Group Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Title: Tapir conservation
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Title: Tapir conservation the newsletter of the IUCNSSC Tapir Specialist Group
Uniform Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Abbreviated Title: Tapir conserv. (Print)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Publisher: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Place of Publication: Houston TX
Houston TX
Publication Date: June 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiannual
regular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
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Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1990.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 12, no. 2 (Dec. 2003); title from cover.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00095885
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 56897961
lccn - 2004215875
issn - 1813-2286

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ISSN 1813-2286
Volume 17/1 U No. 23
June 2008


TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP


Tapir Conservation


www.tapirs.org


., Four t h nirp
rr'~ Udr A r '~aDIv






2 THE NEWSLETTER OF THE IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP



TAPI SPCALS GRU STUCUR


Chair
Patrfcia Medici, Brazil

Steering Committee
Alan Shoemaker, United States
Alberto Mendoza, Mexico/United States
Anders Gongalves da Silva, Canada
Bengt Hoist, Denmark
Carl Traeholt, Denmark/Malaysia
Diego Lizcano, Colombia
Gilia Angell, United States
Jeffrey Flocken, United States
Kelly Russo, United States
Mathias Tobler, Switzerland/Peru
Michael Dee, United States
Olga Montenegro, Colombia
Rick Schwartz, United States
Viviana Quse,Argentina

Baird's Tapir Coordinator
Manolo Garcia, Guatemala

Lowland Tapir Coordinator
Viviana Beatriz Quse,Argentina

Malayan Tapir Coordinator
Carl Traeholt, Denmark/Malaysia


Mountain Tapir Coordinator
Diego J. Lizcano, Colombia


Red List Authority
Red List Focal Point: Alan H. Shoemaker, United States
TSG Species Coordinators /TSG Country Coordinators

Tapir Conservation Newsletter Editors
Contributions Editor English: Michael Dee, United States
Contributions Editor Spanish: Diego J. Lizcano, Colombia
Layout & Distribution Editors: Stefan Seitz, Germany /
Kelly J. Russo, United States

Virtual Library Manager
Mathias Tobler, United States/Peru

Fundraising Committee Coordinator
Patrfcia Medici, Brazil

Action Planning Committee Coordinator
(National Action Plans)
Patr'cia Medici, Brazil /TSG Country Coordinators

Action Plan Implementation Taskforce
Coordinator: Patr'cia Medici, Brazil
Focal Point(s) Lowland Tapir: Olga Montenegro, Juliana
Rodriguez, Benoit de Thoisy
Focal Point(s) Baird's Tapir: Kendra Bauer
Focal Point(s) Mountain Tapir: Carlos Pedraza


Focal Point(s) Malayan Tapir:
Carl Traeholt, Zainal Zahari Zainuddin
Focal Point(s) Ex-Situ Conservation:
Viviana Quse (Lowland Tapir), Nanda Kumaren (Malayan Tapir),
Alberto Mendoza (Baird's Tapir)
Focal Point(s) Marketing & Education: Kelly Russo

Zoo Committee Coordinator
Viviana Beatriz Quse,Argentina

Veterinary Committee Coordinator
Javier Adolfo Sarria Perea, Colombia/Brazil

Genetics Committee Coordinators
Anders Gongalves da Silva, Canada / Cristina Luis, Portugal

Marketing & Education Committee Coordinators
Gilia Angell, United States / Kelly J. Russo, United States

Webmaster
Gilia Angell, United States

Re-Introduction & Translocation Advisory
Committee Coordinators
Patricia Medici, Brazil

Ethics Committee


Country Coordinators
South America
Argentina: Silvia Chalukian
Bolivia: Guido Ayala
Brazil: Patr'cia Medici
Colombia: Olga Montenegro, Juliana Rodriguez
Ecuador: Leonardo Ord6hez Delgado, Fernando Nogales
Guiana Shield (French Guyana, Guiana and Suriname):
Benoit de Thoisy
Paraguay: Jose Luis Cartes
Peru: Mathias Tobler
Venezuela: We are in the process of identifying a coordinator.
Central America
Belize: We are in the process of identifying a coordinator.
Costa Rica: Fabricio Carbonell Torres
Guatemala:Jose Roberto Ruiz Fuamagalli
Honduras: Nereyda Estrada Andino
Mexico: Epigmenio Cruz Aldin
Nicaragua: We are in the process of identifying a coordinator.
Panama: We are in the process of identifying a coordinator.

Southeast Asia
Indonesia: Wilson Novarino
Malaysia: Zainal Zahari Zainuddin
Myanmar: Antony Lynam
Thailand: We are in the process of identifying a coordinator.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008


Evolution Consultant
Matthew Colbert, United States






FROM THE CHAIR 3


would like to start this Letter from the Chair by
mentioning how very, very proud I am of the Tapir
Specialist Group! Earlier this year we all got toge-
ther once again for the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium held in Parque XCARET in Quintana
Roo, Mexico, from April 26th to May 1st. During the
conference, we had the chance to look back and eva-
luate what we have done since the Third Symposium
in Argentina in 2006 and it was absolutely amazing to
realize how much we have accomplished as a group! It
is truly incredible and reflects our group's continuous
commitment to the conservation of the four tapir spe-
cies and their habitat.
The Fourth International Tapir Symposium was
another extremely successful event of the Tapir
Specialist Group, another landmark in our history,
and most of this issue of Tapir Conservation will be
dedicated to providing information generated during
the conference. In this issue you will find a detailed
report and pictures of the conference as well as
reports from all our TSG Committees, Taskforces, and
Working Groups.


On behalf of the main organizers of the Fourth
International Tapir Symposium, including the
Tapir Specialist Group, Parque XCARET in Mexico,
Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG), and European Association of
Zoos & Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group
(TAG), I would like to thank all participants and all
organizations that provided institutional and/or finan-
cial support for the conference.
We had 90 participants, including tapir conservati-
onists from 22 countries worldwide (Argentina, Belize,
Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark,
Ecuador, France, French Guiana, Guatemala,
Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Portugal,
Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and
United States). The conference had the financial and/
or institutional support from over 90 conservation
organizations worldwide, mostly tapir holding zoo-
logical institutions in North America, Europe, Latin
America and Asia. We could not be more grateful for
their contributions and, most importantly, their confi-
dence in the importance of this meeting.
During the entire process of the organization of
this conference, we had the full support from our
major partner on this challenge, the Parque XCARET
in Mexico, and the Tapir Specialist Group will always
remain thankful for this. On behalf of the entire TSG
membership and all symposium participants, I would
like to thank the entire XCARET staff, especially Efrain
Rios Castillo, for all their assistance in making the
conference happen. Also, I would like to thank our
TSG member Alberto Mendoza who was a major part
of our symposium planning committee and who went
out of his way to make this conference happen! This
conference would not have happened without Alberto's
energy and hard work.
A more detailed report about the Fourth
International Tapir Symposium, including a complete
list of all our supporters is included on this issue.
As always, the last session of the conference was
the TSG Strategic Planning Workshop. The main
goal of this session was to evaluate what the TSG has
accomplished over the past two years since the Fourth
Symposium in Argentina and develop a new strategic
plan for the group. Dr. Bengt Hoist, an active member
of the Tapir Specialist Group and Convener of the
European Network of the IUCN/SSC Conservation
Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), and myself
(as a facilitator of the Brazilian Network of CBSG)
facilitated the workshop. During this session, we split
the participants in topic-based working groups and
guided them through the process of thinking about and
discussing the TSG's future challenges and demands,
as well as setting short-term goals and actions for the
next three (3) years in order to be more effective in
terms of tapir conservation worldwide. I say three


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






4 FROM THE CHAIR


Baird's tapir exhibit at Parque XCARET, Mexico.


years because during the conference in Mexico we
decided that from now on the Tapir Symposium will be
held every three years instead of two, which will give us
more time to establish tapir research and conservation
initiatives, and produce tapir conservation knowledge.
Additionally, holding the conference every three years
will give our donors more time in between events.
The final outcome of the TSG Strategic Planning
Workshop held in Mexico was a list of twenty-two (22)
priority goals and sixty-one (61) specific actions that
the TSG will put into practice over the next three years
(2008-2010) in order to reach the goals between now
and the Fifth International Tapir Symposium to be
held in 2011. The final version of the TSG Strategic
Plan 2008-2010 will be made available online on the
TSG Website very soon and I would like to ask all
TSG members and symposium participants to please
review the document and let me know if you have any
questions, comments, suggestions, criticisms etc. This
document is extremely important for the TSG and will
guide our work over the next three years. We need
our entire membership to be familiar with our priority
goals and actions as a group. Additionally, I would
like to invite all of you to please get involved with our
activities, committees, taskforces and working groups,
and contribute as much as you can. Most importantly,
each of the 61 actions is attached to the name of a
person responsible for completing it and we do expect
that those named will step up to the task.

During the conference in Mexico we made several
changes to the TSG Membership. A few members
were removed from the group, mostly because of lack
of participation in the group's activities, and new
members were added. We now have 121 members,
including field researchers, educators, veterinarians,
governmental agencies and NGO representatives, zoo
personnel, university professors and students, from
27 different countries worldwide: Argentina, Australia,


Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Denmark, Ecuador, France, French Guiana, Germany,
Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico,
Myanmar, Republic of Panama, Paraguay, Peru,
Thailand, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, United
States, and Venezuela.
Additionally, we made several necessary changes in
our TSG Structure:
* We have a new Species Coordinator for Baird's
Tapir, Manolo Garcia from Guatemala.
* We have new Editors for the Tapir Conservation
newsletter: Michael Dee from the United States
for English contributions and Diego Lizcano from
Colombia for Spanish contributions. Kelly Russo
from the Houston Zoo in the United States and
Stefan Seitz from Germany will continue as our
Layout and Distribution Editors. Additionally,
we put together a new Editorial Board for Tapir
Conservation, which is now formed by Patricia
Medici (Brazil), Mathias Tobler (Switzerland/
Peru), Anders Goncalves da Silva (Canada), Alan
Shoemaker (USA), Matthew Colbert (USA), Carl
Traeholt (Denmark/Malaysia), Budhan Pukazhenthi
(USA), and Benoit de Thoisy (France/French
Guiana).
* We have officially established our TSG Action Plan
Implementation Taskforce, with different Focal
Points for different tapir species and some specific
relevant issues. More details about this taskforce
can be found in a TSG report included in this
issue.
* Our Marketing and Education Committees,
previously coordinated by Gilia Angell and Kelly
Russo respectively, have been merged. From now
on, Gilia and Kelly will co-coordinate a new com-
mittee called Marketing and Education Committee.
* We reviewed the coordination and membership of
all our different committees, taskforces, working
groups etc. Each coordinator was requested to
re-structure his/her committee and make sure to
communicate effectively with the members. Each
coordinator was requested to provide a report for
this issue of Tapir Conservation.
* We reviewed TSG Country Coordination. We con-
tacted all of our Country Coordinators in order to
assess their interest to continue in their positions
and to explain that we need their active participa-
tion if we want to successfully implement our new
Strategic Plan. Most of the Country Coordinators
reaffirmed their interest to continue their work,
help the TSG implement the Strategic Plan and
develop National Action Plans for their countries
(which was the original goal when we created the
Country Coordinator position). However, some
Country Coordinators resigned due to busy sche-
dules and lack of time to dedicate to the TSG.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






FROM THE CHAIR 5


As a consequence, we are currently searching
for Country Coordinators for Venezuela, Belize,
Nicaragua, Panama and Thailand.
* Now that our Tapir Re-Introduction and
Translocation Taskforce has finalized its main goal
of developing and publishing the TSG Guidelines
for Tapir Re-Introduction and Translocation, it has
turned into an Advisory Committee to assist any
researchers and organizations planning on estab-
lishing re-introduction and/or translocation pro-
grams. I will be coordinating the Re-Introduction
and Translocation Advisory Committee. More
details about the activities of this advisory commit-
tee can be found in a TSG report included in this
issue.
* As I mentioned before, from now on we will hold
the International Tapir Symposium every three (3)
years instead of two. Therefore, we decided to put
together a TSG Steering Committee formed by key,
active TSG members that could meet once or twice
during the 3-year intervals in between conferences
in order to carry out mid-term assessments of the
implementation of the TSG Strategic Plan. We dis-
cussed this idea and selected 14 TSG members
representing a core group including all species and
themes such as in-situ/ex-situ conservation, NGOs,
universities, different TSG committees/taskforces/
working groups etc. (genetics, zoo, veterinary,
newsletter, marketing/education, re-introduction/
translocation, red listing, virtual library etc.),
some species coordinators, some country coordi-
nators, AZA and EAZA Tapir TAG members, Latin
America, Europe, USA, Southeast Asia etc. The
members of the TSG Steering Committee are: Alan
Shoemaker (USA), Alberto Mendoza (Mexico/USA),
Anders Goncalves da Silva (Canada), Bengt Hoist
(Denmark), Carl Traeholt (Denmark/Malaysia),
Diego Lizcano (Colombia), Gilia Angell (USA),
Jeffrey Flocken (USA), Kelly Russo (USA), Mathias
Tobler (Switzerland/Peru), Michael Dee (USA), Olga
Montenegro (Colombia), Rick Schwartz (USA), and
Viviana Quse (Argentina). We strongly believe that
this is something that will help us be more efficient
in terms of monitoring the implementation of our
Species Action Plans and TSG Strategic Plan. And
last but not least, it will take some of the TSG
responsibilities off my shoulders, giving our mem-
bership a lot more freedom to make decisions and
take the lead on different TSG initiatives!!!

The updated versions of both our TSG Membership
and TSG Structure directories are included in this
issue. Please review your name, title, job positions,
and contact information please let us know if these
must be updated. The directories of members of all
different committees, taskforces, working groups,


species coordinators, country coordinators etc. have
been made available online on the TSG Website.
On a final note, I would like to announce that the
Fifth International Tapir Symposium will be held in
Malaysia, most probably in Kuala Lumpur, in April
2011. We decided it is about time to bring our tapir
conference to Southeast Asia! Our TSG Coordinator
for Malayan Tapirs, Dr. Carl Traeholt, and our TSG
Country Coordinator for Malaysia, Zainal Zainuddin,
both based in Malaysia, have already started the pro-
cess of identifying a venue for the event as well as
potential local partners.
We hope to see all of you in Malaysia in 2011!!!
All the best from Brazil!


