Group Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Title: Tapir conservation
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Title: Tapir conservation the newsletter of the IUCNSSC Tapir Specialist Group
Uniform Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Abbreviated Title: Tapir conserv. (Print)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Publisher: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Place of Publication: Houston TX
Houston TX
Publication Date: June 2004
Copyright Date: 2009
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
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Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1990.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 12, no. 2 (Dec. 2003); title from cover.
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June 2004
Volume 13/1 U No. 15


TAPIR SPECIALISTGRDUP Translating Research into Action


Tapir Conservation


www.tapirspecialistgroup.org


Edited by Siin S.Waters and Stefan Seitz


TAPIR SYMPOSIUM


Second International Tapir Symposium
Letters from the Chair and Deputy-Chairs
TSG Committee Reports Regional News a Bibliography
TSG Membership Directory U TSG Structure


Printing and distribution of the Tapir Conservation Newsletter is supported by the
Houston Zoo Inc., 1513 N. Mac Gregor, Houston,Texas 77030, United States,
http://www.houstonzoo.org


NARAULY
WILD


Ak c






2 THE NEWSLETTER OF THE IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP


Conent


Tapi Consevatio


Volume 13/1 U No. 15 E June 2004


From the Chair
Letter from the Chair Patricia Medici
Letter from Co-Deputy Chair Sian S.Waters
Letter from Co-Deputy ChairWilliam Konstant

Second International Tapir Symposium
Organizers and Supporters

TSG Committee Reports
TSG Action Planning Committee:
Report and Plans for Action
TSG Fundraising Committee: Report and Plans for Action
TSG Zoo Committee: Report
Tapir Standards
TSG Veterinary Committee: Report and Plans for Action
TSG Red List Committee: Report
TSG Genetics Committee: Introduction and Report
TSG Education & Outreach Committee:
Introduction and Report
TSG Marketing Committee: Introduction and Report
The New Tapir Specialist Group Website
Newsletter Report

Regional News
COLOMBIA Red Danta Colombia
(Colombian Tapir Network): An Update
BELIZE
HONDURAS Notes on the Relative Abundance and
Hunting of Baird's Tapir in the Rus-Rus Region of
La Moskitia, Honduras: A Proposed Biological Reserve
SUMATRA, INDONESIA
GERMANY Successful Breeding of the MalayTapir
(Tapirus indicus) at Dortmund Zoo, Germany, with a
,,Problem" Female
UNITED KINGDOM

Bibliography

IUCNISSC Tapir Specialist Group
Membership Directory

IUCNISSC Tapir Specialist Group
Structure


Notes for Contributors


Abbreviation


Editorial Board






























Collaborators






Production
& Distribution


Subscriptions






Website


Tapir Cons.


William Konstant
E-mail: bkonstant@houstonzoo.org

Leonardo Salas
E-mail: LeoASalas@netscape.net

Diego J. Lizcano
E-mail: dl36@ukc.ac.uk

Alan H. Shoemaker
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com

PilarAlexander Blanco Marquez
E-mail: albla@telcel.net.ve; albla69@hotmail.com

Matthew Colbert
E-mail: colbert@mail.utexas.edu

Anders Gongalves da Silva
E-mail: ag2057@columbia.edu

Gareth Redston
E-mail: G.Redston@chesterzoo.co.uk

Angela Glatston
E-mail: a.glatston@rotterdamzoo.nl

Patricia Medici
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br

Sheryl Todd
E-mail: tapir@tapirback.com

This issue is kindly sponsored by Houston Zoo
Inc., General Manager, Rick Barongi, 1513 North
Mac Gregor, Houston,Texas 77030, USA.

Members of the Tapir Specialist Group receive the
newsletter free of charge. Subscriptions for non-
members are $10.00 per year and can be obtained
from Sheryl Todd, Tapir Preservation Fund,
tapir@tapirback.com.

www.tapirspecialistgroup.org


The views expressed in Tapir Conservation are those of the authors
and do not necessarily reflect those of IUCN/SSC, the Tapir Specialist
Group or Houston Zoological Gardens. This publication may be photo-
copied for private use only and the copyright remains that of the Tapir
Specialist Group. Copyright for all photographs herein remains with
the individual photographers.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






FROM THE CHAIR 3



Fro th hi


Letter from the Chair

Patricia Medici


I would like to start this letter by saying that the
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group is very proud to
announce that the Second International Tapir Sympo-
sium held in Panama City, Republic of Panama, from
January 10 to 16, 2004, was a major success! As we
reported in the June 2002 issue of this newsletter, the
First International Tapir Symposium in Costa Rica in
2001 was a major boost for the TSG as a group and
for tapir conservation as a whole. That conference
was without any doubt the moment when things really
started happening for the TSG. Tapir conservationists
from many different countries, with many different
backgrounds, representing many different institutions
and doing many different types of research had the op-
portunity to meet each other in person, to learn about
each other's work and to exchange ideas and experienc-
es. After the First Symposium, the TSG went through
an intense process of growth and improvement never
before seen in the history of the group.
In spite of this, the Second International Tapir Sym-
posium's organizers, institutional and financial sup-
porters and participants agreed that this second con-
ference was even better and more productive than the
first one in Costa Rica. We had 80 enthusiastic partici-
pants from 19 different countries, and the atmosphere
during the conference was perfect. All participants
were more than willing to share their knowledge, ex-
change ideas and experiences, establish partnerships,
take over commitments, work hard and have fun. It
always amazes me how much we can accomplish when
we get together, face to face. Approximately 50% of the
TSG membership attended the conference, and during
time we spent together in Panama we were able to dis-
cuss the work of our Specialist Group, evaluate what
has been done over the past two years since the First
Symposium in Costa Rica and develop a whole new set
of plans for the near future.
I will not go into the details of the conference be-
cause there is a complete report about it included in
this issue. Nevertheless, I would like to talk a little
bit about the TSG Plans for Action Workshop, one of
the sessions conducted during the symposium. This
workshop consisted of a full-day meeting dedicated
to identifying and discussing TSG issues, developing
short-term goals for TSG activities, and developing a
list of specific actions that the TSG needs to take in or-


der to reach those goals and
be more effective in terms
of tapir conservation world-
wide. The final outcome of
this workshop was the devel-
opment of the TSG Plans for
Action 2004-2005, an ambi-
tious list of 27 goals ranked
in order of priority and 55
specific actions that the
TSG will put into practice
between now and the Third
International Tapir Sympo-
sium to be held in Chiapas,
Mexico, in January 2006.
For each one of the actions, a Patricia Medici
deadline, an estimated cost,
a person responsible for its
completion, potential collaborators and indicators of
success were established. The first draft of the docu-
ment produced during the workshop was thoroughly
reviewed and edited by a committee of TSG members,
symposium participants and workshop facilitator.
The final version of the plan was distributed to all TSG
members and other interested people and organisa-
tions, and will soon be available online in PDF format
on the TSG Website.
Still on the subject of the conference in Panama,
I would like to take advantage of this opportunity to
THANK all the organizations and people who helped us
to turn the Second Tapir Symposium into reality. The
symposium had institutional and/or financial support
from 60 conservation organizations worldwide, mostly
tapir-holding zoological institutions in the United
States, Europe and Japan. The symposium would not
have been possible without their support and we will
probably never have enough words to demonstrate our
gratitude and appreciation. Special acknowledgements
go to our biggest donors, Houston Zoo Inc., Conserva-
tion International, Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund,
Peace River Center for the Conservation of Tropical Un-
gulates, Los Angeles Zoo, Brookfield Zoo, International
Animal Exchange Inc. and Zoo Conservation Outreach
Group (ZCOG). A detailed list of the symposium's
institutional and financial supporters is provided in
the Second International Tapir Symposium article in-
cluded in this issue. Special acknowledgements also
go to the American Zoo and Aquarium Association
(AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG), especially
Rick Barongi, Lewis Greene and Alan Shoemaker, and
the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA)


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






4 FROM THE CHAIR


Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG), especially Bengt
Hoist. The TSG and both the American and European
Tapir TAGs worked side by side to raise the necessary
funds for the conference, which made it all possible. A
very special person who deserves to be acknowledged
is Philip Schaeffer from Caligo Ventures, who was the
major player in the organisation of the logistics of this
conference. Also, we would like to thank ANCON Expe-
ditions, our ground operator in Panama. Another per-
son who was fundamental in the process was Alberto
Mendoza from the Houston Zoo Inc., who worked real-


Mayor of Panama City, Juan Carlos
Navarro, giving his welcome speech
to the participants of the Second
International Tapir Symposium.
Since beginning the organisation
of this conference Mr. Navarro
has committed the resources of
the entire staff of the Municipality
of Panama City to support this
initiative.


ly hard on vari-
ous aspects of
the conference
organisation
and also on
the construc-
tion of the new
tapir exhibit
at the Summit
Zoo in Panama
City. Speaking
of the tapir ex-
hibit, we would
like to thank
the entire staff
of the Summit
Zoo, the other
members of
the Houston
Zoo staff and
Charles Fo-
erster for all
their hard
work on the
construction
of the 5,000-
square-meter
enclosure.


Special thanks also need to go to Kelly Russo from the
Houston Zoo who designed most of our symposium
materials.
Additionally, during the entire organisation process
for the conference and construction of the tapir exhibit,
we had the full support from the Municipality of Pan-
ama City, and for that we are extremely grateful to the
Mayor, Juan Carlos Navarro, and his entire staff. Mr.
Navarro kindly agreed to give a welcome speech dur-
ing the symposium's opening ceremony, and we truly
appreciated his efforts to accommodate this event in
his busy schedule. We also would like to thank all our
keynote speakers, William Konstant, Matthew Colbert,
Stanley Heckadon-Moreno, William Karesh and Wally
van Sickle, our paper and poster session's presenters,
and our workshop presenters and facilitators. Special
thanks also go to Philip Miller and Amy Camacho from


the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group
(CBSG) who kindly agreed to facilitate our TSG Plans
for Action Workshop, and to our dear friend Wally van
Sickle who once again agreed to conduct our auctions
between many other tasks we gave him!

O n another note, I would like to mention that our
TSG Action Planning Committee keeps working
really hard towards achieving the goal of reviewing and
updating the first version of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Sta-
tus Survey and Conservation Action Plan (1997). As
previously announced, we have agreed that conducting
Population and Habitat Viability Assessments (PHVAs),
in the framework of the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breed-
ing Specialist Group (CBSG), will be the most efficient
method to develop updated versions of the Action Plans
for each one of the four species of tapirs. The first of
a series of four workshops was the Malay Tapir PHVA
held in Malaysia, in August 2003. During the Sec-
ond Symposium in Panama, participants agreed that
the next workshop should focus on mountain tapirs.
The Mountain Tapir PHVA will be held at the Otun-
Quimbaya Sanctuary, Colombia, from October 12 to
15, 2004. The institutional supporters of this project
are the IUCN/SSC CBSG; AZA Tapir TAG; EAZA Tapir
TAG; Houston Zoo Inc.; Colombian Tapir Network;
World Wildlife Fund, Colombia; and Conservation In-
ternational, Colombia. The CBSG will once again be
responsible for the design and facilitation of the work-
shop, as well as production of workshop materials and
final reports. Approximately 60 representatives from
the three mountain tapir range countries Colombia,
Ecuador, and Peru are expected to attend the meet-
ing. Currently, the workshop's planning committee is
putting together a list of potential participants, and sub-
mitting proposals to raise funds for the workshop. The
Baird's Tapir PHVA will be held at The Belize Zoo and
Tropical Education Center, Belize, in the second semes-
ter of 2005, and TSG members are still discussing the
best venue and dates for the Lowland Tapir PHVA. For
further details about the TSG Action Planning Commit-
tee and its previous and future activities please see the
committee's report included in this issue.
Regarding our fundraising activities, I would like to
point out that during 2004 the TSG Fundraising Com-
mittee will once again conduct fundraising campaigns
for private donors and tapir-holding zoos, in order to
raise funds for the TSG Conservation Fund (TSGCF)
and support tapir conservation projects. During the
symposium in Panama we conducted live and silent
auctions, and we were able to raise US$4,500 for
the TSGCF These funds will be distributed to tapir
research projects in the form of small grants during
the TSGCF 2004 Funding Cycle, which will be prob-
ably conducted in June 2004. It is also important to
mention that the Fundraising Committee will be work-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






FROM THE CHAIR 5


ing closely with the recently created TSG Marketing
Committee, coordinated by Gilia Angell, who is also
our Webmaster. Gilia has been working tirelessly on
creating a marketing plan for the group, and she has
been also putting a lot of effort into the construction
of the new TSG Website. If you still haven't had the
chance to visit the site at www.tapirspecialistgroup.org,
please check it out. I must tell you it looks great! As
we already mentioned several times over the past few
months, we need our membership to help Gilia to build
THE website we want to have. Gilia needs our constant
feedback in order to be able to translate our needs and
help us with our tapir conser-
vation initiatives.
Last but not least, I would
like to use this opportunity *
to report a few modifications
on the TSG structure and
membership. First, I would
like to announce that Charles
Foerster has decided to resign
as Deputy-Chair of the group.
Charles will be very busy in
Costa Rica in the next few
months and will be in the field
and away from e-mail for ex-
tended periods of time, which
is the main reason why he has
decided to step down. Charles
continues to be a TSG mem-
ber and will keep working with
us whenever he is able. I have
a lot to thank him for particu- From left to right: Ric
From left to right: Ric
larly all his help over the past the Houston Zoo Inc.
few years when we worked AZATapir
SAZATapirTAG; Lewis
side-by-side co-chairing this r a Zo ad
Virginia Zoo and Chai
group. THANK YOU, Charlie! Patricia Medici, Cha
Patricia Medici, Chair
As a consequence of this, and Specialist Group (TS
Specialist Group (TSC
considering that the amount of Curator of Mammals
TSG work and responsibilities and member of the A
has been growing exponen- the Second Internatio
tially, we decided that it would in Pan
in Panama.
be a good idea to have two Co-
Deputy Chairs. In this way, we
believe that we will be able to coordinate our work a lot
more efficiently, and share the group's responsibilities
and workload. With that said, I would like to announce
that our new TSG Co-Deputy Chairs are Sian Waters
and William Konstant. Sian Waters has been our TSG
Zoo Committee Coordinator for the past two years, be-
sides being the Contributions Editor for this newsletter.
William Konstant has recently accepted TSG member-
ship during the symposium in Panama, but as many
of you know he has always been a constant and major
supporter of virtually all TSG activities. Both Sian
and Bill are very communicative and very enthusiastic


kE
an
G
r c
of
');
of
ZA
*na


about tapir conservation, and I have no doubts we will
be able to accomplish a lot working as a team. Most
importantly, they are both very much willing to help us
to make the TSG even more efficient and active than it
already is! THANK YOU, Sian and Bill, for accepting
our invitation and taking the challenge!!!
Still on the subject of TSG structure changes, and,
as a direct outcome of the TSG Plans for Action Work-
shop conducted during the symposium in Panama, TSG
members attending the conference decided to create a
few new committees in order to improve our group's
efficiency in terms of putting our priority actions into
practice. In addition to the
five TSG Committees formed
; -* in Costa Rica in 2001 Action
Planning, Fundraising, Red
List, Veterinary and Zoo Com-
mittees three new ones Ed-
ucation & Outreach, Genetics
and Marketing Committees
were created in Panama.
SD Each one of these eight com-
mittees will have their own
roles and responsibilities and
the committees' coordinators
and members are truly com-
mitted to work hard. Further
details about and reports
from all TSG Committees are
included in this issue.

Sso in Panama, 17 new
members were added
Earongi, Director ofs we
d memberofthe to our membership and four
D r o t were removed. Therefore, we
reene, Director of the
now have 83 members from
fthe CAZATapirTAG; 24 different countries (Argen-
the IUCN/SSCTapir tina, Australia, Belize, Bolivia,
and Michael Dee,
Brazil, Canada, Colombia,
the Los Angeles Zoo
Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecua-
iTapirTAG, during
TapirT during dor, Germany, Guatemala,
ITapir Symposium
Guyana, Indonesia, Malaysia,
Mexico, Panama, Peru, Tai-
wan, Thailand, The Nether-
lands, United Kingdom, United States, and Venezuela).
The reason for these additions and removals were very
simple. During the symposium in Panama, we had the
pleasure of meeting many tapir conservationists from
many different countries, who demonstrated their will-
ingness to join the group and help us with our activi-
ties. We decided that we needed this new energy and
commitment in order to put our priority actions into
practice and reach our goals. On the other hand, we
decided to review our previous membership list and
remove some of the "not so communicative" members
from the group, something we have decided to do every


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






6 FROM THE CHAIR


six months. We completely understand that Specialist
Group membership is voluntary and that sometimes
people cannot dedicate much of their time to the TSG,
but we strongly believe that once you send in your reg-
istration form to join a Specialist Group, it is assumed
that you are willing to help in some way. The TSG is
not only about information exchange anymore. Over
the past few years, we have grown stronger, we have
became more pro-active, we have people dedicating
their time to specific tasks and actions, and we need all
members to be involved at some level.
As a result of the TSG Plans for Action Workshop,
we now have a considerable amount of work to do, and
we need our entire membership to be as communica-
tive and active as possible. I am certain that if we do
not communicate well and work effectively as a group,
we will never be able to reach our goals. Therefore,
one of the goals listed as a priority for the TSG over the
next two years is to "improve communication between
TSG members", and one of the actions recommended
to reach this goal is to have the TSG Officers (mostly
the chair, deputy-chairs, and committee coordinators)
communicating with the entire membership and/or
members of specific committees at least once a month.
By doing that, we expect that each member of the TSG
will become involved in at least one of the tasks listed
on the TSG Plans for Action 2004-2005.
As a final comment, I would like to urge our TSG
members to get as involved as much as possible in the
general work and specific activities of the Tapir Special-
ist Group. Please contact the coordinators of the TSG
Committees and get involved with their work. Contact
the people responsible for the tasks listed on the TSG
Plans for Action, offer your help, send your comments,
suggestions, and criticisms! Submit articles to the Ta-
pir Conservation Newsletter, post information on Tapir
Talk. Please contribute as much as you can, and try
your best to be a communicative and active member.
I strongly believe, that there is something different
and something really special about the Tapir Special-
ist Group and its network of supporters. During the
symposium in Panama I realized that our group is defi-
nitely surrounded by some sort of positive energy that
becomes undoubtedly evident when we gather together
under the same roof, and I am sure that tapirs can only
benefit if we take advantage of this "energy".

My very best wishes from Brazil,

Patricia Medici
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG),
Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sdo Paulo, Teodoro
Sampaio, CEP: 19280-000, Sdo Paulo, Brazil
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Cell Phone: +55-18-9711-6106
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br


Letter from Co-Deputy Chair

Sian S. Waters



Dear Colleagues,

met many of you at the Second Tapir Symposium
in Panama in January this year. However, for those
of you who have never heard of me I would like to
introduce myself. First of all, many people who have
never met me think I must be a male due to my strange
Welsh name but I am female
and don't worry if you have
addressed me as a male in
a message I'm quite used
to it!
I am a psychology gradu-
ate and my M.Phil research
focused on a South Ameri-
can primate, the white-faced
saki. I have worked in both
captivity and the field, work-
ing mainly primates and
carnivores. I initiated the
EAZA Tapir and Hippo TAG
when I worked as a curator
at Bristol Zoo Gardens and
have worked in Indochina SiG n S.Waters
and Indonesia as a technical
advisor to zoos there.
I have to say that I was very surprised and pleased
when Pati invited me to take on this position as I don't
think I am a particularly active TSG member and I am
certainly no tapir expert, but I am a conservationist and
that's what it's all about. The TSG is a really active Spe-
cialist Group with a great group dynamic. Everything
is achieved through teamwork and that's something
I am very happy to be part of. I am looking forward
to working hard with all TSG members to achieve the
goals set at the Action Planning meeting over the next
two years and meeting you all again in Mexico at the
next Symposium.
Last but not least I would like to thank Pati for the
invitation to be a Co-Deputy Chair. I just hope I'm up
to the job!

