Group Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Title: Tapir conservation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095885/00006
 Material Information
Title: Tapir conservation the newsletter of the IUCNSSC Tapir Specialist Group
Uniform Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Abbreviated Title: Tapir conserv. (Print)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Publisher: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Place of Publication: Houston TX
Houston TX
Publication Date: February 1996
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiannual
regular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1990.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 12, no. 2 (Dec. 2003); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095885
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 56897961
lccn - 2004215875
issn - 1813-2286

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IUCN/SSC
TAPIR SPECIALIST
GROUP


TAPIR CONSERVATION


FEBRUARY 1996


The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP






Issue #6 of the newsletter has been produced with assistance from
Wildlife Preservation Trust, Int'l.


NUMBER 6















TAPIR CONSERVATION




The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group









Editor: Sharon Matola, TSG Chairperson





The views expressed in Tapir Conservation do not necessarily
reflect those of the IUCN nor the entire IUCN/SSC Tapir
Specialist Group (TSG).





The objective of Tapir Conservation is to offer the members of
the Tapir Specialist Group/IUCN/SSC and others concerned with the
family Tapiridae, news brief papers, opinions, and general
information about this threatened mammalian genus. Anyone
wishing to contribute to Tapir Conservation should send materials
to:



Sharon Matola, Chairperson
Tapir Specialist Group/IUCN/SSC
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize
Central America














WORD FROM THE EDITOR


This ISSUE # 6 of TAPIR CONSERVATION discusses field work, and
other issues of interest to the Tapir Specialist Group.


News about tapirs, in the wild, in captivity, historic
information or any appropriate items relative to the TSG should
be sent to:

TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP NEWSLETTER C/O
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize


Central America
















A. UPDATE: TAPIR ADVISORY GROUP


CHAIR: RICK BARONGI
Walt Disney Company


- Tapir CAMP document is completed and available from the CBSG
office.

- Elizabeth Frank, Milwaukee Zoo, has assumed the Malayan tapir
species coordinator position.

- Lewis Greene, Prospect Park Zoo/NYZS, has assumed the Baird's
tapir species coordinator position.

- The most comprehensive bibliography of Tapiridae has been
compiled by Dr. Don Janssen of the San Diego Zoo. Contact TAG
Chair for copies.

- The number of AZA institutions holding Malayan tapirs has
increased by 30% in the past two years, for a total of 22
facilities.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The following is a summary of only those tapirs held in AZA
institutions:


Malayan tapir

Brazilian tapir

Baird's tapir

Mountain tapir


PRIMARY CONCERNS


28.31 = 59

42.48 = 90

21.10 = 31

6.2 = 8


- Encourage more institutions to stop breeding their Brazilian














tapirs to free up more space for the three other more endangered
species.

- Select a Brazilian tapir coordinator and studbook keeper to
update the four year old information on this species.

- Follow up on all the initiatives formulated at the 1994 tapir
TAG mid-year meeting.

- Finalize application for tapir SSP for WCMC approval.

- Schedule a joint tapir TAG and IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
meeting to work on regional and global action plans.

- Acquire more captive bred female Baird's tapirs for AZA
population.

- Become more involved with in situ projects, especially the
mountain tapir which is the most endangered tapir species.

RESEARCH

The tapir Veterinary Advisory Group is coordinated by Dr. Don
Janssen, San Diego Zoo, Fax: 619-557-3959. Necropsy protocols
and chemical immobilizatin data are also available from Dr.
Janssen.


B. NOTES FROM THE FIELD


1. THE CENTRAL AMERICAN TAPIR, Tapirus bairdii


Charles Foerster of Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica, has been
studying T. bairdii in Corcovado National Park, a 41,789 ha
Protected Area on the western portion of the Osa Peninsula (8
26'- 8 39'N and 83 25' 83 44'0). The altitude ranges from 0-
745 msnm, and the rainfall varies -between 3,800mm on the seacoast
up to 6.500 mm in the more elevated regions.

Foerster has successfully captured and attached radio collars to
three female and two male tapirs. No complications were
experienced in any of the captures or recoveries, and no adverse
effects of the collars have been noted.

As expected, Foerster has found, after his pilot study, that
activity patterns were mostly crepuscular and nocturnal. Also,
in his pilot study, Foerster has found home range sizes much
smaller than what was expected. In June of 1995, data showed
that the average home range for all animals was 1.4 km2. The
average female home range was 1.1 km2, while the average male
home range was 1.8 km2.














The following data is being recorded:


Species of plant eaten.
Part of plant eaten.
State of activity.


Foerster will continue to gather data until May of 1996, however
the radio collar batteries will last for an additional 15 months.





