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Title: University of Florida School of Music undergraduate student handbook
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Title: University of Florida School of Music undergraduate student handbook
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: School of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Publisher: School of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 2009
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Volume ID: VID00001
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Full Text






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SCHOOL OF MUSIC

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK

2009-10



Dr. John A. Duff, Director
Dr. Charles Pickeral, Director of Operations
Ms. Mutlu G. Citim-Kepic, Director of Music Admissions and
Undergraduate Advisor


UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

') I







Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION I:

OVERVIEW ............... .. ....... ................................ ........... p.6-8

A. Catalog Year p.6
B. The School of Music Mission Statement p.6-7
C. Undergraduate Degree Programs p.7-8

SECTION II:

ACADEM IC ADVISING......... .. ......... .............. ............. p.9-18

A. Becoming a Music Major p.9
B. Preprofessional Music Major p.9-10
C. Professional Music Major p.10-14
1. Comprehensive Musicianship Juries
2. The Musicianship Assessment Exam
3. Secondary Piano
4. Pre-professional Performance Jury
5. Ensemble Requirement
6. Recital Attendance
D. Registering for Professional Level Courses p. 14-15
E. Portfolio p. 15-16
F. Mid-Point Guidance Conferences p.16
G. Frequently Asked Questions About Universal p. 16-18
Tracking

SECTION III:

BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS ............... ..............p.19-30

A. Area Requirements p. 19-21
1. Music Performance Area
2. Music Theory Area
3. Music History/Literature Area
B. Recital Attendance Policies (MUS 1010) p.21-23
C. Recital Presentation Guidelines (Junior and p.23-25
Senior Recitals)
D. Ensemble Participation p.25-30
1. List of Ensembles
2. Policies on Student Ensemble Participation
a. Ensemble Requirements
b. Participation In Ensembles


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


SECTION IV:

ADDITIONAL DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION ........... .........................p.31-45

A. The Performer's Certificate p.31-32
B. Student Concerto Program p.32-34
C. Music Education Internships/Student Teaching p.34-35
D. Scholarships, Financial Aid and Work Opportunities p.35-38
for Music Students
Introduction
Friends of Music
1. School of Music Scholarship Program for Undergraduates
1. Friends of Music/Academic Affairs Scholarship
2. FOM/Out of State Tuition Waivers
3. Named FOM Scholarship Awards
4. Band Scholarships
6. Mark Stoughton Band Scholarship
College Work Study Program (CWSP)
School of Music Work Assistantships
2. Registration Expectations for Friends of Music and Band
Scholarship Students
3. Scholarship Probation
4. Revoking a Scholarship
5. Application Forms
E. University Policies and the Music School p.39-41
1. Policy on "Incomplete" Grades
2. Grade Changes
3. Gordon Rule (Communication-Computation Requirement)
4. Petitions Process
5. CLAST Examination
6. Course Exemptions
F. Graduating with Honors, High/Highest Honors p.41-42
G. Music School Facilities p.42-44
1. Classroom Use
2. Computer Lab
3. Electronic Keyboard Lab
4. Practice Room Keys/Rooms
5. University Owned Instruments and Equipment
H. Music Library p.44
1. General
2. Overdue Consequences
3. Duplication of Materials
I. School of Music Special Events p.44-45
1. Friday Afternoons
2. President's Visiting Artist Series


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SECTION V:

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS........................... ..... .................p.46-51

A. School and College Leadership Groups p.46-47

1. School of Music Student Advisory Committee
2. Fine Arts College Council

B. Student Music Organizations p.47-49

1. American Guild of Organists--Guild Student
Group
2. Collegiate Music Educators National
Conference- University of Florida Student
Chapter
3. Kappa Kappa Psi, Alpha Eta Chapter--
Honorary Fraternity for Bandsmen
4. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Eta Omega Chapter--
Professional Honorary Music Fraternity
5. Sigma Alpha lota, Delta Gamma Chapter--
Honorary Music Professional Fraternity for
Women
6. Society of Pi Kappa Lambda, Gamma Zeta
Chapter--National Music Honor Society
7. Society of Student Composers
8. Tau Beta Sigma, Beta Xi Chapter-Honorary
Sorority for Band Women

C. Partnership with Music-Student Organization Constitution p.49-51

SECTION VI: .. ................... ........... ............. .............. p.52

BUILDING MAPS


SECTION VII: ......... .......... ......... ....... ............... .. ........... p.53


BE YOUR OWN ADVISOR


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK

SECTION I
OVERVIEW

This handbook clarifies information, policies, and rules which extend the information
available to students in the University of Florida Undergraduate Catalog. The Music School
faculty meets regularly throughout the academic year refining and updating practices and
procedures which guide our work together. Student input feeds into this process through the
Student Advisory Committee which meets monthly with the School of Music Director. Once a
policy is passed through the School Governance System it is up to the Music School
Administration to implement the policy, communicate it to everyone through the Undergraduate
Student Handbook, monitor the results of the policy, and initiate reconsideration of a policy
when it seems outdated, inefficient or lacking in some other way.

Because policies change continuously due to the nature of the curriculum process, the
Undergraduate Student Handbook is revised annually.

A. Catalog Year

Each degree seeking student in the Music School has a CATALOG YEAR which is the
year they begin their program of studies at the University of Florida. The Undergraduate
Catalog serves as the agreement between the student and the university. In effect, the
university pledges to grant the student a degree, if the student meets the conditions outlined in
the catalog. The Undergraduate Catalog, like the Undergraduate Student Handbook, is
updated year by year. It is very important that each student work closely with the
Undergraduate Advisor in order to be sure that academic decisions are being made in
accordance with the CATALOG YEAR and the unique requirements of the degree program.

B. The School of Music Mission Statement

Recognizing the value of music to our culture, society, and individual experience, the School
of Music at the University of Florida is committed to the teaching and development of musicians,
music educators, and scholars. As a vital component of one of the leading AAU research
universities in the nation, the School of Music fully encourages scholarly research, creative
activity, and interdisciplinary studies across all degree programs. Undergraduate and graduate
offerings are intended to meet the needs of a diverse student population and prepare students
for professional careers in music. The faculty includes renowned performers and pedagogues
who are committed to the development of musicians and to the musical enrichment of the
community. Graduate studies in the School of Music are expanding to include and support a
broad range of music degrees and programs. This exemplifies the School's vision, its continued
investment in its students, and the University of Florida's growing presence as a distinguished
institution.

The School fulfills its mission by providing:
excellence in teaching through accredited baccalaureate, Masters, and doctoral
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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


programs in music;

excellence in teaching through the offering to non-majors, of music ensembles,
music performance courses, general education courses, and courses which focus on
International Studies and Diversity;

faculty who engage in research and creative activity, and who share their artistic
achievement and professional expertise with their students;

unique experiences in cast-bell carillon study and performance, early music study and
performance on period instruments, performance in a variety of world music
ensembles, and the notation and composition of music with the latest computer
software;

service to the public and the art of music through numerous performances and
lectures on campus, as well as in the community and on state, regional, national, and
international levels;

service to the public schools through the sponsorship of a variety of on-campus
festivals and summer camp activities, and participation by the faculty as clinicians,
conductors and adjudicators for school music programs throughout the state, as well
as regionally and nationally;

enhancement of public relations at athletic, alumni and University committees and
activities; and

leaders for state, national and international professional music organizations.

C. Undergraduate Degree Programs

A wide variety of undergraduate music degrees are available. Admission to each program
requires a performance audition. A high level of performance proficiency is expected in all degree tracks.

The Bachelor of Music (B.M.) programs are intended for students who
plan to enter professional careers, graduate study, private studio teaching, or college/university-level
teaching.

Bachelor of Music (B.M.)
Performance
Composition
Theory
Combination with Outside Field

The Bachelor of Music in Music Education (B.M.E.) fulfills the educational requirements for
teaching certification, kindergarten through 12th grade in Florida and in most other states through the
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).


Bachelor of Music in Music Education (B.M.E.)
Choral


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


Instrumental
Keyboard/Choral

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) curricula is designed for students who desire a liberal arts
education with an emphasis in performance, theory/composition and music history. Students
electing these degree programs are often planning to continue beyond the undergraduate level
and are using music studies as a base for a career in another professional field that requires an
extensive liberal arts background.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Performance
Theory/Composition
Music History and Literature
Music History and Literature with Ethnomusicology emphasis

Minor in other Disciplines--Music majors who wish to take a minor in other disciplines
may do so by taking these courses in addition to the usual requirements. See the
Undergraduate Academic Advisor for further information.

MUSIC MINOR AND NON-MUSIC MAJORS

The School of Music offers the music minor in Performance, Music literature and
theory/composition, and Ethnomusicology.
Non-music majors are encouraged to participate in music ensembles. Some scholarship
assistance may be available for talented non-majors to perform in ensembles. Complete
information about specific degree programs and minors can be obtained from the
Undergraduate Academic Advisor. Curriculum guides for each music degree program are
published in the Undergraduate Catalogue which is available on line at http://www.ufl.edu and
also at the undergraduate advising web site at www.arts.ufl.edu/music/advisinq.


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


SECTION II
ACADEMIC ADVISING

A. Becoming a Music Major

To become a music major a person must complete a pre-admission audition and be
accepted into a performance studio. It is not possible to become a music maior if the student
does not exhibit sufficient performing competence in his or her audition. There are two
classifications for music majors at the University of Florida: Preprofessional, and Professional*.

B. Preprofessional Music Major

Most music majors will begin their study at the preprofessional level. For all
undergraduate degrees in the School of Music, the following courses must be successfully
completed (with a grade of "C" or higher) before a student can advance to the professional level:

1. Theory of Music I-IV (MUT 1121, 1122, 2126, 2127)
2. Secondary Piano I-IV (MVK 1111, 1112, 2221, 2222) or pass
the Piano Proficiency Exemption Exam
3. Musical Styles (MUL 2110)
4. Performance Studio (MV_14 _, or MV_ 24 _) 4 semesters
5. Ensemble (MUN _ ) As required by your degree track
6. Recital Attendance (MUS 1010, S/U Option) 4 semesters with a grade of
Satisfactory

Preprofessional music majors are eligible for Friends of Music scholarships.
Scholarships will be withdrawn if Preprofessional students are not regularly enrolled in
theory, secondary piano, performance, ensemble, and, recital attendance unless they
have completed their degree requirements. Advancement to the Professional level usually
occurs at the end of the sophomore (2nd) year before students start their junior (3rd) year of
study.

Students will be expected to work constantly at strengthening their musicianship skills
which include: sight-singing, dictation, the ability to verbally analyze repertoire (applied theory),
and the use of keyboard harmony. In addition, the ability to describe the stylistic characteristics
of music (being studied) is essential to success, first as a music major, and later as a musician
in society. Reinforcement with these musicianship skills will occur during lesson times in regard
to repertoire the students are preparing for recitals and juries. During semester jury
examinations, in all performance areas, the student should be prepared to respond to questions
that might be asked on the stylistic elements and the musical structure of the music prepared.

Musicianship skills will be stressed in theory/composition, secondary piano, ensembles,
music history/literature and music education courses.

*Students who seem to have the potential to become music majors but who are not adequately prepared to begin the theory sequence are given provisional acceptance as a
music major Successful completion of MUT 1001, Rudiments of Music, makes a student eligible for classification as a Preprofessional music major A student can be
classified as provisional for only two semesters Provisional students are eligible for School or Friends of Music scholarships.
The secondary piano instructors meet regularly with the theory faculty so that the
secondary piano work in keyboard harmonization reinforces the work being done in theory.
Secondary piano study deals primarily with technique, repertoire and keyboard harmony.
Students taking these courses should expect to be involved in exercises pertinent to the music


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


being studied; that may require sight-singing, dictation, applied theory, and understanding of
musical styles.