Patricia Medici
M.Sc. Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Brazil Regional Network
Rua Tiradentes, 759, Centro, Corumba CEP: 79302-050,
Mato Grosso do Sul, BRAZIL
Phone & FAX: +55-67-3232-5842
Cell Phone: +55-18-8119-3839; +55-67-9965-6960
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br


TSG Strategic Planning Workshop held during
Fourth International Tapir Symposium at Parque
XCARET, Mexico, from April 26th to May I st, 2008.
Credits: Tim Stahl


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008





6 TSG NEWS


TSG
NEWS


. 50,000


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008


Y' :. I I I











May, 2008: Patricia Medici received the Whitley
Award from the VvThitley Fund for Nature in the United 1 -3 r.
Kingdom, a top environmental leadership honor,
which was presented to her by Princess Anne. See
press release below. For further information about
the Whitley Award and the VvThitley FYind for Nature
please visit: www.whitleyaward.org




WhitleyAward
Princess Gives Top Nature Award to
Tapir-Led Initiative by Brazilian Biologist

LONDON, UK: 21 MAY 2008 HRH The Princess Royal Speaking before the results were announcedWFN's foun-
(Princess Anne) tonight presented one of the world's top envi- der, Edward Whitley, said:
ronmental awards aWhitleyAward to Dr Patricia Medici, of "The aim of the WhitleyAwards is to find and support the
Brazil, for a project that uses tapirs as ambassadors for grass- environmental leaders who are helping to build a future where
roots nature conservation. nature and people co-exist in a way that benefits both. Once
Dr. Medici, 35, a founder member of the Brazilian con- again, this year's finalists have risen to the challenge.They have
reservation organization, IPE, was one of I I people honored at impressed and heartened us by telling us their conservation
the ceremony, held at the Royal Geographical Society, London, success stories, and by showing what can be achieved when
by The Whitley Fund for Nature (WFN) the UK-based vision, passion, intelligence and determination are brought to
charity which administers the international awards program. bear. An added bonus is that they give us hope.The example
Dr Medici's prize includes a Whitley Award project grant of set by people like Patricia Medici is an inspiration for us all."
L30,000, donated by The Friends of WFN plus long-term sup- The awards ceremony was co-hosted by BBC broadcaster
port and the opportunity to seek furtherWFN funding. Other Martha Kearney and held in front of a 350-strong audience
WhitleyAward winners came that included Sir
from Bangladesh, Borneo, David Attenborough,
Chile, China, Guatemala, Haiti, embassy representa-
India, Peru and Turkey. tives leading scientists
The Whitley Award to and celebrity conser-
Patricia Medici recognized ovation supporters.
her work in the Atlantic Edward Whitley
Forests of Brazil.There, she added: "As well as
is using lowland tapirs as providing our win-
ambassadors for conservati- N. ners with a substan-
on, introducing them to local tial financial prize, we
communities and so captu- also strive to support
ring interest and support for b \.100 them in wider ways
active habitat conservation for instance, by offe-
of benefit to many wildlife I ring them opportuni-
species. One of the project's ties to seek further
greatest achievements is funding in future years
its agro-forestry work with and by uniting them
landless communities. They with other donors
are creating forest corridors Credits: Whitley Fund for Nature, Patrfcia Medici and conservation
that link up fragmented wild- organizations. They
life habitats while also giving themselves an income by selling also become part of the Whitley Fund for Nature's network of
excess saplings. Plans are now in hand to roll-out the model to past finalists which, after 15 years, now takes in over 100 dyna-
other parts of Brazil, starting in the world's largest freshwater mic environmentalist in more than 50 countries, making it an
wetland, the Pantanal. invaluable source of experience, ideas and best practice."




Tapir Conservation 0 The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group m Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






8 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


T he main purpose of the International Tapir
Symposium is to bring together a multi-faceted
group of tapir experts and conservationists, including
field biologists and researchers, educators, husbandry
and captive management specialists, veterinarians,
government authorities and non-governmental
organization representatives, academicians, politicians,
and other key players in the development and
implementation of tapir conservation and management
programs. To this end, the conference is carried out in
such a way that participants are stimulated to conduct
overviews of current tapir research (in-situ and ex-
situ), conservation and management issues, thereby
generating the necessary information to promote action
planning in terms of priorities for tapir conservation in
Central and South America, and Southeast Asia.
Also, this conference aims to establish
conservation partnerships, and develop and maintain
a communication network of tapir conservationists
worldwide in order to facilitate the implementation of
conference recommendations and their evaluation in
future meetings.
The First International Tapir Symposium was held
in November 2001, in Costa Rica, and attracted 95
participants from 22 countries, proving to be a major
boost for tapir conservation. Never before had there
been so many tapir experts and conservationists,
key players in the development of tapir conservation
programs, assembled under one roof to share
knowledge and address the challenges ahead. The


Second Symposium was held in January 2004, in
Panama, and attracted 80 participants, including
tapir conservationists from 19 countries. Our Third
Symposium was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in
January, 2006, and 95 participants from 18 countries
worldwide attended.
The Fourth International Tapir Symposium
was held in Parque XCARET, State of Quintana
Roo, Mexico, from April 26t to May 1st, 2008, and
it was another extremely successful event for the
Tapir Specialist Group!!! We hosted a total of 90
participants, including tapir conservationists from 22
countries worldwide (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Canada,
Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, France,
French Guiana, Guatemala, Indonesia, Malaysia,
Mexico, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Singapore, Spain,
Switzerland, United Kingdom, and United States).
Approximately 40% of the Tapir Specialist Group
members attended the conference; therefore the group
was very well represented. Tapir experts from many
different backgrounds and institutional affiliations,
and who are carrying out a variety of research projects
all throughout the world had the opportunity to meet
each other in person, exchange ideas and experiences,
and establish partnerships.

The first part of the conference consisted of paper
and poster sessions covering a wide range of issues
relevant to tapir conservation, such as tapir ecology,
field research, population management, threat assess-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 9


ments, husbandry and captive management, veterinary
issues, genetics, implementation of action plans, habi-
tat evaluations, research methodologies, identification
of priority areas for tapir conservation, Geographical
Information Systems (GIS), environmental education
etc. Paper sessions were organized by topic and each
speaker had 15 minutes for their presentations and
5 minutes for questions. Presentations were made in
either English or Spanish and simultaneous translation
was available throughout the conference.
In total, 21 papers were presented: three in the
Tapir Captive and Reproductive Management Session,
four in the Tapir Genetics Session, 11 in the Tapir
Conservation Initiatives: Research, Management &
Education Session, and three in the Tapir Action
Planning and Identification of Priority Areas Session.
Twelve posters were exhibited throughout the con-
ference and presenters were on hand to discuss their
respective posters during the coffee breaks.
Three keynote speakers made presentations throug-
hout the conference. Dena Cator from the IUCN's
Species Programme in Switzerland was the first
keynote speaker of the conference and presented an
outline of the structure of the IUCN's Species Survival
Commission (SSC) and the Species Programme, exp-
laining how its staff and functioning can help to sup-
port and implement the important work of the SSC
Tapir Specialist Group as well as international con-
servation work on tapirs as a whole. Our second key-
note speaker, Jeffrey Flocken from the International
Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) in the United States
and also member of the TSG, made a very inspiring
presentation about how to become a tapir conservation
guru, guiding the audience through a whole series of
tips and advice about motivation, project planning
and organization, fundraising and networking. Rick
Schwartz, Director of the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere
in the United States, gave a presentation about the
Brazil Exhibit he is building and how he is planning to
link it to long-term in-situ conservation and education
for a variety of Brazilian biomes and species, including
lowland tapirs.
Another session conducted in the first part of the conference
was the TSG Reports Session. Viviana Quse, Coordinator of the
TSG Zoo Committee; Anders Goncalves da Silva and Cristina
Luis, Coordinators of the TSG Genetics Committee; Patricia
Medici, Coordinator of the TSG Re-Introduction and
Translocation Taskforce; Gilia Angell, Coordinator of
the TSG Marketing Committee, and TSG Webmaster;
Kelly Russo, Coordinator of the TSG Education &
Outreach Committee; Mathias Tobler, Manager of the
TSG Virtual Library; Alan Shoemaker, TSG's Red List
Focal Point; and Patricia Medici, Coordinator of the
TSG Fundraising Committee, gave reports about the
work of those committees, taskforces etc. during the
past two years.


Tapir Symposium Organizers: Bengt Holst,Alberto
Mendoza, Patricia Medici and participant Carl Traeholt.
Credit: Patricia Medici


ORGANIZERS

IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Parque XCARET, Mexico
Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
European Association of Zoos &Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)


INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark
European Association of Zoos &Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
Houston Zoo Inc., United States
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas
(Institute for Ecological Research), Brazil
IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG) -
Brazil & Europe
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Parque XCARET, Mexico



The second part of the conference was devoted to
round-tables and workshops addressing specific
topics relevant to the conservation of the four tapir
species and their remaining habitats in Central and
South America, and Southeast Asia: (1) Action Plan
Implementation, (2) Paleontology, (3) Permit Issues:
Regulations for In-Situ and Ex-Situ Conservation, and
(4) Tapir Population Modeling.
The Workshop on Action Plan Implementation was
organized by the TSG Action Plan Implementation
Taskforce and facilitated by Bengt Hoist, an active
member of the Tapir Specialist Group and Convener of


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






10 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


Keynote Dena Cator


Keynote Jeff Flocken


Paper Session Budhan Pukazhenthi


Paper Session CarlTraeholt
Paper Session Juliana Rodriguez



Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 11


Paper Session Diego Lizcano


Paper Session Kendra Bauer


Poster Session Cristian Gillet Argentina


Poster Session Agueda Bernal Colombia


Poster Session Mexican Participants


Round Table Permits Alberto Mendoza


Credits (all pictures): Patricia Medici,
Diego Lizcano,Tim Stahl, CarlTraeholt


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






12 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Apenheul Primate Park Nature Conservation Trust,Apeldoorn,
The Netherlands
Audubon Nature Institute, United States
BREC's Baton Rouge Zoo, United States
Bergen County Zoological Park, United States
Brevard Zoo, United States
Brights Zoo, United States
Bronx Zoo,Wildlife Conservation Society, United States
Chaffee Zoological Gardens of Fresno, United States
Cheyenne Mountain Zoological Park, United States
Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo Conservation Fund, United States
Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark
Dallas Zoo, United States
Denver Zoological Gardens, United States
Dutch Zoo Association's Conservation Fund, The Netherlands
El Paso Zoo, United States
Ellen Trout Zoo, United States
Evansville's Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden, United States
Houston Zoo Inc., United States
Howletts Wild Animal Park, United Kingdom
Jackson Zoological Park, United States
Lee Richardson Zoo, United States
Le6n Zoo, Mexico
Los Angeles Zoo, United States
Louisiana Purchase Gardens & Zoo, United States
Minnesota Zoo, United States
Nashville Zoo at Grassmere, United States
Odense Zoologiske Have, Denmark
Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, United Kingdom
Palm Beach Zoo at Dreher Park, United States
Parque XCARET, Mexico
Point Defiance, United States
Reid Park Zoo, United States
Rum Creek Preserve, United States
San Diego Zoo, United States
Santa Ana Zoo, United States
Sedgwick County Zoo, United States
Tokyo Zoo, Japan
TSG Conservation Fund (TSGCF)
Twycross Zoo, United Kingdom
Virginia Zoological Gardens, United States
White Oak Conservation Center, United States
Wildlife World Zoo Inc., United States
Woodland Park Zoo, United States
Zoo de La Palmyre, France
Zoo New England, United States
Zoo Nuremberg, Germany
Zoo Parc Overloon,The Netherlands
Zoologicka Garden & Chateau Zlin-Lesna, Czech Republic



the European Network of the IUCN/SSC Conservation
Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), and Patricia
Medici, Coordinator of the Taskforce and Convener of
the Brazilian Network of CBSG. A very detailed report
of this session is provided on the Report of the TSG
Action Plan Implementation Taskforce included in this
issue.


The Workshop on Paleontology was organized
and moderated by Dr. Matthew Colbert from the
University of Texas at Austin in the United States, and
also Evolutionary Consultant for the TSG. The main
concept of this session was to provide the audience
with a general overview of the fossil record of tapirs,
and what this record which includes some remarkable
fossil assemblages reveals about patterns and process
in the evolution of the group, about biogeography, and
about ancient environments and paleoecology. Matthew
Colbert gave an overview of the fossil record of the genus
Tapirus, and its implications to our understanding of
evolutionary relationships of living and extinct species,
to their biogeographic distribution; and to patterns of
morphological change in tapirs. Dr. Michael Zavada
from the Department of Biological Sciences and Center
of Excellence in Paleontology, East Tennessee State
University in the USA, presented a case study of a
new fossil site containing abundant remains of a fossil
species of tapir,
and what such
an extraordinary
site can tell us
about fossil
tapirs, past
environments,
and paleo-
ecology.
The Round-
Table on Permit
Issues was orga-
nized and mode-
rated by Alberto
Mendoza, for-
mer chair of the
AZA Tapir TAG
and member of
the TSG. The
need for this
session comes
from a long pro-
cess. Following
the Mountain Our way to the conference.
Tapir PHVA
Workshop held
in Colombia in 2005, biological samples from capti-
ve mountain tapirs in the United States were sent to
laboratories in Colombia. More recently, live captive
born tapirs have been transferred between zoos in
Europe and the United States, as well as between zoos
in Mexico and Costa Rica, with zoos in the USA. As
researchers in range countries more closely examine
biomaterials from captive tapirs living in other coun-
tries in their quest for better understanding of tapir
biology and biology as well as ways to further their
conservation efforts, and as zoos in range countries


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 13


and elsewhere further develop captive breeding and
management programs, the international transfer of
live animals and biomaterials will become increasingly
commonplace. To make these transfers as simple as
possible, it will be increasingly important that tapir
researchers, CITES authorities and managers of capti-
ve tapirs all fully understand international law and how
to safely and expeditiously ship living tapirs and pre-
served materials internationally. Therefore, the main
goal of this session was to educate shippers of CITES I
and II species of regulated tapirs of international laws
that impact their trade. Better understanding of this
area will reduce problems related to the growing num-
bers of transfers in live tapirs and preserved materials
between zoos, researchers and NGOs worldwide.
The Workshop on Tapir Population Modeling was
designed by Arnaud Desbiez, Modeler of the Brazilian
Network of the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding
Specialist Group (CBSG), and moderated by Anders
Goncalves da Silva, Post-Doc Student at University of
British Columbia in Canada and Coordinator of the TSG
Genetics Committee. In April 2007, the Lowland Tapir
PHVA Workshop held in Brazil concluded the cycle of
TSG sponsored tapir action planning workshops. As
part of these PHVA Workshops, population dynamic
models were developed for each one of the four tapir
species. The models were developed within VORTEX, a
computer simulation program specifically designed for
Population Viability Analysis (PVA). Computer mode-
ling is a valuable and versatile tool for assessing risk of
decline and extinction of wildlife populations. Complex
and interacting factors that influence population per-


Our bus.


sistence and health can be explored, including natural
and anthropogenic causes. Models can also be used to
evaluate the effects of alternative management strategies
to identify the most effective conservation actions for a
population or species and to identify research needs.