*NOTE: Charles Foerster and advisor Chris Vaughan are looking
for someone to continue this project. All inquiries and
communications are welcome. Contact:

Charles Foerster
PRMVS
Universidad Nacional
tel/fax: 506-237-7039/7036





2. DIETARY HABITS OF TAPIR, T. BAIRDII, IN A TROPICAL HUMID
FOREST IN COSTA RICA, by Eduardo J. Naranjo Pinera has been
published in :

VIDA SILVESTRE NEOTROPICAL Vol. 4 No. 1

This is the biannual publication of Vida Silvestre
Neotropical/Programa Regional en Manejo de Vida Silvestre.
Subscriptions can be obtained:


VIDA SILVESTRE NEOTROPICAL
Program Regional en Manejo de
Dept. SJO 278 -
P.O. Box 025216
Miami, FL 33102


Latin America


Student
Professional
Institutional


8.00
12.00
15.00


Vida Silvestre


Other

15.00
24.00
30.00


3. PRIME HABITAT FOR CENTRAL AMERICA TAPIR IN BELIZE, CENTRAL
AMERICA.

Once again, sponsored by Wildlife Preservation Trust,












International, a ten day field trip to the remote Upper Raspaculo
River Basin was undertaken in December 1995.

Seven tapir were observed over a period of ten days. Faeces was
collected and analyzed at the country's central veterinarian
laboratory. However, no parasite analyses could be determined
due to the length of time the faeces had remained in water.

Plants of the family Compositae were collected and sent to the
Natural History Museum in London for id, at this time, positive
id is uncertain. These plants were noted to have been eaten by
tapir. Tapir tracks led to the plants along the riverbanks.
This species of plant was obviously a browse choice for T.
bairdii in the Upper Raspaculo, as there was repeated evidence of
the plants being bitten off, mid-height.

A Maya indian who took part in this trip was familiar with the
plant as a food plant for tapir.


4. MORE NEWS T. BAIRDII


Tapir TAG Chairperson Rick Barongi reports that biologist Tom
Carr, while rafting a portion of the Rio Platino near the border
of Nicaragua and Honduras in mid-1995, saw 47 tapir events, which
included tracks, dung, and visual sightings.

He saw two different females with young calves and feels
confident that this area has a healthy population of Central
American tapir.


5. THE LOWLAND TAPIR, TAPIRUS TERRESTRIS

Leonardo Salas and Scott Fuller of the University of
Massachusetts, with support from Wildlife Conservation Society,
have completed a study of T. terrestris in the Tabaro River
Valley in southern Venezuela.

Two manuscripts have been produced from their fild work:

1. HABITAT USE BY LOWLAND TAPIRS, TAPIRUS TERRESTRIS L. IN THE
TABARO RIVER VALLEY, SOUTHERN VENEZUELA.

2. DIET OF THE LOWLAND TAPIR, TAPIRUS TERRESTRIS L. IN THE
TABARO RIVER VALLEY, SOUTHERN VENEZUELA.




Their work presents questions about the role T. terrestris plays
in this particular ecosystem as a seed disperser.













Their study area:


6. THE MOUNTAIN TAPIR, TAPIRUS PINCHAQUE

In mid-1995, Craig Downer, one of the world's leading experts on
T. pinchaque -ecoldgy, sent an alert to the United Nations
Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO),
World Heritage Centre, to draw attention to the development of
roads into Sangay National Park, Ecuador's World Heritage Site,
and home to many endangered species, including the Mountain
Tapir.

Since 1991, efforts to push a road into the high altitude ranges
(over 13,000 ft.) of Sangay National Park have been undertaken by
both local inhabitants and government officials.

Besides providing sanctuary for many rare and endangered species,
this ecosystem is a critical watershed for the Morona-Santiago
province.

The northern Andes are recognized as one of the most biologically
diverse areas in the world. And most of the Andean valleys and
mountain ridges have dozens of species of birds, butterflies, and
plants that can be found nowhere else on earth.

The Tapir Specialist Group Chairperson has sent a letter to the
Ecuadorean Minister of Natural Resources drawing attention to the
importance of Sangay National Park and the imperative need to
maintain its biological integrity.

TSG members are urged to be proactive in this matter. A letter
citing the critical need to preserve this unique ecosystem can be
sent to any of the following:

- Excelentisimo, Sr. President de la Republica de Ecuador
Arq. Sixto Duran Ballen, Presidencia de la Republica
Garcia Moreno 1043, Quito, Ecuador, South America.

- Ecuadorean Ambassador to the USA
2535 15th St. NW
Washington, DC 20009














- Ing. Jorge Barba, Director Ejecutivo (INEFAN)
Institute Ecuadoreano Forestal y de Areas Naturales
Eloy Alfaro y Amazonas (Edificio M.A.G.), 8 Piso
Quito, Ecuador South America

- Excelentisimo, Sr. Ministro, Ministerio de Obras Publicas
(MOP)
Avenida 6 de Diciembre 1184
Quito, Ecuador, South America


For an excellent overview of Craig Downer's field work in
Ecuador, see THE GENTLE BOTANIST in Wildlife Conservation
Magazine, August 1995. Or write to TSG Chairperson for a copy.