Cheers,

Sidn S. Waters
14 Lindsay Gardens, Tredegar, Gwent NP22 4RR
United Kingdom
Phone: +44-0-1495-722-117
Email: sian s waters@hotmail.com;
sianswaters@yahoo.co.uk


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






FROM THE CHAIR 7


Letter from Co-Deputy Chair

William Konstant


L et me begin by saying how honoured I was when
Pati Medici asked me to serve as Co-Deputy Chair
of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group, even though I
did not immediately accept the invitation. More than
two decades as a member of the Primate Specialist
Group have shown me the
magnitude of the task and
why such responsibilities
shouldn't be taken lightly.
Three things convinced .l
me to accept Pati's invita-
tion. First and foremost
is the opportunity to work
more closely with her. Few
people I know are as dedi-
cated, dynamic and organ-
ised, but I don't need to tell
you that. Equally important
is the nature of the TSG it-
self. I was fortunate to have
attended the first two inter-
national tapir symposia and
to have met the majority of William Konstant
the specialists whose work is
critical to secure the future,
not only for tapirs but for myriad other plants and
animals that share their tropical habitats. The TSG
is more than just a network. It's a great team as well,
including my Co-Deputy, Sian Waters.
And then there are the tapirs themselves.
At the symposium in Panama, I spoke about tapirs
as "flagship species", a term that is sometimes thrown
around a bit too much to support the case for conser-
vation. Taking a critical look, however, it applies to
tapirs as much as to any other charismatic creatures
and I think it can be used very effectively as a tool to
secure support for conservation actions. What we need
to do is back it up with good solid data. "Flagship spe-
cies for what?" is the question we continually need to
ask ourselves. In Panama, I presented some rough
figures based on Conservation International's recent
hotspot and wilderness area analyses, impressive fig-
ures for how much biodiversity wild tapir populations
may actually represent. Though they may be less well
known and not as appealing to the public as jaguars,
tigers, rhinos and elephants, tapirs are certainly just
as representative of tropical diversity and can be used
effectively to promote ecosystem conservation.
Since the Panama symposium, I have been work-
ing with Pati and several other TSG members to raise


funds for specific projects, which is probably the best
way I can best contribute to the group's mission. We've
had some good success recently and look forward to
more in the weeks and months ahead. One of the great
pleasures of the fund-raising task is the opportunity to
learn more about the work and needs of individual ta-
pir specialists, and I hope to visit a few of your project
sites as we continue to make progress. Each and every
TSG member has a story about tapirs worth telling and
it is important that we get the word out whenever possi-
ble. Tapir conservation efforts can suffer from a lack of
public recognition, as you all are well aware, so we need
to share more interesting information with prospective
supporters to gain an advantage. Pati can add that to
my list of duties.
Let me conclude by thanking Rick Barongi and
the Houston Zoo for supporting my new position. His
personal encouragement and the institutional support
behind it made accepting the invitation an easy deci-
sion. I very much look forward to the tasks ahead and
to working more closely with all of you.

William Konstant
Director of Conservation and Science, Houston Zoo Inc.,
Deputy Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
1513 North MacGregor, Houston, Texas 77030,
United States
Phone: +1-215-233-9318/ Fax: +1-215-402-0469
E-mail: bkonstant@houstonzoo.org











nd oe r b l d t


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






8 SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM



Second Internationa Tapr Ssi


By Patricia Medici


T he Second International Tapir Symposium was
held in Panama City, Republic of Panama, from
January 10 to 16, 2004. The main organizers of the
conference were the IUCN Species Survival Commis-
sion (SSC) Tapir Specialist Group (TSG) and the
American Zoo & Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir
Taxon Advisory Group (TAG). Caligo Ventures Inc. in
the United States was the symposium's planner, and
ANCON Expeditions of Panama was the symposium's
operator on the ground in Panama. Several organisa-
tions collaborated with the organisation of the confer-
ence between them, the Houston Zoo Inc. in the United
States, the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria
(EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) and the
Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark. The symposium had
financial and/or institutional support from about 60
conservation organizations worldwide, mostly tapir
holding zoological institutions in the United States,
Europe and Japan (see the list of institutional and fi-
nancial supporters on page 12).
The main purpose of the Tapir Symposium is to bring
together a multi-faceted group of tapir conservationists
and experts, including field biologists and research-
ers, educators, husbandry and captive management
specialists,
veterinarians,
governmental
authorities
and non-gov-
ernmental
organisation
representa-
tives, academ-
ics, politicians,
and other key
players in the
development
and implemen-
tation of tapir
conservation
and manage-
ment pro-
grammes. The
main goal of
this conference
Researcher and TSG Member Olga is to conduct
Lucia Montenegro from Colombia overviews of
making a presentation during the current tapir
Lowland Tapir paper session. research (in-


situ and ex-situ), conservation and management issues
to generate the necessary information to promote action
planning in terms of priorities for tapir conservation in
Central and South America and Southeast Asia. This
conference also aims to establish conservation partner-
ships and develop and maintain a communication net-
work of tapir conservationists worldwide, allowing for
the conference recommendations to be carried out and
evaluated at future meetings.


Researcher and TSG MemberAdriana Sarmiento
from Colombia presenting her poster during the
symposium's poster session.



The Second International Tapir Symposium was ex-
tremely successful and even better and more productive
than the First Symposium in Costa Rica in 2001. We
had 80 participants, including tapir conservationists
from 19 different countries (Argentina, Australia, Be-
lize, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark,
French Guiana, Guatemala, Honduras, Malaysia, Mexi-
co, Republic of Panama, Peru, The Netherlands, United
Kingdom, United States, and Venezuela). About 50% of
the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG) member-
ship attended the conference, and as a consequence,
the group was very well represented. The Chair (Lewis
Greene) and 4 other members of the American Zoo
and Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory
Group (TAG), and the Chair (Bengt Hoist) and another
member of the European Association of Zoos and
Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
also attended the conference.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM 9


The first part of the symposium consisted of keynote
speeches and paper and poster sessions addressing ta-
pir research, conservation and management. The sec-
ond part of the symposium was devoted to workshops
addressing and prioritising specific topics relevant to
the conservation of the four species of tapirs and their
remaining habitats in Latin America and Southeast
Asia. Paper and poster sessions covered a wide range
of issues relevant to tapir conservation, such as tapir
ecology, field research, population management, threat
assessments, husbandry and captive management, vet-
erinary issues, implementation of action plans, habitat
evaluations, research methodologies, identification of
priority areas for tapir conservation, education, ethno-
zoology etc. Paper sessions were organised by species
and each speaker had 15 minutes for their presenta-
tions and 5 minutes for questions. Presentations were
made in either English or Spanish and simultaneous
translation was available throughout the conference.
In all, 14 papers were presented, four in the Lowland
Tapir Session, two in the Malay Tapir Session, four in
the Mountain Tapir Session, two in the Baird's Tapir
Session, and two in the General Topics Session. Post-
ers were exhibited throughout the first two days of
the conference and presenters were available by their
posters during coffee breaks. In all, 21 posters were
presented, seven about lowland tapirs, three about
Malay tapirs, three about mountain tapirs, seven about
Baird's tapirs, and one on general topics. Paper and
poster presenters represented many different tapir
range countries in Central and South America and
Southeast Asia, including Argentina, Brazil, Colom-
bia, Costa Rica, French Guiana, Guatemala, Malaysia,
Mexico and Venezuela, and there were also presenters
from Australia, Canada and the United States.

S ix keynote speakers made presentations through-
out the conference. Dr. William Konstant with
Conservation International and Houston Zoo Inc., Unit-
ed States, was the first keynote speaker of the confer-
ence and gave a speech about the tapir's potential to be
used as a flagship species. Patricia Medici, Chair of the
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG) made a pres-
entation about the recently founded TSG Conservation
Fund, sharing with the audience the history of the Fund
and its main activities and accomplishments in 2003.
Dr. Matthew Colbert of the University of Texas, United
States, gave a speech about how to estimate maturity of
tapirs using skeletal and dental indicators. Dr. Stanley
Heckadon-Moreno with the Smithsonian Tropical Re-
search Institute, Republic of Panama, made a presenta-
tion about the history of Panama and the involvement
of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in the
conservation of the natural resources of the country,
mostly focusing on the Smithsonian's communications
and public programmes. Dr. William B. Karesh with the


Wildlife Con-
servation Soci-
ety (WCS) and
the IUCN/SSC
Veterinary Spe-
cialist Group
(VSG), United
States, gave a
speech about
conservation
medicine and
the many fac-
tors affecting
wildlife health
and how WCS
and the VSG
have been ad-
dressing the
complexities
of maintain-
ing ecosystem Rick Barongi, Director of the
health. Wally Houston Zoo Inc. and one of the
Van Sickle main organizers of the conference,
with Idea holding a wooden tapir purchased
Wild, United during the live auction. Live and
States, was the silent auctions conducted during
last keynote the conference raised a total of
speaker of the US$4,500 for the TSG Conservation
conference and Fund.
made a very
inspiring presentation about Idea Wild's conservation
work supporting researchers and educators around
the world.
Another session conducted during the conference
was the TSG Committee Reports Session. Sian S.
Waters, Coordinator of the TSG Zoo Committee and
Pilar Alexander Blanco Marquez, D.V.M., Coordinator
of the TSG Veterinary Committee, gave reports about
the work of those committees over the past two years.
Additionally, both committee coordinators conducted
meetings with their committee members to discuss
their future steps and actions for the next two years.
The Tapir Genetics Workshop was conducted by
Anders Gonqalves da Silva from Brazil, Ph.D. Gradu-
ate Student at Columbia University, United States
and Javier Adolfo Sarria Perea from Colombia, M.Sc.
Graduate Student at the Universidade Estadual de Sho
Paulo (UNESP), Brazil. The main goal of this workshop
was to propose the creation of the TSG Genetics Com-
mittee and the design and establishment of the TSG
International Tapir Genetics Project, a concerted effort
to undertake the job of answering important genetic
questions surrounding tapir conservation.
The Husbandry and Captive Management Work-
shop included presentations by AZA and EAZA mem-
bers, as well a representative from a lowland tapir


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






10 SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM


Lewis Greene, Director of the Virginia Zoo and Chair of
the AZATapirTAG, making a presentation during the
Tapir Husbandry and Captive Management Workshop.



range country. Lewis Greene, Chair of the American
Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG) and Director of the Virginia
Zoological Gardens, and Rick Barongi, former chair of
the AZA Tapir TAG and Director of the Houston Zoo
Inc., made a presentation about the AZA Tapir TAG
Action Plan developed in 2003. Alan H. Shoemaker,
Permit Advisor to the AZA Tapir TAG, made a presen-
tation about the management plans for captive tapirs
in North America. Bengt Hoist, Chair of the European
Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG) and Vice-Director of the Copen-
hagen Zoo, Denmark, gave a report about the activities
of the EAZA Tapir TAG over recent years. Rick Barongi
made a presentation about the history of tapirs in
captivity in Panama and the significant developments
in raising awareness for the conservation of tapirs in
the country over the last 13 years. Alberto Mendoza,
Community Programmes Coordinator of the Houston
Zoo Inc., United States, made a presentation about the
construction of the new tapir exhibit at the Summit Zoo
in Panama City. Viviana B. Quse, Senior Veterinarian
of the Temaik6n Foundation, Argentina, gave a speech
about hormonal and ultrasonography studies during
the pregnancy of a lowland tapir at her zoo.
The Action Planning for Tapir Conservation Work-
shop included presentations about the many different
methods of developing action plans. Olga Lucia Mon-
tenegro from Colombia, Ph.D Graduate Student at the
University of Florida, United States, made a presenta-
tion about the National Programmefor Tapir Recovery
and Conservation in Colombia, which was developed
as a joint effort with the Colombian Ministry of Envi-
ronment and the Institute of Natural Sciences of the
National University of Colombia, in October 2002. Dr.


Bengt Holst,Vice-Director of the Copenhagen Zoo in
Denmark and Chair of the EAZATapirTAG, making a
presentation during the Action Planning forTapir
Conservation Workshop.


Eduardo J. Naranjo Pifiera, researcher at El Colegio de
la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Mexico, made a presenta-
tion about the development of the Mexican National
Plan for Tapir Conservation and Recovery. Dr. Philip
S. Miller, Senior Programme Officer of the IUCN/SSC
Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG),
United States, gave a speech about the CBSG's Popula-
tion and Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA) process
and how it can be used as a tool to design and develop
species action plans. Bengt Hoist, Vice Director of the
Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, Chair of the EAZA Tapir
TAG and Convener of CBSG Europe, made a presen-
tation about the PHVA conducted for Malay Tapirs in
August 2003, in Malaysia. He explained how this meth-
odology was used for the development of an updated
Malay Tapir Conservation Action Plan.
The Fundraising Workshop included presentations
about how to identify potential donors and raise funds
for tapir conservation. Wally Van Sickle, President of
Idea Wild, United States, and Patricia Medici, Chair of
the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG), shared
their particular experiences and discussed the many
different types of fundraising, the different types of
donors, how to write successful proposals, how to
approach donors, and how to cultivate a relationship
with donors. Gilia Angell, Web/Graphic Designer of
Amazon.com in the United States, and TSG Webmas-
ter and Coordinator of the TSG Marketing Committee,
made a presentation about the use of web design as a
conservation tool and the marketing and fundraising
strategies for the new TSG Website and the TSG Con-
servation Fund (TSGCF).
On the final day of the conference, we held a work-
shop entitled TSG Plans for Action. It consisted of a
full-day meeting and the main objective of this session


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM 11


was to set short-term goals and actions that the TSG
should take during the next two years (2004-2005) in
order to be more effective in terms of tapir conservation
worldwide. Dr. Philip S. Miller, Senior Programme Of-
ficer of the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Special-
ist Group (CBSG), United States and Amy Camacho,
General Director of Africam Safari and Convener of
the CBSG Mexico Regional Network, facilitated the
workshop.

I n advance of the conference, participants were
asked to prepare a list of ten actions they believed
should be considered as priorities for the TSG over
the next two years. Participants were requested to
ask themselves "What the TSG should do as a group?"
and "What actions should the TSG take in the next two
years in order to be
more effective in terms
of tapir conserva-
tion?" The workshop
facilitators reviewed
the lists of actions
previously prepared by
the symposium partici-
pants and defined the
workshop dynamics.
Four different work-
ing group topics were
identified based on
the actions suggested
earlier. They were: 1.)
Research; 2.) In-Situ
Management; 3.) Ex-
Situ Management; and
4.) Communication
& Education/Public Rick Barongi, Director of the
Awareness. Partici- Brighton with PJ Architects,
pants were then asked City, Juan Carlos Navarro, wit
to join one of these painting during the inaugural
groups at their own at the Summit Zoo. Mr. Brigl
discretion and each well-known zoo architect and
group was requested of the new exhibit to the Sun
to identify a leader, a
flip-chart recorder, a
computer recorder, a timekeeper, and a reporter. As
a first step, each working group was given the tasks
of identifying the issues and developing the short-term
goals for TSG activities related to the main topics they
were covering. The goals identified by each one of the
working groups during these initial deliberations were
presented in a plenary session. This guaranteed every-
one had an opportunity to contribute to the work of the
other groups and ensured that issues and goals were
carefully reviewed and discussed by the group. Once
all the identified goals were presented, each participant
was asked to rank them in order of priority. The work-


He
)re
h
:ioi
htc
I di
nm


shop facilitators then compiled the individual scores
in order to obtain a group prioritisation for TSG goals.
As a second step, all working groups reassembled and
were asked to develop a list of specific actions that
TSG needed to take in order to reach those higher-
priority goals. For each one of the actions, a deadline,
an estimated cost, a person to be responsible for its
achievement, potential collaborators, and indicators
of success was established. Where necessary, similar
actions developed by different working groups for an
individual goal were combined in the most effective
manner. The final outcome of the TSG Plans for Action
Workshop was a list of 27 priority goals and 55 specific
actions that the TSG will put into practice over the next
two years (2004-2005) in order to reach those goals
between now and the Third International Tapir Sympo-
sium to be held in Chi-
apas, Mexico, in Janu-
ary 2006. Long-term
issues directly related
to the conservation of
the four species of ta-
pirs and their habitats
were not addressed
during this specific
workshop, but will be
carefully discussed
during the process of
revising and updat-
ing the first edition of
the IUCN/SSC Tapir
Status Survey and
Conservation Action
Plan (1997), which is
underway. The final
ouston Zoo Inc., and Jim document produced
sending the Mayor of Panama during this workshop
a framed Baird's tapir was carefully reviewed
n of the new tapir exhibit and edited by TSG
n, a very respected and Members and sympo-
esigner, donated the design sium participants, and
nit Zoo. will be made available
on the TSG Website
soon.
Another event conducted during the symposium
was an auction to raise funds for the recently founded
TSG Conservation Fund (TSGCF). Attendees were
asked to bring typical items from their home countries
to sell at the silent and live auctions. Wally Van Sickle
with Idea Wild, United States, with the help of Gilia An-
gell with Amazon.com, United States, kindly organised
and conducted the auction and the symposium raised
$4,500 for the TSG Conservation Fund. These funds
will be distributed in the form of small grants to tapir
field and captivity conservation projects through a se-
lective process to be conducted in May 2004.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






12 SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM



Second Internationa Tapr S os


ORGANIZERS

IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Tapir Specialist
Group (TSG) and American Zoo and Aquarium Association
(AZA) TapirTaxon Advisory Group (TAG).

PLANNING COMMITTEE

Patricia Medici Conservation Biologist, Lowland Tapir
Project, IPE Institute for Ecological Research, Brazil
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)

Rick Barongi Director, Houston Zoo Inc., United States;
Former Chair / Member, American Zoo and Aquarium As-
sociation (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG); Member,
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)

Philip Schaeffer Zoologist/Conference Planner and Regis-
trar, Caligo Ventures Inc., United States

Alberto Mendoza Community Programs Coordinator,
Houston Zoo Inc., United States; Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)

Kelly Russo Conservation Program Assistant, Houston Zoo
Inc., United States; Education & Outreach Committee Coordi-
nator, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)

Marco Gandasegui -Vice President, ANCON Expeditions
of Panama, Republic of Panama

Charles R. Foerster Biologist, Baird's Tapir Project, Cor-
covado National Park, Costa Rica; Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)

SYMPOSIUM LOGISTICS

Caligo Ventures Inc., United States; ANCON Expeditions of
Panama, Republic of Panama; and Hotel Continental, Panama
City, Republic of Panama.