Students should expect to use sight-singing during ensemble rehearsals. The ensemble
directors will be asking students to analyze the music being performed from the standpoints of
(1) applied theory, and (2) the stylistic characteristics of repertoire being studied. In music
education classes, students will continue working on musicianship skills as they plan,
implement, and evaluate musical lessons for students of all ages.

Students will be expected to initiate discussion of music performed at recitals (which are
on the recital attendance list) with peers and professors. As developing musicians, the student
needs to be comfortable with verbally describing stylistic characteristics of the music heard.

C. Professional Music Major

For admission to the Professional Level of study, music majors in all degree tracks will
complete:

1. Musicianship Assessment Jury taken at the end of the theory sequence.
2. Secondary Piano Levels I to IV with a grade of C or better or successful
completion of the Secondary Piano Proficiency Exemption Examination.
3. The pre-professional Performance Jury
(taken the last semester of MV_ 2_ _)
4. Ensemble semesters as required by the student's degree track.
5. Four semesters of Recital Attendance (MUS 1010) with a grade of "S".

1. Comprehensive Musicianship Juries will take place at the end of Music Theory I, II, &
III. These semester-by-semester theory juries will be done before a panel of three faculty
members. Students will be expected to demonstrate the ability to:

1. Sing intervals and chords.
2. Sing both prepared and at- sight melodies.
3. Perform both prepared and at-sight rhythmic exercises.
4. Play prepared and at-sight keyboard exercises.

Rudiments of Music and all four levels of theory, as stated in the respective syllabi, place
an equal emphasis on aural and written theory. In order to pass any level of theory a student
must have both a "C" average in aural skills and a "C" average in written skills in order to get a
"C" in the course. This means that a student can get an "A" in written work and still end up with
a "D" in theory if they fail the aural skills portion of the class. The reverse is also true. If the
student fails in either area, written or aural, they will need to repeat the entire course.

The Musicianship Assessment Jury will be taken after four semesters of theory are completed.
All students must pass the Musicianship Assessment Jury whether theory courses are done at
the University of Florida or are transferred from
another institution.

Resources available to help with aural skills:

The computer lab has a list of programs dealing with basic musicianship which are
available for students to use independently. Students having difficulty are encouraged to seek
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tutorial help. Aural skills, like so many aspects of music performance, require regular daily
practice. It is the responsibility of the student to make use of the resources available in order to
develop their aural skills.

Since success in music theory is essential to continuing progress toward a music
degree, each level of theory will be offered, according to the following plan:

MUT 1001 Introduction Music Theory Rudiments- Fall Semester
MUT 1121 Theory of Music I-Fall and Spring Semesters
MUT 1122 Theory of Music II- Spring Semester and Summer C
MUT 2126 Theory of Music Ill-Fall Semester
MUT 2127 Theory of Music IV-Spring Semester

A minimum grade of"C" is required in MUT 1121, 1122, 2126, and 2127 in order to
advance to the next theory course and to fulfill all music degree requirements. Each of
these courses may be repeated only once.

2. The Musicianship Assessment Exam: The student should plan to take this exam the
semester Theory IV (MUT 2127) is completed. Unless the student has already satisfied the
secondary piano requirements by passing the Piano Proficiency Exemption Exam, it is
recommended that they complete Secondary Piano IV (MVK 2222) during the semester they
take Theory IV.

The five member jury panel for the Musicianship Assessment Jury will include two theory
faculty members, one piano faculty member and two representatives from other areas (history,
education, performance). 15 minutes will be allowed for each student. Students will be
expected to demonstrate successfully the ability to:

1. Sing intervals and chords.
2. Sing both prepared and at-sight melodies.
3. Perform both prepared and at-sight rhythmic exercises.
4. Play prepared and at-sight keyboard exercises.

Transfer students, with or without an AA degree, who have satisfactorily completed the required
four semesters of music theory sequence and four semesters of lower division performance study must
take the Comprehensive Musicianship Exam and receive a passing score for admittance to the School
of Music as a junior. Those students who have not met the above requirements must take the
Comprehensive Musicianship Exam for placement within the theory program and must
then successfully pass the Final Comprehensive Musicianship Exam upon completion of
the theory course work assigned for remediation.

The Comprehensive Musicianship Jury will take place at the end of each semester of theory.
The Final Comprehensive Musicianship Exam will be taken at this jury after four semesters of
theory. All students must pass the Final Comprehensive Musicianship Exam whether theory
courses are completed at UF or are transferred from another institution. Transfer students must
successfully complete at UF, with a grade of "C" or better, any remedial course work assigned
by the School of Music prior to taking the Final Comprehensive Musicianship Exam.

All special situations will be resolved on a case by case basis by the Undergraduate
Petition Committee. See petition process, Section IV:E,4.


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3. Secondary Piano, to the extent possible, is integrated with the theory sequence.
Secondary piano meets twice a week in order to provide ample opportunity for students to focus
on applied harmony at the keyboard. The electronic keyboard lab will be available for practice
at least ten hours a week and a lab monitor will be available to assist as needed. It is the
responsibility of the student to make use of the resources available in order to develop their
skills in applied harmony at the keyboard.

Students with piano background can test out of the piano proficiency requirement by
taking the Piano Proficiency Exemption Exam. This exam covers applied harmony at the
keyboard, technique, and repertoire.

4. Preprofessional Performance Jury *Revised, March 2000, Approved by the Music Faculty 3/16/00)
The Pre-professional Performance Jury (PPJ) is part of the pre-professional/professional
concept adopted by the School of Music in 1994. Details of the entire pre-
profession/professional concept may be found in the document, "Music Major Admission to
Professional Level" (September 8, 1994), which is also contained in the School of Music
"Undergraduate Student Handbook" (p. 10).

The PPJ is normally administered to students completing their sophomore year as they
seek to move from the 2000, pre-professional level, to the 3000, professional level, of
performance study.

Content

The Pre-professional Performance Jury will be 20 minutes in length. It will include sight-
reading, the prepared performance of a minimum of two contrasting styles, and a verbal
presentation by the student about one of the prepared selections. The verbal presentation
should be both historical and analytical and be from two to five minutes in length. The student
may prepare an outline of the presentation for distribution to the members of the jury panel. It is
the option of each performance area to include the performance of other material studied during the
current semester, at the request of the jury panel.

Procedure

In the addition to the appropriate performance faculty, each PPJ will include one non-
performance faculty member. Non-performance faculty members will be assigned to the PPJs
each term by the Director's Office on a fair and equitable basis. The role of the non-performance
faculty member will be the same as the performance faculty completing the jury rating sheet,
providing comments as appropriate, and voting on the jury performance. The non-performance
faculty will have no veto authority over any aspect of the jury performance.

Any one of three actions may be taken as the result of the jury performance, as determined by a
majority vote of the jury. In the case of a tie vote, the action automatically becomes Provisional
Status.

Pass an unconditional pass to the 3000, professional level of study
Fail an unconditional failure of the exam
Provisional Status conditions exist which must be corrected

With regard to Provisional Status, the conditions are determined by the jury panel. The


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student is informed in writing of the conditions. The conditions must be met no later than the
time of the student's next jury exam. Conditions being, satisfied will result in the student being
passed to the 3000, professional level. Conditions not being met will result in the student
being failed, and the student will not be allowed to continue in the program.


RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PERFORMANCE PROFESSORS

The Performance Faculty:

Introduces their student to the jury.
Makes sure the jury has access to scores of the music being played and copies
of papers written by their student during the course of their performance
study.
Provides the jury with a copy of the student's performance portfolio listing
repertoire learned and performances given over the four semesters of
study. See portfolio, p.15
Selects the sight reading excerpt that the student will be asked to perform.
Tells the student how to proceed, making sure the student has an opportunity to
play (about 10 minutes) and talk about their music (about 5 minutes)
Registers vote of jury on Portfolio Coversheet and returns to the Undergraduate
Advisor.
General

The correct name for this performance exam is Pre-professional Performance Jury, or
PPJ for short.

For each student taking the exam, a Pre-professional Performance Jury Report form will
be completed to officially record the jury results. This form, in quadruplicate, will be distributed
with a copy each to the student, the studio teacher, the appropriate area head, and the student's
file in the Music Office.

Any student who fails this exam may repeat it once, at the end of the following semester
of study. This option does not apply to students whose Provisional Status reverts to Fail.

Community college transfer students, with or without an AA degree, who have
satisfactorily completed the required four semesters of music theory, four semesters of lower
division performance study and four semesters of secondary piano will audition at the
Professional Level in order to be admitted to the Junior level of study. The audition will include
a Comprehensive Musicianship Exam and a Pre-Professional Performance Jury (see page 11-
12 of the SOM Student Handbook). Students in the above category who do not successfully
pass either the CMP and/or PPJ will be required to take remedial course work based on their
audition test scores. Upon successful completion of the remedial course work they must re-take
the CMP and/or PPJ and receive a satisfactory score for admittance to the Professional Level
(3000) of study.

Community college students, with or without an AA degree, who have NOT completed
the required pre-professional course work will audition at the Pre-Professional level. These
students will take a comprehensive musicianship exam for placement within the theory program
and must then successfully pass the final Comprehensive Musicianship Exam upon completion
of the theory course work assigned for remediation.


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6. Ensemble Requirement. To qualify for Professional music major status, students need
to have four credit hours in ensemble for every degree track except the B.A. in
theory/composition and history/literature where participation in an ensemble is not a degree
requirement. Every student in the School of Music who is enrolled in a performance
studio is required to participate in an ensemble during that same semester.

7. Recital Attendance is a non-credit course required of all students for all music degrees.
An "S"(Satisfactory) grade in Recital Attendance, requires attendance at 13 recitals. Twelve of
the thirteen events must be from the approved list, and one may be from an outside event of
similar quality to those on the list. During the last two of the six semesters, the acceptable
events will be broadened. Ten of the thirteen events musts be from the approved list, and three
may be from an outside event of similar quality to those on the list. The concerts chosen need
to be those in which the student is free to be part of the audience. Students should plan to
attend the entire concert because there is no provision for partial attendance.

NOTE: Students who perform in a recital/concert will not be granted credit to fulfill the
requirement for MUS 1010.

D. Registering for Professional Level Courses

Courses in performance, theory/composition, music history/literature, and music
education at the 3000-4000 level may be taken only after a student has achieved professional
status by passing the Musicianship Assessment Jury and the Preprofessional Performance
Jury. Other requirements include successfully completing Musical Styles, four semesters of
ensemble (if required in the degree), and four semesters of satisfactory recital attendance.

Since some students may need additional time to successfully complete the
Musicianship Assessment Jury and the Preprofessional Performance Jury, students will be
allowed to register for up to nine hours at the 3000 level prior to becoming a professional level
music major.

The nine hours that may be taken at the 3000 level prior to acceptance into the
Professional level may be selected as follows:

1. Music Education: If MUE 2040 has been passed, MUE 3311 Music for the
Elementary Child and MUE 3330 Music Education Secondary 7-12 may be
taken.

2. Music History and Literature: MUH 3211 Survey of Music History I and 3212
Survey of Music History II may be taken.

3. Students who pass the 2000 Level Performance Jury may register for 3000 level
work in Performance even if they have not yet completed the Musicianship
Assessment Jury, but they may not register for MV_ 3970: junior recital until they
complete the Musicianship Assessment Jury.

4. Students who pass the Comprehensive Musicianship Jury may register for MUG
(Conducting courses), MUR (Church Music courses) and MUS (Projects and
Problems courses) even if they have not passed the Pre-professional
Performance Jury. They may also register for 3000-4000 level courses in Theory
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and Composition, and in Music History and Literature.