At this writing Craig Downer reports that Diego Lizcano is
working under Jaime Cavelier to earn a Biology degree through
Universidad de Los Andes in Bogota. They are planning to
capture, collar and radio track several Mountain Tapirs in the
Ucumari Regional Park, Columbia. They also hope to gather more
information on the role which these animals may be playing as
seed dispersers.

Craig Downer reports that during a three month stay in South
America in mid-1995, he spent time in Ecuador, Columbia and
Venezuela. In Ecuador, Downer radio tracked three Mountain
Tapirs which still had active radio collars. All three of the
adult female tapirs were doing well, as expressed from their
activity patterns. Downer is requesting support to replace the
batteries in the radio collars, so that field work can continue.
Craig Downer can be contacted: .
c/o P.O. Box 456
Minden, Nevada 89423

Downer also reports that he presented numerous public slide shows
and talks while in South America about the endangered Mountain
Tapir. Downer has noted a raise in both awareness and interest
in Mountain Tapirs from the local populations.


C. PROPOSED MEETING!!!

Dr. Jeffrey Jorgenson and Amanda Barrera de Jorgenson are working
with the Colombian organization, Colombian Association for the
Advancement of Science (ACAC), to organize a Tapir/Andean Bear
meeting in Columbia sometime in early 1997. Dr. Jorgenson has
been instrumental in the development of the Andean Bear
Specialist Group, based in Santafe de Bogota, Columbia.

The proposed meeting would extend over a period of four days
which includes standard research presentations, population
viability analyses (tapirs and bears), and workshops that focus













on conservation and research matters at a community level.
Specific topics such as deforestation in the neotropics and
biodiversity monitoring will be discussed.

The goals of the meeting are to:

1. Assess the current status of bears and tapirs.
2. Develop or refine conservation and research strategies for
these species.
3. Develop communication networks between researchers in the
different countries with tapirs and bears.

The target audience includes zoos/captive'breeders, field
researchers, University students, conservation organizations,
government officials involved in natural resources management,
and members of ethnic groups and rural communities.

For further information, contact:

Jeffrey Jorgenson, PhD
Amanda Barrera de Jorgenson
Andean Bear Specialist Group
Apartado Aereo 56487
Diagonal 43 Numero 44-38
Barrio La Esmeralda
Santafe de Bogota, DC
Colombia tel/fax: 571-221-1489


D. SKIN DISEASE IN TAPIRS

Tapir Specialist Group member, Ed Ramsay, DVM forwarded an
article entitled, "Vesicular Skin Disease of Tapirs". This was
published in The 1993 Proceedings of the American Association of
Veterinarians by Mitch Finnegan, DVM, Linda Munson, DVM, PhD,
Sean Barrett, DVM, and Paul P. Calle, VMD.

For general information, many tapirs held in captivity in North
American zoos develop skin lesions. A survey of North American
zoos housing tapirs regarding dermatological disease resulted in
a 45 percent response.

Fifty-three percent reported vesicular skin disease in tapirs (18
T. indicus, 9 T. terrestris, 5 T. bairdii).

Among the 32 affected individuals, approximately 122 episodes of
vesicular skin disease were identified. Many affected animals
had unexplained neurologic signs (e.g. hind limb lameness,
weakness) associated with skin lesions.

In addition, many of the affected tapirs had histories of chronic
intermittent respiratory infections preceding or interspersed
with the episodes of dermatitis. Females and males of all















species were affected equally, but females, cnce affected, tended
to have more repeat episodes of skin disease than males.

To date, no etiologic agent has been identified.

There appears to be a high prevalence of lesions within the
captive tapir population in North America which are inconsistent
with the known clinical and epidemiological characteristics of
these diseases in other species.

Similar diseases have not been reported by institutions holding
tapirs (T. bairdii) in Mexico, Guatemala, Panama or Belize.





E. ADDRESS CHANGES/TSG MEMBERS

1. Leonel Marineros c/o
Proyecto Rescate Cultural Ecologico
IHAH-PNUD
Col. el Sauce 3a
Calle 1A Etapa No. 302
Apartado Postal #651
La Ceiba, Atlantida
HONDURAS tel: 43 2139


2. Lorena Calvo
2924 University Meadows Drive 3. Daniel Brooks
#535 University of Houston-Downtowr
St. Louis, MO 63121 Dept. of Nat. Sciences
1 Main St.
Houston, TX 77002



F. TAPIR ACTION PLAN

Tapir Specialist Group member Daniel Brooks reports that the
Tapir Action Plan is coming into final draft.




NEWS, COMMENTS, QUESTIONS - SEND TO:

Sharon Matola, Chairperson
Tapir Specialist Group/IUCN/SSC
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize
Central America







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