PARTICIPANT SPONSORSHIP

Africam Safari, Mexico
Amneville Zoo, France
BRIT Botanical Research Institute or Texas, United States
Centro de Estudios Conservacionistas, Universidad de San Carlos
de Guatemala
Centro Tecnol6gico de Recursos Amaz6nicos CENTRO FATIMA,
Ecuador
Chicago Zoological Society Brookfield Zoo, United States
Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo Conservation Fund, United States
Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark
Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP), Malaysia
EastTennessee State University, United States
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Mexico
Escuela de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional de Costa
Rica, Costa Rica
Escuela de Gesti6n Ambiental de la Universidad Tecnica Particular
de Loja, Ecuador
Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Fundaci6n Ecuatoriana de Estudios Ecol6gicos EcoCiencia,
Ecuador
Fundaci6n Temaiken, Argentina
Houston Zoo Inc., United States
Howletts Wild Animal Park, United Kingdom
Institute de Ecologia, UNAM, Mexico
Institute de Historia Natural y Ecologia, Mexico
International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), United States
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for Ecological
Research), Brazil
IUCN South America Regional Office, Ecuador
IUCN Species Programme, Switzerland
Kwata Association, French Guiana
Le6n Zoo, Mexico
McGill University, Canada
Nashville Zoo at Grassmere, United States
Parque Municipal Summit, Republic of Panama
Parque XCARET, Mexico
Pronatura Peninsula deYucatin, Mexico
Rafiki Safari Lodge, Costa Rica
Reserva Ecologica El Eden, Mexico
San Diego Zoo, United States
San Francisco Zoo, United States
Singapore Zoological Gardens, Singapore
Sistema Nacional de Areas de Conservaci6n, Ministerio del
Ambiente (MINAE), Costa Rica
Smithsonian National Zoological Park, United States
Universidad de Pamplona, Colombia
The Nature Conservancy
Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), Colombia
University of Texas at Austin, United States
U.S. Fish &Wildlife Service, United States
Virginia Zoological Gardens, United States
Woodland Park Zoo, United States
Zoologico de San Juan de Arag6n, Mexico


Tapirs are distributed across different biomes and eco-
systems where they face various levels types of threats.
VORTEX models can be extremely useful to assess these
threats and the potential threshold at which the thre-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






14 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


Round Table Permits Bengt Hoist


Round Table Permits Joaquin Calvo Costa Rica


Round Table Permits Jorge Garcia Panama


Strategic Planning I


Strategic Planning 2


Strategic Planning 3


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 15


Strategic Planning 5


Strategic Planning 4


Strategic Planning 6


Strategic Planning 7


Strategic Planning 8 Strategic Planning 9



Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






16 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


at may cause extinction of the tapir population. Now,
we have at our disposal baseline biological models for
each tapir species. In other words, we have models
that predict future outcomes of an ideal tapir populati-
on growing unconstrained and unhindered by external
factors. The parameter values of each of these models
are based on current knowledge and years of experi-
ence working with the species. These baseline models
are now available for download on the TSG Website.
Starting from these baseline models, we now have the
potential to model tapir populations, modifying crucial
parameters values to suit the reality of the region or
population we are focused on, including threats and
other factors we may judge important. The tool can
assist in prioritizing threats, scientific goals, and to
gather support to effect change in policy. Therefore,
the main goals of this session were: 1.) To illustrate
the utility of tapir population modeling; 2.) To present
VORTEX and the baseline models developed during the
PHVA Workshops for all four tapir species; and 3.) To
showcase specific study cases (Brazil, Colombia and
Ecuador) of modeling results and actions stemming
from them by tapir researchers and conservationists
working on the ground.
The last session of the conference was the TSG
Strategic Planning Workshop. The main goal of this ses-
sion was to evaluate what the TSG has accomplished
over the past two years since the Fourth Symposium
in Argentina and develop a new strategic plan for the
group. Once again, Bengt Hoist and Patricia Medici
were the facilitators of the workshop. During this
session, we split the participants in topic-based
working groups: 1.) Education, Outreach, Marketing,
and Communication; 2.) TSG Structure & Functioning;
3.) Action Planning & Implementation; and 4.) Ex-Situ
Conservation. Facilitators guided the working groups
through the process of thinking about and discussing
the TSG's future challenges and demands, as well as
setting short-term goals and actions for the next three
(3) years in order to be more effective in terms of tapir
conservation worldwide. The final outcome of the TSG
Strategic Planning Workshop held in Mexico was a list
of twenty-two (22) priority goals and sixty-one (61)
specific actions that the TSG will put into practice over
the next three years (2008-2010) in order to reach the
goals between now and the Fifth International Tapir
Symposium to be held in Malaysia in 2011. The final
version of the TSG Strategic Plan 2008-2010 will
be made available online on the TSG Website. This
document is extremely important for the TSG and will
guide our work over the next three years.

The main organizers of the Fourth International
Tapir Symposium were the Tapir Specialist Group,
Parque XCARET in Mexico, Association of Zoos &
Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG),


and European Association of Zoos & Aquaria (EAZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG). The conference
had the financial and/or institutional support from
over 90 conservation organizations worldwide, mostly
tapir holding zoological institutions in North America,
Europe, Latin America and Asia. Please see below a
complete list of institutional and financial supporters
of the Fourth International Tapir Symposium. Thanks
to the support from these organizations we were
able to cover the conference's expenses and sponsor
the participation of key participants from several
tapir range countries, who otherwise could not have
attended the conference.
During the entire process of the organization of
this conference, we had the full support from our
major partner on this challenge, the Parque XCARET
in Mexico, and the Tapir Specialist Group will always
remain thankful for this. On behalf of the entire TSG
membership and all symposium participants, I would
like to thank the entire XCARET staff, especially Efrain
Rios Castillo, for all their assistance in making the con-
ference happen.
A complete report of the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium will be made available on the TSG Website
soon.

Patricia Medici
M.Sc. Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Brazil Regional Network
Rua Tiradentes, 759, Centro, Corumba CEP: 79302-050,
Mato Grosso do Sul, BRAZIL
Phone & FAX: +55-67-3232-5842
Cell Phone: +55-18-8119-3839; +55-67-9965-6960
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br


Our conference room. Credits: Diego Lizcano


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 17


Strategic Planning 10 Prioritization of goals


Strategic Planning I I Prioritization of goals


Strategic Planning 12 Prioritization of goals


TSG Reports GiliaAngell Marketing


TSG Reports Alan Shoemaker Red List


TSG Reports Kelly Russo Education


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






18 SYMPOSIUM REPORT


TSG Reports MathiasTobler -Virtual Library


TSG ReportsViviana Quse Zoo


Workshop Action Plan Implementation I


Workshop Action Plan Implementation 2


Workshop Action Plan Implementation 3


Workshop Action Plan Implementation 4
Workshop Action Plan Implementation 4


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






SYMPOSIUM REPORT 19


Workshop Action Plan Implementation 5


Workshop Action Plan Implementation 6


Workshop Modeling Andres Tapia Ecuador


Workshop Modeling Olga Montenegro Colombia


Workshop Paleotology Matthew Colbert


Workshop Paleotology Michael Zavada


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






20 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


I TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS I


A s we all know, one of the committees of the Tapir
1 Specialist Group is the TSG Action Planning
Committee, established after the First Tapir Symposium
in Costa Rica in 2001. This committee's main goal was
to organize and hold PHVA Workshops for each tapir
species and publish a new, updated Tapir Action Plan.
As we stated before several times in many different
TSG communications, this goal has been reached! We
now have a new Tapir Action Plan, and a LOT of ener-
gy and hard work was necessary to fundraise for and
organize the four TSG PHVA Workshops around the
world! Therefore, the publication of our new Tapir
Action Plan cannot be the end of our efforts. The TSG
must make sure that our new plan will be actively used
by all organizations directly or indirectly involved with
tapir conservation, and guarantee that all the actions
listed as priorities will be implemented.
The new Tapir Action Plan is a LIVING DOCUMENT,
which means it will be constantly reviewed, updated
and adapted according to tapir conservation needs
identified in the years to come. The new Tapir Action
Plan has not been printed. It is only available online on
the TSG website (in all appropriate languages).
To this end, we have already established an Action
Plan Implementation Taskforce, which has an enor-
mous responsibility including the following:


* To publicize the new Tapir Action Plan throughout
all tapir range countries in Central and South America
and Southeast Asia, reaching all possible stakeholders
and key conservation players;
* To promote the active use of the new Tapir Action
Plan as the main source of information for all organi-
zations directly or indirectly involved with tapir conser-
vation in the range countries and internationally;
* To lead a constant process of review, update and
adaptation of the Tapir Action Plan, incorporating any
evolving and emerging tapir conservation needs identi-
fied through this process (living document);
* To maintain the network of professionals and orga-
nizations formed during the process of organizing and
holding the PHVA Workshops;
* To provide technical assistance for any
professionals/organizations aimed at raising funds to
implement actions of the Tapir Action Plan: assist with
proposal development and review, translations, iden-
tification of potential donors, proposal endorsement,
lobbying;
* To provide institutional support for any initiatives
aiming at implementing actions of the Tapir Action
Plan: endorsement, discussions and negotiations with
interested parties and potential partners, establish-
ment of partnerships and political lobbying;
* To keep in close contact with the persons who are
committed to put into practice all the actions listed as
priorities and make sure they work on their actions
accordingly with proposed deadlines;
* To report back to the TSG membership on a regu-
lar basis.
The progress made in implementing the Tapir Action
Plan will be evaluated during the International Tapir
Symposium every three (3) years, when we will have a
session dedicated to Action Plan Implementation.
In fact, during the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium held in Mexico earlier this year, we had our
first opportunity to review our new Tapir Action Plan.
We held an Action Plan Implementation Workshop,
which was facilitated by Bengt Hoist and myself.
In advance of the symposium, Bengt and I discus-
sed and worked on the design of this session and how
to carry out this first evaluation. We only had four
hours available on the symposium's schedule and we
had to make the most of it! We split the participants
into six (6) different working groups: 1.) Baird's Tapir
Action Plan; 2.) Lowland Tapir Action Plan; 3.) Malayan
Tapir Action Plan; 4.) Mountain Tapir Action Plan; 5.)
Ex-Situ Tapir Conservation (ex-situ actions from of all
4 action plans); and 6.) Marketing, Communication &
Website (actions from all 4 action plans).
Each working group received a digital copy of their
Species Action Plan (or all action plans in the case of
the topic-based working groups) and was requested to
go through the document using a laptop and answer


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 21


the following questions: 1.) What actions have already
been implemented?; 2.) What actions are in the pro-
cess of implementation?; and 3.) What actions have
become irrelevant, obsolete, no longer necessary, over
the past years since the development of each specific
action plan? These initial discussions were presented
during a first plenary session.
As a second step, each working group was reques-
ted to carry out the following tasks: 1.) Identify if the
people/organizations responsible for the actions are
still active in the tapir conservation arena. If not, the
groups were asked to suggest alternative names to be
responsible for the actions, providing contact informa-
tion; 2.) Identify if there are any actions that need to be
changed; 3.) Identify if there are any actions that need
to be updated; 4.) Identify if there are any actions that
need to be added; 5.) Re-think deadlines and other
related variables for each action; 6.) Prepare a written
report for the taskforce; 7.) Identify a member of the
working group to be a focal person for the TSG Action
Plan Implementation Taskforce.
All working groups had to be given extra time to finali-
ze their tasks, so we had to postpone the second work-
shop plenary and presentation of final results to the
following day. The six written reports were finalized
and are currently under review. Once finalized, they
will be made available on the TSG Website as separate
documents. Therefore, anyone downloading the ori-
ginal Tapir Action Plans will be able to download the
action plan reviews as well.
The focal points identified to be members of the
TSG Action Plan Implementation Taskforce are listed
below. This group, under the coordination of Patricia
Medici, will now be working together on all the diffe-
rent responsibilities listed above.
* Focal Points Lowland Tapir: Olga Lucia
Montenegro (Colombia), Juliana Rodriguez Ortiz
(Colombia), and Benoit de Thoisy (French Guiana)
* Focal Point Baird's Tapir: Kendra Bauer (United
States/Costa Rica)
* Focal Point Mountain Tapir: Carlos Alberto
Pedraza (Colombia)
* Focal Points Malayan Tapir: Carl Traeholt
(Denmark/Malaysia) and Zainal Zahari Zainuddin
(Malaysia)
* Focal Points Ex-Situ Conservation
o Lowland Tapir: Viviana Beatriz Quse
(Argentina)
o Baird's Tapir: Alberto Mendoza (Mexico/
United States)
o Malayan Tapir: S R Nandakumaren
(Singapore)
* Focal Point Marketing & Education:
Kelly J. Russo (United States)
The original TSG Action Planning Committee will
continue to operate with the main goal to assist TSG


Country Coordinators on the development of National
Action Plans, and linking the Tapir Specialist Group
with professionals and organizations in the tapir range
countries.

Patricia Medici
M.Sc. Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Coordinator, TSG Action Plan Implementation Taskforce
Coordinator, TSG Action Planning Committee
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Brazil Regional Network
Rua Tiradentes, 759, Centro, Corumba CEP: 79302-050,
Mato Grosso do Sul, BRAZIL
Phone & FAX: +55-67-3232-5842
Cell Phone: +55-18-8119-3839; +55-67-9965-6960
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br




AZA Tapir

Taxon Advisory Group

By Alberto Mendoza


Within the Association of Zoos and Aquariums
(AZA), the organizations in North America to
which most large zoos belong, two species of tapirs are
recommended for management and display: Baird's
tapirs and Asian tapirs. This decision was made in
2003 at a Regional Collection Plan (RC) hosted by the
Houston Zoo that was subsequently approved by the
AZA. The basis of this decision involves space. If it
takes 75 tapirs of any species to maintain that spe-
cies for 100 years, and if there are a maximum of 150
spaces in AZA zoos, then there is only space for two
species in AZA zoos. This triage approach to animal
management may sound heartless but it is reality. This
being the case, the Asian tapir was selected as one of
the two species for the RCP because it is the only spe-
cies of tapir found in the Old World. In the case of New
World tapirs, Baird's tapir was selected because there
is an adequate founder size in captivity, and additional
captive born animals may become periodically availab-
le to AZA zoos. Lowland tapirs are the least threate-
ned species in the New World, and mountain tapirs are
unavailable regardless of their rarity.
With this RCP in place, the last two years has found
the AZA Tapir Tag aggressively phasing out lowland


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






22 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


tapirs from its members' collections by helping zoos
export younger animals to Europe in support of their
EEP for that species. In the case of remaining animals,
the TAG successfully convinced most member zoos
that they should not allow the older lowland tapirs to
breed but rather, to phase them out and replace them
with Baird's tapirs. All owners of mountain tapirs have
also been reminded that that species should be phased
out as well, as the founder size is only two and no addi-
tional animals are available from and range country.
In addition to the general acceptance of the Regional
Collection Plan, there have also been several changes
in AZA Tapir TAG leadership, as well as progress in
importing additional new founders by an AZA zoo.
Some of the salient features include the following:

Leadership Changes

In January, 2007, Alberto Mendoza was officially
appointed as Chair of the AZA Tapir TAG. Alberto
is extremely familiar with AZA issues impacting tapir
husbandry and management needs, as well as being
very knowledgeable about the Latin American zoos and
their staff. Alberto is a veterinarian by training. In May,
Alberto left the Houston Zoo but he remains critical to
the success of the Tapir TAG and TSG. He was instru-
mental in organizing the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium, and his experience in Latin American
programs is probably the best within the AZA. A
replacement for him will hopefully be identified during
the summer of 2008.
Earlier in 2006, Michelle Stancer, Animal Care
Manager at the San Diego Zoo, was approved to become
the North American Regional Studbook Keeper and SSP
chair for Asian tapirs. Michelle has been employed at
the San Diego Zoo for over 20 years and has worked
with tapirs for nearly all that time. Michelle attended
the Fourth International Tapir Symposium that was
held recently in Mexico and will be hosting an Asian
Tapir SSP masterplan meeting later this summer.