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

Africam Safari, Mexico; American Zoo and Aquarium Associa-
tion (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG); Conservation
International, United States; Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark; Eu-
ropean Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon
Advisory Group (TAG); Fundaci6n AndigenA (AndigenA Foun-
dation),Venezuela; Houston Zoo Inc., United States; Idea Wild,
United States; IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute
for Ecological Research), Brazil; IUCN/SSC Conservation
Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), United States; Municipality
of Panama City, Republic of Panama; Nashville Zoo at Grass-
mere, United States; PJ Architects, United States; Red Danta de


Colombia (Colombian Tapir Network), Colombia; Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute, Republic of Panama; Summit Zoo,
Panama City, Republic of Panama; Tapir Preservation Fund
(TPF), United States; and Virginia Zoological Gardens, United
States.

MAJOR FINANCIAL SUPPORTERS

Houston Zoo Inc., United States; Conservation International,
United States; Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund, United
States; Peace River Center for the Conservation of Tropi-
cal Ungulates, United States; Los Angeles Zoo, United States;
Brookfield Zoo, Chicago Zoological Society, United States;
International Animal Exchange Inc., United States; and Zoo
Conservation Outreach Group (ZCOG) c/o Audubon Park
Zoological Garden, United States.

OTHER SPONSORS
Africam Safari, Mexico; Asociaci6n Meralvis (Meralvis Associa-
tion), Costa Rica; Beardsley Zoological Gardens, United States;
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, United States; Fundaci6n Zoologica
de Cali (Cali Zoological Foundation), Colombia; Center for
Environmental Conservation and Research (CERC), Colum-
bia University, United States; Chaffee Zoological Gardens of
Fresno, United States; Chester Zoo, North of England Zoo-
logical Society, United Kingdom; Continental Airlines, United
States; Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark; Detroit Zoological Insti-
tute, Detroit Zoological Society, United States; El Colegio de
la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Mexico; El Paso Zoo, United States;
Fossil Rim Wildlife Center, United States; Chaffee Zoological
Gardens of Fresno, Fresno Zoological Society, United States;
Fundaci6n Temaiken (Teimaiken Foundation), Argentina; Hat-
tiesburg Zoo, United States; Idea Wild, United States; IUCN/
SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG), United
States; Marwell Zoological Park, United Kingdom; Miami Metro
Zoo, Zoological Society of Florida, United States; Miejski Ogrod
Zoologiczny Lodz (Lodz Zoo), Poland; Milwaukee County Zoo-
logical Gardens, United States; Mountain View Conservation
and Breeding Center, Gilman Investment LLC, Canada; Henry
Doorly Zoo, Omaha Zoological Society, United States; Paignton
Zoological & Botanical Gardens, United Kingdom; Palm Beach
Zoo at Dreher Park, United States; Parc Zoologique Doue-
la-Fontaine (Doue-la-Fontaine Zoo), France; Parc Zoologique
de Lille (Lille Zoo), France; Parque XCARET (XCARET Park),
Mexico; Rotterdam Zoo, The Netherlands; Sedgwick County
Zoo, United States;The Belize Zoo and The Tropical Education
Center, Belize; Ueno Zoo and Tama Zoo,Tokyo Zoo Conserva-
tion Fund,Japan; Universidad del Mar Campus Puerto Escon-
dido, Mexico; University of Florida, United States;White Oak
Conservation Center, United States; Wildlife Conservation
Society, Argentina;Wildlife World Zoo Inc., United States.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM 13


WallyVan Sickle, President of IdeaWild, making a Diego J. Lizcano, Ph.D. Graduate student at Kent
presentation during the FundraisingWorkshop. University in the UK and a mountain tapir researcher
in Colombia, presenting the results from the Research
Working Group during the TSG Plans forAction
Workshop.


Mid-conference trips provided the opportunity for the
symposium participants to either spend the day at the
Barro Colorado Island (BCI), one of the most studied
patches of tropical forest managed by the Smithso-
nian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), or take a tour
around Pana-
ma City, includ-
ing visits to the
City's Metro-
politan Park,
the Panama
Viejo and the
Panama Canal
Miraflores
Locks. Both
trips ended at
the Panama
City's Sum-
mit Zoo in the
late afternoon
Si ., for a cocktail
reception and
the inaugura-
tion of the new
5,000 square
metre tapir ex-
hibit attended
by the Mayor
of Panama
Dr. Philip S. Miller, Senior City, Dr. Juan
Programme Officer of the IUCNI Carlos Navar-
SSC Conservation Breeding ro, other local
Specialist Group (CBSG),facilitating dignitaries, the
the TSG Plans for Action Workshop. Summit Zoo


and Houston Zoo staff members who worked on the
construction of the exhibit, symposium participants
and the press. A partnership between the Houston
Zoo and the Municipality of Panama City was forged
to bring this exhibit to reality. Jim Brighton of PJ
Landscape Architects, United States, and staff at the
Houston and Summit Zoos combined their design and
husbandry expertise with ecological knowledge pro-
vided by Baird's tapir biologist Charles R. Foerster to
design an enclosure that would best suit the zoo's seven
tapirs. Four separate trips to Panama by Houston Zoo
staff, led by Houston Zoo's Community Programmes
Coordinator Alberto Mendoza, ensured that construc-
tion stayed on schedule and that extra hands were put
to work building two large exhibits, six holding pens
(all with individual pools), welding fences and building
viewing platforms out of trees harvested from Summit
Park. Funding for the project came from Houston Zoo's
Naturally Wild Conservation Programme and the Mu-
nicipality of Panama City.

D during the next few months, the TSG will be asking
all paper and poster presenters, keynote speak-
ers and workshop facilitators of the First and Second
International Tapir Symposiums to submit complete
articles so that a complete Proceedings CD-ROM can be
produced and distributed, ensuring that all the infor-
mation and recommendations generated during these
conferences are published and implemented so that
there are immediate and long-term benefits for tapir
conservation worldwide.
If you are interested in receiving the complete re-
port about the Second International Tapir Symposium
or the final version of the TSG Plans for Action 2004-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






14 SECOND INTERNATIONAL TAPIR SYMPOSIUM 0 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


2005, please do not hesitate to contact me. We
will also keep you all posted about the progress on
the organisation of the Third International Tapir
Symposium!

Hope to see you all in Mexico in 2006!


Patricia Medici
M.Sc. in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and
Management
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sdo Paulo, Teodoro
Sampaio, CEP: 19280-000, Sdo Paulo, Brazil
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Cell Phone: +55-18-9711-6106
E-mail: epmedici @uol.com.br; medici(@ipe.org.br


From left to right: Silvia C. Chalukian from Argentina,
Philip S. Miller from the USA,Amy Camacho from Mexico,
Siti Khadijah Abd. Ghani from Malaysia, Jaime Andres Suarez
Mejia from Colombia,Adriana Sarmiento from Colombia,
and Adrian Naveda Rodriguez from Venezuela, during the
symposium's final banquet dinner.


TSG Committee Reports


TSG Action Planning

Committee:

Report and Plans for Action

By Patricia Medici


D during the First International Tapir Symposium,
which was held in San Jos6, Costa Rica, in No-
vember 2001, participants agreed that the revision and
update of the first version of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Status
Survey and Conservation Action Plan (Sharon Matola,
Richard Bodmer and Daniel Brooks, 1997) should be
one of the priority goals for the TSG in the medium-
term. As a result, the TSG Action Plan Committee was
created, and discussions about the most efficient and
practical ways to accomplish the revision of the 1997
Plan were carried out. The final conclusion of these
discussions was that conducting Population and Habi-
tat Viability Assessments (PHVAs), in the framework of
the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist Group
(CBSG), would be the most appropriate and efficient
methodology to develop updated versions of the Action


Plans for each one of the four species of tapirs.
The major partner of the TSG in this ambitious
goal is the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specia-
list Group (CBSG). With 975 volunteer members, the
CBSG is one of the largest Specialist Groups within the
Species Survival Commission (SSC). CBSG has over
10 years of experience developing, testing and applying
scientifically based tools and processes for risk assess-
ment and decision-making in the context of species
management. These tools, based on small populations
and conservation biology, human demography, and
the dynamics of social learning are used in intensive,
problem-solving workshops to produce realistic and
achievable recommendations for both in-situ and ex-
situ population management.
The Population and Habitat Viability Assessment
(PHVA) is a very efficient and systematic working pro-
cess for species action planning. Managing endangered
species is an extremely complex conservation problem.
It requires a coalescence of expertise from different
professions and sectors, an exchange of knowledge and
technology, a building of consensus around threats and
solutions and a mobilization of resources. The PHVA
balances the need to integrate information necessary
for evaluating alternative species conservation strate-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 15


gies with the need to integrate, or at least connect, in-
dividuals from different disciplines and backgrounds
that are centrally concerned with the species of inter-
est. This is done in the hope that some realignment of
priorities among individual stakeholder groups will re-
sult which takes into account the needs, views and ini-
tiatives of other groups. Central to this process is the
use of Vortex, a computer software simulation model
of wildlife population dynamics that performs a risk
assessment, and provides a tangible focus for quanti-
tative evaluation of conservation options for a species
and a vehicle for integrating diverse species biological
and human sociological data. Taken together, the risk
assessment modelling and focused, stakeholder-driven
deliberations are designed to directly address the is-
sues affecting the species so that alternative strategies
can be analysed rationally and systematically. When
this occurs, better conservation decisions and specific
action steps with targeted responsibility result.

The first step of the PHVA Workshop is to compile
all the available information and data about the spe-
cies. Participants are requested to contribute scientific
articles, data and knowledge of the species and its habi-
tat, and list the major issues related to the species con-
servation. Based on this, participants are divided into
working groups to work on specific topics identified
as major issues. Each group has a series of tasks: 1.)
Identify and define problems and rank them in order of
priority; 2.) Develop goals to achieve the change in the
conditions identified in the problem statement, specify-
ing minimum and maximum goals to be achieved over
the next five years, developing goals for each problem
and ranking the goals in order of priority; 3.) Develop
actions to accomplish the goals identified under the
problems or issues, taking into account the scientific
information on the species, its habitat, and the threats
identified. Additionally, the PHVA develops a large set
of alternative models that represent different hypoth-
eses of the species biology/ecology and then, through
comparison of model behaviours, identifies those
biological factors that most acutely influence popula-
tion growth. With this knowledge, and with data on
the specific threats that are known to impact the spe-
cies populations now or in the future, it is possible to
design and test management strategies that minimize
those specific threats which act on the most influen-
tial biological factors. In this comparative approach,
significant insight can be gained with surprisingly little
detailed biological data.
During the First Symposium in Costa Rica, it
became clear that one of the most serious concerns
among tapir experts and conservationists was the lim-
ited attention that had been given to the conservation
of Malay tapirs, and that TSG should give this species
priority. As a consequence, the TSG decided that the


first step towards achieving the goal of conducting
PHVA workshops for each one of the four species of
tapir should be the organisation of the Malay Tapir
PHVA Workshop. As reported in a previous issue of
this newsletter, the Malay Tapir PHVA was held in Ma-
laysia, from August 12 to 16, 2003. The main organis-
ers of the meeting were the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist
Group (TSG), the IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding
Specialist Group (CBSG), the European Association of
Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group
(TAG), and the Malaysian Department of Wildlife and
National Parks (DWNP). The workshop group included
35 participants from the Malay tapir range countries
in Southeast Asia, including Malaysia, Indonesia and
Thailand, and also TSG representatives from several
other countries. The main topics discussed by the
PHVAs working groups were distribution and habitat,
habitat threats, species management, and population
biology and simulation modelling, and recommenda-
tions coming from all working groups were put together
and prioritised. The final outcome of the meeting is a
very detailed and updated action plan, listing and pri-
oritising strategies, recommendations and actions for
the conservation of Malay tapirs. The CBSG editorial
team and members of the TSG are still working on re-
viewing the draft of the action plan, and as soon as we
have the final version of the document we will print and
distribute copies to all interested parties in Southeast
Asia.
During the Second International Tapir Symposium
held in Panama City, Republic of Panama, from Janu-
ary 10 to 16, 2004, participants agreed that the next
PHVA should focus on mountain tapirs. Although some
previous efforts for the conservation of Mountain ta-
pirs already exist, it is important to identify strategies
at a larger scale and include the three range countries
- Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. In 2002, a National
Recovery and Conservation Programme for Tapir
Conservation was designed in Colombia (Ministry of
Environment 2002). This programme identified short,
medium and long-term goals for the conservation of
the three Latin American tapir species, all occurring
in Colombia, based on a preliminary assessment of the
conservation status of tapirs in the country. However,
Population and Habitat Viability Assessments based on
the species demographic data have not been conducted
yet but are urgently needed in order to identify con-
servation strategies for mountain tapir along its entire
range, refining those goals previously identified for
specific areas.
The Mountain Tapir Population and Habitat Viabil-
ity Assessment (PHVA) Workshop will be held at the
Otin-Quimbaya Fauna and Flora Sanctuary in Pereira,
Colombia, from October 12 to 15, 2004. The institu-
tional supporters of this project are the IUCN/SSC Con-
servation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG); American


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






16 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Ad-
visory Group (TAG); European Association of Zoos and
Aquaria (EAZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG);
Colombian Tapir Network (Red Danta de Colombia);
World Wildlife Fund (WWF CEAN), Colombia; and
Houston Zoo Inc., United States. The CBSG will once
again be responsible for the design and facilitation
of the workshop, as well as production of workshop
materials and final reports. Approximately 60 repre-
sentatives from the three mountain tapir range coun-
tries Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru are expected to
attend the meeting. Currently, the workshop's planning
committee is putting together a list of potential partici-
pants, and submitting proposals to raise funds for the
workshop.
The Baird's Tapir PHVA will be held at The Belize
Zoo and Tropical Education Center, Belize, Central
America, in the second semester of 2005. TSG mem-
bers are still discussing the best venue and dates for
the Lowland Tapir PHVA.
As I mentioned before, the major goal of these Tapir
PHVA workshops is to develop updated Action Plans
for each one of the four species of tapirs, concentrat-
ing on recommendations for their conservation in the
wild, but also with attending to the captive population,
education and capacity building, research priorities
and funding. Eventually, these documents will be in-
corporated as chapters in the next, revised edition of
the IUCN/SSC Tapir Status Survey and Conservation
Action Plan.
During the TSG Plans for Action Workshop con-
ducted as part of the programme of the Second Sympo-
sium in Panama, the major priority goal listed for the
TSG during the next two years is the development of
National Action Plans for Tapir Conservation and Man-
agement in all the tapir range countries in South and
Central America and Southeast Asia. We know that this
is a very ambitious goal, but the TSG Action Planning
Committee is certainly committed to work hard and
give it a try.
The specific actions we will be taking in order to
reach that goal are:

Action 1. Identify TSG Members (appoint new mem-
bers if necessary) to be TSG Country Coordinators,
responsible for coordinating the development of the
National Action Plan in each tapir range country in
Central and South America, and Southeast Asia.

Action 2. Re-structure the TSG Action Planning Com-
mittee including the TSG Country Coordinators.

Action 3. Elaborate Guidelines for the Development of
National Action Plans. Distribute document to all TSG
Country Coordinators in Central and South America
and Southeast Asia.


Action 4. Establish Regional Tapir Action Planning
Committees to work on the development of National
Action Plans for Tapir Conservation and Management
in each tapir range country in Central and South Amer-
ica and Southeast Asia.

Action 5. TSG Country Coordinators compile a direc-
tory of all key people and organizations directly or indi-
rectly involved in tapir conservation and management
within their countries (researchers, governmental and
non-governmental organizations, universities, zoologi-
cal institutions, community organizations etc.).

Action 6. TSG Country Coordinators send question-
naires to all key people and organizations directly or
indirectly involved in tapir conservation and manage-
ment within their countries (researchers, governmen-
tal and non-governmental organizations, universities,
zoological institutions, community organizations etc.).
Questionnaires will include questions about tapir sta-
tus, distribution, threats etc. Questionnaire templates
will be provided in the Guidelines for the Development
of National Action Plans (See Action 3). The informa-
tion gathered through this initial survey will be used
to draw up preliminary documents for each country,
which will be presented and discussed during the Re-
gional Action Planning Meetings.

Action 7. Organise and conduct Regional Action Plan-
ning Meetings in each tapir range country in Central
and South America and Southeast Asia. The objective
of these meetings is to discuss, improve and prioritise
the preliminary action planning documents, and pro-
duce the first drafts of the National Action Plans for
Tapir Conservation and Management.

Action 8. Elaborate the final version of the National
Action Plan for Tapir Conservation and Management in
each tapir range country in Central and South America
and Southeast Asia.

It is important to mention that for each one of the ac-
tions, a deadline, an estimated cost, a person to be
responsible for its completion, potential collaborators,
and indicators of success were established.
If you have any questions, comments, suggestions
etc. about the work of the TSG Action Planning Com-
mittee, please feel free to contact me at any time. As I
always say, your feedback is more than welcome.