Students who pass both the 2000 Level Performance Jury and the Comprehensive
Musicianship Jury may register for courses in Music Education and Music History/Literature at
the 4000 level.

Students must be classified at the Professional Level before they can take 4000 level
work in Performance, Theory/Composition, 4000 level courses in Music Education, and 4000
level courses in Music History/Literature.

Students in music education degree programs must have been admitted to Professional
level before they can register for and complete EDG 4203 Elementary/Secondary Curriculum,
MUE 4940 Student Teaching and MUE 4140 Administration of Music Education.

E. Portfolio

The Undergraduate Academic Advisor will have a portfolio for each student on file in
his/her office. The responsibility for keeping the portfolio up-to-date rests with the
student. The beginning and end of each semester are ideal times in which the student and
advisor can bring the portfolio up-to-date while discussing the student's progress through his/her
degree program.

The following information should be in the student's portfolio:

1. Performance courses with jury grades and final grades
2. Data on completion of the 2000 Level Performance Jury
3. Data on completion of the Comprehensive Musicianship Jury
4. Jr. and Sr. Recital completion data (program signed by faculty committee)
5. Performer's Certificate data (if this option is part of the student's program)

F. Mid-Point Guidance Conference

Music Composition Degree Track

In order to be accepted into the College of Fine Arts for a B.M. in composition, the
student needs to do a Mid-point Guidance Conference during his/her last semester of Pre-
professional study.

The process for completing the Mid-point Guidance Conference in Composition is as
follows:

1. Make an appointment with the Coordinator of the Theory/Composition area.

2. The student should request that the Undergraduate Academic Advisor to give his/her
portfolio to the area coordinator so that it can be discussed during their conference.

3. The student should be prepared to discuss his/her career goals at the time of the
conference.

4. After the conference, the area coordinator will either write a letter supporting
admission into the B.M. in Composition program or recommend that the student


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consider another degree track. A copy of this letter will be kept in the student's
portfolio.

G. Frequently Asked Questions About Universal Trackinq

1. What is Universal Tracking?

Universal tracking (UT) is a system that monitors the progress of all undergraduate majors
toward graduation.

2. What is the purpose of universal tracking?

Universal tracking is designed to assist students in finding the best path toward completion of
their degree, to advise them into the most appropriate major as soon as possible, and to
provide feedback every Fall and Spring semester on their academic progress.

3. How does UT help students into the best major for them?"

UT monitors the critical courses for all majors and provides feedback to the student and to the
advisor beginning with the Fall semester of the freshman year. This immediate feedback will
help the student determine if he/she has chosen the best major.

4. When did tracking begin?

Evaluation of all undergraduate students began in the Fall 1996.

5. How can a student find out what the tracking criteria is for other majors?

There are several ways to obtain this information:

Speak with an advisor in the college that offers the major.
Speak with an advisor in the Academic Advising Center (AAC).
Look at the Undergraduate Catalog in the appropriate college section;
information and semester-by-semester plans for each major are included.
Pick up instructions from any campus computer lab or access ISIS on-line via
the World Wide Web (http://www.isis.ufl.edu). ISIS allows a student to
explore the requirements of different majors.
Students may also utilize the computers located in the campus computer labs,
(CIRCA), to access ISIS.

6. How will students be informed about critical tracking criteria?

Critical tracking criteria are indicated in the catalog under the curriculum
plans for each major.
Students are encouraged to look up their universal tracking audits each fall and spring
semester.
The UT audit lists all curriculum requirements for a student's major. Critical
tracking courses are preceded by the ">>" symbol on the UT audit and
they are highlighted in the catalog.
Students may consult an advisor in their college for additional information.


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7. How are students notified that they are OFF track?

A HOLD is placed on the students' record and they cannot advance register until they have met
with an academic advisor in their college for additional information.

8. How does the off-track HOLD affect students?

Students may not register until they meet with their advisor.
Students must develop a plan to complete the necessary courses to get back on
track for the major or seek a different major.
If the student is able to be on track within one semester, he advisor then can lift the
HOLD and allow the student to register.

9. Who will have the authority to decide if students who are off track for a particular
major can continue in that major?

The college or academic advisor will have the authority to determine if a student can continue
to register. The advisor and student must work together to develop a plan to get the student
back on track toward graduation.

10. Will students who are on track receive any notification?

The students who are on track will receive their grades.

11. How many terms can a student be off track?

If a student is off track for two consecutive terms, he/she should consider a different major.

12. If a student is off track for two consecutive terms and wants to change majors, what
should he/she do?

If the student has selected a new major, he/she should contact the college offering that major to
schedule an appointment with an advisor to discuss changing the major. The student should
visit the Academic Advising Center for assistance in choosing a new major. If the chosen major
is not offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the student will be referred to the
college offering the major to initiate a request for change of major.

13. How will Universal Tracking impact academic advising, especially for freshman and
sophomores?

Universal Tracking ensures that all students (freshman, sophomores, juniors, and (seniors)
receive academic advising from their college advisors.

14. Are students allowed to change majors?

Yes, students can change majors if they have approval from the college they are applying to.
The goal of universal tracking is to help students find majors that match their talents and
interests.


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SECTION III
BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS

A. Area Requirements

1. Music Performance Area:

Policies Concerning Performance Courses

1. Performance study is guided by the syllabus of individual studio teachers. These
syllabi reflect School guidelines.

2. There is no auditing of performance courses.

3. Non-music majors wishing to study performance may do so with the approval of
the School Director. Approval may be granted providing an appropriate audition
is passed and faculty studio space is available.

4. The School of Music faculty respects and supports the provisions of the United
States Copyright Law. Specialized scores are available from or can be ordered
through local music stores. Students are expected to purchase their own music.
No lesson, iury, or recital may be presented using photocopied material.

5. It is expected that each student will assume full responsibility for obtaining an
accompanist to the extent needed for his/her music performance requirements.

6. Cumulative Music Performance Record Forms must be maintained for all
students studying performance. They must be brought up to date during the last
two weeks of each term. The completed record will be kept in the Academic
Advisor's files as part of the student's portfolio. Other copies may be kept by
student and/or the studio teacher at their option.

The goals of music performance vary with the different music curricula. The
requirements are tailored to the needs of each major and non-major through four levels.
General descriptions of the four levels are as follows:

LEVEL I: BASIC TECHNIQUES (Course numbers in the 1000 series)

These courses will be used by:

1. Music majors not majoring in performance, for first-year study in his/her performance
concentration.

2. Music majors doing performance study on a secondary instrument.

3. Non-music majors accepted for performance studies courses Level I is
designed to build a secure foundation in the fundamentals. Materials and repertoire
are selected to develop the physical, technical, and aesthetic aspects of music
performance in a framework for comprehensive musicianship. Jury exams are not


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required following the first semester of study on this level in some studios. A jury
exam is required during the second semester of 1000 level study.

LEVEL II: TECHNIQUE, REPERTOIRE, PERFORMANCE (Course Numbers in the 2000
series)

Students accepted to pursue the bachelor of music or bachelor of arts in performance
will begin Level II courses in the first year.

In Level II, the student applies the basic techniques acquired in Level I to build a
repertoire and to achieve a basic mastery in his/her performing medium. Solos are
prepared for presentation in repertoire class and/or in recital. Participation in both large
and small ensembles is encouraged and, in some instances, required. Keyboard
students are encouraged to gain experience in accompanying. Emphasis is placed on
comprehensive musicianship and on sight-reading. Jury exams are required for this and
all upper (3000 and 4000) levels of performance study.

LEVEL III: PERFORMANCE, PEDAGOGY (Course numbers in the 3000 series)

The student acquires considerable experience in performance of major works
and greatly extends his/her repertoire at this level of study. The preparation of a public
recital (see below) is a major objective at this level. In addition, pedagogical
considerations are stressed and the student is encouraged to develop teaching
techniques based upon his/her own experiences) as well as upon those of the teacher.

Students who complete Level III are encouraged to elect to study in a second
performance area and/or to develop in depth other areas of individual interest. Qualified
majors in all degree options other than the bachelor in music performance degree may
be invited to pursue the Certificate in Music Performance by their performance studies
professor. (See IV A Performer's Certificate)

LEVEL IV: ADVANCED PERFORMANCE (Course numbers in the 4000 series)

Entrance into Level IV is by full-faculty jury. This exam is usually taken during
the second semester of study at the 3000 level study. Considerable emphasis is placed
upon performance of the major literature involving the principal instrument, including solo
and chamber works, and larger ensembles.

2. Music Theory Area:

Music theory is required in the freshman and sophomore years of all music curricula.
The courses consist of an integrated lecture/laboratory experience in which both written and
aural skills are developed.
Freshman Year
Fall Spring

MUT 1121 MUT 1122



Sophomore Year
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Fall Spring

MUT 2126 MUT 2127

All transfer students and in-coming freshmen should take the Undergraduate Theory and
Secondary Piano Proficiency Examinations. See the statement on exemption of courses and
credit-by-examination in the Undergraduate Catalogue. The Undergraduate Theory Proficiency
Examination description is available in the School's office. A minimum grade of "C" is
required in MUT 1121, 1122, 2126, and 2127 in order to advance to the next theory course
and to fulfill all music degree requirements. Each of these courses may be repeated only
once. For further information, see the faculty member in charge of the undergraduate theory
sequence.

3. Music History/Literature Area:

The following courses are required in all B.A. and B.M. and B.M.E: MUH 3211, MUH
3212, MUH 3213 and one of the following courses in world music: MUH 2501, MUH 2530, or
MUH 3541. A minimum grade of "C" is required in all of the above courses in order to
fulfill all degrees in music. Each of these courses may be repeated only once.

Students majoring in music history and literature must earn a minimum of a "B" average
in all music history and literature courses taken as part of their undergraduate degree
requirements.

For further information, see the faculty member in charge of the undergraduate music
history and literature sequence.

B. Recital Attendance Policies (MUS 1010)

All music majors in the School of Music are expected to be acquainted with as many
styles of music as possible by the time they graduate, and to be acquainted with current
research in music theory, musicology, and music education.

In addition, it is expected that students will support performances given by University of
Florida faculty, ensembles, and students, as well as guest artists. Therefore, as part of all
music curricula the following recital attendance policy is established :

1. Recital is defined as any "All-school" student recital, faculty recital, or any official,
scheduled School of Music concert, public lecture, or performance held on the
University of Florida campus, including the Visiting Artist Series. A list of
acceptable events will be approved by the Assistant Director of the School of
Music.

2. One course number, which may be repeated for an indefinite number of
semesters, will be used to verify completion of each semester of Recital
Attendance (MUS 1010).

3. In order to graduate, all undergraduate music majors must enroll and receive a
satisfactory "S" grade for a total of six semesters during the undergraduate
degree program. A student must attend 13 approved recitals/concerts/lectures
per semester in order to receive a grade of "S" for the semester. Twelve of the


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thirteen events must be from the approved list, and one may be from an outside
event of similar quality to those on the list. During the last two of the six
semesters, the acceptable events will be broadened. Ten of the thirteen events
musts me from the approved list, and three may be from an outside event of
similar quality to those on the list. The concerts chosen need to be those in
which the student is free to be part of the audience. Students should plan to
attend the entire concert because there is no provision for partial attendance.

NOTE: Students who perform in a recital/concert will not be granted credit to
fulfill the requirement for MUS 1010.

Ticket stubs, programs, etc. From outside events musit be turned in within ooone
week of the performance. The Assistant Director will make all decisions on the
acceptability of outside events not listed on the approved list for recital
attendance credit.

