pupils s h e had ever h ad, and that s h e w i s hed she mi gh t con tinue as his instructor. HI. Matching: Put the a nswer match i n g best 10 bl ank space provided. A. 1. Copp e r sulphate a Ch e mistry l a b ex 2. Pete Johnson plosion ( ) 3. Ten cents b. Fly swatter ( ) 4. Harry Wertz c. What every young person 5. E uge n e S aphir should know( ). B. 1. W alking e n cy clopedi a a Euge n e H amlin ( ) 2. R e d button h M ary Osborn ( ) 3. Swee t sophisticatio n c. R C. H ackett ( ) 4. R e d ink C. 1. Mathilde Brewerton a B e tty B oop ( ). 2. Dolore s Palmer b Sus p ec t e d C oca Cola 3. R ay Piper addict ( ). 4. "Snowball" c "Toot toot" trumpet ( ) 5. L o is D e La Mater d Si",ply horrified ( ) D. 1. Fra nces And erson a. Perpetua l s mil e ( ). 2. Jane Elle n Norm a n b Iris h gr in ( ). 3. Bill Shee h a n c. B at h towel shirts ( ). 4. Billy French d Edith Baker ( ). 5. D w i g 'ht Shurtleff e. Girlis h g i gg l e ( ). E 1. Jose Sossa a. Cl assroom acrobati cs ) 2. Shurtle ff b. Nes t of eggs ( ). 3. 1. C. Flowers c. The quintessence of 4. J ui-j itsu procrastina tion ( ).

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F. 1. H Down w i th everything'r' a. T a ll. dark. a n d 2. C a m pbe ll h a ndsome ( ). 3. Cavalryman b. J ackie B row n ( ). 4. B i ll S out hard c. Chess (ty) Cham pio n ( d. J lIa n Vallarin o ( ) G 1. "Did I get it a ll over P i nchy .. H aze l d in e ( ) a. youT b. Marjorie Bullo c k ( ). 2 Where ca n I get adate c. Bill D a n ie l s ( ) for to night? d. Edith R owe ( ). 3. 1 mean t to co m b m y hair but-" 4 "Oh. Nel se m a h IllY'"

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LITERARY POST'':CRIPTS TAKING UP OUR BURDENS -BOOKSl A Fami7iar Essa y by Frances Ande rson When the word "burdens" is not given a strictly limited meaning, 2 reader's mind i s likely to follow a tang';:nt of its own. So that there will be no mistaking the purport of m y "bllrdens," I say I mean the Burdens of college. Closely associated with Burdens are th, alliterative Book". M y f irst two days at co lleg' e can be epitomized in t h e word B,-oks. Teachers say, "You will need this Book. That "Book can be bought secondhand; this Book is new thi s year. Pupils c hat, "Have you boug'ht your B O'Jks yet 1" \ here can I get this Book s 'econdhand?" Parents despair, "John need, many expensive Books for college." Everywhere I tllrn I hear Books. Rushing to the Administration Building, eager, like all other freshmen, to get my Books, I find numerous other students, mostly freshmen-also buyin g Books. 'Length y discu,.sions about p : iccE of Books; d ,etailed explanations of cOurses and needed Books; and questions about Books 1 All this while waiting' in line for Books! Stag'gerin g out with a t least ten Books h eld cradl efashion in m y arms, I stumble and drop o n e As I reach to sllccor the o ne, two or three others escape m y protectin g arms. Rescue of all i s at last achi,eved, and we proceed. Suddenly, looking' at m y similarly burdened companions, I laugh, greatl y amused by the d:'parity between the laughing faces a n d the m a n y serious-looking Book ... Back in the college building we needs must have lockers for our Books. I can not escapo t h e thou
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of collegi e shldents. grown-u p no\v. lo\verin g t heir dig rlity b y use of such devices! In less than a week's time I discover that exporting and importing the Books from college is as nothing w h e n compared wi:h the huge Bourde n of studying the Books. With that soberin g real,=ation t h e word Books is chan g e d to the word Study and College has started! THE MONEY FOR A MEAI L A S Aort SAort Story. by Marjorie Bullock Jimn1 i e a young' man wit h a at tin1es almost too symprdhetic was on his \vay down lr..to F ar'!atna City one afternoon. He h d just passed the Century Club w h e n h e saw a Mexican a squalid-lookin g c",=ature whose filt h y clothes hung' loosel y o n his scrawny body. His redrimme d eyes, with dark circles like bruises b e neath them, a ppealed to t h e passers-by with 2n expl'ession both desperate and sad. Seeinf.' that the tll a n ,vas nearly Jimmie stopped. D own went his h and into his pecket, and out i t came with two d ollars, '''Here man, you take this a n d go buy yourself a g'ood meal. F i ll yourself all the way up to h ere." Jimmie indica ted his chin with h i 3 fing;er. The n he put t h e money into t h e 1'-1exican's h and. smiled, and wen. t o n his way. A week later Jin1.mi e \vas o n his way do\vn to\vI1 again. He. was p assing the Century Clu b when a man rushed up to him. "Senor, Senor!" "Ye,?" H D o you not kno\v me?" the In al1 askect a n xious l y and approached a little closer. Jim! nie at t h e n e \VCOll1er closel y I -Ie sa\v a \velldressed l\1exican. with a s \v arth y cornplexi on. dtil1cing' eyes. and a g r i n that was more th2 n surprisi:lg'. -\vait! Are you t h e sam e Ina 1 1 \v h o ,,-as hcre -T' "Si, Ei, senor. You give me two dollars to buy food. I buy lood with o n e dollar -take other O n e and plav lottery. I win 1