Patricia Medici
M.Sc. in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and
Management
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Coordinator, Action Planning Committee, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 17


Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sdo Paulo, Teodoro Sampaio,
CEP: 19280-000, Sdo Paulo, Brazil
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Cell Phone: +55-18-9711-6106
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br




TSG Fundraising Committee:

Report and Plans for Action

By Patricia Medici


T he TSG Fundraising Committee was created dur-
ing the First International Tapir Symposium,
which was held in San Jos6, Costa Rica, in November
2001. During the conference in Costa Rica fundraising
was one of the most exhaustively addressed issues, and
participants discussed their difficulties in raising funds
for tapir conservation projects. It became clear that
the TSG as a group should put together a committee
to help tapir researchers and conservationists to raise
funds for their projects. The most important initial ob-
jective of this committee was to create the TSG Conser-
vation Fund (TSGCF), and to develop the Fund in such
a way so that it could centralise our fundraising efforts.
Other objectives included providing assistance to tapir
researchers on the development and design of project
proposals and, most importantly, on the identification
of potential donors; reviewing and endorsing tapir pro-
posals submitted to funding sources; and stimulating
the development of joint proposals involving research-
ers from different countries and creating international
conservation efforts that could have a better chance of
getting funded.
The whole process of creating of the TSG Conser-
vation Fund involved several different phases and was
finalised in January 2003. The first steps involved
discussions within the TSG membership, and exchang-
ing ideas with IUCN officers, representatives from con-
servation organizations, people from zoo conservation
funds etc. The organizations involved in the creation
and management of the TSGCF are the TSG, AZA Tapir
TAG, EAZA Tapir TAG, Houston Zoo, and Tapir Pres-
ervation Fund, in other words, the key groups working
for tapir conservation today.
The concept of the TSG Conservation Fund is to
work as a vehicle to raise and contribute funds towards
tapir conservation initiatives. The structure of the
Fund is pretty similar to many other funding agencies.
We have application guidelines and application forms,
deadlines, and we have a reviewing committee to review
the proposals and decide which ones will be funded.
In 2003, our funds were collected, managed and dis-


tribute via the Tapir Preservation Fund in the United
States, but for 2004 we have decided to move the Fund
to the Houston Zoo. As most of you probably know,
Specialist Groups are not legal entities and therefore
need a partner organisation, preferably a non-profit or
charity, to support any fundraising activities.
The funding priorities of the TSGCF are projects
targeting research with wild and/or captive tapirs;
projects targeting restoration, protection and conser-
vation of tapir habitat in South and Central America,
and Southeast Asia; education and capacity-building
programmes for local communities within the tapirs'
range in South and Central America, and Southeast
Asia; implementation of the recommendations of the
IUCN/SSC Tapir Status Survey and Conservation Ac-
tion Plan (1997); and operational costs for TSG and
tapir meetings. The TSGCF criteria for funding specific
proposals are: 1.) The proposal must be cooperative in
nature and may have matching funds; 2.) The proposal
must be scientifically sound, significant and logistically
feasible; 3.) The proposal must have a high probability
of success, and clearly contribute to the conservation of
tapirs and/or their remaining habitats. We also decided
that, for many different reasons, this fund should not
support salaries, university tuition fees, scholarships,
and operational/overhead costs for institutions or es-
tablished projects and/or programmes.
Once we finished the process of creating and struc-
turing the TSGCF establishing our objectives, funding
priorities and funding criteria, the next step was to
raise funds so that we could start running our fund-
ing cycles and distributing conservation grants. The
main questions we had in mind were "What should we
do to raise money for a Fund like this?", "What kind
of public should we approach?", and "What kinds of
fundraising strategies should we use?". Therefore, we
started a process of identifying potential donors and
establishing appropriate methods for fundraising to
attract and target those potential donors. We decided
on three strategies as being those most appropriate for
the TSGCF The first is to conduct annual campaigns
targeting private donors, such as tapir enthusiasts, re-
searchers, conservationists etc. The second strategy
is to conduct annual campaigns targeting tapir-holding
zoological institutions worldwide, especially those in
the United States and Europe. The idea is to approach
all tapir holders and ask for small contributions for
the fund. The third strategy is to produce written
and multimedia TSG proposals that we can submit
or present to large conservation NGOs, corporations,
conservation trusts and foundations. These proposals
should include details about the group itself, and also
information about the projects being conducted by our
members.
We conducted our first Campaign for Private Do-
nors in March 2003. Our partner organisation for


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






18 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


this campaign was the Tapir Preservation Fund, which
was in charge of collecting and managing the dona-
tions. Campaign flyers were printed and mailed to
400 postal addresses worldwide. We received 41 do-
nations, signifying 10% of the mailing list, mostly from
the United States and Europe. Donations ranged from
$5 to $200 dollars, and we were able to raise a total of
$2,900 dollars, which was not much, but helped us to
get started!
In July 2003 we started our first Zoo Campaign.
The campaign was organized through a partnership be-
tween the TSG, the AZA Tapir TAG and the EAZA Tapir
TAG, and our main goal was to raise funds specifically
for the Second International Tapir Symposium. The
sponsors of the campaign were the Houston Zoo in
the States and the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark. both
these zoos covered all the expenses of mailing the zoo
campaign letters. We sent letters to 164 tapir hold-
ers in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe and the United
States. Most of the zoos we approached were located in
the USA (48 zoos) and Europe (100 zoos). We received
20 donations, which means 12% of the mailing list.
Most of the contributions came from the United States,
from which 12 zoos made donations, then Europe with
7 zoos and Asia with 1 zoo (Tokyo Zoo in Japan). Do-
nations ranged from $100 to $750 dollars, and we were
able to raise a total of $8,450 dollars.
In 2003, we also wrote proposals and made con-
tacts in order to raise funds for specific TSG activities.
The Houston Zoo Inc. provided funds for the printing
and distribution of the Tapir Conservation Newsletter
(2 issues per year), and also provided support for the
attendance of TSG members to tapir meetings. The
Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark was the major donor of
the Malay Tapir Conservation Workshop held in Malay-
sia in August 2003, which was also partially supported
by the Malaysian Department of Wildlife and National
Parks (DWNP), Wildlife Conservation Society Thailand,
and Idea Wild. The total budget of the workshop in
Malaysia was US$15,000. The Second International
Tapir Symposium was financially supported by about
60 conservation organizations worldwide, mostly tapir
holding zoos in the US, Europe and Japan, but the
major donors were the Houston Zoo Inc., Conserva-
tion International, Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund,
Peace River Center for the Conservation of Tropical
Ungulates, Los Angeles Zoo, Brookfield Zoo Chicago
Zoological Society, International Animal Exchange Inc.,
and Zoo Conservation Outreach Group (ZCOG) c/o
Audubon Park Zoological Garden, which donated a to-
tal of US$30,000 for the conference.
In total therefore, we raised about US$56,350, this
doesn't include the newsletter costs, which are covered
by the Houston Zoo. Our financial report for 2003
includes expenses with research grants distributed to
three tapir field projects selected during our TSGCF


2003 Funding Cycle (US$1,950); the Malay Tapir
Conservation Workshop (US$15,000); the Second In-
ternational Tapir Symposium (US$33,000); and small
expenses such as 10% overhead for the Tapir Preserva-
tion Fund, bank fees, the new TSG Website, gifts for the
private donors campaign etc. (US$1,000).
Our TSG Fundraising Committee had other activi-
ties in 2003. We contacted about 150 funding agencies
worldwide, mostly zoological institutions, and created
a database of potential donors for tapir conservation
projects, which was distributed to TSG members and
other interested people. We provided assistance to a
number of tapir researchers in the development and
review of project proposals. We reviewed and endorsed
32 tapir proposals submitted to 12 different funding
agencies. And finally, we developed our first joint
proposal involving exclosure plots experiments coordi-
nated by tapir researchers from five different countries
(Charles Foerster in Costa Rica, Silvia Chalukian in
Argentina, Diego Lizcano in Colombia, Carl Traeholt in
Malaysia, and myself in Brazil).

Our plans for 2004-2005 include the following specific
goals and actions:

GOAL 1. Re-Structure the TSG Conservation Fund
(TSGCF).
Action 1. Create web pages for the TSG Conservation
Fund (TSGCF) on the TSG Website, and establish a
system of donations online.
Action 2. Improve the TSG Conservation Fund (TS-
GCF) Proposal Reviewing Forms.

GOAL 2. Raise a larger amount of funds for the TSG
Conservation Fund (TSGCF) and distribute these
funds to tapir conservation projects (field and captiv-
ity) through selective processes.
Action 1. Conduct Annual TSGCF Campaigns for Pri-
vate Donors worldwide (printed flyers, e-mails, and
through the TSG Website).
Action 2. Increase our mailing list of private donors.
Action 3. Implement an intensive marketing campaign
making full use of our new TSG Website.
Action 4. Conduct annual TSGCF Campaigns target-
ing tapir holding institutions worldwide (Tapir Ap-
peals).
Action 5. Develop the TSG Proposal (printed and
multimedia) and the "Menu" of Tapir Conservation
Projects. Submit or present the proposal to at least
five major potential funding sources.
Action 6. Identify two conservation organizations to
establish partnerships with the TSG, adopting the
group and supporting its activities on a regular ba-
sis.
Action 7. Conduct at least two funding cycles, and dis-
tribute at least ten tapir conservation grants.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 19


GOAL 3. Raise funds for the upcoming tapir meet-
ings in 2004, 2005 and 2006: Mountain Tapir PHVA
(Pereira, Colombia, October 2004), Baird's Tapir PHVA
(Belize City, Belize, 2005), Workshop about Data Col-
lection Standardisation (2005), and the Third Interna-
tional Tapir Symposium (Mexico, 2006).
Action: Write and submit proposals for each one of
the meetings.

GOAL 4. Seek financial support for TSG printing and
mailing expenses (fundraising campaigns, action plans,
brochures etc.), promotional materials (T-shirts, post-
ers, bags etc.), educational CDs etc.
Action: Identify and contact as many potential donors
as possible.

GOAL 5. Raise funds for the establishment of spe-
cific TSG-Supported Projects such as the International
Genetics Project, Lowland Tapir GIS Project, TSG Vet-
erinary Committee Training Fund, TSG "Vets Without
Frontiers" Programme, TSG Exclosure Plots Project
etc.
Action: Write and submit proposals for each one of
the projects.

GOAL 6. Provide support for TSG members and other
tapir conservationists to identify potential funding
sources and raise funds for their projects.
Action: Continue to provide TSG endorsement for
tapir proposals.

It is important to mention that for each one of the ac-
tions, a deadline, an estimated cost, a person respon-
sible for its completion, potential collaborators, and
indicators of success were established.
I would like to use this opportunity to acknowledge
some people and organizations that have been helping
our TSG Fundraising Committee to achieve its goals.
Most of our work would not have been possible without
the support received from Mariano Gimenez Dixon,
Programme Officer of the IUCN Species Survival Com-
mission (SSC); Rick Barongi, Director of the Houston
Zoo Inc.; William Konstant, Director of Conservation
and Science of the Houston Zoo Inc.; Alan Shoemaker,
Permit Advisor of the AZA Tapir TAG and TSG Red
List Authority; Lewis Greene, Chair of the AZA Tapir
TAG; Bengt Hoist, Chair of the EAZA Tapir TAG; Gilia
Angell, our Webmaster and Marketing Committee Coor-
dinator; Sian S. Waters, our Newsletter Contributions
Editor and Zoo Committee Coordinator; Sheryl Todd,
President of the Tapir Preservation Fund; Kelly Russo
and Alberto Mendoza, members of the staff of the Hou-
ston Zoo Inc.; Wally Van Sickle, President of Idea Wild;
Jeffrey Flocken, International Affairs Specialist of the
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; and several TSG members
who are constantly sending ideas and suggestions. All


these people are in constant communication with our
TSG Fundraising Committee, and keep their eyes open
for any opportunities for us, and for that, I am deeply
thankful!!!
If you are interested in receiving more detailed in-
formation about the activities of the TSG Fundraising
Committee, or if you have any comments, suggestions,
ideas, or criticisms, please do not hesitate to contact
me at any time. Also, if you have any suggestions for
any potential funding sources for the TSGCF we should
contact, PLEASE let me know!!! We are still learning
how to deal with all this, and any feedback will be more
than welcome.

Patricia Medici
M.Sc. in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation and
Management
Chair, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Coordinator, Fundraising Committee, IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sdo Paulo, Teodoro Sampaio,
CEP: 19280-000, Sdo Paulo, Brazil
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Cell Phone: +55-18-9711-6106
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br





TSG Zoo Committee:

Report

By Sidn S. Waters



T he TSG Zoo Committee was formed during the
First Tapir Symposium in Costa Rica in 2001.
Heidi Frohring was the co-ordinator at that time but
she decided to step down in 2002 and I took over about
18 months ago.
At the first zoo committee meeting in Costa Rica it
was decided that the committee would have four main
tasks. The tasks are listed below but are not in order
of priority.

1. Compile a list of funding resources available from
zoos for tapir conservation projects. Pati had al-
ready begun this task and the final document was
circulated to TSG members in the spring of last
year. We would be interested in knowing if any of
you have found it useful whilst looking for funding
agencies. This resource will need to be updated on
a fairly regular basis and Pati Medici is currently
doing this.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






20 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


2. The second task was to compile and maintain a
list of experts in the captive husbandry and man-
agement of tapirs. This list or register holds the
names, contact addresses and fields of expertise for
about 20 people from nine countries and is an on-
going project. Requests for voluntary registrations
were placed in the electronic newsletter ZooNews
Digest and in print in International Zoo News. A
request was also placed on various listserves. This
generated a reasonable response. Australia, Cen-
tral and South America, Europe and the US are all
represented, but unfortunately there are no repre-
sentatives from Asia.

3. The third goal was to improve communication be-
tween those working with tapirs in captivity and
those working with tapirs in the field. During the
Second Tapir Symposium it seemed that most TSG
members felt that the newsletter, Tapir Conserva-
tion, was fulfilling this role adequately.

4. The last task from the original zoo committee meet-
ing was a project working with zoos on new zoo
signage/labelling for their tapir exhibits. The idea
was to encourage zoos to include information about
the work of the TSG on their signage and perhaps
to talk about a tapir conservation project they were
sponsoring.
This last project has made little progress, and dur-
ing a meeting of the Zoo Committee at the Second
Tapir Symposium held in Panama the possibility of
developing a CD containing photos from the field
which could be used by zoos for in new tapir sig-
nage etc. The CD would also include accurate and
interesting information about all four species of ta-
pir. Later on, during the TSG Planning Workshop
it was decided that there was such a lot of work to
do regarding education and outreach that a new
committee specifically for that should be formed.
Therefore, the task of compiling the CD has passed
to the new Education and Outreach Committee
co-chaired by Kelly Russo (Houston Zoo, Inc.) and
Gareth Redston (Chester Zoo).

During the Zoo Committee meeting a new task was dis-
cussed which will concentrate on attempting to get ba-
sic husbandry information to those taking care of tapirs
in range country zoos and elsewhere. Basic husbandry
guidelines have been developed and are available on the
web in English and Spanish. However these are a little
out of date and needed to be revised and translated into
Spanish, Portuguese and some Asian languages. Alan
Shoemaker volunteered to take on this work and his
progress report follows.


Sidn S. Waters
Zoo Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)
14 Lindsay Gardens, Tredegar, Gwent NP22 4RP
United Kingdom
Phone: +44-0-1495-722-117
Email: sian s waters@hotmail.com;
sianswaters@yahoo.co.uk




Tapir Standards

By Alan Shoemaker


Last summer, husbandry standards for keeping
tapirs in captivity were finalised by the AZA.
These standards were much more rigorous than the
earlier guidelines developed by the AZA at the request
of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture for use by its inspectors
when inspecting zoos, circuses, dealers, laboratories,
etc. Specifically intended for use by members of AZA
Accreditation Inspectors who may not be familiar with
tapirs, the new husbandry standards cover all aspects
of tapir husbandry, including exhibit and enclosure
requirements, dietary needs, veterinary issues and
social behavior.
After the standards were written and announced
in Tapir Talk and other tapir-related publications, it
became apparent that there was a great deal of interest
by non-USA holders of tapirs in this document. Nearly
50 requests for copies of the final standards were
electronically distributed to all who requested a set
of standards. More recently and as a result of the
Second International Tapir Symposium in Panama,
it has become apparent that there is a great deal of
interest by TSG members and others worldwide in
receiving this data, albeit in languages more suitable
for range countries. While many veterinarians and
other senior staff read and understand English, most
keeper-level staff in range countries does not. With
that in mind, the AZA husbandry standards were
modified for international use, deleting references that
only impact AZA members. Of particular importance
was the subsitution of the veterinary standards section
from the AZA Husbandry standards to the original
basic guidelines which were already available. TSG
members were solicited to translate the standards into
Spanish, Portuguese, Thai, Malaysian and Indonesian.
Most gratifying was the turnout of TSG members that
saw the need for translating these standards into
appropriate languages and who volunteered to take on
this time-consuming task. Regardless, by spring, this
document will hopefully be ready for electronic, if not


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 21


paper, distribution to range country zoos, veterinarians,
wildlife biologists and any others working with tapirs.
Their availability will be announced in all tapir
publications in order to reach as many individuals
as possible. Anyone interested in receiving a copy
of this document in English, Indonesian, Spanish or
Portuguese and shortly, other languages, should contact
Alan Shoemaker, sshoe @mindspring.com.
We are very grateful to Leonardo Salas for the
translation from English to Bahasa Indonesian, Viviana
Quse for the Spanish translation and George Velastin
and Patricia Medici for the translation into Portuguese.

Alan H. Shoemaker
Permit Advisor, American Zoo and Aquarium
Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
Coordinator, TSG Red List Committee
330 Shareditch Road, Columbia,
29210 South Carolina, United States
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com




TSG Veterinary Committee:

Report and Plans for Action

By Pilar Alexander Blanco Marquez


T he TSG Veterinary Committee was created dur-
ing the First International Tapir Symposium held
in November 2001 in San Jos6, Costa Rica. Dr. Sonia
Hernandez Divers, Ph.D. Graduate Student at the Uni-
versity of Georgia, United States, was the coordinator
when the committee was created, and I took over dur-
ing the Second International Tapir Symposium in Pan-
ama in January. The initial goal of this committee was
to identify the role of veterinarians in multidisciplinary
teams involved in tapir conservation projects. With
the participation of a number of veterinarians from
Latin America and the United States, this committee
launched a series of activities, such as the compilation
of bibliographic materials and the standardization of
field methodologies in order to guarantee that health
studies will be effectively conducted.

During the last two years we have accomplished a
number of tasks:

1. We responded to 71 e-mails in regard to health is-
sues. The majority of these questions came from
Latin America. The most commonly requested
information dealt with reproduction/contraception,
nutrition, vaccination, immobilization and ques-
tions about specific clinical signs.


2. We summarised tapir mortalities in the North
American captive population from 1996-2002.
3. We developed Pre-Shipment/Quarantine Guidelines
for tapirs for the AZA Tapir TAG Veterinary Advi-
sory Group.
4. We formulated a document, which outlines the
rationale for including a veterinarian in field
projects.
5. We formulated a list of health-related priorities for
research, as a way to aid the IUCN/SSC Tapir Spe-
cialist Group Chair in prioritising research needs.
6. We created a document to guide field researchers
who do not have continuous veterinary assistance
in the area of biological sample collection.
7. We summarised previously reported immobilisa-
tion protocols in one document.
8. We revised the updated version of the AZA Hus-
bandry Manual for Tapirs.

During the TSG Veterinary Committee meeting held
during the Second International Tapir Symposium in
Panama and during the TSG Plans for Action Workshop
conducted as part of the Symposium's programme, we
were able to discuss and evaluate our previous activi-
ties, and set new goals and actions for the committee:

GOAL: To provide support for technical training and
capacity building on veterinary issues.
Action 1. Identify possibilities of training and capac-
ity building for field and zoo veterinarians working
on tapirs. Develop and distribute a list of potential
courses on wildlife medicine including training in
anaesthesia, health assessments, epidemiological
studies, collection, handling and storage of biologi-
cal samples, biomedical parameters etc.
Action 2. Develop a curriculum for a training course
specifically directed at field veterinarians working
on tapirs.
Action 3. Establish a small annual fund within the
TSG Conservation Fund (TSGCF) to support the ac-
tivities of the TSG Veterinary Committee, including
professional training of committee members, veteri-
nary support for tapir field projects worldwide and
establishment of a TSG "Vets Without Frontiers"
Programme.

GOAL: To encourage field projects to include health
aspects.
Action 1. Resume and complete the process of devel-
oping the Tapir Veterinary Manual started during
the First International Tapir Symposium in Costa
Rica. Distribute the Manual to the entire TSG
Membership and any other researchers and organi-
sations working on tapirs.
Action 2. Develop a list of areas of veterinarian exper-
tise within the TSG Veterinary Committee (Anaes-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






22 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


thesia, Medicine and Health, Parasitology, Microbi-
ology, Public Health, Health Management, Capture
and Manipulation, Genetics, Reproduction, Immu-
nology, Pharmacology etc.). Distribute the list to the
entire TSG Membership and any other researchers
and organizations working on tapirs.
Action 3. Create the Tapir Talk Vet e-list to facilitate
communication and information exchange among
veterinarians working on tapirs.

Besides these specific goals and actions, the TSG Vet-
erinary Committee will contribute to the development
of the International Tapir Genetics Project coordinated
by the TSG Genetics Committee (For further details
about this committee and the project please see the
TSG Genetics Committee Introduction and Report in
this issue), and collaborate with the development of
TSG approved husbandry and veterinary guidelines for
all four species of tapirs.
For further details about the activities of the TSG
Veterinary Committee, please feel free to contact me at
any time.

