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Group Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Title: Tapir conservation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095885/00004
 Material Information
Title: Tapir conservation the newsletter of the IUCNSSC Tapir Specialist Group
Uniform Title: Tapir conservation (Print)
Abbreviated Title: Tapir conserv. (Print)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Publisher: IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group
Place of Publication: Houston TX
Houston TX
Publication Date: August 1993
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiannual
regular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1990.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 12, no. 2 (Dec. 2003); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095885
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 56897961
lccn - 2004215875
issn - 1813-2286

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IUCN/SSC
Tapir Specialist Group


NUMBER 4


TAPIR CONSERVATION


AUGUST 1993


The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP.


Issue #4 of the newsletter was produced with the support of
Wildlife Preservation Trust, International.














TAPIR CONSERVATION


The Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group.




Editor: Sharon Matola


The views in Tapir Conservation do no necessarily reflect those of
the IUCN nor the entire IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group (TSG).



The objective of Tapir Conservation is to offer the members of the
Tapir Specialist Group/IUCN/SSC and others concerned with the
family Tapiridae, news brief papers, opinions, and general
information about this threatened mammalian genus. Anyone wishing
to contribute to Tapir Conservation please send material to:

Sharon Matola, Chairperson
Tapir Specialist Group/IUCN/SSC
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize
Central America

















WORD FROM THE EDITOR


Tapir Specialist Group Update


Please remember that a Tapir
written without your input.
your attention about tapirs,


Specialist Group newsletter cannot be
Send to me any news which may come to
in the wild, or in captivity. Thanks.


Coming soon thanks to energetic Tapir Specialist Group member
Daniel Brooks, the Tapir Action Plan. This first ever report will
include the most current information on all four species of tapir,
photographs and maps with a foreword by John Eisenberg, Ph.D. Both
Dan Brooks and I extend gratitude to all who contributed to this
document, and our appreciation to the Sir Peter Scott Fund/IUCN for
providing the funds for its publication.


















NEWS



UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY IN FRENCH GUIANA

It has been requested that the following notice be included in the
Tapir Specialist Group newsletter:




Wildlife Rescue
Petit Saut-French Guiana



90% of French Guiana is covered with neotrdpical'rainforest. Its major part is
presently intact due to low human density and lack of penetrating roads. In
January 1994, as part of a hydroelectric project, 310km2 of this forest will be
flooded. A wildlife rescue operation is underway and will be financed by the
public company building the dam. This kind of operation is controversial but we
believe strongly that if it is well conducted and well documented, it will be
very useful and worthwhile. A large amount of scientific information will be
obtained.

Mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds... will be captured under surveillance of
wildlife veterinarians. A suitable release area has been selected and will be
prepared. control animals will be followed (radio-tracking & visual check) for
at least 2 to 3 years. This area is close to the capture area and has been
overhunted, so the risk of disturbing population in balance and of importing
diseases is minimal. The area will be protected by law.

An important objective of the operation is public awareness. Local actions are
being planned and will be focused on schools. International education will be
possible through the media which has shown much interest in the operation.
A scientific study based on analysis of biological samples is planned. A
biological bank (serum,cells,parasites...) will be constituted and accessible to
the international scientific community, but there will be no funding for shipment
and research. Laboratories are invited to express their interest and submit their
proposals. The possibility of adding new projects to the actual following plans
will be considered if such propositions are formulated.
Several positions will be opened in January and February for staff veterinarians,
biologists and volunteers with interest and experience in wildlife restraint,
care and management. Candidates should be in a good physical condition in order
to work under hard field conditions for seven months. Knowledge of French is
highly desirable.
Send either scientific proposals or a letter of intent, a curriculum vitae and
references to: Dr. J.-Christophe Vie, Operation de Sauvetage de Petit Saut,
EDF/CNEH, Savoie Technolac, 73373 Le Bourget-du-lac cedex, France, Fax (33)-79-
25-30-09.
















A. THE CENTRAL AMERICAN TAPIR, Tapirus bairdii


1. ATTEMPTS TO INITIATE CAPTIVE BREEDING PROGRAM FOR T. bairdii
IN MEXICO

Notice has been received that a Mexican organization, NATURALIA,
A.C., under the leadership of zoologist Dr. Bernardo Villa and Dr.
Jesus Estudillo, will be attempting to initiate a captive breeding
program for the Central American tapir.