Importation Activities

As a result of a recent (May 2006) master plan meeting
that was hosted by the El Nispero Zoo in Panama for
all range country zoos holding Baird's tapirs, a mas-
terplan for Central American tapirs was developed that
will initiate the transfer of surplus animals among zoos
of that region and North America. There are many cap-
tive born animals in zoos of this region, and many tapir
holders have more specimens than they can accommo-
date satisfactorily. One of these animals identified
for transfer was a young, captive born male at the La
Marina Zoo in Costa Rica. After a lengthy application
process, the Nashville Zoo successfully imported him
in January, 2008. This is extremely significant becau-


se there has not been an importation of a Baird's tapir
into the United States in over 30 years, and there has
never apparently been an exportation of a CITES-regu-
lated species from Costa Rica.
To facilitate this importation, the former TAG
chair Alberto Mendoza, Rick Schwartz, Director of the
Nashville Zoo, and Alan Shoemaker, Red List Authority
for the IUCN Tapir Specialist Group, met with the
Costa Rican CITES officials at the La Marina Zoo. The
La Marina Zoo was very excited about this transfer as
this animal is surplus to their needs. In addition the
CITES authorities in Costa Rica were excited about
the conservation potential related to this exportation
and are extremely interested in being able to help in
the international genetic management of Baird's tapirs
held in captivity. Also, an unrelated captive born fema-
le at the Summit Zoo in Panama has been identified for
exportation to Nashville as a future mate for the male
from La Marina and is expected to export in June,
2008.
During this year a young male Baird's tapir was
transfer from the Milwaukee Zoo to Africam Safari in
Mexico, this institution is planning to get a female in
the region for pairing with their new male.
In 2005 the Houston Zoo hosted an SSP master-
plan meeting for Asian tapirs. Unlike Baird's tapirs
whose populations are heavily biased towards males,
the Asian tapir population within the AZA, Europe and
Asia has far more females than males. To help impro-
ve that situation, as well as to add additional founders
to the SSP population, the Denver Zoo successfully
imported a young male Asian tapir from the Belfast
Zoo and is now seeking a mate for it in Asia. Hopefully
such a female can be identified in the spring of 2008.





TSG Fundraising Committee

&TSG Conservation Fund

(TSGCF)

By Patricia Medici


ur TSG Fundraising Committee was very busy over
the last two years since the Third International
Tapir Symposium held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in
January 2006. Our main activities included:
SRaising funds for TSG events:
o Lowland Tapir PHVA Workshop held in
Sorocaba, Sio Paulo, Brazil, in April 2007. This
was our last PHVA workshop and concluded the
TSG's Species Action Planning activities.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 23


o Raising funds for the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium held in Parque XCARET, Quintana
Roo, Mexico, from April 26th to May 1st, 2008.
* Securing funding for TSG annual operating costs;
* Running Annual Cycles of the TSG Conservation
Fund (TSGCF);
* Working with the TSG Marketing Committee on the
establishment and maintenance of a website dona-
tion system (PayPal);
* Maintaining our TSG List of Endorsed Projects;
* Providing endorsement letters to TSG members
submitting proposals for funding.

Raising Funds for TSG Events

Our campaigns to raise funds for the Lowland Tapir
PHVA Workshop and the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium were conducted, as always, in partner-
ship with the AZA and EAZA Tapir TAGs. Besides
connecting the TSG with tapir holders worldwide and
providing us with opportunities to link in-situ and ex-
situ initiatives for tapir conservation, stimulating the
exchange of data and information, the Tapir TAGs pro-
vide the TSG with critical support for the design and
implementation of fundraising campaigns for specific
activities of the group, including PHVA Workshops and
Tapir Symposia.
Thanks to this long-term partnership with the
Tapir TAGs, over the past eight years the TSG has been
able to secure financial support from 131 zoological
institutions worldwide, including three zoological asso-
ciations (AZA, EAZA, and WAZA), four AAZK Chapters,
and 124 individual zoos (62 in North America, 31 in
Europe, 27 in Latin America, three in Asia, and one
in Australia). From this pool of 131 institutions, 66
made contributions to the PHVA Workshops (Malaysia
2003, Colombia 2004, Belize 2005, and Brazil 2007),
as mentioned before, and 108 supported the Tapir
Symposia (Costa Rica 2001, Panama 2004, Argentina
2006, and Mexico 2008). Many of them contributed to
several different events over the years. We have recei-
ved financial contributions from 123 individual tapir
holding zoos out of the 200 tapir holders worldwide.
This means that 62% of all tapir holders worldwide
have supported the work of the Tapir Specialist Group
in some way.
The main strategy used by the TSG and the Tapir
TAGs to raise the necessary funds to hold the TSG
events is to approach tapir holders worldwide with
letters of request for US$1,000 contributions for the
specific event being organized that year. In the case of
the PHVA Workshops, only holders of the species for
which the PHVA was being held for were approached.
For the Tapir Symposia, all holders of all four species
of tapirs received a request letter.
The letters of request for contributions are signed


by the chair of the TSG and both chairs of the Tapir
TAGs, and sent out by mail. The chair of the AZA Tapir
TAG organizes the mailing and follow up for North
American and Latin American holders. The chair of
the EAZA Tapir TAG does the same for European,
Australian and Asian holders. The TSG has bank
accounts in the United States (Houston Zoo) and in
Europe (Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark). The letters are
mailed one year before the event. Whenever necessary,
the chairs of the Tapir TAGs follow up with phone calls
to some zoos, explaining the importance of that specific
event and stimulating them to make a donation.
Additionally, the TSG Chair attends the AZA and
EAZA Annual Conferences and makes presentations
about the TSG during their Tapir TAG meeting ses-
sions. These presentations give the zoo community
members a clear picture of the work of the TSG, expla-
nations about how their funding has been used, and
reasons why they should continue making donations!
Finally, the TSG and Tapir TAGs provide all zoo-
logical institutions supporting the TSG with complete
reports at the end of each PHVA Workshop or Tapir
Symposia. These reports are sent with a thank you
letter acknowledging the importance of their cont-
ributions. All institutions supporting the TSG are
listed and acknowledged in articles published in Tapir
Conservation and on the TSG Website.
Just to give you a few more numbers in terms of
funding obtained for TSG events:

PHVA Workshops
219 Contributions / 150 Organizations

This support was provided in the form of actual donati-
ons to the workshops (grants), expenses with planning
and organization of the meetings, traveling expenses
for employees of these organizations, sponsorship for
key participants, infra-structure and logistics for the
meetings, time of professionals, and free plane tickets
or vouchers for organizers and facilitators (airlines).
Many of these organizations contributed to more than
one PHVA workshop.
* 03 Zoological associations (AZA, EAZA, WAZA)
* 29 American zoos
* 16 European zoos
* 23 Latin American zoos
* 71 zoological institutions
* 04 Networks of CBSG (Headquarters, Brazil,
Europe & Mexico)
* 02 Local communities in range countries
* 16 International conservation organizations
* 16 NGOs in range countries
* 38 Governmental agencies (international &
range countries)
* 21 Universities (international & range countries)
* 02 Airlines (American and Continental)


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






24 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS



Malayan Tapir Mountain Tapir Baird's Tapir Lowland Tapir
2003 2004 2005 2007

US$ 15,725 US$ 22,330 US$ 42,350 US$ 46,500
16 contributions 50 contributions 68 contributions 85 contributions
(2 zoo institutions) (6 zoo institutions) (24 zoo institutions) (39 zoo institutions)
12.5 % 12 % 35.3 % 45.9 %

Total spent to develop newAction Plan: US$ 126,905


Tapir Symposia
312 Contributions / 201 Organizations

Once again, this support was provided in the form
of actual donations to the workshops (grants), expen-
ses with planning and organization of the meetings,
traveling expenses for employees of these organizati-
ons, sponsorship for key participants, infra-structure
and logistics for the meetings, time of professionals,
and free plane tickets or vouchers for organizers and
facilitators (airlines). Many of these organizations con-
tributed to more than one Tapir Symposium.
* 03 Zoological associations (AZA, EAZA, WAZA)
* 04 AAZK Chapters
* 55 American zoos
* 23 European zoos
* 13 Latin American zoos
* 03 Asian & Australian zoos
* 101 zoological institutions
* 09 IUCN Groups (Specialist Groups,
CBSG Networks, SSC etc.)
* 01 Local community in range countries
* 20 International conservation organizations
* 23 NGOs in range countries
* 08 Governmental agencies (international &
range countries)
* 30 Universities (international & range countries)
* 09 Airlines, travel agencies, hotel chains

Securing Funding for
TSG Annual Operation Costs

The TSG has been able to secure two major sources of
funding for its Annual Operation Costs:
Houston Zoo, United States: Provides an annual
contribution of US$5,000 for the production, prin-
ting and distribution of the TSG's newsletter, Tapir
Conservation. We publish two issues per year (June
and December), distributing approximately 200-250
printed copies to TSG members, AZA and EAZA Tapir
TAG members, IUCN offices, as well as TSG donors
and institutional supporters. We would like to THANK
Rick Barongi and Peter Riger from the Houston Zoo
for providing continuous support to our main publi-
cation.


Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark: In January 2007,
Bengt Holst, an active member of the Tapir Specialist
Group and Vice Director/Director of Conservation and
Science for the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, secured
an annual contribution to the TSG in the amount of
US$5,000, to be used strictly for TSG Operating Costs.
In 2008, the Copenhagen Zoo contribution was incre-
ased to US$10,000 per year. This funding is used to
cover the following expenses:
1. Participation of TSG chair in meetings, workshops,
conferences (airfare, registration, accommodati-
ons);
2. Translation of TSG documents and publications;
3. 35% of TSG chair's office expenses (phone bills,
internet access, mailing); and
4. Design and production of TSG promotional materi-
als (brochures, t-shirts, pins, hats).

Running Annual Cycles of the
TSG Conservation Fund (TSGCF)

We held a funding cycle for the TSGCF in 2006,
during which we reviewed 17 proposals and selected
six projects to receive $1,000 donations each. This
funding cycle was reported in a previous issue of Tapir
Conservation. In 2007, we were incredibly busy with
the conclusion of our new Action Plan and with the
organization of the Fourth Tapir Symposium and,
unfortunately, we did not manage to run the annual
cycle of funding.
Now that the symposium is behind us, we are run-
ning a funding cycle for 2008. The first call for propo-
sals was distributed in early May and the deadline for
proposal submission is August 15, 2008. Applicants
will be notified of the final decision by September 15,
2008. For this cycle, we should be able to distribute
5-6 grants of $1,000 dollars. We have put together a
new Reviewing Committee for 2008.
The TSGCF grants continue to be restricted to
members of the Tapir Specialist Group, or members
of the AZA or EAZA Tapir TAGs. Additionally, TSGCF
grants are restricted to projects contributing to the
implementation of actions listed on the Tapir Action
Plans developed during previous Population and
Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA) Workshops.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 25



Costa Rica Panama Argentina Mexico
2001 2004 2006 2008

US$ 40,430 US$ 32,515 US$ 52,506 US$ 52,703
60 contributions 69 contributions 93 contributions 90 contributions
(16 zoo institutions) (42 zoo institutions) (58 zoo institutions) (57 zoo institutions)
26.7 % 60.9 % 62.4 % 63.5 %

Total spent on Tapir Symposia: US$ 178,154


Maintaining our TSG List
of Endorsed Projects

We continue to try our best to maintain our TSG List
of Endorsed Projects and keep it as up to date as pos-
sible. Currently, the list includes 55 different projects
worldwide. The list is available online on the TSG web-
site and has proved to be an important resource for
funding agencies searching for good tapir projects to
support. However, our TSG List of Endorsed Projects
is in urgent need of some serious review and updates
and we are currently looking for a volunteer to do this
important task.

Annual Financial Reports

Our TSG Fundraising Committee is now working hard
to develop annual financial reports to be sent to all our
donors and institutional supporters. Additionally, we
will make these annual reports available online on the
TSG Website, so that all our members as well as the
general public will have access to this information.