4. Attendance requirements for transfer students who were music majors at the
institution from which the transfer is being made:

Freshman transfers (less than 30 semester hours completed)
6 semesters required
Sophomore transfers(30 semester hours completed)
4 semesters required
Junior transfers (60 semester hours completed)
2 semesters required
Senior transfers (90 semester hours completed)
I semester required

Procedures for Recital Attendance Verification

A Student Assistant will distribute one attendance form to each student upon entrance to
the concert hall. The student will complete the recital form and at the conclusion of the program
return it to the Graduate Assistant. If a student attends a performance that has been approved,
but is not listed on the Events Schedule, that student has one week from the date of the
performance to turn in a ticket stub or program (if it is a UMA or MUB event, a professor will
need to sign the program. NOTE: No Attendance Forms will be accepted at the front office
if a monitor was present at the recital. The student is strongly urged to keep a copy of the
Student Recital Attendance Verification Form receipt until he/she has received his/her grades
for the current semester. If an error has been made, the student must produce the receipts.

The above statement is interpreted in the following manner:

The student must arrive on time in order to receive an attendance form and may not
leave until the conclusion of the program. Failure to comply will result in no credit being
given.

The Graduate Assistant(s) assigned to monitor a specific recital will process the forms
and an accurate record of attendance will be maintained. At the conclusion of each semester, a
complete report of the semester attendance will be given to the Assistant Director of the School
of Music for grading purposes. All questions concerning a student's recital attendance shall be
directed to the Assistant Director of the School of Music whose decision will be final.


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C. Recital Presentation Guidelines (Junior and Senior Recitals)

Presentation of a public recital is a requirement for all performance studies at the 3000
level and above. Following is a listing of all undergraduate degrees and their respective recital
requirements:

Bachelor of Music (B.M.)

Performance: Junior (3000 level) recital
Senior (4000 level) recital
Composition: Junior (3000 level) recital
Theory: Junior (3000 level) recital
Outside Field: Junior (3000 level) recital

Bachelor of Music in Music Education (B.M.E.)

Instrumental: Junior (3000 level) recital
Choral: Junior (3000 level) recital
Choral/Keyboard: Junior (3000 level) recital

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Performance: Junior (3000 level) recital
Theory: No recital required
Composition: No recital required
History: No recital required

Note: Some studio teachers require their students to do program notes for recitals .

1. Length of Recitals

Public recitals and concerts are presented for audiences composed of members of the
community as well as for music faculty members and students. It is in the best interest of
performing musicians, as well as the audience, to have understandings about the typical length
of programs. In order to qualify as a degree recital, the following guidelines are to be met:

Junior (3000) level recital 30-45 minutes of prepared music
Senior (4000) level recital 45-60 minutes of prepared music

Note: In both cases, the lower number constitutes the minimum amount of music to be
presented.

2. Qualifying Exam for Recital

A faculty panel of at least three members administers the Qualifying Exam for each
degree recital presented. This panel must include two faculty members from the performance
area, with the third member being chosen from outside the performance area. The Qualifying
Exam will follow the protocol outlined below and must be presented no later than two weeks
prior to the recital date.


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a. the student presents the panel with a typed copy of the complete program,
including program notes where appropriate

b. the student performs material from the proposed recital as requested by the
examining panel

c. following the performance, the faculty panel votes yes or no for recital approval

3. Scheduling of Undergraduate Degree Recitals

The School of Music uses designated recital times for all undergraduate degree recitals.
Recital times are available at 7:30 p.m. on T,W,R,F with dress rehearsal the day before the
recital at 6:15 p.m. It is the responsibility of the student performer to schedule a recital date and
time that is agreeable to all persons involved, including assisting performers, studio teachers,
and faculty panel members. In consultation with the studio teacher, it is necessary to file
required forms to reserve Room 120 for recital presentation/dress rehearsal.

Students can schedule a recital by filling out an application for a junior/senior recital
date, which are located next to the faculty mailboxes in the music office. This application must
be signed by each member of the recital committee and must indicate the date/time/place of the
pre-recital jury.

The first two weeks of the Fall semester will be reserved for Graduate and Senior recital
sign-up. The 3rd and 4th weeks of the fall semester will be reserved for Junior recital sign-up.
Students failing to take advantage of this will reserve recital dates on a first come-first serve
basis.

4. Recital Programs

Following the successful completion of the Qualifying Jury for any degree recital, a final
copy of the program must be submitted to the School of Music office for printing. This should be
done immediately but not later than two weeks prior to the scheduled recital. Program copy
must be turned in to the front office IBM (PC) convertible text formatted disk. Program notes
and/or translations must be turned in camera ready on eight and one-half by eleven stock,
SEPARATE from the program copy. Students are responsible for correct spelling, biographical
information, dates, etc. What you turn in on the disk is what will be printed. IT IS NOT THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE FRONT OFFICE STAFF TO PROOF-READ YOUR COPY!! Make
sure it is correct BEFORE you turn it in.

5. Recording of Recitals

Audio and video recordings of all degree recitals are available by request through Phi
Mu Alpha. All cost relating to the recording are the responsibility of the student. The student
can also make his/her own arrangements for recording.

6. Receptions

Post-recital receptions are available by request through Sigma Alpha lota. All costs
relating to the reception are the responsibility of the student. The student may also arrange
his/her own reception.


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7. Rules Pertaining to the use of MUB 120

a. The locked Steinway piano is reserved for dress rehearsals and recital
performances.

b. Any housekeeping pertaining to MUB 120 is the responsibility of the
student performer. Any items removed from the room (lecterns, music
cabinets, etc.) must be returned following the performance. The extra
grand piano is not to be removed from MUB 120.

c. Receptions in MUB 120 are prohibited by School of Music policy. The courtyard
area of the Music Building is an appropriate venue for receptions. In case of
inclement weather, Room 145 can sometimes be used for receptions.

8. Recital Day Checklist

a. Pick up recital programs in the School of Music office and an envelope containing
the dated Recital Attendance Slips which will be distributed and collected by the
student's studio teacher. (This should be done by 4:00 p.m. on the day of the
recital).

b. Secure the key for the Steinway piano from the music office staff. (This should
be done by the studio teacher by 4:00 p.m. on the day of the recital).

c. Check with Lighting Technician to make sure he/she knows about the recital (if
the Lighting Technician doesn't show up to the rehearsal he/she does not know
about the recital).

d. Provide ushers to pass out programs and seat late arrivals. Late arrivals may be
seated only between selections or groups of selections.

D. Ensemble Participation

1. List of Ensembles

General Ensemble Policies: Ensembles are open to all students attending the University of
Florida. Ensembles are also open to community college students through Dual-Enrollment (they
must fill out the Transient Student Form from their school). Audition requirements vary by
ensemble. Students must be registered for an ensemble in order to participate in it.

CHORAL ENSEMBLES

Chamber Singers: Highly select chamber choir of 20-24 graduate and undergraduate
singers, which performs a diverse and challenging repertoire ranging from Renaissance
to Contemporary music. The Chamber Singers give concerts several times each
semester on and off campus and have toured throughout the U.S. and in Europe.
Whereas this group is comprised mostly of voice majors, it is open to all university
students through competitive audition.

Men's Glee Club: This group of 40-50 men performs music from the traditional glee
club repertoire, as well as a broad spectrum of works from light classical to popular
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styles. It performs several times throughout the academic year. Comprised of students
from across the UF campus, the Men's Glee Club is open to all male students without an
audition.

Summer Chorus: This large mixed ensemble rehearses each Monday evening during
the Summer B term. It performs major choral works and is open to all students without
an audition. Listed in the summer course catalog as MUN 1310 University Choir,
interested students should simply register for the class to participate.

University Choir: Select large mixed choir of 50-70 singers that performs a variety of a
cappella and accompanied works from the standard classical repertoire. This choir
regularly tours in Florida and the U.S. and recently toured France. They also perform in
conjunction with orchestras and are one of the main performing groups in the annual
Sounds of the Season concerts each December. The University Choir is open to all UF
students through audition.

Women's Chorale: Large ensemble of 70-90 women that sings a wide variety of music
including classical, popular, and Broadway styles. It performs several times throughout
the academic year. Comprised of students from across the UF campus, the Women's
Chorale is open to all female students without an audition.

INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES

Concert Bands: These groups meet during the Spring Semester and typically are
made up of non-music majors from the Marching Band who are interested in continuing
musical pursuits throughout the Spring Semester. The Concert Band is also open to
music majors who wish to play in an ensemble on a secondary instrument. Two
concerts are given during the Spring Semester. No audition is required.

Jazz Band: The School of Music's jazz program is highlighted by three large jazz
ensembles. Each year, the jazz band performs with legendary jazz artists and clinicians.
These have included Joe Williams, Bill Watrous, Bobby Shew, Louie Bellson, Ernie
Watts, and many others. The band has recorded three CDs including "Montreux
Bound" recorded just before their performances at the 1998 Montreux Jazz Festival in
Switzerland. Concerts are performed on and off campus and at state and regional
conventions. Auditions are held the first week of school and the bands are open to all
University of Florida and Santa Fe Community College students.

Marching Band: The Pride of the Sunshine begins rehearsals in the summer just prior
to the start of the Fall Semester. The Director of Admissions or the Band Office provides
applications for the summer mailing list which lists the Marching Band summer schedule.
Dorms are available to students during Pre-season band practice. The band appears at
all home games, travels to many away games, and always appears at bowl games. In
the spring, upperclassmen have the opportunity to participate in the Basketball Pep
Bands as well. An audition is required.

Percussion Ensemble: The Percussion Ensemble performs two on campus concerts
every year, and tours throughout the state on a regular basis. The ensemble performs
marimba ensemble and pop-rock music as well as standard percussion ensemble
literature. Audition and permission of instructor is required. Auditions take place during
the first week of classes before Fall and Spring semester. E-mail
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kbroadwavy@arts.ufl.edu for more information.

Steel Drum Ensemble: The Steel Drum Ensemble performs two on campus concerts
and several other performances throughout the school year. Students perform on
instruments hand crafted by Ellie Mannette and Lloyd Gay. The ensemble is open to all
students, but audition and permission of instructor is required. Auditions take place
during the first week of classes before Fall and Spring semester. E-mail:
kbroadwavy@arts.ufl.edu for more information.

Symphonic Band: This ensemble tours each Spring to places such as Washington
D.C., New Orleans, Florida, and Georgia. The ensemble has recorded numerous CD's
and has frequent guest artists, including conductor Eugene Corporon and the group
Canadian Brass. Interested students should come to the first scheduled class meeting
to sign up for an audition time. Auditions will be completed before the end of drop/add is
over each Fall and Spring Semester. Auditions consist of two contrasting prepared
movements or etudes, and sight-reading.

Symphonic Wind Ensemble: This ensemble performs advanced wind literature, tours, and
regularly features guest artists. Auditions will be the first day of classes during the
semester. Students will audition once for the Director of Bands, and he will place them
in either Wind Ensemble or Symphonic Band. Audition requirements are the same as
for Symphonic Band.

University Orchestra: The Orchestra is involved in a variety of performances including
children's concerts and ballet productions at the Center for the Performing Arts (in
conjunction with Dance Alive!). Auditions begin on the first day of the Fall and Spring
semesters. Wind and percussion players who wish to play in orchestra, audition for the
Orchestra Instructor and the Director of Bands on the first day of classes. String players
audition for the Orchestra Conductor on the first day of classes. Auditions will be
completed before the end of drop/add is over each Fall and Spring Semester. Auditions
consist of a prepared excerpt or movement and all scales. Expect to be asked to sight-
read as well.

World Music Ensemble: This group, popularly known as "Jacare Brazil", performs
traditional and contemporary Brazilian music locally and statewide under the direction of
Dr. Larry Crook. Auditions are held each semester for percussion, voice, and winds
with approval of instructor. Knowledge of Portuguese preferred, but not required (for
voice).