Pilar Alexander Blanco Marquez
D.VM. Fundaci6n Nacional de Parques Zool6gicos e
Acudrios (FUNPZA)
Associate Researcher, Earthmatters.Org
Veterinary Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)
Urbanizacion Los Caobos, Calle Apure, Edificio:
Residencia Los Caobos
Piso 9 Apartamento 9-A, Maracay, Estado Aragua,
VENEZUELA
Phone: +58-243-246-0185; +58-414-477-1262/
Fax: +58-243-246-0185
E-mail: albla@telcel.net.ve; albla69@hotmail.com






TSG Red List Committee:

Report

By Alan Shoemaker


In 2000, the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
assembled its first Red List Committee in order to re-
view the present (1990's) IUCN categories of the four
species of tapirs to decide if changes were in order. Be-
yond the fact that all four species are declining due to
habitat loss and over-hunting, the official status of some
species was thought to need upgrading. This committee
of the TSG was chaired by Alan Shoemaker (USA) as-


sisted by field biologists from the range countries of all
four species: Denis Alexander Torres (Venezuela), TSG
Lowland Tapir Coordinator; Emilo Constantino (Co-
lombia), TSG Mountain Tapir Coordinator; Eduardo
Naranjo Pinera (Mexico), TSG Baird's Tapir Coordina-
tor; and Nico Van Strien (The Netherlands/Indonesia),
TSG Malay Tapir Coordinator. After all species were
reviewed by the Red List Committee, the entire TSG
was invited to contribute additional information. This
solicitation of information resulted in responses from
several normally quiet members whose replies often
provided new and vital information on the status of
tapirs in several poorly surveyed countries. As a result
of the Red List Committee's activities, the status of the
lowland tapir was changed from Low Risk to Vulner-
able, with the population of Colombian lowland tapirs
noted as being Critically Endangered.
IUCN/SSC requires that Red List assessments be
reviewed every three years. As a result, the TSG Red
List Committee was reactivated during winter, 2004
and two new members added. The TSG Malay Tapir
Coordinator is now Carl Traeholt, a research coordina-
tor based in Krau Wildlife Reserve, Malaysia. He re-
places Nico Van Strien whose new work responsibilities
have prevented him from being as active as he would
like. Also, another lowland tapir specialist, Silvia Cha-
lukian of El Rey National Park, Argentina was added
to give additional insight into the status of this species
at the opposite end of its range. Since the Second
International Tapir Symposium in Panama, the Chair
of the IUCN/SSC TSG Red List Committee has sent
last cycle's information to all committee members as
well as instructions for review. Given the information
presented in Panama, it may be necessary to change
(upgrade) the status of the Malay tapir, and to separate
Colombian lowland tapirs away from the rest of the
species in order to heighten international awareness of
the plight of this isolated subspecies. By mid-spring,
committee responses should be completed, thus allow-
ing for the entire TSG membership to provide input
before submitting updated information to IUCN.

Alan H. Shoemaker
Permit Advisor, American Zoo and Aquarium
Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
Coordinator, TSG Red List Committee
330 Shareditch Road, Columbia,
29210 South Carolina, United States
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 23


TSG Genetics Committee:

Introduction and Report

By Anders Gongalves da Silva, Javier Sarria &
Emilio Constantino


C conservation only makes sense if we are conser-
ving the evolutionary process. That should be
the ultimate goal of any conservation programme. The
reason is quite simple. By speciation and extinction the
evolutionary process drives biodiversity. Through spe-
ciation, new species come into existence to fill the void
left by the species that became extinct, and to fill new
niches. The last 650 million years are full of illustrative
examples of this turnover process, with five particularly
evident events in the fossil record. Of these, probably
the closest one to us is the dinosaur extinction 65 mya,
which opened the pathway for the mammalian radia-
tion. Through this interplay between speciation and ex-
tinction absolute biodiversity has increased markedly
since the origin of life on this planet, albeit with a few
bumps in the road. The hope is that we are only one of
the minor bumps on this road.
Conserving the evolutionary process requires a con-
certed effort that incorporates knowledge of the ecol-
ogy, population biology, natural history and genetics of
species. Furthermore, we must incorporate the human
component, not as a problem, but as a part of the solu-
tion. The tapir conservation efforts, embodied by the
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG), have been
very good so far at all the components listed above,
with the one exception: genetics! The importance of
understanding the underlying genetic variability for
conservation purposes cannot be overstated. Genetic
variability is what drives evolution, making natural
selection possible. Nevertheless, this is now changing.
During the Second International Tapir Symposium in
Panama the TSG Genetics Committee was created to
start filling this void. The purpose of the committee is
to facilitate the use of the genetic tool for the conserva-
tion of tapirs.
To start the job, we are initiating an International
Tapir Genetics Project to involving all four species of
tapirs, and most, if not all, of the members of the TSG.
The objective here is to answer basic questions about
the systematics, population genetics and history of the
four living tapirs. The information produced by this
study will contribute to our understanding of the evolu-
tion of tapirs, and provide a first picture of the amount
and location of genetic diversity in each species. Yet,
more importantly, at the end of the project we hope to
have established a network among members of the TSG
and molecular labs. The network will hopefully make
it possible for more regional and local genetic studies


of tapirs to be carried out more readily. In addition,
we might find along the way a few more TSG members
keen on tapir conservation and trained in genetics. I
am happy to say that the Project is currently underway.
The first step was taken at the Symposium in Panama
with the presentation of the Project ideals and goals.
(Thank you all that attended and provided invaluable
criticism and support.) Furthermore, we already have
samples from several countries, and have taken the
first steps towards the collection of the information
necessary to start our fundraising efforts. (Thanks to
all that have replied to our survey, and have collected
samples for the Project! And, hope to hear soon from
those who haven't replied yet.)
This is just the beginning though, the main job of
the Genetics Committee will be to advise members
on potential techniques and methods of analysis. For
instance, one of the main uses of genetic tools today
is to assist ecologists in understanding the behaviour
and dispersal patterns of their focal species. New tech-
niques have been developed in the past decade to as-
sess, for example, mating systems and structures (i.e.
sex-biased dispersal). The most recent breakthroughs
are in identifying fine-scale barriers to dispersal, likely
roots of dispersal in a landscape, and first and second-
generation immigrants within a population and their
most likely population of origin. Furthermore, signifi-
cant development has been achieved in using unlikely
and poor sources of DNA such as faeces. In turn, this
makes it possible to have higher sampling sizes, with
less effort and less stress for the animals, and higher
confidence in statistical analyses. In as much, the
Committee's job is to make sure that the TSG has a
core of genetic experts that can advise members, if a
member has an interest in using genetic tools. This is
not completely operational as yet, and probably won't
be until the Genetics Project is well underway. How-
ever, we have started by cooperating with the Veterinary
Committee in preparing an appropriate protocol for
genetic sampling, which should soon be available.
One final point that must be stressed is that genet-
ics is an important and essential source of information
for both ecology and evolution, but it is only one source
of information, and should not be deemed sufficient for
making conservation decisions. Data collected using
molecular genetic tools must always be interpreted in
light of what is independently known about the ecology,
natural history, and evolution of the species. If this in-
formation is not available, genetic information should
be considered preliminary and not final. Additionally,
we believe we have to be pragmatic and take into con-
sideration what is economically viable and politically
acceptable before making action decisions based on
genetic, or any kind of data, that unnecessarily compli-
cate and hinder the conservation effort. With that said,
I reiterate what was said before, we need a concerted ef-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






24 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


fort to guarantee the success of any conservation effort,
and the Genetics Committee is only one part of this ef-
fort. Through this effort we hope to ensure that we will
only be a minor bump on the biodiversity road.

Anders Gongalves da Silva
Graduate Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Program, Center for Environmental Research and
Conservation (CERC), Department of Ecology,
Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B),
Columbia University
1200 Amsterdam Ave MC5556, New York, New York
10027, United States
Phone: +1-212-854-0377 /Fax: +1-212-854-8188
E-mail: ag2057@columbia.edu

Javier Adolfo Sarria Perea
D.VM. M.Sc. Genetics & Animal Improvement
Cra 58A, No. 74 A-31 Interior 3, Apartamento 102,
Bogota, Colombia
Phone: +57-1-2508020
E-mail: jasarrip @fcav. unesp.br; jasarrip @yahoo.com

Emilio Constantino
Biodiversity & Conservation Coordinator,
Red de Reservas Naturales de la Sociedad Civil
Mountain Tapir Coordinator, IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Calle 21 Norte No. 8-18, Barrio Santa Monica,
Call, Colombia
Phone: +57-2-660-6133; 2-653-4539 /
Fax: +57-2-660-6133
E-mail: emilio@resnatur.org.co




TSG Education &

Outreach Committee:


everyone. We will work hand in hand with the market-
ing and zoo committees to establish the TSG as the
"point of reference" for anyone seeking information on
tapirs. Additionally we want to improve communication
between TSG members and with other organizations.
Our first task is to create an educational CD-Rom,
which will contain facts, figures and range maps of all
four tapir species. Also included on the CD will be a
database of copyright free images allowing zoos and
other tapir holding institutions to create their own edu-
cational materials.
Another product of this committee will be the long
awaited TSG brochure. Our plan is to have it widely
distributed both electronically and in hard copy to
zoos, in-country partners, museums and universities
around the world.
We realise that informing the world about tapirs is a
huge undertaking, so Gareth and I are formally asking
for help. Anyone interested in joining this committee or
those who have any ideas to share on E&O topics then
please don't hesitate to contact either of the Co-Chairs.

Kelly J. Russo
Conservation Program Assistant, Houston Zoo Inc.
Education & Outreach Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
1513 North MacGregor Drive, Houston, Texas 77030,
United States
Phone: +1-713-533-6556/ Fax: +1-713-533-4762
E-mail: krusso@houstonzoo.org

Gareth Redston
Education Division, North of England Zoological Society,
Chester Zoo
Education & Outreach Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Caughall Rd., Upton, Chester CH2 1LH, Cheshire,
United Kingdom
Phone: +44-1244-650-205 /Fax: +44-1244-650-234
E-mail: G.Redston@chesterzoo.co.uk


Introduction and Report


By Kelly Russo & Gareth Redston


A t the recent Action Planning Session of the TSG,
it was determined that there is a critical need to
spread the word about the fight to save tapirs above
and beyond the TSG membership. Consequently, a
new TSG committee was formed the Education &
Outreach Committee (E&O). The co-chairs are Gareth
Redston from Chester Zoo, UK and Kelly Russo from
the Houston Zoo, USA.
The main responsibility of the E & 0 is to increase
awareness about tapirs and tapir conservation to, well,


TSG Marketing Committee:

Introduction and Report

By Gilia Angell


A new committee was formed at the 2004 Tapir
Symposium: The Tapir Specialist Group Market-
ing Committee. Gilia Angell, TSG Marketing Commit-
tee Coordinator, will lead this committee in fundraising
campaigns, public relations and marketing of the TSG


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS 25


and its mission. The TSG Marketing Committee's
goals are outlined in the Final Report from the sympo-
sium. They are:

1. Launch the new TSG Website.
2. Create the "TSG Members" and "Tapir Project Pro-
files" pages on the TSG Website.
3. Design and distribute an attractive and multi-lin-
gual HTML E-mail including information about
TSG and its activities.
4. Design and distribute attractive and multi-lingual
TSG educational and promotional brochures.
5. Develop an educational CD with tapir information
and high-resolution photos for zoo exhibit graphics
and placement of our materials on other websites.
6. Use Stephen Nash's tapir illustrations for promo-
tional materials (T-shirts, bags, posters etc.) and
fundraising.
7. Send TSG information (HTML E-mail) to mass
media vehicles (newspapers, magazines, television
networks etc.), pointing back to the TSG Website
as the point of reference for multi-media/mass me-
dia and articles on tapirs.
8. Invite producers of different animal-related televi-
sion programs (Animal Planet, Discovery Channel,
National Geographic, BBC etc.) to include tapirs in
their programmes.
9. Identify a celebrity to act as TSG spokesperson.

In addition to these goals, the TSG Marketing Com-
mittee will design and distribute at least one (1) print
fundraising campaign for the TSG Conservation Fund
(TSGCF) for the year 2004 (targeted at zoo directors
& officials, targeted at past givers, and targeted to new
potential donors).
In preparation for launching these various market-
ing strategies, the Committee Coordinator is inviting
members of TSG to join the committee and voice their
opinions on prioritising these tasks, and offer any con-
nections, ideas, or funding sources. Several non-TSG
marketing and conservation professionals will be con-
sulted and invited to sit in on an advisory basis as well.
Please join in this important effort!

Gilia Angell
Web/Graphic Designer, Amazon.com
Webmaster, www.tapirspecialistgroup.org
Marketing Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)
270 Dorffel Drive East, Seattle, Washington 98112,
United States
Phone: +1-206-266-2613; +1-206-568-1655/
Fax: +1-206-266-1822
E-mail: gilia angell@earthlink.net


The NewTapir Specialist

Group Website

By Gilia Angell


T he new Tapir Specialist Group Web-
site was launched in January 2004.
Tapirspecialisgroup.org has now commenced as the
group's official website and online source for up to
date document downloads, committee rosters and an-
nouncements regarding tapir-related events and news
items. We gratefully thank Sheryl Todd who maintained
several pages on her Tapir Gallery site for the TSG for
so many years, and we have rebuilt much of her content
on our own site.
The TSG's goals and activities are global a strong
online presence can help create influence, enable easy
access to information, and become a potential mar-
keting tool for our fundraising efforts. Ultimately, we
would like the site to be the number one online re-
source about tapirs and tapir conservation. Maintain-
ing and building the website will take the combined ef-
forts and participation of all TSG members. We plan on
providing researcher project pages, which can be used
for individual grant proposal marketing. We also plan
to launch an up-to-date tapir article bibliography and
an online donation form for the Tapir Specialist Group
Conservation Fund (TSGCF).
Our site can only be as good as its content, so
please submit any and all content or ideas to gilia
angell@earthlink.net or to webmaster@tapirspeciali
stgroup.org. English, Spanish, Portuguese and Asian
languages are all accepted. Content will be edited for
spelling and grammar and posted as submitted. We
want this to be OUR site, so send us anything you'd
like to have posted about your project, findings or ta-
pir events at your institution, country or research site.
Sharing information is key to creating and maintaining
our already fantastic consortium of tapir researchers
and afficionados. By maintaining a strong web pres-
ence, we can create even more awareness about the
issues surrounding tapir conservation.
Thanks for your participation.

Gilia Angell
Web/Graphic Designer, Amazon.com
Webmaster, www.tapirspecialistgroup.org
Marketing Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG)
270 Dorffel Drive East, Seattle, Washington 98112,
United States
Phone: +1-206-266-2613; +1-206-568-1655/
Fax: +1-206-266-1822
E-mail: giliaangell@earthlink.net


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






26 TSG COMMITTEE REPORTS


Newsletter Report

By Sidn S. Waters, Stefan Seitz & Kelly Russo



A s everyone else has had something to report in
this newsletter we thought that we ought to have
a report about the actual newsletter! The important
news is that we now have an Editorial Board. The
board is made up of willing (well most of them!) volun-
teers who will review contributed articles falling within
their specialist remit. These longer contributed articles
are being submitted more frequently and we hope that
this means that Tapir Conservation is becoming better
known in general and not just amongst those working
with tapirs.
Apart from Sidn, Stefan Seitz, Patricia Medici and
Sheryl Todd, the other members of our Editorial Board
are William Konstant, Conservation and Science Direc-
tor, Houston Zoo Inc., USA; Leonardo Salas, Ph.D.
Freelance Consultant, Venezuela/Indonesia; Diego
Lizcano, Ph.D. Graduate Student, Durrell Institute
of Conservation and Ecology (DICE), University of
Kent, Colombia/UK; Alan H. Shoemaker, Permit Advi-
sor, American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG), USA; Pilar Alex-
ander Blanco Marquez, D.V.M. Fundaci6n Nacional de
Parques Zool6gicos e Acuarios (FUNPZA), Venezuela;
Matthew Colbert, Ph.D. Research Associate, Depart-
ment of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, USA;
Anders Goncalves da Silva, Graduate Fellow, Center for
Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC),
Columbia University, Brazil/USA; Gareth Redston, Ed-
ucation Division, North of England Zoological Society,
Chester Zoo, England; and Angela Glatston, Curator
of Hoofstock & Conservation Coordinator, Rotterdam
Zoo, The Netherlands. We are very grateful to everyone
on this list and we hope that the newsletter will get even
better as a result of their input.
A slight downside to this is that articles may not be
published quite as promptly because the review proc-
ess will be slightly longer. It does mean, however, that
contributed articles can be submitted throughout the
year but deadlines remain as 31st March and 30th Sep-
tember for news, project updates etc. This means that
the latter will be published in a timely manner June
and December respectively. We would also ask all con-
tributors to refer to the instructions for contributors
which are usually found on the inside back page of the
newsletter before submitting their contribution.
We are also in the process of obtaining an ISSN
number for the newsletter and we hope this will be
achieved by the end of the year. Regarding the content
of the newsletter I would like to thank Leonardo Salas
for his idea of the "Ask the Experts" section. This has


dealt with some interesting topics so far and please
don't hesitate to contact Leo if you have a topic on
which you would like to initiate a discussion (LeoAS
alas@netscape.net). If anyone else has an idea for the
newsletter then please don't hesitate to contact us.
We would like to take this opportunity to thank
everyone who has contributed to the newsletter in the
last two years and encourage those of you who haven't
to send us something. Thanks to Patricia Medici and
Sheryl Todd for their help with final editing. And last,
but most certainly not least, many thanks to Rick
Barongi and the Houston Zoo Inc. for sponsoring the
publication and distribution of the newsletter as with-
out that there wouldn't be a publication.

Sidn S. Waters
Contributions Editor
14 Lindsay Gardens, Tredegar, Gwent NP22 4RP
United Kingdom
Phone: +44-0-1495-722-117
Email: sian s waters@hotmail.com;
sianswaters@yahoo.co.uk

Dr. Stefan Seitz
4TAPIRS Information Centre
Bonndorfer Strasse 19, 68239 Mannheim, Germany
Phone & Fax: +49-(0)-621-471428
E-mail: tapirseitz@web.de; info@4tapirs.de

Kelly J. Russo
Conservation Program Assistant, Houston Zoo Inc.
Education & Outreach Committee Coordinator, IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
1513 North MacGregor Drive, Houston, Texas 77030,
United States
Phone: +1-713-533-6556/ Fax: +1-713-533-4762
E-mail: krusso@houstonzoo.org


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






REGIONAL NEWS 27



Rgoa News


COLOMBIA

Red Danta Colombia
(Colombian Tapir Network):
An Update

By Diego J. Lizcano, Jaime Andres Sudrez &
Olga Montenegro


T he Colombian Tapir Network (Red Danta de
Colombia) was created during the First Interna-
tional Tapir Symposium, held in Costa Rica in 2001.
This network has carried out several activities during
its two first years, such as designing and producing
the network's website (http://tapiruscol.tripod.com),
holding an on-line discussion group, participating in
the joint effort to formulate a National Programme for
Tapir Conservation in Colombia, and improving com-
munication among its members.
Two years after its creation, Red Danta held a meet-
ing during the Second Tapir Symposium held recently
in Panama. The Colombian participants at the sym-
posium talked about Red Danta's perspectives and fu-
ture. During the discussions, new and important ideas
were suggested and commitments made.
Our web page is to include more and new infor-
mation regarding traditional knowledge about tapirs
among indigenous communities. This task will be un-
dertaken by Adriana Sarmiento who will put together
the information regarding this issue which is currently
dispersed among other sources. The publications link
will not just be a list of references, but will become a
real tapir library for downloading articles in PDF for-
mat. This huge task is being undertaken by Olga Mon-
tenegro.
There will be a bi-annual news bulletin, which will
be distributed to regional environmental offices, Na-
tional Parks, NGOs, private reserves and universities in
Colombia. This bulletin will contain information about
TSG, and an abstract of Red Danta's activities. This
first bulletin will also include information promoting
the mountain tapir PHVA, to be carried out in October
2004 in Otun Quimbaya Sanctuary, Pereira, Colombia.
Editors for the first edition will be Jaime Andres Sua-
rez, Olga Montenegro and Javier Sarria.
There will be an editorial committee dedicated to
providing assistance with proposal preparation, as
well as projects and publications related to tapirs. The
aim for these articles is that they be published in Tapir


From left to right: Colombian participants in the
Second InternationalTapir Symposium.Javier Sarria,
Sergio Sandoval, Olga Montenegro, Jaime Andrds
Suarez, CarolinaVillegas, Emilio Constantino, Adriana
Sarmiento and Diego J. Lizcano.