Patricia Medici
M.Sc. Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Coordinator, TSG Fundraising Committee
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Brazil Regional Network
Rua Tiradentes, 759, Centro, Corumba CEP: 79302-050,
Mato Grosso do Sul, BRAZIL
Phone & FAX: +55-67-3232-5842
Cell Phone: +55-18-8119-3839; +55-67-9965-6960
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br


Genetics Committee


ByAnders Gongalves da Silva and
Cristina Luis


t has been two years since our last Symposium in
Argentina where we announced several changes to
the objectives of the Genetics Committee. In particular,
we chose to have a more passive role, providing techni-
cal support for the TSG members interested in develo-
ping genetic projects with tapirs. It has also been four
years since the creation of the Genetics Committee.
Before 2004, we were aware of one group in North
America that was doing genetic work with tapirs, which
was Mary Ashley's lab in Illinois, USA. Now, there are
genetic projects being carried within most range coun-
tries, and with all four species. Even though the TSG is
not responsible for all this work, it has certainly been
a significant driver.
Among this work, it is important to point out some
of the new tools being developed. Currently, there are
four different groups each working on developing
microsatellite primers for one of the four species of
tapirs. For those of you not familiar with microsatel-
lites, they are small tandem repeats (e.g., ATATATAT)
that are spread throughout the genome of most orga-
nisms. These small repeats are inherited in Mendelian
fashion, have great variability both within as well as
among individuals, and are easily assayed in the lab. In
forensics, they are used to identify the perpetrators of
crimes, or to establish parenthood. In wildlife biology,
they can be used for many things from surveying gene-
tic variation to identifying parts of the genome that may
be under natural selection and reconstructing levels of
relationship among individuals. These markers promi-
se to revolutionize the level of detail with which we will
be able to examine genetic diversity in tapir populati-
ons. In addition to these markers, new tools should
soon be added to our genetics toolbox. For instance,
tools for sexing non-invasively collected samples (e.g.,
dung or hair), and for analyses at broader temporal
and spatial scales based on mitochondrial DNA mar-
kers will soon be available.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






26 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


Nevertheless, it is not possible for us to carry out
genetic studies without samples. Work being carried
out will hopefully allow for more seamless sampling
for genetic material from tapirs. Currently, forensic
technologies are being tested to sample and preserve
DNA from dung of sufficient quality for most genetic
tools. Twenty-four different combinations of dung age,
storage temperature, media and time, as well as extrac-
tion and marker systems are being tested to identify the
best protocol. So far, the results have been very promi-
sing, with DNA of sufficient quality and quantity being
recovered for successful genetic analyses. In addition,
the protocol is simple to carryout, relatively cheap, and
easy to store and transport. Once the final results of
these tests are in, we will re-write the TSG Genetics
Manual to reflect the findings. Meanwhile, please do
not hesitate to contact us for more information.
The future, therefore, is full of interesting and exci-
ting prospects. As the IV Symposium was ending, we
had heard many of the members of this Committee
talking about their ongoing and future projects. Right
now, I (Anders) am involved in analyzing the genetic
variation in the captive population of lowland tapirs in
the Argentina, with views of making recommendations
for a new management plan in the country. During the
meeting we heard about Gina della Togna's project,
in collaboration with Budhan Pukazhenthi from the
National Zoo (USA), to analyze genetic variation in
the Panamanian captive population of Baird's tapirs,
with objectives in mind. I also heard about the effort
of Benoit de Thoisy (French Guiana) and Andr6s
Tapia (Ecuador) to infer the phylogeography of low-
land tapirs, and of a similar effort being carried out
in Malaysia with the Malay tapir in partnership with
Zainal Zainuddin. Cristina Luis and Carina Cunha
(Portugal) have proposed to examine genetic variation
in historical samples of Malay tapirs from museums,
in order to complement the picture found from con-
temporary samples. Manolo Garcia (Guatemala) has
contacted the Committee asking for assistance in desi-
gning a genetics project with Baird's tapirs in his home
country. Finally, during the meeting we put into con-
tact Ann Snook (TNC Mexico) and Georgina O'Farrill
(Mexico), who are both interested in using genetic tools
to answer questions of conservation importance to the
Baird's tapirs in the Yucatan Peninsula.
On other fronts, the TSG Committee has an infor-
mal invitation to participate in the Genetics Workshop
being developed by Zainal Zainuddin and Carl
Traeholt, which should include among its participants
some of the main Malay tapir biologists. This will be
an amazing opportunity to showcase the TSG Genetics
Committee as a resource to be used by Malay tapir
conservationists and biologists interested in developing
their own genetics projects. This opportunity will hope-
fully address what we think is the Committee's biggest


weakness, which has been our ability to assist our
comrades in the East. The Committee is also working
with the American Museum of Natural History (USA) to
create a database of mitochondrial DNA sequences, or
barcodes. Our initial objective is to catalogue all captive
individuals of tapirs in the US, and hopefully Argentina
and Panama. This database may then be used to screen
for individuals with similar genetic profiles to ones in
the regions chosen for re-introduction programs. As
such, this database could act as a first step in iden-
tifying potential individuals for re-introduction. Now, it
is important to state that this has not been done before,
and is still subject to testing and modification. Finally,
we have agreed to revive the Small Texts in Genetics
project, which was discussed during the Lowland Tapir
PHVA. The objective is to have a series of small, one-
page, texts with crucial information on genetic tools
and analyses to be used as a starting point for any TSG
member interested in developing a genetics project or
collaborating with someone on a genetics project.
All in all, the Genetics Committee will have a busy
three years ahead leading up to the next Symposium.
Beyond the projects above, the strategic planning
identified actions that fall within the purview of this
Committee. In addition, the new tools which are beco-
ming available open exciting and new prospects of
research, not only for understanding the basic biology
of tapirs, but also for developing conservation actions.
It should be exciting and we can't wait to get our hands
dirty!




TSG's Marketing and

Website Committee

By Gilia Angell


TSG's Marketing and Website Committee met at the
Symposium in Mexico and evaluated the last four
years of work using our goals as a committee:
1. To amplify and highlight the great work YOU do as
TSG researchers and tapir advocates
2. Spread the word about tapir conservation
3. To help create tools for tapir advocacy
We decided to base our next set of actions on those
actions and types of achievements TSG has made up
to now, and build on advances in technology to further
market our work and tapir conservation.
Actions that were successful for us in the past:
SExpand media coverage on tapirs: Get tapir
placements, articles and photos into major television
programs, newspapers, online publications and


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 27


magazines this reaches a large audience for very
little cost.
o A dozen magazine placements (BBC Wildlife,
Somos, Chickadee, etc)
o Several tv appearances of TSG researchers &
tapirs (SkyOne TV, Discovery Channel/Animal
Planet)
o A chapter on tapirs in author Jeffrey Masson's
latest book
* Have a consistent message about tapirs and tapir
conservation: Tapirs.org is the point of reference for
materials with the TSG brand and messaging; these
materials would be available to all TSG members
for use in their respective countries. Could include
talking points about tapirs, education kit, an
expanded press kit, video & photos
o TSG Educational & Fundraising brochures
o Expansive downloads area with many useful
documents
o Recognizable "TSG" brand and tapir con-
servation message
o Preliminary press kit available for download
In addition to continuing and building on those
actions above, we created the following new actions at
the meeting:
* Improve communication within TSG and with
outside organizations: Better harness our member
network and areas of expertise and existing relati-
onships with NGOs, such as IUCN, to more swiftly
affect marketing opportunities for TSG and tapir
conservation
* Expand our web presence: Make our website
(tapirs.org) the #1 point of reference on tapirs
and tapir conservation, and the place for TSG
members to come for any and all needed docu-
ments
o Search engine optimization
o Harness online Communities presence
o Technical updates to our site
o Add more content to our site
o Add video of tapir captures and researchers in
action to site
We also decided to combine the Educational and
Marketing Committees into one committee because
the goals and projects of each committee were so clo-
sely aligned. As a result, Kelly Russo and Gilia Angell
are the new co-coordinators of Marketing, Web and
Education Committee. Two subcommittees were also
created: Website subcommittee & Spanish Language
Subcommittee, managed by Gilia Angell and Juliana
Rodriguez, respectively.
Those of you with skills or an interest in helping
to accomplish our initiatives, please contact Kelly
(krusso@houstonzoo.org) or Gilia (gilia@tapirs.org).
Look to tapirs.org to see changes, updates and
announcements on our projects. Thanks!


Developing the new

2008 Red List


By Alan H. Shoemaker
Red List Focal Point,
IUCN Tapir Specialist Group


Prior to 2000, much of the information available
about tapirs in the wild was anecdotal and outda-
ted. Although tapirs are physically the largest species
of mammal in three of the four species' ranges, too
often they have not benefited from the significant levels
of support offered families such as primates, felids,
elephants and bovids. In 1997, the IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG) wrote its first "modern" Red
List and put the world on notice that a number of bio-
logists and conservationists were concerned about the
declining status of tapirs in nature. In that first editi-
on of the Red List, mountain tapirs and Baird's tapirs
were considered Endangered while lowland and Asian
tapirs were listed as Vulnerable.
To update the outdated 1997 Red List, a new Red
List Assessment for tapirs was initiated in 2003 by the
TSG. To begin this review, the TSG Chair identified
English-speaking species coordinators for all tapir spe-
cies that could work with the Red List Authority (RLA).
All four coordinators quickly responded with current
information that was consolidated and then sent to all
other members of the Specialist Group. As a result of
this TSG-wide request, a blizzard of additional infor-
mation was received by the RLA within weeks that
would become the basis for the new Red List. After the
draft Red List was completed, the final 2004 version
was prepared and in this way, the 2004 Red List for
tapirs was developed that is currently in use by IUCN.
When the TSG held its First International Tapir
Symposium in Costa Rica in 2001 all participants
attending the symposium agreed that the TSG should
initiate a series of Population and Habitat Viability
Assessment (PHVA) workshops to review the conser-
vation status for all four tapir species. The first PHVA
workshop was held in 2003 in Krau Wildlife Reserve in
Malaysia for Malayan tapirs. While not widely attended
by TSG members outside of Asia, the workshop did
provide new information that strongly suggested that
populations in Sumatra were declining rapidly even
though populations in Malaysia and Thailand were
still larger.
The second PHVA, for Mountain Tapirs was held
in 2004 in the Santuario de Fauna y Flora Otun-
Quimbaya near Pereira, Colombia and high in the
Colombia Andes, within a park that physically pos-
sessed mountain tapirs. Participants representing all


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






28 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


three mountain tapir range countries, including park
rangers, local village representatives and biologists
working with all aspects of mountain tapir conserva-
tion attended the meeting. The final result provided
the world with the most up to date information on
mountain tapirs ever developed since the inception of
the Red List.
With such outstanding results, the third PHVA of
this series, one held for Baird's tapirs, was hosted by
the Belize Zoo and again, a wide assortment of field
biologists, university professors, and government offi-
cials came together to discuss problems facing tapirs
in Central America. Remarkably, a number of staff
members from zoos in range countries and beyond
were also present, many providing funding for this
meeting even though they were not expecting to obtain
animals as part of their participation. Like the earlier
PHVA for mountain tapirs, this meeting provided new
and important information about this species, and pro-
vided information about Baird's tapirs in Colombia, a
country not widely considered to be within its range.
As a result of this meeting, it was decided by those in
attendance that although tapirs are found in all coun-
tries of historical attendance except El Salvador, they
were steadily declining because of habit loss and hun-
ting and should remain protected under the category
of Endangered.
Six years after the First International Tapir
Symposium was held in Costa Rica in 2001, the
fourth and last tapir PHVA, one for lowland tapirs, was
held in Brazil in 2007 and a new Red List is now being
developed that contains substantially updated informa-
tion that should be ready for approval by IUCN later
this year. In this instance, this widely ranging species
that remains Vulnerable overall does nevertheless have
some populations that are Endangered in the Cerrado
region of central Brazil or even Critically Endangered
in Brazil's Atlantic Forest or in the region surrounding
Lake Maracaibo in Colombia and adjacent Venezuela.
Since completing this fourth PHVA, all TSG
Country and Species Coordinators were given one last
chance to update the new Red List prior to submission
to IUCN. New information provided by delegates at
the Fourth International Tapir Symposium was also
submitted to IUCN's representative in Washington, DC
for consideration. The Red List will always be consi-
dered a "living document" by the RLA of the TSG and
new information will always be welcome. In this way,
we have all brought our understanding of tapirs to a
new level, and it is this type of support that makes this
Specialist Group so successful.


TSG Tapir Re-Introduction

& Translocation Advisory

Committee


By Patricia Medici


O ne of the sessions held during the Third
International Tapir Symposium in Argentina in
2006 was a Tapir Re-Introduction and Translocation
Workshop, which was organized and moderated by
Sian Waters. One of the outcomes of this session
was a recommendation to develop TSG Guidelines
for Tapir Re-Introductions and Translocations, in
accordance with the criteria of the IUCN/SSC Re-
Introduction Specialist Group (RSG). As a result, a
TSG Re-Introduction & Translocation Taskforce was
established, under the coordination of Patricia Medici
and incorporating members from the TSG Veterinary,
Genetics and Zoo committees.
The first action of the taskforce involved a
literature review, initial contacts with the chairs of
the IUCN/SSC Re-Introduction Specialist Group and
IUCN/SSC Wildlife Health Specialist Group, as well as
contacts with chairs and members of other Specialist
Groups, such as rhinos and elephants, that had alrea-
dy developed or were in the process of developing re-
introduction and/or translocation guidelines. Last but
not least, we discussed these issues with a number of
wildlife veterinarians with experience in re-introduc-
tions and translocations.
In January 2007, Patricia Medici and the coor-
dinators of both the TSG Veterinary and Genetics
committees, Javier Sarria and Anders Goncalves da
Silva respectively, as well as the veterinarians of the
Lowland Tapir Conservation Initiative in Brazil, Paulo
Mangini and Joares May Jr., also members of the TSG
Veterinary Committee, got together in Patricia's Atlantic
Forest field site in Morro do Diabo State Park, SAo
Paulo, Brazil. The group participated for two weeks
on one of Patricia's tapir capture rounds in Morro do
Diabo during which we decided to take advantage of
the opportunity to finalize the development of the Re-
Introduction and Translocation Guidelines!
The document was written in sync with the TSG
Veterinary Manual published in 2007, which provides
protocols for tapir capture, immobilization, manipula-
tion, collection of samples, necropsy etc., and the TSG
Genetics Manual published in 2005, including informa-
tion about sampling procedures to collect and preser-
ve biological samples for genetic studies. Additionally,
most of the tapir transport recommendations came
from the Zoo Committee's Husbandry Guidelines.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 29


Members of the team that developed theTSG
Guidelines forTapir Re-Introduction and Translocation.
Credit: Patricia Medici


The first draft of the document was ready by the
end of the 2-week capture round in Morro do Diabo
and was immediately sent out to all TSG members for
review and comments. We also sent the document to
members of the AZA and EAZA Tapir TAGs, as well
as other wildlife veterinarians, members of the RSG
etc. In the following four months, the document was
reviewed by over 30 professionals who made extreme-
ly useful comments, suggestions, additions, criticisms
etc. which helped us refine our guidelines tremendous-
ly.
In December 2007, the final stage after a rigorous
process of finalizing the guidelines, the document was
submitted for review to the IUCN/SSC Re-Introduction
Specialist Group (RSG) and IUCN/SSC Wildlife Health
Specialist Group (WHSG). We wanted to make sure
our Guidelines were in accordance with the criteria
established by these two Specialist Groups and we
wanted to make sure we had their endorsement. The
chairs of the two groups reviewed the document very
carefully and made some extremely useful and relevant
final comments that we incorporated into the guideli-
nes before its publication.
The English version of the TSG Guidelines for
Tapir Re-Introduction & Translocation was presented
and launched during the Fourth International Tapir
Symposium in Mexico in April and immediately after-
wards made available online on the TSG Website! The
document is currently being translated into Spanish
and Portuguese.
Given that the TSG Tapir Re-Introduction and
Translocation Taskforce has finalized its main goal
of developing and publishing the TSG Guidelines for
Tapir Re-Introduction and Translocation, we have


decided it should become an Advisory Committee to
assist any researchers and organizations planning
on establishing re-introduction and/or translocati-
on programs. Patricia Medici will be coordinating
the Re-Introduction and Translocation Advisory
Committee. Members of this Advisory Committee will
be the members of the TSG Veterinary, Genetics and
Zoo Committees, and we have selected a few exter-
nal advisors to be consulted on a case-by-case basis,
including: IUCN/SSC Re-Introduction Specialist Group
(RSG); IUCN/SSC Wildlife Health Specialist Group
(WHSG); IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG); IUCN/SSC African Rhino Specialist
Group (AfRSC); and IUCN/SSC Asian Rhino Specialist
Group (AsRSC).
As mentioned in the TSG Tapir Re-Introduction
and Translocation Guidelines document itself, we
opted to keep an experimental approach to developing
the guidelines. As such, the document is composed
of some scientifically-gathered information, well-infor-
med suggestions and recommendations about how to
proceed with tapir re-introductions and translocations
as an experiment. We hope that our approach will
encourage tapir researchers, conservationists and
other interested parties to follow our recommendati-
ons and think critically about these guidelines, keeping
records, sharing results and helping us improve the
document over time.