Project coordinators for this program are requesting the following
information:

-size and design of enclosures
-nutritional needs in captivity
-medical care
-breeding in captivity
-behaviour in captivity
-general information on captive management

If any Tapir Specialist Group members wish to get in touch with
this group NATURALIA, A.C., please note the following address:

APDO
Postal 21-541
Mexico, DF 04021


2. T. bairdii STUDY PROPOSED IN CORCOVADO NATIONAL PARK
COSTA RICA

Eduardo Naranjo of the National University in Heredia, Costa Rica,
is proposing to study the abundance, habitat use and diet of T.
bairdii in 545 km2 Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.

This is the largest tract of rainforest that remains on the Central
American Pacific slope, and the data obtained from this study would
be used as a basis to design management and conservation strategies
for T. bairdii.

As Eduardo Naranjo has noted, few field studies exist about the
ecology of _. bairdii. None have ever been undertaken in Corcovado
National Park.

Daniel Janzen (1983) has indicated that "between 100-300
individuals" are in Corcovado National Park, making this protected
area ideal for the study of the ecology of T. bairdii.















B. THE MOUNTAIN TAPIR, Tapirus pinchaque


1. ECOLOGICAL STUDY OF T. pinchaaue IN COLUMBIA

A project to study the ecology of the mountain tapir in the high
Andes of Columbia has been proposed by Craig Downer, Jaime
Cavelier, Carlos Mejia and Bernardo Ortiz.

The study sites chosen are the montane forests and paramo
vegetation of the Ucumari National Park in the Central Cordillera
of the Columbian Andes.

One of the target points of the study is to investigate the
potential role of tapir feces on the fertility of montane forest
soils. The investigators are also interested in the effect of the
digestive systems on the percentage germination of seeds and growth
rates of seedlings of plants eaten by the animals and returned to
the soil in the feces.

Radio-tracking is the proposed method of gaining information on
home range estimates, the size of the population in the study area,
and to evaluate the viability of this population knowing the
current extension of montane forests and paramo vegetation along
with the trends in deforestation and habitat degradation.

This project is hoped to become part of an international research
program between Ecuador and Columbia for the conservation of T.
pinchacue.


2. EFFORTS BEING MADE TO RELEASE A FEMALE T. Dinchague INTO A
PROTECTED AREA OF SANGAY NATIONAL PARK

A female mountain tapir, between the ages of one-two years old is
showing successful adaptations having made frequent browsing
excursions into this cloud forest, reports mountain tapir
researcher, Craig Downer.

Downer also reports the possibility of taking four T. Dinchaque
from the Los Angeles Zoo and sending them to Ecuador for radio-
collaring and release into the Sangay National Park.

According to Downer, this idea received support from L.A. zoo
officials, Richard Kunard and Michael Dee.

Three of the four T. Dinchaaue were born in captivity, and the
remaining one came from Ecuador; very likely from Sangay National
Park.














C. TAPIR MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES TO BECOME AVAILABLE

Researched by Amanda R. Lee, and published with assistance from The
Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland, The
Tapir Management Guidelines are some of the most up-to-date and
comprehensive reviews of all four species of tapir.

Historic data is mentioned, and information seldom in print has
been made available in this important work.

Facts about tapirs which rarely surface in literature:

-2. terrestris and T. pinchaque are most closely related
while T. bairdil is the most aberrant form.

-Feeding ecology and social behaviour is comparable to that
of the middle Eocene Perissodactyls.

-Normal rectal temperature ranges 36.4"C 37.2*C.

-Normal heart rate is 45 b.p.m.

The publication of the Tapir Management Guidelines and the Tapir
Action Plan will fill current voids in the literature about all
four species of tapir.


D. DISEASE BEING INVESTIGATED IN CAPTIVE TAPIR SPECIES

Mitch Finnegan DVM, a zoological medicine resident at the
University of Tennessee College of Veterinary medicine, has been
looking into an interesting disease that seems to occur in most
captive tapir species.

These have been described by Dr. Finnegan as multiple coalescing
vesicles over the dorsal cervical and lumbosacral regions. The
vesicles would rupture and leak a serosanguinous exudate. A biopsy
showed the lesion to be subepidermal with intravesicular
neutrophils, eosinophils, and red blood cells and an etiological
agent has not been identified.

Dr. Finnegan found that the lesions eventually resolved after being
treated topically.

Curious about these lesions, thirty-three zoos were sent surveys
requesting more information about other cases of skin disease in
tapirs. Fifteen zoos responded and thirty-two animals; 18 T.
indicus, 9 T. terrestris, and T. bairdii were identified having
similar appearing skin lesions and many animals experienced
multiple episodes of the disease.