Conservation, the newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG), and other journals. The coor-
dinator of this committee is Diego J. Lizcano.
Currently we are committed to the implementation
of the National Programme for Tapir Conservation in
Colombia, and we will be bringing our experience in the
development of our National Programme to the Moun-
tain Tapir PHVA to be held later this year.

Diego J. Lizcano
Ph.D Student, Durrell Institute of Conservation and
Ecology, Department of Anthropology, University of Kent
Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NS, United Kingdom
E-mail: dl36@kent.ac.uk

Jaime Andres Sudrez Mejia
Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad
Tecnologica de Pereira
Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
La Julita, Pereira, Risaralda, Colombia
E-mail: suarmatta@yahoo.com

Olga L. Montenegro
Ph.D Student, University of Florida
Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
303 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Gainesville, Florida 32611,
United States
E-mail: olmd@ufl.edu; olmdco@yahoo.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






28 REGIONAL NEWS


BELIZE

By Sharon Matola


D ue to a 3-2 ruling against the environmental
concerns presented by the Canadian proposed
Chalillo Dam, Fortis, Inc continues to push this project
forward. This court decision by the UK's Privy Council
was summed up by their admission indicating that Be-
lize was a sovereign nation, and if it should choose to go
forward with this dam, that is its decision, and not one
in which the Privy Council will interfere. Unfortunately,
this decision has been bad news for the populations
of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in the Upper Macal
River Valley. Having made a site visit in October 2003,
it was startling to note that, in over ten years, this was
the first time that not one sign of wildlife was observed.
Reliable sources state that hunting is rampant. Fortis,
Inc, has employed Chinese workers and there is no
monitoring of hunting activities. Belizean workers are
also joining in the hunting scene and as a result, this
once-biodiverse rich region is now without the popula-
tions of tapir, peccaries, and other species, which once
thrived there. Any field research on T. bairdii and the
other 3 extant species is so important as we need to
consider the reality of the steady depletion of our natu-
ral resources.
A PHVA for Baird's tapir is in the early planning
stages, and will take place at The Belize Zoo and Tropi-
cal Education Centre in 2005.
TSG members Humberto Wohlers and Sharon Ma-
tola will be making strenuous efforts during 2004 to
locate a female T. bairdii, from captive collections. We
hope to acquire a female on breeding loan to pair with
our 14-year-old male. As the species becomes rarer,
breeding in captivity is a crucial option, which should
be considered. In the future, T. bairdii may become a
role model species for release into the wild, into pos-
sible restored habitat. Collecting field data to empower
this future work is a vital part of a conservation strat-
egy.

Sharon Matola
Director, The Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center
Member, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
PO. BOX 1787, Belize City, Belize, Central America
E-mail: matola@belizezoo.org


HONDURAS

Notes on the Relative Abundance and
Hunting of Baird's Tapir in the Rus-Rus
Region of La Moskitia, Honduras:
A Proposed Biological Reserve

By Nereyda Estrada


O ne of the recommendations made by the IUCN/
SSC Tapir Status Survey and Conservation Ac-
tion Plan is to investigate the population status of the
four species of tapirs throughout their range (Brooks
et al. 1997). The status and distribution of the Baird's
tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in Honduras, Nicaragua and
Panama is poorly known (E.J. Naranjo, cor. pers).
According to Marineros & Martinez (1998) most of the
reports of Baird's tapirs in Honduras come from the
lowland tropical forests in the Eastern area of the coun-
try (La Moskitia).
The region known as La Moskitia comprises the
lowland forests of Eastern Honduras and Northeastern
Nicaragua, which forms the largest continuous area of
tropical forest in Central America (Wilber 1996), cov-
ering an area of about 17,000 km2. Four indigenous
groups inhabit the area: Miskitos, Pech, Garifunas
and Tawahkas. All of these groups practice traditional
hunting and, in many communities, wild game is the
only source of animal protein available. The proposed
Biological Reserve of Rus-Rus (PBRR) is located in the
Southern Honduran Moskitia, near the Nicaraguan
border (Figure 1). Broadleaf forest covers 48.8% of the
PBRR, pine forest 38%, guamiles 5.6% and natural
grasslands and swamps cover 6.6%. There are five
communities within the PBRR area, accounting for a
total population of 1,762 inhabitants covering 1% of
the area.
From July 8 to 23, 2002, I walked 20 km of
transects within the proposed limits of the PBRR.
Transects had an average length of 1 km. The aver-
age walking speed was 1 km per hour. I recorded the
number of tracks, faeces and other signs indicating the
presence of Baird's tapirs and other mammals. Eighty-
six percent (86%) of transects were in broadleaf and
riparian forest, the remainder were in pine forest and
swamps. Transects were walked with the assistance of
an experienced hunter from the Rus-Rus community.
Evidence of Baird's tapir was found only in broad-
leaf (0.42 tracks/km) and riparian forests (2.22 tracks/
km). The average relative abundance index was (SE)
0.77 + 0.41 tracks/km. Near the headwaters of the
Rus-Rus River, several tracks of young and adult tapirs
were found near the remains of fruits from Astrocary-


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






REGIONAL NEWS 29


Figure I. Proposed Biological Reserve of Rus-Rus (PBRR) with
vegetation types, Honduras.


um alatum palms and Bellucia pentamera trees, and
there was evidence that tapirs were consuming these
two types of fruits. The native Miskitos call the tree
Bellucia pentamera "Tilba takaika" (Zamora 2000),
which means "the place where the tapir jumps sud-
denly".
Through informal interviews done in the Rus-Rus
community, I found out that the local hunters have a
preference for white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari),
pacas (Agouti paca), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus
virginianus). Baird's tapir is not preferred game in
the community and its meat is seldom consumed. I
visited the PBRR in November and December 2000 and
found tapir tracks within one kilometer of the Rus-Rus
community. This could indicate that there is no strong
hunting pressure on tapirs, given that their tracks can
still be seen near the villages. Nonetheless, a greater
hunting pressure in the PBRR comes from Honduran
and Nicaragua villagers outside the area. These hunt-
ers enter the PBRR for several days and they preserve
the meat with salt or smoke. In this way they are able to
hunt in the area for longer periods of time and extract
larger amounts of meat. This kind of hunting is not only
for subsistence, but also has a commercial purpose.
In the PBRR some areas of forest are in the process
of regeneration. These patches of secondary broad-
leaf forest are the result of the establishment of about
4,000 Nicaraguan refugees during the 1980's. During
their stay of about ten years in the PBRR, the refugees
exerted strong pressure on the local natural resources.
They cleared out large areas of forest and hunted heav-
ily. According to Rus-Rus hunters, after the refugees


went back to Nicaragua towards the end of the
1980's, the local fauna was almost exhausted.
Nonetheless, they also mentioned that towards
the mid 1990's they started to notice gradual
recovery in the populations of some mammal
species.
Contrary to the situation in the other areas
of La Moskitia, tapirs are not preferred game
in the Rus-Rus village, implying that the PBRR
is a potential refuge for this mammal. There-
fore, the legal declaration of this area as a pro-
tected reserve, and the establishment of strict
control over the non-local commercial hunters
that come into the area are urgent and must be
implemented as soon as possible. Additional-
ly, I would recommend the establishment of a
long-term Baird's tapir research project in the
area in order to conduct extensive sampling
and monitoring of the population.



Acknowledgements


I am grateful to Patricia Medici and Eduardo Naranjo
for their comments and corrections to the manuscript
and for their enthusiastic support of this study. Finally,
I want to thank F Castafieda J. McCranie and T. Man-
zanares for their invaluable help.

Nereyda Estrada
M.Sc. Graduate Student, Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR)
Villas de Miraflores Norte b.B, c.2., Tegucigalpa, Honduras
E-mail: nerestr@yahoo.com



Literature Cited

Brooks, D.M., Bodmer, R.E & Matola, S. 1997.
Tapirs: Status, Survey and Conservation Action
Plan. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland.
Marineros, L. & Martinez, F. 1998. Guia de Campo
de los Mamiferos de Honduras. INADES-PAGS.
Tegucigalpa. 374 pp.
Wilber, S. 1996. The Honduran Mosquitia, A Pre-
investment Analysisfor the Parks in Peril Program.
Unpublished Report. The Nature Conservancy.
Virginia, USA.
Zamora, N. 2000. Arboles de la mosquitia hondurefia:
descripci6n de 150 species. Manual t6cnico N
43.CATIE. Turrialba. 335 p.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






30 REGIONAL NEWS


SUMATRA, INDONESIA

By Deborah Martyr


I n early March, undercover investigators from the
FFI/Kerinci Seblat National Park Tiger Protection
Unit who were seeking to penetrate a tiger trafficking
syndicate were offered a live tapir for sale by a bro-
ker for an illegal wildlife dealer in the South Sumatra
provincial capital of Palembang. The broker claimed to
have seen the animal and, from his description, it was
probably a young adult. Contact was made with the
vendor a Chinese woman through the broker and
the investigators learned that the animal had recently
died after being held at an unknown location in or close
to Palembang city for some weeks.
This is not the first time the FFI team has received
reports of live tapir in trade in Sumatra and in 2002, a
private zoo in the Philippines was found to have a tapir,
from Sumatra on display and was reportedly negotiat-
ing with brokers in Indonesia to buy one and possibly
two more. Checks with Indonesian authorities advised
that no legal exports of tapir to the Philippines had
taken place in the time frame in which this animal had
been acquired.

Deborah Martyr
Team Leader, Fauna & Flora International
PO Box 42, Kantor Pos, Sungai Penuh Kerinci
Jambi 13007, Sumatra, Indonesia
E-mail: tigers@ja.mweb.co.id






GERMANY

Successful Breeding of the Malay Tapir
(Tapirus indicus) at Dortmund Zoo,
Germany, with a"Problem" Female

By Frank Brandstatter


D ortmund Zoo has been keeping Malay tapirs
(Tapirus indicus) since 1978. The first birth
was recorded in 1981, but the baby died within a few
days. The first successful births (two animals from two
different mothers) were recorded in 1982. From then
on Dortmund Zoo became a regular breeder of Malay
tapirs and successful births occurred in 1984, 1985,
1993, 1995, 1998 and in 2000.


MalayTapir offspring "Kakak Gotz" at Dortmund Zoo,
Germany.


The last offspring, a male called "Jinak", was born
on 1st February 2000 and is now our breeding male. He
is paired with the female "Aria", born at Oklahoma City
Zoo (USA) in 1996, later transferred to Munich Zoo
and from there to Dortmund Zoo in 2000. When she
arrived, she was considered to be a "problem" animal
as she had previously failed to be paired with any male.
When "Aria" arrived the breeding male was "Paul", an
animal originally born at Mulhouse Zoo (France) in
1988, later transferred to Rotterdam Zoo (The Nether-
lands) and finally to Dortmund Zoo in 1990 after they
had lost their breeding male. "Paul" was a successful
and proven breeder fathering all four Malayan tapirs
born at Dortmund Zoo after 1990. Although he was a
tame and handsome animal, "Aria" was afraid of him
from the beginning. She seemed very nervous and
became more so as the weeks went by. She obviously
had problems, not only with being paired with a male
she was afraid of, but also with the visitors. The Malay
tapirs at Dortmund Zoo are kept in a rectangular en-
closure of about 650 m2 with two sides being accessible
to visitors, the rear being accessible to zoo staff mem-
bers exclusively and the fourth side covered by a dense
hedge separating the tapir enclosure from the one for
Asian hoofed stock.
Due to her obvious problems "Aria" was finally
paired with the, by then still juvenile, "Jinak" in early
2001. "Paul" was transferred to Berlin Zoo where he
died in 2002. After being paired with "Jinak" of whom
she was obviously unafraid, "Aria" seemed to calm
down for the first time since her arrival.
In early 2002 "Jinak" began to show courtship be-
haviour and tried to "climb" "Aria" which she seemed to
accept without problems. At first "Jinak" was too small
but when he grew up he was finally successful and on
2nd August 2003 "Aria" gave birth to a young male. Due


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






REGIONAL NEWS E BIBLIOGRAPHY 31


to her previous behaviour, the staff at Dortmund Zoo
was at first sceptical about whether "Aria" was calm
enough to rear her baby. However, to everyone's relief,
"Aria" proved to be an exemplary mother, even allowing
keepers and veterinarians to check up on the youngster,
named "Kakak G6tz" in an Indonesian style honouring
its sponsor, German entertainer G6tz Alsmann.
When she gave birth to her first offspring "Aria" was
already seven years old, "Jinak" on the other hand must
have been only two years of age when he successfully
mated with her, as the gestation period for tapirs is
given as 390 to 395 days (Nowak 1999). Standard zoo-
logical references quote an age of three to four years for
reaching maturity in tapirs, the earliest being two years
of age (Kauffels 2004). Thus, it must be considered that
"Jinak" was one of those rare animals who bred much
younger than the average.


Dr. Frank Brandstatter
Zoo Dortmund
Mergelteichstr. 80
D 44225 Dortmund, Germany
E-mail:f.brandstaetter@stadtdo.de


References

Kauffels, T. 2004. Familie Tapire (Tapiridae). In:
W Puschmann (ed.) Zootierhaltung. Tiere in
menschlicher Obhut. Sdugetiere, pp. 596-602.
Verlag Harri Deutsch, Frankfurt, Germany.
Nowak, R.M. 1999. Walker's Mammals of the World.
Volume II. Sixth Edition. The John Hopkins
University Press, Baltimore, USA.




UNITED KINGDOM

In October 2003, London Zoo produced its first
Malay tapir for nearly a century. 'Sayang', a female
was born at the beginning of October to first time
parents 'Doris' (from Oklahoma Zoo) and 'Hutan' (from
Dortmund Zoo).

Jackie Ossowski
Hoofstock Keeper, Zoological Society of London
Regent's Park, London, NW4 4RY, United Kingdom


BIbiography


A first bibliographic outline has been published in
Tapir Cons. Vol. 11 No. 2 from June 2002. We
would like to continue this service and list some more
scientific references related to tapirs and of further eco-
logical importance. This update considers most recent
articles published out of this newsletter.
New records are asked to be sent to Stefan Seitz for
completion: tapirseitz@web.de



Journal Articles

Barnichta, F. 2003. El tapir seductor en en el arte
rupestre antillano. Arqueo-Mitico-Astron6mica 9:
1-12.

Corlett, R.T. 1998. Frugivory and seed dispersal by
vertebrates in the Oriental (Indomalayan) Region.
Biological Reviews 73(4):413-448.

Foerster, C., Vaughan, C. 2002. Home range, habitat
use and activity of Baird's tapirs in Costa Rica. Bio-
tropica 34(3):423-437.


Foerster, S.H., Bailey, J.E., Aguilar, R., Leandro Lo-
ria, D., Foerster, C.R. 2000. Butorphanol/xylazine/
ketamine immobilization of free-ranging Baird's
tapirs in Costa Rica. J. Wildlife Diseases 36(2):
335-341.

Flesher, K. 1999. Preliminary notes on the conserva-
tion status of Baird's tapir Tapirus bairdii in north-
eastern Honduras. Oryx 33(4):294-300.

Fragoso, J.M.V., Silvius, K.M., Correa, J.A. 2003.
Long-distance seed dispersal by tapirs increases
seed survival and aggregates tropical trees. Ecology
84(8):1998-2006.

Henry, O., Feer F., Sabatier, D. 2000. Diet of the Low-
land Tapir (Tapirus terrestris L.) in French Guiana.
Biotropica 32(2):364-368.

Holden, J., Yanuar, A., Martyr, D.J. 2003. The Asian
Tapir in Kerinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra:
evidence collected through photo-trapping. Oryx
37(1):34-40.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






32 BIBLIOGRAPHY


Lizcano, D.J., Pizarro, V., Cavelier, J., Carmona, J.
2002. Geographic distribution and population size
of the mountain tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Co-
lombia. Journal of Biogeography 28:1-9.

Maffei, L., Cu6llar E., Noss, A. 2002. Uso de tram-
pas-camara para la evaluaci6n de mamiferos en el
ecotono Chaco-Chiquitania. Rev. Bol. Ecol. Con-
serv. Amb. 11:55-65.

Miglino, M.A., Santos, T.C. dos, Oliveira, M.F. de,
Bonatelli, M., Ambr6sio, C.E., Carter, A.M. 2003.
Aspectos Morfol6gicos da placenta da anta (Tapirus
terrestris). Revista Brasileira de Reproducdo
Animal 27(2):280-281.

Mendoza, M., Janis, C.M., Palmqvist, P. 2002. Char-
acterizing complex craniodental patterns related to
feeding behaviour in ungulates: a multivariate ap-
proach. Journal of Zoology 258(2):223-246.

Naranjo, E.J. & Cruz, E. 1998. Ecologia del tapir en la
Reserva de la Bi6sfera La Sepultura. Acta Zool6gica
Mexicana 73:111-125.

Torres, I.L., Naranjo Pifiera, E.J., Giiiris Andrade,
D.M., Cruz Aldan, E. 2004. Ecologia de Tapirus
bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae) en la Reserva de
la Biosfera el Triunfo (Poligono I), Chiapas, M6xico.
Acta Zool6gica Mexicana (n.s.) 20(1):1-21

Witmer, L.M., Sampson, S.D.,Solounias. N. 1999.
The proboscis of tapirs (Tapirus terrestris): a case
study in novel narial anatomy. Journal of Zoology
249:249-267.



Book Chapters

Bodmer, R.E. & Robinson, J.G. 2002. Evaluating the
sustainability of wildlife in the Neotropics. In: K.
Silvius, R.E. Bodmer & J.M. Fragoso (eds.), People
in Nature: Wildlife Conservation in the Neotropics.
Columbia University Press, New York, NY, USA.

Downer, C.C. 2003. Tapirs. In: Kleiman, D.G., Geist,
V, Hutchins, M., McDade, M.C. (eds.) Grzimek's
Animal Life Encyclopedia. Mammals IV. Vol. 15,
pp. 237-248. Farmington Hills, Michigan, USA.

Janssen, D.L. 2003. Tapiridae. In: M.E. Fowler and
R.E. Miller (eds.) Zoo and Wild
Animal Medicine, 5th Ed. pp569-577. W.B. Saunders
Co., St. Louis, Missouri, USA.


Kauffels, T. 2004. Familie Tapire (Tapiridae). In:
Puschmann, W. (ed.) Zootierhaltung. Tiere in
menschlicher Obhut. Siugetiere, pp. 596-602. Ver-
lag Harri Deutsch, Frankfurt, Germany.