Patricia Medici
M.Sc. Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Coordinator, TSG Re-Introduction & Translocation
Advisory Committee
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Brazil Regional Network
Rua Tiradentes, 759, Centro, Corumba CEP: 79302-050,
Mato Grosso do Sul, BRAZIL
Phone & FAX: +55-67-3232-5842
Cell Phone: +55-18-8119-3839; +55-67-9965-6960
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br


TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






30 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


Veterinary Committee


By Javier Sarria, Paulo Rogerio Mangini and
Viviana B. Quse


The last two years since the Third International
Tapir Symposium held in Buenos Aires, Argentina,
in January 2006, was a very productive period for
the TSG Veterinary Committee, especially in terms of
publications. We published our Tapir Field Veterinary
Manual, a complete set of guidelines for field veterina-
rians and researchers including topics such as tapir
anatomy, capture and restraint, sampling, reproduc-
tive assessments and pathology (including necropsy
protocols). This document was published in English,
Spanish and Portuguese and is available online on the
TSG website. We also compiled, in association with
the International Species Information System (ISIS),
the Physiological Data Reference Values for Tapir
Species, a document including all the information
about tapir normal physiological values that is now
available to all professionals involved with tapir health
investigation. Finally, we collaborated with the TSG
Tapir Re-Introduction and Translocation Taskforce
and TSG Genetics Committee on the development
and publication of the TSG Guidelinesfor Tapir Re-
Introductions and Translocations.
In addition to that, members of the TSG Veterinary
Committee provided assistance to several veterinari-
ans in Europe and Latin America on tapir health and
management issues, and oriented some veterinary stu-
dents in their curricular projects. We were also invited
by Aude Desmoulins, coordinator of the European
Captive Population of Lowland Tapirs, to participate in
the design of the management plan for Tuberculosis,
a zoonotic disease that is becoming a serious hazard
for the captive tapir populations in Europe and South
America.
In the next three years until the the next International
Tapir Symposium, which will be held in Malaysia in


April 2011, the TSG Veterinary Committee will address
efforts to improve our connections with zoos and cap-
tive breeding centers holding tapirs around the world.
We will try to establish a global network to share infor-
mation about collections and better assist institutions
facing problems with tapir breeding management and
to try and unify criteria in the management of the four
tapir species in captivity.
For this purpose, our plans for the next three years
are:
1. To establish a network among zoos holding tapirs
around the world to promote the adequate manage-
ment of tapirs in captivity;
2. To collect available information about current
health status and hazards for captive tapirs and to
aid in the creation and maintenance of internatio-
nal and regional studbooks;
3. To create and promote, together with universities
and research institutes, research programs in prio-
rity topics such as pathology, reproduction, immu-
nology and others;
4. To collaborate with on-going efforts to develop pro-
tocols for the diagnosis of Tuberculosis in tapirs;
5. To stimulate the research on tapir health in diffe-
rent areas
a. To spread the need for more research on tapir
health issues, stimulating field researchers to
include veterinarians as part of their teams.
b. To design a session to be held during the next
Tapir Symposium, where specific issues related
to tapir health may be presented, in order to
promote discussions about relevant infectious
diseases in tapirs.
6. To widely promote the distribution of the protocols
published by the Committee in the TSG website,
enhancing its reviewing by the users and promoting
the creation or publication of additional protocols;
7. To create a tapir health information network that
includes:
a. The establishment of the network and the in-
situ and ex-situ global tapir health database.
b. To contact worldwide specialists in the areas of


Veterinarians of the Lowland Tapir Conservation Initiative, IPE, Institute for Ecological Research, Brazil.
Credits: Patricia Medici

Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 31


epidemiology, pathology, microbiology, parasi-
tology, clinical pathology, toxicology, nutrition,
endocrinology and reproduction among others.
c. To contact reference laboratories in each coun-
try and/or geographic region, where new biolo-
gical samples may be submitted for analysis.
8. To develop a Population Viability Analysis (PVA)
based on health data. For this purpose we will
include:
a. The establishment of a system of compilation,
interpretation and diffusion of epidemiological
data valuable for the PVA.
b. To create a taskforce group formed by TSG
members and other qualified professionals.
c. To create a system for the analysis of health
data, which may be applied to advanced PVA
models such as Outbreak.




TSG Virtual Library 2008

By Mathias Tobler


The idea of compiling all tapir-related articles in
PDF format and making them available to all TSG
members through the internet came up in 2005 and
was included as a goal for the TSG strategic planning
at the 2006 Tapir Symposium in Buenos Aires.
Harald Beck and his students started compiling all
the articles they could get their hands on and other
TSG members contributed articles from their personal
collections. Soon the collection contained over 300
documents, and in a next step, Mathias Tobler entered
all the bibliographic information into a database. At
the same time, the Botanical Research Institute of
Texas (BRIT) completed a virtual library module as
part of their Atrium biodiversity information system.
This module met all the requirements for easily
publishing and managing the tapir literature, and
BRIT agreed to host the TSG Virtual Library on one
of their servers. The TSG Virtual Library was officially
released in September 2006 at the 7th International
Conference for the Management of Wildlife in Amazonia
and Latin America in Ilh6us, Brazil. Since then, the
number of documents in the library has been growing
continuously, moving us closer to the goal of bringing
together everything ever published on tapirs.
In May 2008, the library contained a total of 485
documents spanning a time period from 1821 to
2008. Figure 1 shows a steady increase of publications
since 1960. The majority of the documents are journal
articles followed by book sections and thesis (Figure
2), indicating that most of the available information


on tapirs has been published in a peer-reviewed form.
A quick analysis shows that the largest number of
publications are about the lowland tapir (Tapirus
terrestris), followed by Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).
The TSG Virtual Library can be accessed at http:
//atrium.tapirs.org. It allows for simple searches by
keywords as well as advanced searches by year, author,
document type etc. Search results can be downloaded
in a variety of formats including some that allow easy
import into reference software such as Endnote and
Reference Manager. Registered users have full access
to all PDF documents and can store references in a
personal workspace for later export. The library also
allows administrators to add and edit records through
simple web interfaces.
Two goals were set for the TSG Virtual Library at
the 2008 Tapir Symposium in Mexico: (1) to continue
adding new articles to the library and search for older
articles that are still missing and (2) to add standardized
keywords to all documents. These keywords will
include the tapir species mentioned in the document
as well as the general subject of the article (e.g. diet,
husbandry, genetics, conservation). This will allow
for more specific searches returning more complete
results. The goal is to have these keywords added to
all documents by the end of 2008.
If anybody has documents about tapirs that are
not in the library yet, please send the reference and if
possible a PDF to Mathias Tobler (matobler@gmx.net).
Also please indicate if you hold the copyright to the
document (for example for a thesis or a report) and
would like to make it available to the general public. If
you are a TSG member or else work with tapirs and
need an account to access the PDFs please write to
Mathias to request a username and password.




TSG Zoo Committee

By Viviana Quse,Alan Shoemaker,
Bengt Hoist andAlberto Mendoza


During the Third International Tapir Symposium
celebrated in Argentina in January 2006, different
goals were established between zoos that hold tapirs in
captivity. In this sense, different actions were taken for
the four species of tapirs: Tapirus bairdii; T. indicus; T.
terrestris and T. pinchaque.
One of the first actions involved the development
of a Master Plan for range countries holding Central
American Tapirs, Tapirus bairdii. This meeting was
held in May 2006 because of problems identified at the
Population and Habitat Viability Assessment Workshop


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






32 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


Figure I: Number of documents hosted by the TSG
Virtual Library for each year between 1960 and 2008
(May 2008).


Figure 2: Contribution of different document types to
the 485 documents stored in the TSG Virtual Library
(May 2008).


(PHVA) for the conservation of the Central American
Tapir that was held the preceding August 2005.
The objective of this masterplan was to review
the ex situ status of T. bairdii and identify conserva-
tion actions in all area of their distribution in order
to develop a Central American Regional Collection
Plan. Representing range countries were 12 zoos from
Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico and
Panama as well as zoos from the United States and
Canada. IUCN and AZA were also represented. The
main problems identified at the meeting included the
following:
1. Lack of communication between tapir holders.
2. Little research on captive population.


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Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008


3. Difficulty in transferring tapirs between
institutions.
4. Budgetary constraints in many institutions.
5. Lack of a Regional Collection Plan.
In order to be able to solve these problems it was
necessary to know the actual and potential capacity
of the zoos in Mexico and Central America. The majo-
rity of zoos in this region have completed a question-
naire and the International Studbook is completed
and available on the Tapir Specialist Group website,
www.tapirs.org
The results of the questionnaire are as follows:
There are 54 captive Tapirus bairdii in 6 Central
American countries (31.22.1). Unsexed tapir are also
present at Thomas Belt Zoo in Nicaragua. The biggest
collection of captive tapirs in the world is in the private
collection in Panama at Villa Griselda with 19 tapirs. In
North Korea also there are some bairdii tapirs, but, we
need to gather more information from there.
In April of 2007 a PHVA workshop for lowland
tapirs, Tapirus terrestris, was held in Sorocaba Zoo,
San Pablo, Brazil. Goals were identified for the zoos of
the region and include the following:
1. To develop collection plans at National, Regional,
and International level.
2. To increase the value of tapirs in all holding institu-
tions within the region.
3. To increase the communication between lowland
tapir investigators in situ and ex- situ.
In order to reach these goals, the Zoo Committee deci-
ded that the first objective would be to identify zoo-
logical institutions holding Tapirus terrestris within
their collections. For accomplish this, individuals were
identified in each country that would be responsible for
the distribution of a questionnaire in Spanish, English
and Portuguese asking for past and present inventory
data of captive tapirs within their countries. Although
this work is still in process, we already have some
information about the status of captive tapirs in some
of these countries. A summary of this information is as
follows: In South America, 54 zoos in 7 countries hold
241 tapirs (Table 1).
Of the 241 tapirs registered, 43% are males and
39% are females; 18% have no data about the sex. Of
these 241 tapirs, 102 were males including 51% that
were born in captivity, 13% were born in the wild and
37% of the animals' owners did not specify their ani-
mals' origin. Of the 94 females, 48% were born in cap-
tivity, 22% were born in the wild and 30% of them did
not have information on their origin reported.
Regarding ages, of 102 males, 40% were of unknown
age. The remaining 60% averaged 4 years in age. In the
case of the 94 females, 36% were of unknown age. The
average age of the remaining 64% was 3 years.
In Argentina, a complete studbook is maintained
by the Temaiken Zoo. In it, 12 zoos report holding a


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TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 33


Table I. Tapirus terrestris registered in South America.


Country Tapirs
Argentina 55
Brasil 84
Chile 5
Colombia 12
Ecuador 32
Peru 18
Venezuela 35
Total 241


total of 53 tapirs (28.25). Of these 53 tapirs, 49 are
identified with microchips. Genetic studies by the TSG
Committee of Genetics are being developed in Canada
and the sanitary studies of this captive population are
progressing, among other areas of need.
In the case of Asian tapirs, Tapirus indicus, there
is some data from Malaysia, Indonesia and China.
From Indonesia and Malaysia, 17 zoos report holding
56 T. indicus.
The information until the present is the following:
1. Indonesia: 8 zoos report holding 23 (7.6) tapirs.
There are also 10 tapirs whose gender was not
reported.
2. Malaysia: There are 9 zoos holding 33 (12.21)
tapirs. Of these 33 tapirs, adults include 28 (9.19).
There are also 3.2 tapirs.
3. China: In Beijing data was received for 9 (2.7)
tapirs.
In the case of mountain tapirs, Tapirus pinchaque,
Alan Shoemaker informs reports that there are 12
tapirs (8.4) in captivity in 5 zoos. Table 2 provides
distribution of captive mountain tapirs.
The female at the LA Zoo is post-reproductive and
the female in Cheyenne Mountain Zoo may be separa-
ted from the male to prevent reproduction. From an
AZA point of view, the one in Colombia and the two in
Canada have no relationship to the AZA and its RCP
as they are outside of the US, and outside of the AZA.
Mountain View is not an AZA member.


Table 2. Distribution of captive mountain tapirs.


Zoo Males Females
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, I I
Colorado Springs, CO USA
Los Angeles Zoo, 4
Los Angles, CA USA
San Francisco Zoo,
San Francisco, CA USA
Mountain View Farm,
Ft. Langley, British Columbia, I I
Canada
Private Collection, Colombia I 0


A high degree of inbreeding exists because the first
reproductive tapirs were born in 1983 (the male: #26)
and in 1988 (the female: #27); both have the same
father (#2). They have provided several descendants,
and in some cases they have reproduced among them.
About the ages, the older age correspond to this
reproductive pair: 25 years for the male and 20 years
for the female. The youngest corresponds to a male,
that was born in September 2007 (son from #26 and
#27), in Los Angeles Zoo.
During the Fourth International Tapir Symposium,
held in Mexico, the Zoo Committee established the fol-
lowing activities to develop in the following 3 years:
1. Disseminate husbandry guidelines to all facili-
ties holding captive tapirs.
2. Increase communication and cooperation.
3. Identify veterinary and nutrition issues for all
four species.
4. Develop international/regional collection plans
for all species.
5. Increase representation of governmental agen-
cies, researchers and facilities holding tapirs at
future meetings.
6. To promote outreach in facilities holding
tapirs.
7. To identify research priorities for management
of tapirs in captivity.
8. Contribute in the veterinary investigations/
research about tapir health.








folt% ?