CHAMBER ENSEMBLES

Chamber Groups: Chamber groups are open to any student who is currently in a
studio. The student should talk to their professor concerning what kind of group they
would like to be a part of; they vary each semester. Some possible ensembles include
4-hand Piano, Brass Quintet, Woodwind Quintet, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Trio and
others as appropriate to the student's instrument.


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2. Policies on Student Ensemble Participation

a. Ensemble requirements

1. Curricular requirements. Students enrolled in any undergraduate music major
degree program must earn at lest one (1) hour of ensemble credit each semester
enrolled in studio. A maximum of four (4) semesters of ensemble credit (1 each
per semester) may be transferred from other institutions for degree credit.
Graduate students enrolled in studio will perform in ensembles as assigned by
the studio teachers as appropriate to the degree program. Any exceptions must
be approved by the performance studio teacher, the student's academic advisor,
and the appropriate ensemble directorss, all of whom will monitor and approve
the students participation. Appropriate area heads and the School Assistant
Director will be informed.

2. Limitations. Students may not participate in more that two (2) ensembles in
any one semester, except by permission of the studio teacher and the Academic
Advisor, (who monitor the student's participation). A student in academic
difficulty may be required to limit his/her participation. Enrollment in the specified
ensembles is required for participation.

b. Participation in Ensembles

1. Any student enrolled in studio [major, minors, and non-majors] must
participate as assigned through auditions for the appropriate ensemble.

Assignments are based on the following considerations:

a. the educational needs of the student
b. the needs of the ensemble [concert plans, instrumentation,
and quality of the musician required].
c. the performance studio teacher's guidance

2. All music scholarship students will participate in at least one ensemble per
term, but may be required to participate further, subject to the student's
course load limitation. All Friends of Music scholarship students are required
to remain enrolled in a University of Florida performance studio.

3. All students enrolled in performance studio will participate in ensemble as
follows:

Strings- All strings students will enroll and participate in the University
Symphonic Orchestra each semester. In addition, participation in chamber music
ensembles will be required as follows:

a. Students in the BM and BA performance degree tracks will
earn two (2) credits in chamber music (double bass students will
earn only one (1) credit.
b. Students in all other music degree program tracks will earn
one (1) credit in chamber music.


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Winds/Percussion- All wind and percussion students will audition for either
University Orchestra or Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble each semester and
perform as assigned by the ensemble director, which may include Jazz or other
ensembles. Music education majors must earn at least one (1) semester credit in
Marching Band. Performance majors playing orchestral instruments must earn at least
two (2) credits in University Orchestra.

Voice- All voice students will audition for University Choir each semester and
perform as assigned by the Director of Choral Activities.

Recorders and Historical Instruments- Students who are enrolled in recorder
and historical instruments may satisfy ensemble requirements by performing in the
Renaissance Ensemble. Music majors with a principal instrument in another area will
follow the guidelines for that area.

Keyboard- All keyboard students will satisfy their ensemble requirements by
participating in large ensembles and chamber ensembles, and by enrolling in
Accompanying (MVK 3702) according to:

a. their interests and abilities, and

b. the requirements of their individual degree programs.

ALL Piano principals, regardless of degree program, must take Accompanying (MVK
3702) during their first two semesters of enrollment. This will count towards their ensemble
requirement. Additional ensemble hours may be chosen from instrumental, choral, or chamber
ensembles according to the specific degree program.

a. Students pursuing the BM performance track degree will earn
two (2) credits in large ensembles, eight (8) credits in
Accompanying, and two (2) in chamber ensembles. They will
also accompany students in recitals as part of their degree program.

b. Students pursuing the BA performance track degree will earn
two (2) credits in large ensembles and eight (8) credits in
Accompanying.

c. Keyboard students pursuing the BM degree in music education
will satisfy ensemble requirements as follows:

Students pursuing a choral emphasis will earn a minimum of four (4) credits in a large
choral ensemble by auditioning for the University Choir and performing as assigned by the
Director of Choral Activities.

Students pursuing an instrumental emphasis will earn a minimum of four (4) credits in a
large instrumental ensemble by auditioning for the University Orchestra or Symphonic
Band/Wind ensemble and performing as assigned by the ensemble director.

All keyboard students, regardless of applied emphasis, will earn four (4) credits in
Accompanying and one (1) credit in either vocal or instrumental chamber music.


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d. Keyboard students pursuing a degree in organ performance
will earn a minimum of four (4) credits in a large choral ensemble by
auditioning for the University Choir and performing as assigned by the
Director of Choral Activities. In addition, students in these two degree
programs will earn four (4) credits in Accompanying and two (2) credits
in vocal or instrumental chamber music. (Music education majors
earn one (1) credit in chamber music).

e. Keyboard students whose principal instrument is harpsichord
will earn two (2) credits in large instrumental or choral
ensembles, four (4) credits in Accompanying, and four (4)
credits in instrumental or vocal chamber music. They will
also perform continue parts as appropriate.

4. If problems arise in balancing the above criteria, they will be resolved by the
Assistant Director in consultation with the student, the appropriate
conductors, the studio teacher, and the faculty advisor. Area Coordinators
will be informed.

5. Auditions will be scheduled during Registration periods, prior to the end of
drop/add, so that instruction may begin during the first week of classes.
Information on School auditions will be sent to all entering University students
as part of the Registrar's mailings. It is the responsibility of the student to
audition for the appropriate ensemble during this time period.


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SECTION IV
ADDITIONAL DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION

A. The Performer's Certificate

The Certificate in Music Performance is awarded to graduating seniors who are not in
music performance degree tracks but who fulfill the required music performance components of
the bachelor of music in music performance degree. These include performance studies
(private lessons), ensemble participation, and two full recital presentations. It is understood that
any future changes in the requirements of these components of the music performance
curriculum will automatically pertain to the Certificate in Music Performance requirements. The
certificate is awarded at the time of the graduation as an addendum to the baccalaureate
degree.

Basic course requirements:

Performance Studies:
2000 level: 8 hours; 3000 level: 6 hours; 4000 level: 6 hours at the "Performance Major" level,
the 2000 level jury; the Full Faculty Jury Examination for entrance into the 4000 level of study);
junior and senior recital.

Ensemble Participation:

8 hours, earning at least 1 hour per semester (Pianists will normally earn 2 credits in large
ensembles, 4 credits in Studio Accompanying (MVK 3702) and 2 credits in chamber ensemble).

Recital Presentations:

Two full recitals; to be presented in the junior and senior years.

Procedures:

1. Students must qualify at the "Performance Major" level at the 2000 level jury
or, in the case of transfer students, upon admission into the 3000 level of study.

2. At the beginning of 3000 level study, qualified students will be invited to
pursue the Certificate in Music Performance by their performance studies
professor. A committee of three professors will be selected by the major
professor and the student. Two of the professors, which includes the major
professor, must be from the area faculty, and one must be from another
performance area.

3. A full recital will be presented during the junior year with the committee's
approval of the program presented and with a pre-performance recital
audition two or more complete weeks before the recital. During the week
following the first recital, the committee will determine, in writing, whether
or not the student may continue pursuit of the Certificate in Music
Performance.

4. At the end of the junior year, the student must successfully pass a full faculty


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jury examination for entrance into the 4000 level of study.

5. A second full recital will be presented in the senior year. The repertoire
performed will include 4000 level literature.

6. The Faculty Committee has the responsibility of assessing the quality of the
student's progress and determining if the student has successfully met the
requirements for the Certificate in Music Performance. At the end of the
student's final semester before graduating, a recommendation from the
committee will be submitted to the music faculty for final approval.

B. Student Concerto Program

1. Performance with the University Orchestra is one of the highest honors the School bestows
on a student. The competition is designed to identify the best student soloists each year in order
to provide them with the opportunity of performing with orchestra.

2. The Solo Concerto Competition is divided into two separate levels, undergraduate and
graduate, and is open to all students who are music majors (including duel majors). Those
students who have already won may not compete again at the same level. However, graduate
students who have won as an undergraduate are eligible to audition with different repertoire. In
the semester the competition takes place, an undergraduate must be registered for a
minimum of 12 credits and a graduate student for 9 credits. In the semester of the
performance, an undergraduate must be registered for 12 credits and a graduate student
must be enrolled for a performance course at the 6000 or 7000 level (minimum).

3. Each student who plans to audition must be recommended by his/her studio teacher, using
the Concerto Audition Application form. Undergraduate auditionees must have studied with
their UF Performance instructor a minimum of one semester prior to the semester in
which the audition takes place.

4. The composition the student wishes to perform must be approved by the Studio Teacher
and submitted to the conductor by the posted date. Teacher and conductor will consider length
of composition, level of difficulty for the orchestra, availability of scores and any other matters
that would be required for performance. The conductor will either approve or deny repertoire
selections and report the decision to the Director of the School of Music by the beginning of the
fifth week of classes. When the teacher and conductor have approved the work, and an
application has been turned in to the music office, the final list of competitors will be prepared
for the Concerto Adjudicators.

5. All auditions must be performed with accompaniment.

6. The decision to require or waive memorization will be left to each Studio teacher.

7. It is recommended that an instrumentalist prepare a complete concerto, a movement of a
concerto, or some other concert piece; and that a singer prepare an aria or other suitable vocal
music with orchestral accompaniment. Musical works requiring more than one soloist (e.g.,
concert grossi) are not permissible.

8. Once the student has selected his/her music, the entire piece must be performed at the
audition.


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9. For each year's competition, an Audition Committee of off-campus adjudicators will be
appointed by the Director of the School of Music. The Performance Area Heads will consult
with their faculty members in compiling a recommended list of qualified adjudicators.

10. Students will be chosen on the basis of high performance standards, without regard to
instrument or voice. The highest point earner in each category, undergraduate and graduate,
will be selected as the winner. No attempt will be made to "balance" the program with
representation from various studios or instruments. A numerical point system will be used to
rate the performers as follows:

16-20 points: Comparable to the best undergraduate or graduate student
performance based on a national scale.

11-15 points: Comparable to the below average undergraduate or graduate
student performance on a national scale.

6-10 points: Comparable ot the below average undergraduate or graduate
student performance on a national scale.

1-5 points: Should not have auditioned.

11. No more than two students will be selected. Of the two winners, one should be classified
as an undergraduate student and one classified as a graduate student. If no graduate
auditionee is acceptable with an average of 16 or more points, a second undergraduate with the
next highest score averaging 16 or more points should be chosen.

12. Limited rehearsal time, based on the number of students auditioning, may be scheduled in
the University Auditorium to prepare for the Concerto auditions. Students are responsible for
reserving rehearsal time in the Music Office on a first come, first serve basis beginning Monday,
October 13th. Usual UA space reservations guidelines will apply.

13. The winner of the competition will be posted in the Music Office. The Concerto
Competition winners) will perform with the University Orchestra during the Spring Semester.


2004-2005 University of Florida School of Music
Student Concerto Competition Auditions


The procedures and deadlines for the submission of applications for the annual Student
Concerto Competition are listed below. Please note the dates as well as the attached
application form, schedule, and policies. In fairness to all applicants, deadlines will be strictly
adhered to.

Wed., September 8: Application materials available in the Music Office.

Monday, September 20: Student applications (time/date stamped) to Dr. Chobaz's mailbox
in the Music Office.


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DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE
ACCEPTED AFTER 5:00 p.m. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.
Completed applications must be date/time stamped in the Music Office.

Monday, September 27: Approved Student applications to Mr. Langford.

Monday, October 11: Sign-up in the Music Office for a rehearsal time in University
Auditorium.

Wednesday, October 20: Competition performance times to be posted.