Dr. Finnegan is very interested in obtaining more data about this
curious disease. If any Tapir Specialist Group members can provide
information relative to the above-mentioned data, please contact:

Mitch Finnegan, DVM
University of Tennesse
College of Veterinary Medicine
Department of Environmental Practice
P.O. Box 1071
Knoxville, Tenn. 37901-1071
619-974-5576


E. PREPARATION OF THE SIXTH EDITION OF WALKER'S MAMMALS
OF THE WORLD BEGINS

Ronald Nowak, author of the fifth edition of Walker's Mammals of
the World, is beginning the sixth edition, to be published by the
John Hopkins University Press.

The new edition will emphasize the problems, conservation, and
current numerical and distributional status of mammals.


F. RESEARCH BEING UNDERTAKEN ON THE REPRODUCTIVE
PHYSIOLOGY OF THE TAPIR

Dr. Janine L. Brown, a research physiologist at the Smithsonian
Institution Conservation and Research Center, has been studying the
reproductive physiology of the tapir since 1988.

Dr. Brown has been collaborating with the Miami MetroZoo to
characterize reproductive hormones during the estrous cycle and
pregnancy of two Central American tapirs.

The project has gone well, mainly due to the disposition of the
animals who are very tractable and allow blood samples to be
collected up to three times per week.

Dr. Brown has analyzed luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating
hormone, and has planned to examine several others such as
prolactin, possible pregnancy associated proteins.

Future publications will result from Dr. Brown's extensive
research.
















G. CBSG HEADED FOR PANAMA

A conservation workshop is planned for early 1994, headed by Dr.
Ullie Seal, in Panama.

Both a PHVA (Population Habitat Viability Assessment) for the
Central American tapir is planned, as well as a CAMP (Conservation
and Management Plan) for endemic and threatened species of Panama.

ANCON, Association Nacional para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza,
is working with the San Diego Zoo and the New York Zoological
Society to help conserve and protect the Central America tapir in
Panama.

ANCON is interested in breeding 2. bairdii in captivity for later
reintroduction into protected areas in Panama.

The Zoological Society of San Diego has formally committed US
$30,000.00 for the initial phase of a tapir-howler monkey
Rehabilitation Center in Panama.


TAPIR SPECIALIST GROUP



1. Rick Barongi
Zoological Society of San Diego
P.O. Box 551
San Diego, CA 92112

2. Richard E. Bodmer, Ph.D.
Dept Zoologia
Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi
Calixa Postal 399

3. Dan Brooks
1645 West Main Street #1
Houston, Texas 77006

4. Milton R. Cabrera
Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala
Escuela de Biologia
ciudad Universitaria, Guatemala 10102

5. Alfredo D. Cuaron
Rebsamen 1134
Col. del Valle
Mexico DF C.P. 13100














6. Michael Dee
Los Angeles Zoo
5333 Zoo Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90027

7. Craig Downer
P.O. Box 456
Minden, NV 89423

8. Joe Fragoso
Dept. of Natural Sciences
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL

9. Bill Konstant, Vice President
Conservation
c/o Philadelphia Zoo

10. Karl Krantz
Philadelphia Zoo
34th St. and Girard Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19104

11. Mr. Sukianto Lusli
Jamblang raya 1-17
Jakarta 11270

12. Sharon Matola, Director
The Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Centre
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize

13. Dr. Choompol Ngampongsai
Dept. of Conservation
Kasetsart University
Bangkok, Thailand

14. Ed Ramsay
Zoological Medicine/University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37901-1071

15. Oliver Ryder, Ph.D.
Zoological Society of San Diego
P.O. Box 551
San Diego, CA 92112

16. Mr. Phairot Suvanakorn
Deputy Director General
Royal Forest Dept.
Bangkok, Thailand


















17. Dr. Charles Santiapillai
WWF-Indonesia Programme
P.O. Box 133 Bogor
Java Barat 16001
Indonesia

18. Alan Shoemaker
Riverbanks Zoo
P.O. Box 1060
Columbia, S.C. 29202-1b60

19. Dr. Nico J. van Strien
P.O. Box 537
Zomba, Malawi

20. Chris Vaughan, Director
Wildlife Graduate Program
Universidad Nacional
Campus Omar Dengo
Heredia 1350
Costa Rica

21. Chris Wemmer, Ph.D.
National Zoological Park
Conservation and Research Center
Front Royal, VA 22630

22. Bill Zeigler
General Curator
Miami Metrozoo
12400 SW 152nd St.
Miami, FL 33177

Please send written contributions for the next TSG newsletter to:

Sharon Matola, Chairperson
Tapir Specialist Group
P.O. Box 1787
Belize City, Belize
Central America




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