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






34 TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP



currently, the TSG has 122 members, including
field researchers, educators, veterinarians,
governmental agencies and NGO representatives, zoo
personnel, university professors and students, from
27 different countries worldwide (Argentina, Australia,
Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Denmark, Ecuador, France, French Guiana, Germany,
Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico,
Myanmar, Republic of Panama, Paraguay, Peru,
Thailand, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, United
States, and Venezuela).


ABD GHANI, SITI KHADIJAH (Malaysia)
PERHILITAN Bukit Rengit, Krau Wildlife Reserve
E-mail: cobra7512081 @hotmail.com

AMANZO, JESSICA (Peru)
Seccion Ecologia, Sistematica y Evolucion, Departamento Academico
de Ciencias Biologicas y Fisiologicas, Facultad de Ciencias y Filosofia,
Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia
E-mail: jessicaamanzo@yahoo.com

ANEZ GALBAN, LUIS GUILLERMO (Venezuela)
D.V.M. Gerente de Operaciones, Fundaci6n Parque Zool6gico
Metropolitan del Zulia
E-mail: galbanluis70@hotmail.com; galbanluis97@yahoo.com

ANGELL, GILIA (United States)
Senior Designer, Amazon.com
E-mail: gilia angell@earthlink.net; gilia@tapirs.org

ARIAS ALZATE,ANDRES (Colombia)
Biol6go, Researcher, Laboratorio de Ecologia Evolutiva de Mamiferos,
Institute de Biologia, Universidad de Antioquia
E-mail: andresarias3@yahoo.es

AYALA CRESPO, GUIDO MARCOS (Bolivia)
M.Sc. Bi6logo, Investigador de Vida Silvestre,WCS Wildlife
Conservation Society, Northern La Paz Living Landscape Program
E-mail: gayala@wcs.org; guidoayal@gmail.com

BARONGI, RICK (United States)
Director, Houston Zoo Inc.
Former Chair/ Member,Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: RBarongi@aol.com; rbarongi@houstonzoo.org


BAUER, KENDRA (United States)
Ph.D. Graduate Student, University of Texas at Austin
Integrative Biology, I University Station
E-mail: kendrabauer@mail.utexas.edu

BECK, HARALD (Germany I United States / Peru)
Ph.D.Assistant Professor & Curator of the Mammal Museum
Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University
E-mail: hbeck@towson.edu
BENEDETTI,ADRIAN (Republic of Panama)
Director, Parque Municipal Summit, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
E-mail: panasummit@gmail.com

BERMUDEZ LARRAZABAL, LIZETTE (Peru)
General Curator / Jefe de Fauna, Parque Zoologico Recreacional Huachipa
E-mail: lizettelarrazabal@yahoo.com

BERNAL RINCON, LUZ AGUEDA (Colombia)
D.V.M. Mountain Tapir Project Colombia (Diego Lizcano)
E-mail: aguedabernal@gmail.com, aguedabernal@yahoo.es

BLANCO MARQUEZ, PILAR ALEXANDER (Venezuela)
D.V.M. Director Tecnico, Fundaci6n Nacional de Parques Zool6gicos e
Acuirios (FUNPZA) Ministerio del Ambiente (MARN)
E-mail: pblanco@minamb.gob.ve; albla69@yahoo.com.mx;
albla69@hotmail.com

BODMER, RICHARD E. (England)
Ph.D. Lecturer in Biodiversity Conservation, Durrell Institute of
Conservation and Ecology (DICE), University of Kent
E-mail: R.Bodmer@ukc.ac.uk

BOSHOFF, LAUTJIE (Costa Rica)
Rafiki Safari Lodge
E-mail: lautjie@gmail.com

CALVO DOMINGO,JOSE JOAQUIN (Costa Rica)
Coordinador deVida Silvestre, Sistema Nacional de Areas de
Conservaci6n, Ministerio del Ambiente y Energia (MINAE)
E-mail: joaquin.calvo@sinac.go.cr

CAMACHO,JAIME (Ecuador)
Coordinator, Dry Forest Conservation and Development Initiative,
The Nature Conservancy / Fundaci6n Natura
Associate Researcher, Fundaci6n Ecuatoriana de Estudios Ecol6gicos
- EcoCiencia
E-mail: tulias@hotmail.com

CARBONELLTORRES, FABRICIO (Costa Rica)
Coordinador de Proyectos Ambientales,Asociaci6n Meralvis
E-mail: carbonf@yahoo.com.mx

CARTES,JOSE LUIS (Paraguay)
M.Sc. Coordinador de Conservaci6n de Sitios, Guyra Paraguay
E-mail: jlcartes@guyra.org.py

CASTELLANOS PENAFIEL,ARMANDO XAVIER (Ecuador)
Director,Andean Bear Project, Fundaci6n Espiritu del Bosque
E-mail: iznachi@yahoo.com.mx; zoobreviven@hotmail.com

CHALUKIAN, SILVIA C. (Argentina)
M.Sc. Proyecto de Investigaci6n y Conservaci6n del Tapir Noroeste
Argentina
E-mail: schalukian@yahoo.com.ar; tapiresalta@argentina.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY 35


COLBERT, MATTHEW (United States)
Ph.D. Research Associate, Jackson School of Geological Sciences,
University of Texas at Austin
E-mail: colbert@mail.utexas.edu

CONSTANTINO, EMILIO (Colombia)
E-mail: econch@gmail.com

CRUZ ALDAN, EPIGMENIO (Mexico)
M.Sc. Researcher, Instituto de Historia Natural y Ecologia
E-mail: pimecruz59 10@hotmail.com; ecruz59 10@prodigy.net.mx

CUARON,ALFREDO D. (Mexico)
Ph.D. Departamento de Ecologia de los Recursos Naturales, Instituto
de Ecologia, UNAM
E-mail: cuaron@oikos.unam.mx

DEE, MICHAEL (United States)
Editor,Tapir Conservation Newsletter, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist
Group (TSG)
E-mail: mjdrhino@yahoo.com

DELLATOGNA, GINA (Panama)
Investigadora Asociada, Instituto de Investigaciones Cientificas
Avanzadas y Servicios de Alta Tecnologia (INDICASAT)
E-mail: gdellat@hotmail.com; gtogna@indicasat.org.pa

DESMOULINS,AUDE (France)
Assistant Director, ZooParc de Beauval
Lowland Tapir Studbook Keeper, European Association of Zoos and
Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: aude.desmoulins@zoobeauval.com

DINATA,YOAN (Indonesia)
Assistant Director, ZooParc de Beauval
Field Manager, Fauna & Flora International Indonesia Program
E-mail:y Idinata@yahoo.com

DOWNER, CRAIG C. (United States)
BA, M.Sc., President, Andean Tapir Fund
E-mail: ccdowner@terra.es; ccdowner@yahoo.com

ESTRADAANDINO, NEREYDA (Honduras)
M.Sc. SAID MIRA
E-mail: nereyda.estrada@gmail.com

FLESHER, KEVIN (United States I Brazil)
E-mail: KevinFlesher@yahoo.com

FLOCKEN,JEFFREY (United States)
Director of Washington DC Office, International Fund for Animal Welfare
E-mail: J Flocken@ifaw.org

FOERSTER, CHARLES R. (United States / Costa Rica)
M.Sc. Leader, Baird's Tapir Project, Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica
E-mail: CRFoerster@aol.com

GARCIAVETTORAZZI, MANOLO JOSE (Guatemala)
Licenciado, Investigador, Centro de Estudios Conservacionistas,
Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala
E-mail: manelgato@gmail.com


GARRELLE, DELLA (United States)
D.V.M. Director of Conservation and Animal Health, Cheyenne
Mountain Zoo
E-mail: dgarelle@cmzoo.org; dgarelle@yahoo.com

GEMITA, ELVA (Indonesia)
Field Manager, Fauna & Flora International / Durrell Institute of
Conservation and Ecology (DICE)
E-mail: elvagemita@gmail.com

GLATSTON,ANGELA (The Netherlands)
Ph.D. Curator of Mammals, Rotterdam Zoo
Member, European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir
Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: a.glatston@rotterdamzoo.nl

GOFF, DON (United States)
Assistant Director, Beardsley Zoological Gardens
Lowland Tapir Studbook Keeper,Association of Zoos & Aquariums
(AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: dgoff@beardsleyzoo.org

GONCALVES DA SILVA,ANDERS (Canada)
Ph.D. Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Unit of Biology and Physical
Geography, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of
British Columbia Okanagan
E-mail: anders.goncalvesdasilva@ubc.ca

GREENE, LEWIS (United States)
Director, Fresno Chaffee Zoo
E-mail: Igreene@fresnochaffeezoo.com

GUERRERO SANCHEZ, SERGIO (Mexico)
D.V.M. Manager, Clinic Laboratory, Zool6gico Regional Miguel Alvarez
del Toro (ZooMat), Instituto de Historia Natural y Ecologia
E-mail: ekio@yahoo.com

GUIRISANDRADE, DARIO MARCELINO (Mexico)
D.V.M. M.Sc.Jefe de Operaciones, UN.A.CH., Policlinica y Diagn6stico
Veterinario
E-mail: dmguiris@hotmail.com

HANDRUS, ELLIOT (United States)
E-mail: ebh 12345@hotmail.com

HERNANDEZ DIVERS, SONIA (United States)
D.V.M.Adjunct Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of
Georgia
E-mail: shernz@aol.com

HOLDEN, JEREMY (Indonesia)
Photographer, Flora and Fauna International
E-mail: pop@padang.wasantara.net.id; jeremy_holden I @yahoo.co.uk

HOLST, BENGT (Denmark)
M.Sc.Vice Director and Director of Conservation and Science,
Copenhagen Zoo
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG)
- Europe Regional Network
Chair, European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: beh@zoo.dk


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






36 TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


JANSSEN, DONALD L. (United States)
D.V.M. Ph.D. Director,Veterinary Services, San Diego Wild Animal Park
E-mail: djanssen@sandiegozoo.org

JULIA,JUAN PABLO (Argentina)
Ph.D. Coordinador, Reserva Experimental Horco Molle
Universidad National de Tucumrn, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales,
E-mail: jupaju@yahoo.es

KAEWSIRISUK, SUWAT (Thailand)
Chief, Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary Department of National Parks,
Wildlife and Plant Conservation, Royal Forest Department of Thailand
E-mail: king@btv.co.th

KANCHANASAKA, BUDSABONG (Thailand)
Wildlife Research Division Department of National Parks,Wildlife
and Plant Conservation, Royal Forestry Department of Thailand
E-mail: Budsa@hotmail.com

KASTON FLOREZ, FRANZ (Colombia)
D.V.M. Scientific Director, Fundaci6n Nativa
E-mail: tapirlanudo@hotmail.com

KAWANISHI, KAE (Malaysia)
Ph.D.Technical Advisor, Division of Research and Conservation
Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP)
E-mail: kae@wildlife.gov.my; kae2000@tm.net.my

KONSTANT,WILLIAM (United States)
Director of Conservation and Science, Houston Zoo Inc.
E-mail: bkonstant@houstonzoo.org

LINKIE, MATTHEW (United Kingdom I Indonesia)
Ph.D. Research Associate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology (DICE), University of Kent
E-mail: m.linkie@kent.ac.uk

LIRATORRES, IVAN (Mexico)
D.V.M. M.Sc. Subdirector de Salud Animal, Direcci6n Tecnica y de
Investigaci6n, Direcci6n General de Zool6gicos yVida Silvestre de la
Ciudad de Mexico (DGZVSDF), Zool6gico de Chapultepec
E-mail: ilira 12@hotmail.com

LIZCANO, DIEGO J. (Colombia)
Ph.D. Professor, Universidad de Pamplona
E-mail: dj.lizcano@gmail.com

LUIS, CRISTINA (Portugal)
Ph.D Post-Doctoral Researcher, CIES-ISCTE
Centro de Biologia Animal, Departamento de Biologia Animal,
Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa
E-mail: cmluis@fc.ul.pt

LYNAM,ANTONY (Thailand)
Ph.D.Associate Conservation Scientist & Regional Advisor, Wildlife
Conservation Society -Asia Program
E-mail: tlynam@wcs.org

MANGINI, PAULO ROGERIO (Brazil)
D.V.M. M.Sc.Associated Researcher, Lowland Tapir Conservation
Initiative, IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for
Ecological Research)
Scientific Coordinator,Vida Livre Medicina de Animais Selvagens
E-mail: pmangini@uol.com.br; pmangini@ipe.org.br


MANOPAWITR, PETCH (Thailand)
Deputy Director,Wildlife Conservation Society -Thailand Program
E-mail: pmanopawitr@wcs.org; pmanopawitr@hotmail.com

MARTYR, DEBORAH (Indonesia)
Team Leader, Flora and Fauna International
E-mail: ffitigers@telkom.net

MATOLA, SHARON (United States I Belize)
Director, Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center
E-mail: matola@belizezoo.org

MAY J R, JOARES A. (Brazil)
D.V.M.Wildlife Veterinarian
Associate Researcher, Lowland Tapir Conservation Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for Ecological
Research)
E-mail: joaresmay@ig.com.br

MEDICI, PATRICIA (Brazil)
M.Sc.Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and Management
Research Coordinator, Lowland Tapir Conservation Initiative
IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for Ecological
Research)
Ph.D. Candidate, Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology
(DICE), University of Kent, United Kingdom
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG)
- Brazil Regional Network
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br

MENDOZA,ALBERTO (Mexico I United States)
D.V.M. Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
E-mail: alumen@aol.com

MOLLINEDO, MANUELA. (United States)
Director, San Francisco Zoological Gardens
E-mail: manuelm@sfzoo.org

MONTENEGRO, OLGA LUCIA (Colombia)
Ph.D. Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL)
E-mail: olmdco@yahoo.com; olmontenegrod@unal.edu.co

MORALES, MIGUELA. (Paraguay I United States)
Ph.D. Protected Areas Management Advisor
People, Protected Areas and Conservation Corridors, Conservation
International (CI)
E-mail: mamorales@conservation.org

NARANJO PINERA, EDUARDO J. (Mexico)
Ph.D. El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)
E-mail: enaranjo@ecosur.mx

NOGALES, FERNANDO (Ecuador)
Institute Ecuatoriano de Propiedad Intelectual (IEPI)
Professor, Escuela de Gesti6n Ambiental de la Universidad Tecnica
Particular de Loja
E-mail: fernogales@yahoo.com; fbnogales@utpl.edu.ec

NOVARINO,WILSON (Indonesia)
Lecturer, Jurusan Biologi FMIPA, Universitas Andalas
E-mail: wilson n id@yahoo.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY 37


NUGROHO,AGUNG (Indonesia)
Field Team Leader / Field Researcher, Fauna & Flora International -
Indonesia Program
E-mail: Pithecellobium98@yahoo.com; info@ffi.or.id

O'FARRILL, GEORGINA XoXo (Mexico I Canada)
Ph.D. Graduate Student, Biology Department, McGill University
ECOSUR-Chetumal, Mexico
E-mail: elsa.ofarrill@mail.mcgill.ca