MR. LANGFORD WILL SCHEDULE PERFORMANCE TIMES.
STUDENTS AND THEIR ACCOMPANIST SHOULD BE AVAILABLE FOR
ANY AND ALL PERFORMANCE SLOTS.

Monday, October 25: Concerto competition rehearsals, University Auditorium.

Tuesday, October 26: Concerto competition/judging in University Auditorium. This event
is open to the public.

C. Music Education Internships/Student Teaching

Students are expected to be informed about the requirements and prerequisites
specified by the College of Education. (See Undergraduate Catalog). At least one semester
prior to the semester in which the student plans to student teach he/she must be approved by
the Music School's Undergraduate Academic Advisor to enroll in EDG 4203 (Elementary and
Secondary Curriculum).

Students should consult the Coordinator of Music Education at least one semester in
advance of the semester in which they wish to do their student teaching. The Coordinator's
written approval is required before enrolling in MUE 4940 (Student Teaching in Music) and MUE
4140 (Administration of Music Education).

Students must make application for student teaching at the Office of Extended Services
(Room 150, Norman Hall). Applications for the Fall Semester may be picked up after February
1 and must be received no later than April 1. Applications for the Spring Semester may be
picked up after April 15 and must be received no later than September 15.

Often, one or both of the student teaching placements will be beyond the Gainesville
area in Orange, Duval, and Hillsborough Counties. Upon learning the location of their
placements, student teachers should make plans for housing in the area of their placements.

The School of Music requires that a student have completed all course work and recital
prior to the student teaching experience. Any exceptions to this requirement must be approved
in writing by the Coordinator of Music Education.

Because student teaching is a full-time commitment, student teachers may not register
for any other course except the companion seminar MUE 4140, or be employed on weekdays
during the period of their student teaching placements.


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Please be reminded that any person who has been convicted of a felony cannot be
certified to teach in this state and many others. If such an incident should ever happen with any
of the majors in music education, they will be advised out of the teaching profession.

D. Scholarships, Financial Aid and Work Opportunities for Music Students

Introduction

A wide variety of scholarships are available for incoming and resident undergraduate and
graduate music students. Undergraduate scholarships are primarily, but not exclusively
restricted to music majors. Out-of- state tuition waivers for undergraduate students are also
available. Graduate scholarships are reserved for students pursuing graduate degrees in music
only. Scholarships and tuition waivers are awarded on the basis of musical performance,
academic excellence and needs of the School of Music. College Work Study opportunities are
also available.

Friends of Music

On April 2, 1974, the Friends of Music held its first meeting, fulfilling a dream of Frances Reitz,
wife of former University of Florida President J. Wayne Reitz, and Dr. Donald E. McGlothlin,
then Chairman of the Music Department and now Dean of the College of Fine Arts. The primary
goal of the Friends of Music was to establish a scholarship fund for talented and deserving
music students. Since 1974, the Friends of Music endowment has grown to over $1,000,000,
and more than 2,000 students have been named as Friends of Music Scholars. Some have also
been recipients of one of the named and endowed awards, given by the Friends of Music and
the School of Music each year.

Scholarship students represent many communities throughout Florida and the United States, as
well as several foreign countries. Many go on to music careers in teaching, performing,
conducting, and composing, extending their influence throughout the nation. Others pursue
professional interests outside the field of music, while remaining actively involved in musical
activities in their local communities.

1. School of Music Scholarship Program for Undergraduates

1. Friends of Music/Academic Affairs Scholarships are available for incoming
freshman and transfer students who reside in the state of Florida, and who demonstrate the
greatest potential for musical and academic success toward an undergraduate degree in music.
A variety of criteria are considered, including the performance audition, high school or
community college GPA, SAT/ACT scores, and the results of musical aptitude and music theory
placement exams. Most of these scholarships are awarded to students who audition in person
at one of the three scheduled entrance audition dates in the spring. Students who are unable to
audition at those times, however, can submit audition tapes for consideration, with the
understanding that scholarship awards will be contingent upon their satisfactory performance on
the musical aptitude and music theory placement exams, taken during the summer preceding
admission, or during the first week of the fall term. Scholarship awards vary from $200 to $1500
each year and are renewable for up to eight semesters. Minimum criteria for maintaining these
scholarships are reflected in the statement below, which is included in the scholarship contract:

I understand that I will be expected to participate in the Music Ensemble Program as specified in the
School of Music Ensemble Participation Requirements document. I also understand that the continuation


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of this award for succeeding years will be subject to: (1) my enrollment as a full-time undergraduate
music major. (2) my maintaining normal progress toward a music degree (maintaining grades of B or
better in performance studies and C or better in all music and academic classes), (3) my successful
completion of all curricula obligations each semester, including those pertaining to enrollment in MUS
1010 Recital Attendance, (4) my demonstrating a positive and constructive attitude toward departmental
goals and the music ensemble program, (5) the availability of funds, (6) and any other special conditions
as noted in my scholarship award materials.

In certain special situations, non-music major students maybe considered for one of these
scholarships, based on the needs of the performing ensembles and the results of the student's
performance audition.

2. Friends of Music/Out of State Tuition Waivers are available to incoming freshman or
transfer students who reside outside the state of Florida, and who meet the same criteria as that
required of in-state students. Waivers cover the out-of-state tuition for between twelve and
sixteen credits each semester, based on the availability of funding. Students must pay the out-
of-state tuition for credits taken in excess of those covered by the waiver.

3. Named Friends of Music Scholarship Awards are given each year by School of Music
faculty. Award recipients are selected during the spring term, and are recognized at the Annual
School of Music Awards Convocation in April. The amount of the awards, as well as the criteria
for selection vary, as noted below.

A. Didier Graeffe Scholarship: Awarded annually to one undergraduate music major in
the School of Music, who to the satisfaction of the Theory/Composition faculty,
demonstrates financial need. Preference is given to minority students. Students
studying composition are given first consideration. In the event that there is no qualified
recipient in a given year, the award need not be given. Recipients should, whenever
possible, perform at least one of Didier Graeffe's compositions during the year for which
the scholarship is given. The amount of the award varies each year, based on the
amount of interest earned on the endowment principal, and is given in addition to any
scholarship the student may already hold.

Edith Pitts Memorial Scholarship: Awarded to an undergraduate music major with at
least one full academic year of residence remaining to finish the degree. Eligible
students will have a 3.0 GPA, will be outstanding performers and leaders in the School
of Music, and will demonstrate high personal qualities. Students are chosen by the vote
of the full music faculty. The amount of the award is $650, given in addition to any
scholarship the student may already hold.

Theodore Presser Scholarship: Awarded each year by the Presser Foundation to an
undergraduate rising senior music major. The student is chosen b y the vote of the full
music faculty, based on excellence and merit. The amount of the award is $2600, given
in addition to any scholarship the student may already hold.

Dorothy Reaves String Scholarship: Awarded each year to an outstanding music
major in the area of strings, based on nomination by the strings performance faculty and
the vote of the full music faculty. Eligible students will demonstrate good academic
standing, excellence in performance and/or string music education, leadership in
performing organizations, and a record of service to the community and University. The
amount of the award is $500, given in addition to any scholarship the student may
already hold.


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Frances Millikan Reitz Scholarship: Funded by the University Women's Club, this
scholarship is awarded annually to the most outstanding music major. The eligible
student must have a 3.5+ GPA, and must have demonstrated excellence in
performance, promise for further development, and musical service to the University
and/or the community. The amount of the award is $1,000, given in addition to any
scholarship the student may already hold.

E. E. Larsen Scholarships for Strings and Orchestra: Awarded each year to one or
more string students holding leadership positions in the University Orchestra. Students
are selected by the area Head for Strings and the Director of the Orchestra. Amount of
the award ranges from $250 to $500. Students can receive this award for more than
one year. The award is given in addition to any scholarship the student may already
hold.

4. Band Scholarships: are given each year for performance in the Symphonic Band or the
Wind Ensemble. Eligible students are required to audition. An ensemble grade of B or better is
required for the scholarship to be renewed each semester. Students receiving band
scholarships are required to perform at all scheduled events and rehearsals throughout the
year. Interested students should apply directly to the Director of Bands.

5. Mark Stoughton Band Scholarship: Awarded each year to one band student, based on
scholarship, performance, and service to the band. Recipients are selected by the Band faculty.
The amount of the award is between $200 and $300, variable each year, and is given in
addition to any scholarship the student may already hold.

College Work Study Program (CWSP)

There are a variety of work opportunities available to students in the School of Music through
the College Work Study Program. Students work for the School of Music as needed. Eligibility
for CWSP awards is determined by the Office of Student Financial Affairs. Students must (a)
demonstrate financial need as assessed on the College Scholarship Service Financial Aid Form
(FAF); (b) maintain at least a 2.0 GPA; and (c) be enrolled for at least six credits. The amount
of the award is governed by the prevailing hourly wage. Interested students should apply to the
School of Music and to the Student Financial affairs Officer.


School of Music Work Assistantships

A limited number of School of Music work assistantships are available to students who do not
qualify for the CWSP program. Interested students should apply directly to the School of Music
Office Manager. The amount of the award is governed by the prevailing hourly wage.

2. Registration Expectations for Friends of Music and Band Scholarship Students

At the beginning of each semester, the Undergraduate Academic Advisor will evaluate
and ensure that every scholarship student is registered for the required music classes and
ensembles. Music majors who are on scholarship must be, without exception, registered for the
following:

MUT Rudiments or Theory 1-4, until sequence is complete


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MVK __ Secondary piano skills 1-4, unless satisfied through performance on the
piano proficiency exam
MV() Studio lessons; until degree requirements are met
MUN __ Ensemble(s), as required by specific degree program and/or scholarship
contract
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance, until degree requirements are met

Students who are not registered for everything that is required will receive a letter and/or
telephone call immediately after the last day of the ADD period, and will be advised to remedy
the problem. If the problem is not resolved within the time frame stipulated by the School
Director, the student will receive a letter indicating that the scholarship has been revoked.

3. Scholarship Probation

At the end of each term, the Undergraduate Academic Advisor will identify all
scholarship students who have not achieved a "B" or betterin music performance courses and a
"C" or better in music and academic courses, or who are not meeting any of the other terms of
their scholarship contract. These students will be placed on scholarship probation, and will be
so notified in writing by the School Director. Once placed on probation, the students' scholarship
will be revoked upon any further deficiencies.

4. Revoking A Scholarship

Students on scholarship probation who do not correct deficiencies during the following
semester of enrollment, or who are placed on scholarship probation for a second time, will have
their scholarship revoked, and will be so notified in writing by the School Director. Students
whose scholarship are revoked may submit an appeals to the Undergraduate Student Appeals
Committee, in accordance with department guidelines governing student appeals, if there are
extenuating circumstances that need to be considered. (See Appeals Process)

5. Application Forms

Music scholarship application forms and additional information may be obtained from the
Director of Music Admissions.

For information on financial aid available through University Bands, students should
apply directly to the Director of Bands, School of Music.

For School of Music work-study jobs apply to the School of Music.

Where need is a factor, the student should apply directly to the University of Florida
Office of Student Financial Aid, Criser Hall.

E. University Policies and the Music School

1. Policy on "Incomplete" Grades:

Only illness and real emergencies are valid reasons for Incomplete ("I") grades.
Complications which occur as a result of getting "I's" are:

a. The teacher concerned may be gone by the time the student is ready to make up


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the "I" .


b. In music courses, the student may not register for the next course in a sequence,
including performance study, until the "I" is removed.

c. "I" grades become punitive in regard to your grade-point-average after one
semester.

The student should plan in advance to get the "I's" removed before the end of the
drop/add period for the next semester. This is the only way the department will allow the
student to continue in a course sequence.