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See 1" H e reached i nto the pocket of his new sui t a n d pulled 011t a n immeOlse roll of bills. "I win first prize 1" "\Vhy that ;s fine." Jimmie's voice had a trul y pleased ring "Ver" fi ne. But you finer. For w hat you do I buy you this." He h ande d Jimmie a beautiful watch "But sec here lean 't /<.ke this. I only gave you t h a t mone y because : :ou needed it, because you were hungry almost starv-, Jng'. "Si -but Jose never forget. You do much for him." T he Mexican ( hrust the watch ill Jimmi e'. hand and started off. After advan cing a few feet, h e (t:rned, grinned, and said very humbly "Adios, amig o mio y much as gracias. Always I shall remember you." H e disappeared around the corner, leavin g Jimmie standin g there wiih the watch in his hand.

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NORTHER CHRISTMAS A Petr a rcJ!; all So" . et. by Carol Pa.'mer i'h ere ;s a wh;te peace ;n the world ton ;gl,t. As ;f ;n p; t y God llUd wrapped H;s sweet And ge7ltle arms about the earH to cheat. For one hushed space of t;me. tl,e rule and r;ght O f burnt a 7ld b;tter sOl'row Iy;ng t;gl, t Across the drawn earth's &troat, So;s;t meet T o r:cme th::; n;g],t d llOly n;gl,t, a n:! greet \11';/1. psalm. the clecr, hard stars. cold stars and br;ght. The frees stand lea n a"d st;ff w;tl, arms upra;sed I n pray'r. and s;lence h w;th w;nter dreams H as s ettled softly down ;n u"',,dless vales. 01, Glory be to God, and God be prm'sed" T h e paean st,.;kes across the gl;nts a n d r;.'eams O f s now, th;c], roofs. and calm wh;te peace preva,'ls. REVERIE .4 Shakesf,earean Sonnet. by M aryM argaret M An:! ever now the memory of your sm;le H as found ;ts way aga.;" ;nto my room. The d reams I thought were dead now by me f,'le And all past joys spn'"g up to haunt the gloom. The p;ctures on c1he wall reflect your face And ever y board ;s creahng o u t you r name. Your echo softly rings throllghout the p lace; And then I know ;t cannot be the same. Upon thest< th;ng, no 10t'!ler If';;; J d",,<:I; Now J w,'ll f,'ll my heart 'VI'th n e w des;re; For what the y left ;s naught bul t just a shel1, And I must toss my dreams ;nto ehe f;re. The ghost of you br;ngs out the /001 ;n me; R.ecalls the th;ngs I can no lo n g e r see,

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A SONG FOR THE CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE Sing you your northern cellege. By mouT tai n. shore. or p lai n. But dre am of magic i slands S e t in the Spanish Main. Ours ar e those magic is7ands. And o ur s the e m erald deep. Of jung 7 e s hung w i th orchids W'there g 7eaming r e p t i7es creep Your, be the far-off campus Where snows torm s d eck th e p ine. \Y/here spnng r cr;e w s the l il ac. And autum n g70ws 7il