ORDONEZ DELGADO, LEONARDO (Ecuador)
Coordinator, Proyecto Corredores de Conservaci6n, Fundaci6n
Ecol6gica Arcoiris
E-mail: leonardo@arcoiris.org.ec; tsg.ecuador@gmail.com

PAVIOLO,AGUSTIN (Argentina)
Biologist, Ph.D. Graduate Student, CONICET- LIEY, Universidad
Nacional de Tucuman
E-mail: paviolo4@arnet.com.ar

PEDRAZA PENALOSA, CARLOS ALBERTO (Colombia)
Institute de Investigaci6n de Recursos Biol6gicos < Humboldt>
E-mail: cpedraz@gmail.com

POOT, CELSO (Belize)
Education Director,The Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center
E-mail: celso@belizezoo.org

PRASTITI, SHARMY (Indonesia)
Animal Curator,Taman Safari Indonesia
International Studbook Keeper, Malayan Tapirs
E-mail: tamansafari@indo.net.id; amicurator@tamansafari.com

PRAYURASIDDHI,THEERAPAT (Thailand)
Ph.D.Technical Forest Official Department of National Parks,Wildlife
and Plant Conservation, Royal Forest Department of Thailand
E-mail: theerapat@hotmail.com

PUKAZHENTHI, BUDHAN (United States)
Ph.D. Ungulate Biologist, Smithsonian National Zoological Park
Conservation & Research Center,
E-mail: pukazhenthib@si.edu

QUSE,VIVIANA BEATRIZ (Argentina)
D.V.M. Senior Veterinarian, Fundaci6n Temaiken
E-mail: vquse@temaiken.com.ar

RESTREPO, HECTOR FRANCISCO (Colombia)
M.Sc. Fundaci6n Wii
E-mail: restrepof@gmail.com

RODRIGUEZ ORTIZ, JULIANA (Colombia)
Institute de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
(UNAL)
E-mail: mjuli2@gmail.com

ROJASALFARO,JUAN JOSE (Costa Rica)
Director, Zoocriadero de Dantas La Marina
E-mail: rescatela@yahoo.com; galouno@racsa.co.cr


ROMAN,JOSEPH (United States)
Curator,Virginia Zoological Park
Baird's Tapir Studbook Keeper, Association of Zoos & Aquariums
(AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: Joseph.Roman@norfolk.gov

RUBIANO,ASTRITH (Colombia I United States)
University of Connecticut / Conservation and Research Center,
Smithsonian Institution, Natural Resources Department,
E-mail: astrith.rubiano@uconn.edu; astrithrubiano@yahoo.com

RUIZ FUAMAGALLI,JOSE ROBERTO (Guatemala)
Professor & Researcher, Escuela de Biologia, Universidad de San
Carlos de Guatemala
E-mail: rruizf@yahoo.com

RUSSO, KELLY J. (United States)
Manager of Interactive Marketing,Web Communications Department,
Houston Zoo Inc
E-mail: krusso@houstonzoo.org

SALAS, LEONARDO (Venezuela I United States)
Ph.D.Animal Population Biologist, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Redwood
Sciences Laboratory
E-mail: leoasalas@netscape.net

SAMUDIO JR., RAFAEL (Panama)
Ph.D. President, Sociedad Mastozoologica de Panama (SOMASPA)
Director, Proyecto de Biodiversidad de Mam(feros (PROBIOMA)
E-mail: samudior@si.edu

SANDOVAL ARENAS, SERGIO (Colombia)
Vice-President, Tapir Preservation Fund (TPF)
E-mail: dantascol@yahoo.com.mx

SANDOVAL CANAS, LUIS FERNANDO (Ecuador I Brazil)
Program de P6s-Graduacao em Ecologia e Conservacgo,
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS)
E-mail: luissandoval79@gmail.com

SARMIENTO DUENAS,ADRIANA MERCEDES (Colombia)
M.Sc. Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL)
Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
E-mail: adrianasarmi@hotmail.com; adriana-s@wildmail.com

SARRIA PEREA, JAVIER ADOLFO (Colombia I Brazil)
D.V.M. M.Sc. Genetics & Animal Improvement
Departamento de Genetica e Melhoramento Animal, Universidade
Estadual de Sao Paulo (UNESP)
E-mail: jasarrip@fcav.unesp.br, jasarrip@yahoo.com

SCHWARTZ, KARIN (United States)
M.Sc.Animal Behavior, Ph.D. Candidate, Conservation Biology, George
Mason University, FairFAX)VA, United States
Biological Database Manager, Chicago Zoological Society Brookfield Zoo
Registrar Advisor,Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
Member, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG)
Member, IUCN/SSC Re-Introduction Specialist Group (RSG)
E-mail: karin.schwartz@czs.org


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






38 TSG MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


SCHWARTZ, RICHARD (United States)
President, Nashville Zoo at Grassmere
Chair, Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory
Group (TAG)
E-mail: rschwartz@nashvillezoo.org

SEITZ, STEFAN (Germany)
Ph.D. Captive Research on Tapirs: Behavior and Management, 4TAPIRS
Information Centre
E-mail: tapirseitz@web.de; dr.stefan.seitz@t-online.de

SHEFFIELD, RICHARD (Mexico)
Curador General, Parque Zool6gico de Le6n
Miembro,Asociaci6n de Zool6gicos, Criaderos yAcuarios de Mexico
(AZCARM)
Coordinador, Programa de Recuperaci6n de Especies del Tapir
Centroamericano de AZCARM, MEXICO
E-mail: curador@zooleon.org

SHEWMAN, HELEN (United States)
Collection Manager,Woodland Park Zoo
E-mail: helen.shewman@zoo.org

SHOEMAKER,ALAN H. (United States)
Permit Advisor, Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com

SMITH, BRANDIE (United States)
Assistant Director, Conservation and Science, Association of Zoos &
Aquariums (AZA)
Advisor, Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory
Group (TAG)
E-mail: bsmith@aza.org

SMITH, DIORENE (Republic of Panama)
D.V.M. Parque Municipal Summit
E-mail: dsmithc@gmail.com

STAHL,TIM (United States)
Owner, Stahl Photographics
E-mail: tim I I @cox.net

STANCER, MICHELE (United States)
Animal Care Manager, San Diego Zoological Society
Malayan Tapir Studbook Keeper,Association of Zoos &Aquariums
(AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
E-mail: mstancer@sandiegozoo.org

SUAREZ MEJIA,JAIMEANDRES (Colombia)
Jardin Botanico, Universidad Tecnol6gica de Pereira
E-mail: suarmatta@yahoo.com; jsuarezmejia@gmail.com

TAPIA,ANDRES (Ecuador)
Centro Tecnol6gico de Recursos Amaz6nicos de la Organizaci6n de
Pueblos Indigenas de Pastaza (OPIP) CENTRO FATIMA
E-mail: centrofatima@andinanet.net; centrofati@panchonet.net

THOISY, BENOIT DE (French Guiana)
D.V.M. Ph.D. Kwata Association
E-mail: thoisy@nplus.gf; bdethoisy@pasteur-cayenne.fr


TOBLER, MATHIAS (Switzerland I Perul United States)
Ph.D.Andes to Amazon Biodiversity Program, Botanical Research
Institute of Texas (BRIT)
E-mail: matobler@gmx.net

TODD, SHERYL (United States)
President,Tapir Preservation Fund (TPF)
E-mail: tapir@tapirback.com; oregontapir@yahoo.com

TORRES, NATALIA (Ecuador)
Departamento de Educaci6n, Zool6gico de Quito, ECUADOR
E-mail: ntorres@quitozoo.org; naty I 75@yahoo.com;
naty 75@hotmail.com

TRAEHOLT, CARL (Denmark I Malaysia I Cambodia)
Ph.D. Research Coordinator, Malayan Tapir Project, Krau Wildlife
Reserve, Copenhagen Zoo
E-mail: ctraeholt@pd.jaring.my

UNDERDOWN, POLLY (United Kingdom I Costa Rica)
Rafiki Safari Lodge
E-mail: pollyunderdown@yahoo.co.uk; pollyunderdown@gmail.com

VALDEZ LEAL, JUAN DE DIOS (Mexico I Costa Rica)
E-mail: jdvaldezleal@yahoo.com.mx

VARELA, DIEGO (Argentina)
Licenciado Ciencias Biologicas, Ph.D. Graduate Student, Universidad de
Buenos Aires / Conservaci6n Argentina
E-mail: diegomv@arnet.com.ar

VIEIRA FRAGOSO,JOSE MANUEL (United States)
Ph.D.Associate Professor, Botany Department, University of Hawaii at
Manoa
E-mail: fragoso@hawaii.edu

WALLACE, ROBERT B. (England I Bolivia)
Ph.D.Associate Conservation Ecologist,Wildlife Conservation Society
(WCS) Madidi
E-mail: rwallace@wcs.org

WILLIAMS, KEITH (Australia)
Ph.D. Private Consultant
E-mail: kdwilliams56@yahoo.co.uk

WOHLERS, HUMBERTO (Belize)
General Curator, Belize Zoo
E-mail: animalmgt@belizezoo.org; humbertowohlers@yahoo.com

ZAINUDDIN, ZAINAL ZAHARI (Malaysia)
Malaysian Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP)
E-mail: rhinosrcc@hotmail.com; zainal@wildlife.gov.my

ZAVADA, JEANNE (United States)
Director, East Tennessee State University Natural History Museum
E-mail: zavada@etsu.edu

ZAVADA, MICHAEL (United States)
Ph.D. Professor & Chairman, Department of Biological Sciences, East
Tennessee State University
E-mail: zavadam@etsu.edu


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008






THE NEWSLETTER OF THE IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP 39


TAPI CONSERATO


Tapir Cons.

1813-2286


Website


Editorial Board




















Collaborators






Editors


The views expressed in Tapir Conservation are those of the authors and
do not necessarily reflect those of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
or Houston Zoological Gardens. This publication may be photocopied
for private use only and the copyright remains that of the Tapir Specialist
Group. Copyright for all photographs herein remains with the individual
photographers.


Abbreviation


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 17/1 0 No. 23 0 June 2008


ISSN


www.tapirs.org


Leonardo Salas
E-mail: LeoASalas@netscape.net

Diego J. Lizcano
E-mail: dj.lizcano@gmail.com

Alan H. Shoemaker
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com

Matthew Colbert
E-mail: colbert@mail.utexas.edu

Anders Gongalves da Silva
E-mail: ag2057@columbia.edu

Angela Glatston
E-mail: a.glatston@rotterdamzoo.nl

Patricia Medici
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br

Sheryl Todd
E-mail: tapir@tapirback.com

Michael Dee
E-mail: mjdrhino@yahoo.com

Diego J. Lizcano
E-mail: dj.lizcano@gmail.com

Kelly J. Russo
E-mail: krusso@houstonzoo.org

Stefan Seitz
E-mail: tapirseitz@web.de

This issue is kindly sponsored by Houston Zoo Inc.,
Kelly Russo, 1513 North Mac Gregor, Houston,
Texas 77030, USA.


Cover: Tim Stahl,Whitley Found for Nature


Scope
This newsletter aims to provide information regarding all
aspects of tapir natural history. Items of news, recent events,
recent publications, thesis abstracts, workshop proceedings
etc concerning tapirs are welcome. Manuscripts should be
submitted in MS Word.

Deadlines
There are two deadlines per year: 3 I March for publication
in June and 30 September for publication in December.

Please include the full name and address of the authors
underneath the title of the article and specify who is the
corresponding author.

Full length articles on any aspect of tapir natural history
are accepted in English, Spanish or Portuguese language. They
should not be more than 5,000 words (all text included). In
any case, an English abstract up to 250 words is required.

Figures and Maps
Contributions can include black and white photographs, high
quality figures and high quality maps and tables. Please send
them as separate files (formats preferred: jpg, pdf, cdr, xls).

References
Please refer to these examples when listing references:

Journal Article
Herrera, J.C.,Taber,A.,Wallace, R.B. & Painter, L. 1999.
Lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) behavioral ecology in a
southern Amazonian tropical forest. Vida Silv.Tropicale
8:31-37.

Chapter in Book
Janssen, D.L., Rideout, B.A. & Edwards, M.S. 1999.Tapir
Medicine. In: M.E. Fowler & R. E. Miller (eds.) Zoo and Wild
Animal Medicine, pp.562-568. W.B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia,
USA.

Book
Brooks, D.M., Bodmer, R.E. & Matola, S. 1997.Tapirs: Status,
Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN, Gland,
Switzerland.

ThesislDissertation
Foerster. C.R. 1998.Ambito de Hogar, Patron de Movimentso
y Dieta de la Danta Centroamericana (Tapirus bairdii) en
el Parque Nacional Corcovado, Costa Rica. M.S. thesis.
Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.

Report
Santiapilli, C.& Ramono,WS. 1989.The Status and
Conservation of the Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) in Sumatra,
Indonesia. Unpublished Report,Worldwide Fund for Nature,
Bogor, Indonesia.

Contact
Please send all contributions to Michael Dee, e-mail:
mjdrhino@yahoo.com


Production
& Distribution



Photo Credits







Tapir Conservation

The Newsletter of theTapirSpeci.a t Grou


Volume 17/1 U No. 23 U June 2008


I~ Cotet


Tapir Specialist Group Structure .................... 2

From the Chair ............................................... 3

Letter from the Chair
By Patricia M edici ............................................ 3

Tapir Specialist Group Chair Honored with
Two Environmental Leadership Awards! ......... 6

Symposium Report ........................................ 8

Fourth International Tapir Symposium
By Patricia M edici ............................................ 8

TSG Committee Reports .............................. 20

TSG Action Plan Implementation Taskforce
By Patricia Medici ........................................ 20

AZA Tapir Taxon Advisory Group
By Alberto Mendoza ....................................... 21

TSG Fundraising Committee & TSG Conservation Fund
By Patricia Medici ........................................ 22

Genetics Committee Report
By Anders Gongalves da Silva and Cristina Luis .... 25


TSG's Marketing and Website Committee
By Gilia Angell .............................................. 26

Developing the new 2008 Red List
By Alan H. Shoemaker ................................... 27

TSG Tapir Re-Introduction &
Translocation Advisory Committee
By Patricia Medici .......................................... 28

Veterinary Committee
By Javier Sarria, Paulo Rogerio Mangini and
Viviana B. Quse ...................................... ...... 30

TSG Virtual Library Report 2008
By Mathias Tobler ........................................ 31

TSG Zoo Committee
By Viviana Quse, Alan Shoemaker, Bengt Hoist and
Alberto Mendoza ......................................... 31

Tapir Specialist Group Members ................. 34

Editorial Board ..................................... ... 39

Notes for Contributors ................................ 39


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