2. Grade Changes

By policy of the College of Fine Arts, after grades have been turned in,
grades are not changed except in the case of instructor error.

3. Gordon Rule (Communication Computation Requirement)

The State Board of Education requires completion of course work in communication and
computation prior to earning 60 credit hours. The requirement includes 12 semester hours of
coursework in which the student is required to demonstrate writing skills and six hours of
mathematics coursework at the level of college algebra or higher. Three (3) hours of the
mathematics requirement may be fulfilled by approved courses in Statistics or Computer and
Information Sciences.

Specific courses to meet the requirement are part of the authorized courses for General
Education. The mechanics are:

1. Students are reminded throughout their sophomore year that the requirement
must be completed. Music History (MUH 3211 & 3212) are both Gordon Rule
courses required in all music degree tracks.

2. If the student has not completed the requirement by the time he/she earns 60
hours, the student may petition the College of Fine Arts Petitions Committee to
continue one more term and complete the
requirements during that term.

Certain music courses have been approved as meeting the requirements of the Writing
and Math Requirement (Gordon Rule). Once this approval has occurred, the faculty member is
held responsible for seeing that students write a minimum of 6,000 words. Passing a Writing
and Math Requirement course means that the faculty member will be grading the student's work
not only on content but on format, grammar and spelling. Once the student completes the
requirements for the course, he/she automatically completes the Writing and Math
Requirement. The Registrar monitors and tabulates the number of courses a student has taken
which qualifies for inclusion as a Writing and Math Requirement course. See UF
Undergraduate catalog for further information.

4. Petitions Process


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School of Music Petitions Procedure

The following School of Music policies may be appealed at the School level when
extenuating circumstances warrant such a petition:

a. Recital Attendance Requirement

b. Enrollment in a course for the third time

c. Ensemble requirement attached to studio enrollment

School policies which are not appealable at the School of Music level include:

1. change of grades
2. change of degree requirements
3. waiver of pre-requisite courses or taking courses out of sequence

Students must provide a letter explaining the extenuating circumstances and submit it to the
Undergraduate Advisor for Appeals Committee review. Students will be notified by the UG
advisor once the committee makes the decision.

The College of Fine Arts Petitions procedure

1. Student picks up petition form from the Academic Advisor and completes the
top portion, returning the form to the Academic Advisor.

2. Academic Advisor completes the second part of the form (indicating
GPA, hours earned, SOM grade history) and forwards the form to the
chair of the Undergraduate Petitions Committee (UGPC).

3. The UGPC meets to make a decision on the petition and returns the form
indicating this decision to the Academic Advisor.

4. Academic Advisor will notify the student as to the outcome of
their petition.

All drops/withdrawals made after the published deadline must be petitioned through the
College of Fine Arts Petition Committee which meets weekly throughout the semester.
Students may pick up a College of Fine Arts Petition form from the Academic Advisor.

5. CLAST Examination

The State of Florida has developed a test of college-level communication and
computation skills. The test is called the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST). It is
designed to test the communication and computational skills that are judged by state university
and community college faculty to be generally associated with successful performance and
progression through the baccalaureate level. The rules of the test as required by Florida
statues are:

The CLAST is administered three times a year (paper/pen version) to university students
as well as to community college students who are completing either Associate of Arts degree


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programs or Associate of Science degree programs and are seeking admission to upper
division programs in state universities in Florida. Students who do not satisfactorily complete
the test will not be awarded the Associate of Arts nor will they be admitted to upper division
status in state universities in Florida. Current UF student may take a computerized version of
the test every 30 days until all parts are completed (fee applies, check 1012 Turlington Hall for
registration) after taking it paper/pen at least once. The CLAST requirements also apply to
students transferring to state universities in Florida from private colleges in Florida and from out-
of-state colleges. Students must satisfactorily complete the CLAST before they will be accepted
into the College of Fine Arts. MUSIC EDUCATION MAJORS MUST TAKE AND PASS ALL
SECTIONS OF THE CLAST TEST, NO EXEMPTIONS ARE ACCEPTED.

6. Course Exemptions

A student may be exempted from taking a music course whenever the student indicates
by examination or audition that he/she has mastered the content of the course.

Appropriate examinations and procedures are established and administered by the
appropriate faculty members) on a "case-by-case" basis. To initiate the process of course
exemption see the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

Courses most likely to be exempted by students are Piano Skills, Instrumental Skills,
and Voice Skills. However, exemptions are not limited to these courses.

F. Graduating with Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors

Music majors will be considered for HONORS upon earning a minimum 3.4 academic
average. The average will be calculated on all work attempted while the student is classified
3FA and above.

To be recommended for HIGH or HIGHEST HONORS, in addition to earning a 3.75 academic
average on all work attempted whiled classified 3FA or above, a student in music education,
music history/literature, performance, theory/composition, or curriculum in combination with an
outside field is expected to successfully complete an independent creative or research project
under the guidance of a full-time faculty member in the School of Music. Based on the quality of
performance or project completed, as evaluated by the faculty member working with the
student, the area faculty may recommend the student to the School of Music faculty as a whole
for high or highest honors. Students in the music education curriculum must complete this
project prior to Student Teaching. It is required that students enroll under a Projects and
Problems course.
Please see the Undergraduate Academic Advisor and University Catalog for further
information.

G. Music School Facilities

1. Classrooms

Classrooms are used primarily for general instructional purposes. However, classrooms
may also be available as rehearsal space for small ensembles and for special functions
associated with the School of Music. To request the use of a classroom students must fill out
an Application for Room Reservation and have the application signed by their studio teacher.


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The signed application is then submitted to the main office for approval. Students are not
permitted to use classrooms for special purposes without school approval. Once approved, the
students are expected to adhere to the following department guidelines for classroom use:

-All rooms have a normal set-up which is posted in each classroom. Rooms
should be restored to the posted condition immediately following each rehearsal
or class period.

-Students are expected to lock all doors, including the A/V cabinet, and turn off
the lights when leaving.

-Any problems with the rooms, such as burned out lights, damaged furniture,
broken A/V equipment, or custodial problems, should be reported to the main
office by completing an Incident Report Form. The forms are located next to the
faculty mailboxes in the main office.

2. Computer Lab

The computer lab is located in room 147. Lab hours are posted on the door and vary each
semester. Students are encouraged to use the lab for electronic music courses, theory tutorials,
hypercard programming and computer assisted instructional programs. CD-ROM materials are available
for use in music history/literature courses.

3. Electronic Keyboard Lab

The Electronic Keyboard Lab is located in room 143 and consists of 16 keyboards linked
by a master control center. The control center allows for group instruction, individual instruction,
and duet and ensemble instruction. There are also several other keyboards available for
individual practice. Because of the sensitive nature of electronic equipment the following rules
apply:

1. NO FOOD OR DRINKS in the lab.
2. No smoking.
3. Keep texts either on the music rack or on the floor under the piano.
Please do not use the pianos as desks!
4. No instruments are to be moved for any reason.
5. Come to class with clean hands.
6. Do not abuse the headsets; they are fragile.
7. At the end of class, place the headset on top of the piano.
8. Please DO NOT CLOSE LIDS ON KEYBOARD.

4. Practice Room Keys/Rooms

Practice rooms are available for use by students who are enrolled in studio or one of the
primary ensembles. Eligible students may sign up for two hours of practice per day (three for
students in Piano Studio). Practice room assignments and schedules will be handled in room
103 during the second week of each semester. Students are encouraged to come early
because room assignments are allocated on a "first-come-first-served" basis. Students
assigned to a practice room have the right to ask someone to leave the room during the
assigned student's scheduled practice time. This right is forfeited if the student arrives more
than ten minutes late.


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Proof of registration and a UF ID will be required to receive a practice room key. Students will
be required to sign for the key. If the key is lost, the student will be expected to pay for a
replacement key. If the key is lost a second time the student will be denied further use of the
practice rooms.

The following rules apply to practice room use:

1. Food and drinks are not permitted in the practice rooms.
2. Smoking is not permitted in the practice rooms.
3. Practice room keys are not to be shared. DO NOT unlock practice rooms
for other people.
4. Doors MUST be locked when leaving.
5. Students must vacate the room if the assigned occupant arrives on time.
6. Keys are to be returned at any time a student is not actually enrolled in classes.
This includes summer breaks, graduation, or withdrawal from the School of
Music or University for any reason.
7. Keys will be due back regardless of enrollment at the end of the spring semester
NO LATER than the Wednesday of exam week.

Practice Room assignments are as follows:

Piano 334, 336, 342, 344, 348
String/Voice 321, 325, 329, 331, 333, 335, 341
Brass/Woodwind 310, 312, 314, 316, 320, 324, 330
Organ 337, 338
Percussion 315, 317, 319

Students enrolled in other music courses, but who are not registered for studio, may
practice in Room 318.


5. University Owned Instruments and Equipment

Instruments and equipment are available to students registered in skills classes and
music ensembles. Proof of registration and a UF ID will be required to check out any UF
property. Students will be required to sign for the property and will be responsible for the
property while in their care. The student will be expected to pay for any loss or damage to the
property which may occur while in the student's possession.

All UF property issued to students must be returned the Wednesday of exam week each
semester. Failure to do so will result in the student's records being flagged.

H. Music Library

1. General

The Music Library is located on the second floor of the Music Building, Room 231. It has
an area of approximately 6,400 square feet with reader seating for 50 and listening stations for
32. The hours for the library are posted on the Music Library door and are available online
through the home page at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu .
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The Music Library is operated as a branch within the George A. Smathers Library
System. The staff consists of one full-time librarian, two technical assistants, and student
workers. The Library Committee for the School of Music serves as liaison between the
department and the Smathers Libraries.

There are more than 35,000 cataloged titles including books, scores, collected works of
composers, song books in series, and periodicals. In addition, there are sound recordings,
including compact discs, laser discs, LPs, cassettes, and videos. The collection of sound
recordings is non-circulating. Inquire at the circulation desk if items are needed for in-class
presentations.

2. Overdue Consequences

There are penalties, including fines and loss of borrowing privileges, for overdue
materials. Please see the George A. Smathers Libraries circulation information handout for
details.

3. Duplication of Materials

There is a commercial photocopier for patron use. It is a card/coin-operated machine.
Copy cards may be purchased at the following libraries: Architecture and Fine Arts, West,
Marston Science, and Education.

Please note that there is no recording equipment available in the Music Library.
LIBRARY PATRONS ARE EXPECTED TO SUPPORT THE COPYRIGHT LAW BY
REFRAINING FROM ANY KIND OF VISUAL OR AURAL COPYING WHICH VIOLATES ITS
TENANTS.

I. School of Music Special Events

1. Friday Afternoons
The School of Music provides a diverse array of musical events on Friday Afternoons
from 12:50-1:40 p.m. Students can count their attendance at these events toward the MUS
1010 Recital Credit requirement.

Each semester the following types of programs are scheduled:

-student recitals (about 6)
-student orientation(s) and/or an awards assembly
-a special event sponsored by each of the areas
(theory, musicology and music education)
-special presentations by visiting artists

The schedule of events that count toward Recital Attendance is published each semester.
Friday afternoons are included in this schedule.

2. President's Visiting Artist Series

With funding from the Office of the President, this program brings composers, scholars,
and performers to campus to meet with students in master classes, lectures and seminars.


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


SECTION V
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

A. School and College Leadership Groups

1. School of Music Student Advisory Committee

The Student Advisory Committee meets once a month with the School of Music Director.
The group serves as a forum for communication with the Director on matters related to students.
The Director communicates student concerns to faculty as appropriate. In the past, the group
has made recommendations concerning the revision of the student handbook. Their input has
also led to some important changes in the way student recitals are scheduled.