Montenegro, O. L. 1999. Observaciones sobre la es-
tructura de una poblaci6n de tapires (Tapirus ter-
restris) en el sureste de la Amazonia peruana. In:
T.G. Fang, O.L. Montenegro & R.E. Bodmer (eds.)
Manejo y conservaci6n defauna silvestre en Ame-
rica Latina, pp.437-442. Institute de Ecologia, La
Paz, Bolivia.

Peres, C. A. 2000. Evaluating the impact and sustaina-
bility of subsistence hunting at multiple Amazonian
forest sites. In: J.G. Robinson & E.L. Bennett (eds.)
Hunting for Sustainability in Tropical Forests, pp.
31-56. Columbia University Press, New York.



Theses and Dissertations

Ayala, G. 2003. Monitoreo de Tapirus terrestris en
el Izozog (Cerro Cortado) Mediante el Uso de
Telemetria Como Base para un Plan de Conser-
vaci6n. M.S. thesis. Universidad Mayor de San An-
dr6s, La Paz, Bolivia.

Cruz, E. 2001. Hdbitos de Alimentaci6n e Impacto
de la Actividad Humana sobre el Tapir (Tapirus
bairdii) en la Reserva de la Biosfera La Sepul-
tura, Chiapas, Mexico. M.S. thesis, El Colegio de la
Frontera Sur, San Crist6bal de Las Casas, Chiapas,
Mexico.

Foerster, C.R. 1998. Ambito de Hogar, Patr6n de
Movimientos y Dieta de la Danta Centroamericana
(Tapirus bairdii) en el Parque Nacional Corcovado,
Costa Rica. M.S. thesis, Universidad Nacional,
Heredia, Costa Rica.

Hammer, G. 2001. Mixed species exhibits with mam-
mals. Stock report & problems. Doctoral thesis,
University of Salzburg, Austria.

Montenegro, O.L. 1998. The Behavior of Lowland Ta-
pir (Tapirus terrestris) at a Natural Mineral Lick
in the Peruvian Amazon. M.S. thesis, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Naranjo, E.J. 2002. Population ecology and conserva-
tion of ungulates in the Lacandon Forest, Mexico.
Doctoral thesis. University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL, USA.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






BIBLIOGRAPHY 0 MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY 33


Soto, Q.G. 2002. Dieta del Tapir Tapirus terrestris
y su Rol como Dispersor de Semillas en el Chaco
(Cerro Cortado), Provincia Cordillera, Santa Cruz,
Bolivia. B.S. thesis. Universidad Auton6ma Gabriel
Ren6 Moreno, Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

Zenzinger, S. 2003. Environmental Enrichment
durch das Einbringen von Beschaftigungsfutter
bei den Schabrackentapiren (Tapirus indicus) des
Nirnberger Tiergartens. M.S. thesis, Friedrich-Ale-
xander-Universitat, Erlangen, Germany.


Reports

Roman, J. 2001. Central American Tapir (Tapirus
bairdii) International Studbook. Unpublished Re-
port. Virginia Zoological Park, Norfolk, Virginia.

Shoemaker, A.H., Barongi, R., Flanagan, J., Jans-
sen, D. 2003. AZA Husbandry Standards for
Keeping Tapirs in Captivity. Unpublished Report,
AZA Tapir Taxon Advisory Group, Columbia, South
Carolina.


IUN/S Tapi Spcals Gru Members


ABD. GHANI, SITI KHADIJAH (Malaysia)
Local Research Coordinator, Malayan Tapir Project,
Krau Wildlife Reserve
PERHILITAN Bukit Rengit, Krau Wildlife Reserve, 28500
Lanchang Temerloh, Pahang State, MALAYSIA
Phone & Fax: +609-276-2348
E-mail: cobra7512081@hotmail.com

AGORAMOORTHY, GOVINDASAMY (Taiwan)
Ph.D. Associate Professor, Sun Yat-Sen University
Director (Research & Conservation), Singapore Zoological
Gardens
PO. BOX 59-157, Kaohsiung, TAIWAN 80424
Phone: +886-7525-2000 Ext. 3623 / Fax: +886-7525-3623
E-mail: agoram@mail.nsysu.edu.tw

ANGELL, GILIA (United States)
Web/Graphic Designer, Amazon.com
270 Dorffel Drive East, Seattle, Washington 98112,
UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-206-266-2613; + 1-206-568-1655 /
Fax: +1-206-266-1822
E-mail: gilia_angell@earthlink.net

APARICIO, KARLA (Republic of Panama)
M.Sc. Specialist in Wildlife Conservation and Management
Scientific Committee, Patronato "Amigos del Aguila Harpia"
Associate Researcher, Earthmatters.Org
Apartado Postal 810-337, Zona 10, Panama City,
REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Phone & Fax: +507-222-1781
E-mail: kaparicio@yahoo.com

BARONGI, RICK (United States)
Director, Houston Zoo Inc.
Former Chair / Member, American Zoo and Aquarium
Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
1513 North MacGregor, Houston, Texas 77030,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-713-533-6800 / Fax: + 1-713-533-6802
E-mail: RBarongi@aol.com; rbarongi@houstonzoo.org


BLANCO MARgUEZ, PILAR ALEXANDER (Venezuela)
D.VM. Fundaci6n Nacional de Parques Zool6gicos e
Acuarios (FUNPZA)
Associate Researcher, Earthmatters.Org
Urbanizaci6n Los Caobos, Calle Apure, Edificio: Residencia
Los Caobos
Piso 9, Apartamento 9-A, Maracay, Estado Aragua,
VENEZUELA
Phone: +58-243-246-0185; +58-414-477-1262/
Fax: +58-243-246-0185/ Mobile: +58-014-454-3193
E-mail: albla@telcel.net.ve; albla69@hotmail.com

BODMER, RICHARD E. (England)
Ph.D. Lecturer in Biodiversity Conservation
Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE),
Eliot College, University of Kent
Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NS, ENGLAND (U.K.)
Phone: +44-1227-823-233/ Fax: +44-1227-827-289
E-mail: R.Bodmer@ukc.ac.uk

BUSTOS, SOLEDAD DE (Argentina)
Licenciada en Cs. Biol6gicas, T6cnica de la Delegaci6n
Regional NoA, Parques Nacionales
Florida 466, 4400 Salta, ARGENTINA
Phone: +54-0387-432-0645/ Fax: +54-0387-431-0255
E-mail: soledebustos@hotmail.com

CARBONELL TORRES, FABRICIO (Costa Rica)
Coordinador de Proyectos Ambientales, Asociaci6n Meralvis
Apartado 1854-3000, Heredia, COSTA RICA
Phone & Fax: +506-262-5927
E-mail: carbon_f@yahoo.com.mx

CASTELLANOS PENAFIEL, ARMANDO XAVIER
(Ecuador)
Director, Andean Bear Project, Fundaci6n Espiritu del
Bosque
Reina Victoria 17-37 y La Nifa, Quito, ECUADOR
Phone: +593-2-223-9703/ Fax: +593-2-250-4452
E-mail: iznachi@yahoo.com.mx; zoobreviven@hotmail.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






34 MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


CHALUKIAN, SILVIA C. (Argentina)
M.Sc. Researcher, El Rey National Park
Rio Negro 2508, 4400 Salta, ARGENTINA
Phone: +54-387-424-0861
E-mail: silviach@sinectis.com.ar

CHONG, MIKE H. N. (Malaysia)
Coordinator, Freelance Naturalist, Bird Guide
Asian Raptor Research & Conservation Network-Information
Centre / Nature Tours
208 Jalan H-8, Taman Melawati, 53100 Kuala Lumpur,
MALAYSIA
Phone & Fax: +603-4107-1958
E-mail: mikechn@pc.jaring.my

COLBERT, MATTHEW (United States)
Research Associate, Department of Geological Sciences,
University of Texas
Austin, Texas 78712, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-512-471-0260 / Fax: + 1-512-471-9425
E-mail: colbert@mail.utexas.edu

CONSTANTINO, EMILIO (Colombia)
Biodiversity and Conservation Coordinator, Red de Reservas
Naturales de la Sociedad Civil
Calle 21 Norte No. 8-18, Barrio Santa Monica, Cali,
COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-2-660-6133; +57-2-653-4539 /
Fax: +57-2-660-6133
E-mail: emilio @resnatur.org.co

CRUZ ALDAN, EPIGMENIO (Mexico)
M.Sc. Researcher, Instituto de Historia Natural y Ecologia
Calzada Cerro Hueco S/N, A. P 6, C. P 29000, Tuxtla
Guti6rrez, Chiapas, MEXICO
Phone: +52-961-614-4765; +52-961-614-4459;
+52-961-614-4701 / Fax: +52-961-614-4700
E-mail: cruz5910@prodigy.net.mx

CUARON, ALFREDO D. (Mexico)
Ph.D. Departamento de Ecologia de los Recursos Naturales,
Institute de Ecologia, UNAM
Apartado Postal 27-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michoacan 58089,
MEXICO
Phone: +52-4-322-2786; +52-5-623-2786; +52-4-322-2777
Ext. 32786/ Fax: +52-4-322-2719; +52-5-623-2719
E-mail: cuaron@oikos.unam.mx

DEE, MICHAEL (United States)
General Curator, Los Angeles Zoo
Member, American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
5333 Zoo Drive, Los Angeles, California 90027,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-323-644-4254 / Fax: + 1-323-662-9786
E-mail: mdee@zoo.lacity.org

DOWNER, CRAIG C. (United States)
President, Andean Tapir Fund
PO. BOX 456, Minden, Nevada 89423-0456,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-775-267-3484 / Fax: + 1-775-747-1642
E-mail: CCDOWNER@terra.es


FLESHER, KEVIN (United States)
Ph.D. Graduate Student, Rutgers University
55 Dudley Road, 2nd Floor, New Brunswick, New Jersey
08901, UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-732-932-9153 Ext. 351
E-mail: KevinFlesher(@yahoo.com

FOERSTER, CHARLES R. (United States / Costa Rica)
M.Sc. Leader, Baird's Tapir Project, Corcovado National
Park, Costa Rica
445 CR 221, Orange Grove, Texas 78372, UNITED STATES
Phone & Fax: +1-719-228-0628
E-mail: CRFoerster@aol.com

FRANKLIN, NEIL (Indonesia)
Director, Indonesia Program, The Tiger Foundation (Canada)
- The Sumatran Tiger Trust (United Kingdom)
Prima Lingkar Asri B2/12, Jatibening, Bekasi,
INDONESIA 17412
Phone & Fax: +62-0-21-865-0114/
Mobile: +62-0-811-998-881
E-mail: franklin(@pacific.net.id

FROHRING, HEIDI (United States)
Zookeeper, Woodland Park Zoological Gardens
2649 N.W 60th Street, Seattle, Washington 98117,
UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-206-782-5964
E-mail: heidi.frohring@zoo.org; heidifrohring@earthlink.net

GARRELLE, DELLA (United States)
D.VM. Director of Conservation and Animal Health,
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo
4250 Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Road, Colorado Springs,
Colorado 80906, UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-719-633-9925 Ext. 120 / Fax: +1-719-633-2254
E-mail: dgarelle@cmzoo.org

GOFF, DON (United States)
Director of Animal Programs, Beardsley Zoological Gardens
Lowland Tapir Studbook Keeper, American Zoo and
Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group
(TAG)
1875 Noble Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06610,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-203-394-6564 / Fax: + 1-203-394-6577
E-mail: dgoff@beardsleyzoo.org

GONQALVES DA SILVA, ANDERS (Brazil / United States)
PhD. Graduate Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Program
Center for Environmental Research and Conservation
(CERC)
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental
Biology (E3B), Columbia University
1200 Amsterdam Ave MC5556, New York, New York
10027, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-212-854-0377 / Fax: +1-212-854-8188
E-mail: ag2057@columbia.edu


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY 35


GREENE, LEWIS (United States)
Director, Virginia Zoological Park
Chair, American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
3500 Granby Street, Norfolk, Virginia 23504, UNITED
STATES
Phone: + 1-757-441-2374
E-mail: lgreene@virginiazoo.org

GUERRERO SANCHEZ, SERGIO (Mexico)
D.VM. Manager, Clinic Laboratory, Zool6gico Regional
Miguel Alvarez del Toro (ZooMat)
Institute de Historia Natural y Ecologia
Calzada Cerro Hueco S/N, A. P 6, C. P 29000, Tuxtla
Guti6rrez, Chiapas, MEXICO
Phone: +52-961-614-4701/ Fax: +52-961-614-4700
E-mail: ekio@yahoo.com

GUIRIS ANDRADE, DARIO MARCELINO (Mexico)
D.VM. M.Sc. Jefe de Operaciones, UN.A.CH. / Policlinica y
Diagn6stico Veterinario
Blvd. Angel Albino Corzo # 635, Zona Militar, Tuxtla
Guti6rrez, Chiapas, MEXICO 29079
Phone & Fax: +52-961-614-4214
E-mail: dguiris@web.correosdecuba.cu;
dguiris@web.correosdecuba.cu

HERNANDEZ DIVERS, SONIA M. (United States)
D.VM. Adjunct Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine,
University of Georgia
197 East Creek Bend, Athens, Georgia 30605,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-706-548-3414
E-mail: shernz@aol.com

HOLDEN, JEREMY (Indonesia)
Photographer, Flora and Fauna International
PO. BOX 42, Kantor Pos, Sungai Penuh Kerinci, Jambi,
Sumatra INDONESIA 371000
Phone & Fax: +0-7482-2267
E-mail: pop@padang.wasantara.net.id;
jeremy_holdenl @yahoo.co.uk

HOLST, BENGT (Denmark)
M.Sc. Vice Director, Copenhagen Zoo
Convener, IUCN/SSC Conservation Breeding Specialist
Group (CBSG) Europe Regional Network
Chair, European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA)
Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
Sdr. Fasanvej 79, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, DENMARK
Phone: +45-72-200-200; +45-72-200-220/
Fax: +45-72-200-219
E-mail: beh@zoo.dk

JANSSEN, DONALD L. (United States)
D.VM. Ph.D. Director, Veterinary Services, San Diego
Wild Animal Park
15500 San Pasqual Valley Road, San Diego, California
92027-7017, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-760-291-5401 / Fax: + 1-760-747-3168
E-mail: djanssen@sandiegozoo.org


KAEWSIRISUK, SUWAT (Thailand)
Chief, Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary Department of National
Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation
Royal Forest Department of Thailand
PO. Box 3, Waeng District, Narathiwat Province,
THAILAND 96160
Phone: +6697-333101
E-mail: king@btv.co.th

KANCHANASAKA, BUDSABONG (Thailand)
Government Official National Park, Wildlife and Plant
Conservation Department
Royal Forestry Department of Thailand
Paholgothin Road, Chatujak, Bangkhen, Bangkok,
THAILAND 10900
Phone: +662-940-7159/ Fax: +662-579-9874
E-mail: Budsa@hotmail.com

KASTON FLOREZ, FRANZ (Colombia)
D.VM. Scientific Director, Nativa Foundation
Carrera 64 #22B-10 Int 03-703, Ibague, Tolima, COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-315-798-3086
E-mail: tapirlanudo@hotmail.com

KAWANISHI, KAE (Malaysia)
Ph.D. Technical Advisor, Division of Research and
Conservation
Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP)
Km. 10, Jalan Cheras, 56100 Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA
Phone: +603-9075-2872/ Fax: +603-9075-2873
E-mail: kae@wildlife.gov.my; kae2000@tm.net.my

CONSTANT, WILLIAM (United States)
Director of Conservation and Science, Houston Zoo Inc.
1513 North MacGregor, Houston, Texas 77030,
UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-215-233-9318 / Fax: + 1-215-402-0469
E-mail: bkonstant@houstonzoo.org

LIRA TORRES, IVAN (Mexico)
D.VM. M.Sc. Research Associate, Universidad del Mar -
Campus Puerto Escondido
Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, C.P 71980, MEXICO
Phone: +01-954-588-3365/ Fax: +01-954-582-3550
E-mail: ilira@zicatela.umar.mx

LIZCANO, DIEGO (Colombia)
Ph.D. Graduate Student, Durrell Institute of Conservation
and Ecology (DICE), University of Kent
A. A. 53804, Bogota 0107, DC, COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-1-281-4256
E-mail: dl36@jukc.ac.uk

LYNAM, ANTONY (Thailand)
Ph.D. Associate Conservation Ecologist, Wildlife
Conservation Society
PO. BOX 170, Laksi, Bangkok, THAILAND 10210
Phone & Fax: +66-2-574-0683
E-mail: tlynam@wcs.org


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36 MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


MANGINI, PAULO ROGERIO (Brazil)
D.VM. M.Sc. Research Associate, IPE Instituto de
Pesquisas Ecol6gicas (Institute for Ecological Research)
Scientific Coordinator, Vida Livre Medicina de Animals
Selvagens
Rua Professor Alvaro Jorge, 795, Apto. 15C BL 3, Curitiba
CEP: 80320-040, Parana, BRAZIL
Phone: +55-41-3026-1846/ Mobile: +55-41-9996-5138
E-mail: pmangini@uol.com.br; pmangini@ipe.org.br

MARTYR, DEBORAH (Indonesia)
Team Leader, Flora and Fauna International
PO. BOX 42, Kantor Pos, Sungai Penuh Kerinci, Jambi
13007, Sumatra, INDONESIA
Phone: +00-0-7482-2267; +00-0-7462-1846/
Fax: +00-0-7482-2267
E-mail: tigers@ja.mweb.co.id; tigers@ja.mweb.co.id;
DebbieKerinci@aol.com

MATOLA, SHARON (United States / Belize)
Director, Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center
PO. BOX 1787, Belize City, BELIZE
Phone: +501-813-004/ Fax: +501-813-010
E-mail: belizezoo@btl.net

McLAIN, JENNIFER (United States)
Registrar, Houston Zoo Inc.
Malay Tapir Studbook Keeper, American Zoo and Aquarium
Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
1513 North MacGregor Drive, Houston, Texas 77030,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-713-533-6510 / Fax: +1-713-533-6755
E-mail: jmclain@houstonzoo.org

MEDICI, PATRICIA (Brazil)
M.Sc. Research Coordinator, IPE Instituto de Pesquisas
Ecol6gicas (Institute for Ecological Research)
Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sao Paulo, Teodoro Sampaio
CEP: 19280-000, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Mobile: +55-18-9711-6106
E-mail: epmedici@uol.com.br; medici@ipe.org.br

MEIJAARD, ERIK (The Netherlands / Australia /
Indonesia)
Post-Graduate Researcher, Department of Archaeology and
Anthropology, Australian National University
1/14 Portus Place, Bruce, 2617 ACT, Canberra, AUSTRALIA
0200
Phone: +61-2-6125-3557/ Fax: +61-2-6251-0193
E-mail: erik.meijaard@anu.edu.au

MENDOZA, ALBERTO (Mexico / United States)
D.VM. Community Programs Coordinator, Houston Zoo Inc.
1513 North MacGregor, Houston, Texas 77030,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-713-533-6548 / Fax: +1-713-533-6768
E-mail: amendoza@houstonzoo.org


MOLLINEDO, MANUEL A. (United States)
Director, San Francisco Zoological Gardens
1 Zoo Road, San Francisco, CA 94132, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-415-753-7080; + 1-415-753-7119 /
Fax: +1-415-681-2039
E-mail: manuelm@sfzoo.org