Four members of the Student Advisory Committee, one from each level (freshman,
sophomore, junior, senior), are elected by their peers. The election takes place in the freshman
year. The elected representative continues to serve until they graduate, provided they are
willing and that they are serving their constituency in a satisfactory manner. An additional three
undergraduates are appointed, one from each major ensemble.

2. Fine Arts College Council

A description of the Fine Arts College Council (FACC) is found on p. 141 of the
University of Florida Undergraduate Catalog (1997-98), under Student Organizations. The
Preamble from the Constitution and the objectives of the group are as follows:

Preamble from the Constitution

We, the members of the Fine Arts College Council, recognizing the rich academic
diversity latent in our College, and further realizing that a formal, democratic, and multi-
disciplinary association of concerned students may be a creative means of comprehending and
contributing to both our growth as effective persons and to the growth of the College, do hereby
design and adopt the following constitution.

OBJECTIVES

To encourage and promote fellowship, cooperation, and solidarity between
students of the College of Fine Arts, hereinafter referred to as CFA.
To collectively represent the students of CFA in all matters relative to the
curriculum, the faculty, and the administration of the CFA.
To collectively represent the students of the CFA to other campus organizations,
their agents and the community.
To encourage, originate and implement projects and processes of interest and
value to the students of the CFA.

The faculty and administration of the School of Music encourage music students to
participate in the Fine Arts College Council. The projects supported by the FACC are funded by
Student Government. Funding is based on the number of majors in the CFA. Meeting times are
posted in the music building. The FACC normally meets in the Dean's Conference Room 101
FAA. All interested students are invited to attend. Officers are usually elected in April from
those who consistently participate. There is an attempt to support projects for non-funded


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groups. The Council strives to allocate resources fairly between the departments of Art, Music
and Theater. Some of the past projects have included support of a Speaker's Bureau,
Renaissance Ensemble, Script Library, Phi Mu Alpha, Jazz Combo, Chamber Singers, and
equipment needs for the School of Art.

Other events and activities sponsored by the Fine Arts College Council are Brown-bag
lunches with the Deans, Teacher of the Year Awards for each department, Student of the Year
Award for each department, Inter-school lecture/performance series, Fine Arts College Awards
Convocation, Resume and Career Opportunity Workshops, UF Homecoming Exhibits and
Performances, Gator Expo Exhibits, as well as others.
Copies of the complete FACC constitution are available in the Fine Arts College office,
101 FAA.

B. Student Music Organizations

1. American Guild of Organists--Guild Student Group

Students may become members of the Gainesville Chapter of the American Guild of
Organists and be an active part of the world's largest professional association serving the organ
and choral music fields. University student members meet weekly for studio class at the
magnificent Anderson Memorial Organ in the University Auditorium, and often participate in the
Young Artist Playing Competitions sponsored by the Guild. Whether active as performers or
simply as enthusiastic listeners, AGO members throughout the country give freely of their time,
talent and resources to further the cause of excellence in the art of the organ and of choral
singing. With their biennial national conventions with regional meetings in alternate years, their
extensive local chapter programming, and especially their international magazine The
American Organist, the activities of the AGO combine to form an extensive professional
network of information and support for those who love the music of the King of Instruments.

2. Collegiate Music Educators National Conference--
University of Florida Student Chapter

The Florida Collegiate Music Educator's National Conference (FCMEA) is open to all
students interested in music education. Music teachers in the area are often invited to speak at
special events planned by the local CMENC Chapter.

Dues in the organization include a subscription to the Music Educators Journal and
Teaching Music. Each year the local chapter sponsors fund-raisers that enable members to
attend the Florida Music Educators Association (FMEA) state meeting in

Tampa and the Music Education National Conference (MENC) meetings at a reduced rate.
Active involvement in CMENC helps students develop a professional network with music
teachers in Florida and across the nation. Students who become active in the state chapter
have the opportunity to develop friendships with other students preparing to become music
teachers. The president of the State Chapter serves on the FMEA Executive Board.




3. Kappa Kappa Psi, Alpha Eta Chapter--
Honorary Fraternity for Bandsmen


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


Kappa Kappa Psi is a honorary fraternity committed to providing service to the University
Band Program. The brotherhood consists of about thirty students with diverse cultural
backgrounds, academic disciplines, and campus involvement. The fraternity stresses a high
commitment to academic performance and fraternity involvement, and have thus been honored
as one of the Top Ten Chapters in the nation.

As a student becomes more involved in the fraternity, he will acquire skills of service,
communication, and leadership that will prove invaluable well past graduation. In addition, he
may gain numerous friends and mentors to last a lifetime.

4. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Eta Omega Chapter--
Professional Honorary Music Fraternity

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is the nations' largest professional music fraternity. It is a group
comprised of men who are interested in the composition, performance, research, and teaching
of the best in music. Phi Mu Alpha was formed in 1898 at the New England Conservatory of
Music and has grown to span the Nation. The national fraternity has included distinguished
musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Count Basie, and Aaron Copland. The chapter at the
University of Florida was formed in 1958 and has been an active force in the School of Music
ever since. This chapter has initiated many of the male faculty of the University as honorary
members, and enjoys the association of many other members of the faculty who were
themselves initiated in college. In November 1994, the UF chapter initiated President John
Lombardi as an honorary member.

If you have a love of music in any form -- if you can get into Mahler, swing with Ellington,
rock with Primus, groove with Coolio -- we of Phi Mu Alpha would love to meet you and
welcome you into our brotherhood of musicians.

5. Sigma Alpha lota, Delta Gamma Chapter--
Honorary Professional Fraternity for Women

Sigma Alpha lota is an international music fraternity for women whose goal is to promote
the highest standards of musical training and achievement among women musicians, and to
further musical interest nationally and internationally. The fraternity also aims to aid, inspire,
and direct its membersin musicianship, citizenship, and friendly and unselfish sisterhood. Sigma
Alpha lota encourages and strives for the best in music performance, scholarship, and
creativity.

The Delta Gamma chapter of Sigma Alpha lota was founded in 1962, and is open to
music majors and non-majors. Requirements for eligibility include some form of college credit
or a 2.5 GPA from the previous semester, and credit or current enrollment in at least one hour of
music at the University of Florida. All prospective pledges are encouraged to attend rush
functions which occur bi-annually at the beginning of every Fall and Spring Semester.




6. Society of Pi Kappa Lambda, Gamma Zeta Chapter--
National Music Honor Society


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The Society of Pi Kappa Lambda is a national music honor society. Membership is
based on high academic achievement and excellence in musicianship. Juniors, seniors, and
graduate students are eligible for consideration. Nominees are chosen by a Faculty Committee
of Pi Kappa Lambda members.

7. Society of Student Composers

The Society of Composers Student Chapter at the University of Florida was founded in
1992. The national parent organization, Society of Composers, has among its members many
of the finest composers of the present day. Student members have the opportunity to attend
regional and national conferences and interact with composers of all styles and ages. The UF
Chapter meets monthly to discuss all types of contemporary music and other matters of interest
and relevance to its members. In addition, the student chapter presents a concert of members'
works at the end of each Spring Semester.

8. Tau Beta Sigma, Beta Xi Chapter--
Honorary Sorority for Band Women

Tau Beta Sigma is a National Honorary Sorority for college bandswomen. Our sisters
work hard planning service projects, concert receptions, and social events, which help promote
and serve the band in a variety of ways. In this diverse sisterhood, one can find future
journalists, economists, teachers, and doctors, that work together to promote two things--
sisterhood and music.

Sisters share many good times and memories while serving the band and strengthening
our sisterhood. In order to meet new students and share our organization we host many
different rush functions during pre-season and the first weeks of school. Regardless of your field
of study, you can find someone who shares your interests.

C. PARTNERSHIPS WITH MUSIC Student Organization Constitution

Article I- Purpose Statement- The purpose of this student organization is to promote music
events, to promote integration of music with other disciplines, and to serve as a link between
community arts organizations and the University of Florida Student Body. Music is defined as
traditional and avant-garde art music, jazz, and ethic (folk) styles. Quality, educational value,
and UF student involvement will be the criteria in planning our activities. This organization is
intended to assist other existing fine arts organizations and provide an opportunity for UF
students to discuss music.

Article II- Membership- Membership in this student organization is free and open to all
interested UF students. Any student who attends a meeting shall have full voting rights on
event planning. All UF students are eligible to participate in organization events. All UF faculty,
staff, and student spouses are eligible for associate membership in which they can participate in
all events but cannot vote or hold office.

Article III- Nondiscrimination Statement- In all of its activities, Partnerships With Music will
not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age, national origin, disability, or sexual
orientation.

Article IV- Meetings- There shall be monthly meetings during the fall and spring semesters.
Meetings can be more or less frequent if authorized by a simple majority of the members.


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There must be at least two meetings during a semester. Partnerships With Music can be
inactive during the summer semesters if approved by a simple majority of the members.

Article V- Finance- There is no cost to participate in this student organization.

Article VI- Officers.- The officers of the organization are the President, Vice President,
Secretary/Treasurer and Faculty Advisor. These officers shall make up the executive council
which may assume any duty prescribed in the by-laws.

Section 1.- President.- The President shall be the chief executive officer of the
organization. The President shall chair all meetings, act as liaison between the organization
and related community organizations, act as liaison between the organization and University
faculty, and carry out the directives of the organization membership.

Section 2.- Vice President- The President shall assist the President in all executive
matters and shall carry out any duty assigned by the President. The Vice President shall
assume the Presidency in the absence of the President.

Section 3.- Secretary/Treasurer.- The Secretary/Treasurer shall keep minutes of all
organization meetings and shall tend to all correspondence of the organization on the directive
of the President. The Secretary/Treasurer shall also serve as the liaison between the
organization and the Fine Arts College Council and keep an accurate balance of all organization
funds. The position may be split into Secretary and Treasurer in the future upon the
authorization of the executive council.

Section 4.- Faculty Advisor.- The Faculty Advisor will be a part of the executive council
and serves to guide the officers. The advisor cannot vote but does have the power to make
formal recommendations. The Advisor has the right to deactivate this student organization if it
is in violation of this constitution.

ARTICLE VII Elections.- Officers and Faculty Advisor shall be elected in April of each year by
the electors of the organization and shall serve a term of one year. Any student who has
attended more than one meeting per semester shall be considered an elector.

Section 1 Officers.- The officers shall be elected in April of each year by the electors
of the organization and shall serve for a term of one year. In the case of vacancies, the chair
shall announce the vacancy and shall carry out a replacement election at the next meeting. Any
student who has attended more than one meeting per semester shall be eligible to run for office.

Section 2 Faculty Advisor.- The Faculty Advisor shall be selected from the School of
Music Faculty. The one-year term can be renewed. Any member can nominate a faculty
member but approval is subject to a two-thirds vote by the general membership.

ARTICLE VIII Committees.- The officers may create committees as needed to carry out
business with the approval of the general membership.

ARTICLE IX Statement of Rules.- This organization will adhere to the Student Guide and
other laws, rules, and regulations which govern the University of Florida, and its students.
Hazing, as defined by Florida law and the University of Florida, is prohibited.


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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


ARTICLE X By-laws.- This organization may adopt or amend by-laws based on a simple
majority vote of the membership.

ARTICLE XI Amendments.- Any member may propose an amendment which will be
discussed in an officers' meeting with the Faculty Advisor present. Presentation and
recommendation will be made at the next general meeting with a two-thirds vote needed for
approval.







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Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


SECTION VI:
BUILDING MAPS







The School of Music


Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10


SECTION VII:
BE YOUR OWN ADVISOR***

***Please see your academic advisor for the most recently updated music
curriculum degree outlines.








The School of Music


Undergraduate Student Handbook 2009-10




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