MONTENEGRO, OLGA LUCIA (Colombia / United States)
Ph.D. Graduate Student, University of Florida
Av. 1 de Mayo, # 39 A 49 Sur, Bogota, COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-1-203-5582
E-mail: olmdco@yahoo.com

MUENCH SPITZER, CARLOS ERIK (Mexco)
Biologist, Departamento de Ecologia y Sistemitica Terrestre,
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)
Calle 18 de Julio, 29, Colonia Gilberto Palacios de la Rosa,
Chapingo, Texcoco, MEXICO 56230
Phone: +967-87-896; 595-46-976
E-mail: carloserik@yahoo.com

NARANJO PINERA, EDUARDO J. (Mexico)
Ph.D. El Colegio de la Frontera Sur
Carr. Panamericana, Ap. 63, San Cristobal de Las Casas,
Chiapas, MEXICO 29290
Phone: +52-9678-1884/ Fax: +52-9678-2322
E-mail: enaranjo@sclc.ecosur.mx; enaran7@prodigy.net.mx

NAVEDA RODRIGUEZ, ADRIAN JOSE (Venezuela)
T.S.U. en Recursos Naturales Renovables, Museo de la
Estaci6n Biol6gica de Rancho Grande
Apartado Postal 4845, Maracay, 2101-A Aragua,
VENEZUELA
Phone: +58-416-433-2160/ Fax: +58-243-235-8238
E-mail: adrian.naveda@cantv.net

NOVARINO, WILSON (Indonesia)
Lecturer, Jurusan Biologi FMIPA, Universitas Andalas
Kampus Limau Manis Padang, Sumatera Barat,
PO. BOX 093, Padang, INDONESIA 25163
Phone: +062-0751-777-425; +062-0751-497-952 /
Fax: +062-0751-71343
E-mail: wilson n id@yahoo.com

NUNEZ, RUBEN (Ecuador)
President, Fundaci6n Bafios 2000, Fundaci6n Tapir y
Biodiversidad Ecuador
Universidad Escuela Politecnica Ecologica Amazonica -
ESPEA
Barrio Ecol6gico 5 de Junio, Calle Rocafuerte 806 y Juan
Leon Mera, PO. BOX 1803, Bafios, Tungurahua, ECUADOR
Phone: +59-303-740 447
E-mail: tapirub@yahoo.com

ORTMEIER VELASTIN, GEORGE (Brazil)
D.VM. Researcher, IPE Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas
(Institute for Ecological Research)
Vida Livre Medicina de Animais Selvagens
Avenida Perdizes, 285, Vila Sao Paulo, Teodoro Sampaio
CEP: 19280-000, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL
Phone & Fax: +55-18-3282-4690 /
Mobile: +55-41-9105-0765
E-mail: velastin@uol.com.br; george@ipe.org.br


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY 37


PARAS GARCIA, ALBERTO (Mexico)
D.VM. Gerente del Departamento de Veterinaria, Africam
Safari
11 Oriente 2407, Col. Azcarate, Puebla, MEXICO 72007
Phone: +22-360-933/ Fax: +22-363-049
E-mail: pago@servidor.unam.mx;
pago@africamsafari.com.mx

PRAYURASIDDHI, THEERAPAT (Thailand)
Ph.D. Technical Forest Official National Park, Wildlife and
Plant Conservation Department
Royal Forest Department of Thailand
61 Phaholyothin Road, Chatuchack, Bangkok,
THAILAND 10900
Phone: +66-2-561-4292 Ext. 797 / Fax: +66-2-579-7048
E-mail: theerapat@hotmail.com

QUSE, VIVIANA BEATRIZ (Argentina)
D.VM. Senior Veterinarian, Temaiken Foundation
Ruta 25 y km 0.700, Escobar, 1625, Buenos Aires,
ARGENTINA
Phone & Fax: +54-3488-436805
E-mail: vquse@temaiken.com.ar

REDSTON, GARETH (England)
Education Division, North of England Zoological Society,
Chester Zoo
Caughall Rd., Upton, Chester CH2 1LH, Cheshire,
ENGLAND (U.K.)
Phone: +44-1244-650-205/ Fax: +44-1244-650-234
E-mail: G.Redston@chesterzoo.co.uk

ROJAS CARRIZALES, HECTOR ANDRES (Mexico)
Biologist, Procuradoria Federal de Protecci6n al Ambiente,
Asesores en el Manejo de Recursos Naturales, S.A. de C.V
Carretera Ajusco, 200, 60 Piso, Col. Jardines em La
Montana, Mexico DF MEXICO
Phone: +52-5587-1293/ Fax: +52-5587-1293
E-mail: tlalcoyote@hotmail.com; arcano@operamail.com;
zacatuche@excite.com

ROMAN, JOSEPH (United States)
Curator, Virginia Zoological Park
Baird's Tapir Studbook Keeper, American Zoo and
Aquarium Association (AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group
(TAG)
3500 Granby Street, Norfolk, VA 23504, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-757-441-2499 Ext. 267 / Fax: + 1-757-624-9939
E-mail: Joseph.Roman@norfolk.gov

RUIZ FUAMAGALLI, JOSE ROBERTO (Guatemala)
Professor & Researcher, Escuela de Biologia, Universidad de
San Carlos de Guatemala
Escuela de Biologia, Edificio T-10, Ciudad Universitaria,
Zona 12, Guatemala, GUATEMALA
Phone & Fax: +502-476-9856
E-mail: rruizf@yahoo.com


RUSSO, KELLY J. (United States)
Conservation Program Assistant, Houston Zoo Inc.
1513 North MacGregor Drive, Houston, Texas 77030,
UNITED STATES
Phone: +1-713-533-6556 / Fax: +1-713-533-4762
E-mail: krusso@(houstonzoo.org

SALAS, LEONARDO (Venezuela / Indonesia)
Ph.D. Freelance Consultant, Indonesia
JL Pemuda, 92 The Nature Conservancy, Tanjung Redeb,
Kalimantan Timur 77311, INDONESIA
Phone: +62-554-22954
E-mail: LeoASalas@netscape.net

SANDOVAL ARENAS, SERGIO (Colombia)
Coordinator, Mountain Tapir Project, Cali Zoo and
Los Angeles Zoo
Cr. 2 Oeste Cl 14 Esquina, Cali, Valle del Cauca, COLOMBIA
Phone: +2-892-7474 Ext. 115 /Mobile: +310-490-5189
E-mail: dantascol@yahoo.com.mx

SARMIENTO DUENAS, ADRIANA MERCEDES (Colombia)
M.Sc. Candidate, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
Diagonal 41 No 46-05, Bogota, Cundinamarca, COLOMBIA
Phone & Fax: +57-1-315-0850
E-mail: adrianasarmi@hotmail.com;
adriana-s@wildmail.com

SARRIA PEREA, JAVIER ADOLFO (Colombia)
D.VM. M.Sc. Genetics & Animal Improvement
Cra 58A, No. 74 A-31 Interior 3, Apartamento 102, Bogota,
COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-1-250-8020
E-mail: jasarrip@fcav.unesp.br; jasarrip@yahoo.com

SEITZ, STEFAN (Germany)
Ph.D. Zoo Biologist: Behaviour and Captive Management
4TAPIRS Information Centre
Bonndorfer Strasse 19, 68239 Mannheim, GERMANY
Phone & Fax: +49-621-471-428
E-mail: tapirseitz@web.de; info@4tapirs.de

SHOEMAKER, ALAN H. (United States)
Permit Advisor, American Zoo and Aquarium Association
(AZA) Tapir Taxon Advisory Group (TAG)
330 Shareditch Road, Columbia, South Carolina 29210,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-803-772-6701
E-mail: sshoe@mindspring.com

SUAREZ MEJIA, JAIME ANDRES (Colombia)
Environmental Manager, Enviromental Sciences,
Universidad Tecnol6gica de Pereira
Carrera 4 bis #24-33, Pereira, Risaralda, COLOMBIA
Phone & Fax: +57-6-321-2443
E-mail: suarmatta@yahoo.com


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






38 MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY


TILSON, RONALD (United States)
Ph.D. Director of Conservation, Minnesota Zoo
13000 Zoo Blvd., Apple Valley, Minnesota 55124,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-952-431-9267/ Fax: + 1-952-431-9452
E-mail: r-tilson@mtn.org; rtilson@5tigers.org

TODD, SHERYL (United States)
President, Tapir Preservation Fund (TPF)
PO. Box 118, Astoria, Oregon 97103, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-503-325-3179
E-mail: tapir@tapirback.com

TORRES, DENIS ALEXANDER (Venezuela)
President, Fundaci6n AndigenA
Apartado Postal 210, M6rida 5101-A, Edo. M6rida,
VENEZUELA
Phone: +58-7-421-9993
E-mail: fundacion_andigena@yahoo.com

TRAEHOLT, CARL (Denmark / Malaysia)
Ph.D. Research Coordinator, Malayan Tapir Project,
Krau Wildlife Reserve, Copenhagen Zoo
D3 Selangor Properties, Ukay Heights, 68000 Ampang,
MALAYSIA
Phone & Fax: +603-4256-6910
E-mail: ctraeholt@pd.jaring.my

VALDEZ LEAL, JUAN DE DIOS (Mexico / Costa Rica)
M.Sc. Candidate, Programa Regional de Manejo de Vida
Silvestre (UNA Costa Rica)
Apartado 1350-3000, H. Cardenas, 86550, Tabasco,
MEXICO
Phone: +506-2-377039/ Fax: +506-2-377036
E-mail: jdvaldezleal@yahoo.com.mx

VAN STRIEN, NICO (The Netherlands / Indonesia)
Ph.D. SE Asia Coordinator, International Rhino Foundation
Tower 3, Unit 23B, Kondominium Taman Anggrek, Lt 6
Jl. Let. Jen. S. Parman Kav 21. Slipi, Jakarta,
INDONESIA 11470
Phone: +62-21-560-9401/ Fax: +62-21-560-9402
E-mail: Strien@indo.net.id
Julianaweg 2, 3941DM, Doom, THE NETHERLANDS
Phone: +31-343-420-445/ Fax: +31-343-420-447
E-mail: strien@compuserve.com

VIEIRA FRAGOSO, JOSE MANUEL (United States)
Ph.D. College of Environmental Science and Forestry SUNY
6 Illick Hall, 1 Forestry Dr., Syracuse, New York
13210-2778, UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-315-470-6792 / Fax: +1-315-470-6934
E-mail: fragoso@esf.edu

VILLEGAS, CAROLINA (Colombia)
Photographer / Veterinary Student, Universidad CES
Medellin
Cra. 39, #5d-2, Apt 502, Medellin, Antioquia, COLOMBIA
Phone: +57-4-266-5350/ Fax: +57-4-312-2870
E-mail: timo@epm.net.co


WALLACE, ROBERT B. (United States / Bolivia)
Ph.D. Associate Conservation Ecologist, Wildlife
Conservation Society, Madidi
Calle 13 de Obrajes No. 594, Entre Veintemillas y 14 de
Septiembre, La Paz, BOLIVIA
Phone: +591-2-278-6642; +591-2-211-7969;
+591-2-212-6905 / Fax: +591-2-278-6642
E-mail: rwallace@wcs.org

WATERS, SIAN S. (United Kingdom)
Zoo Committee Coordinator & Newsletter Contributions
Editor, IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG)
14 Lindsay Gardens, Tredegar, Gwent NP22 4RP
UNITED KINGDOM
Phone: +44-0-1495-722-117
E-mail: sian s waters@hotmail.com;
sianswaters@yahoo.co.uk

WATKINS, GRAHAM (Guyana)
Ph.D. Senior Wildlife Biologist, Interim Project
Implementation Manager
Iwokrama International Centre for Rain Forest Conservation
and Development
67 Bel Air, PO. BOX 10630, Georgetown, GUYANA
Phone: +59-2-225-1504/ Fax: +59-2-225-9199
E-mail: ggwatkins@hotmail.com; gwatkins@iwokrama.org

WOHLERS, HUMBERTO (Belize)
General Curator, Belize Zoo
PO. BOX 1787, Belize City, BELIZE
Phone: +501-220-8004/ Fax: +501-220-8010
E-mail: animalmgt@belizezoo.org;
humbertowohlers @yahoo.com

WORTMAN, JOHN (United States)
Collections Manager, Peace River Center for the Conservation
of Tropical Ungulates
4300 SW County Road 769, Arcadia, Florida 34268,
UNITED STATES
Phone: + 1-863-993-4529 / Fax: + 1-863-993-4547
E-mail: peaceriver@desoto.net


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004






THE NEWSLETTER OF THE IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP 39


Chair
Patricia Medici, Brazil, epmedici@uol.com.br

Deputy-Chairs
Siin S.Waters, United Kingdom, sian s waters@hotmail.com
William Konstant, United States, bkonstant@houstonzoo.org

Baird's Tapir Coordinator
Eduardo J. Naranjo Pihera, Mexico, enaranjo@sclc.ecosur.mx

Lowland Tapir Coordinator
Denis Alexander Torres, Venezuela, fundacionandigena@yahoo.com

Malay Tapir Coordinator
Carl Traeholt, Denmark / Malaysia, ctraeholt@pd.jaring.my

Mountain Tapir Coordinator
Emilio Constantino, Colombia, emilio@resnatur.org.co

Red List Authority
Alan H. Shoemaker, United States, sshoe@mindspring.com

Tapir Conservation Newsletter Editors
Siin S.Waters, United Kingdom, sian s waters@hotmail.com
Stefan Seitz, Germany, tapirseitz@web.de
Kelly J. Russo, United States, krusso@houstonzoo.org

Fundraising Committee Coordinator
Patricia Medici, Brazil, epmedici@uol.com.br

Action Planning Committee Coordinator
Patricia Medici, Brazil, epmedici@uol.com.br

Zoo Committee Coordinator
Siin S.Waters, United Kingdom, sian s waters@hotmail.com

Veterinary Committee Coordinator
D.V.M. Pilar Alexander Blanco Marquez,Venezuela, albla@telcel.net.ve

Genetics Committee Coordinators
Anders Gongalves da Silva, Brazil/United States, ag2057@columbia.edu
D.V.M. Javier Adolfo Sarria Perea, Colombia, jasarrip@fcav.unesp.br
Emilio Constantino, Colombia, emilio@resnatur.org.co

Education & Outreach Committee Coordinators
Kelly J. Russo, United States, krusso@houstonzoo.org
Gareth Redston, England, G.Redston@chesterzoo.co.uk

Marketing Committee Coordinator
Gilia Angell, United States, gilia angell@earthlink.net

Webmaster
Gilia Angell, United States, giliaangell@earthlink.net

Evolution Consultant
Matthew Colbert, United States, colbert@mail.utexas.edu


Scope
This newsletter aims to provide information regarding all
aspects of tapir natural history. Items of news, recent events,
recent publications, thesis abstracts, workshop proceedings
etc concerning tapirs are welcome. Manuscripts should be
submitted in MS Word.

Deadlines
There are two deadlines per year. They are 3 I March for
publication in June and 30 September for publication in
December.

Please include the full name and address of the authors
underneath the title of the article and specify who is the
corresponding author.

Full length articles on any aspect of tapir natural history
should not be more than 15 pages in length (including
references). An abstract is required and British English
spelling is requested.

Figures and Maps
Articles etc can include black and white photographs, high
quality figures and high quality maps and tables.

References
Please refer to these examples when listing references:

journal Article
Herrera, J.C.,Taber,A.,Wallace, R.B. & Painter, L. 1999.
Lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) behavioral ecology in a
southern Amazonian tropical forest. Vida Silv.Tropicale 8:
31-37.

Chapter in Book
Janssen, D.L., Rideout, B.A. & Edwards, M.S. 1999.Tapir
Medicine. In: M.E. Fowler & R. E. Miller (eds.) Zoo and Wild
Animal Medicine, pp.562-568. W.B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia,
USA.

Book
Brooks, D.M., Bodmer, R.E. & Matola, S. 1997.Tapirs: Status,
Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN, Gland,
Switzerland.

ThesislDissertation
Foerster. C.R. 1998.Ambito de Hogar, Patron de Movimentso
y Dieta de la Danta Centroamericana (Tapirus bairdii) en
el Parque Nacional Corcovado, Costa Rica. M.S. thesis.
Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.

Report
Santiapilli, C.& Ramono,WS. 1989.The Status and
Conservation of the Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) in
Sumatra, Indonesia. Unpublished Report,Worldwide Fund
for Nature, Bogor, Indonesia.

Contact
Please send all contributions to Sian S.Waters,
sian s waters@yahoo.co.uk or by hard copy to this postal
address: 14 Lindsay Gardens, Tredegar, Gwent NP22 4RP UK.


Tapir Conservation a The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group a Vol. 13/1 0 No. 15 0 June 2004







Tapir Conservation

TheNewsletter of the T apir Specia t Gro


Volume 13/1 U No. 15 U June 2004






Contents.............................................................................................................................. 2

Editorial Board ............................................................................................................... 2

From the Chair .................................................................................................................... 3
Letter from the Chair Patricia Medici ............................................................ .... .............. 3
Letter from Co-Deputy Chair Sian S. W aters ........................................................................ ...6
Letter from Co-Deputy Chair W illiam Konstant ............................................................ .......... 7

Second International Tapir Symposium .................................................... ................... 8
By Patricia M edici ............................................................ .. ....................................... 8
O organizers and Supporters ....................................................... ...................................12

TSG Committee Reports .............................................................. ............................... 14
TSG Action Planning Committee: Report and Plans for Action By Patricia Medici .......................... 14
TSG Fundraising Committee: Report and Plans for Action By Patricia Medici................................ 17
TSG Zoo Committee: Report By Sian S. Waters.................................................................. 19
Tapir Standards By Alan Shoem aker .......................................................................... .......... 20
TSG Veterinary Committee: Report and Plans for Action By Pilar Alexander Blanco Marquez ........21
TSG Red List Committee: Report By Alan Shoemaker............................................................. 22
TSG Genetics Committee: Introduction and Report
By Anders Gongalves da Silva, Javier Sarria & Emilio Constantino.............................................. 23
TSG Education & Outreach Committee: Introduction and Report
By Kelly Russo & Gareth Redston .......................................................................................... 24
TSG Marketing Committee: Introduction and Report By Gilia Angell .........................................24
The New Tapir Specialist Group Website By Gilia Angell ........................................................ 25
Newsletter Report By Sian S. Waters, Stefan Seitz & Kelly Russo .............................................26

Regional New s .................................................................................................................. 27
COLOMBIA Red Danta Colombia (Colombian Tapir Network): An Update
By Diego J. Lizcano, Jaime Andres Suarez & Olga Montenegro .................................................. 27
BELIZE By Sharon M atola ............................................................................. .................. 28
HONDURAS Notes on the Relative Abundance and Hunting of Baird's Tapir in the Rus-Rus Region
of La Moskitia, Honduras: A Proposed Biological Reserve By Nereyda Estrada .............................28
SUMATRA, INDONESIA By Deborah Martyr ..........................................................................30
GERMANY Successful Breeding of the Malay Tapir (Tapirus indicus) at Dortmund Zoo, Germany,
with a ,Problem" Female By Frank Brandstatter ..................................................................... 30
UNITED KINGDOM By Jackie Ossowski ............................................................................. 31

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 3 1

IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group Membership Directory................................... ......... 33

IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group Structure ...................................................................... 39

Notes for Contributors ................................................................................................. 39




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