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Panama Canal Museum Review

PCANAL
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00012

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00012

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00012

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00012


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This is the $64 thousand question. The Board of Trustees has begun a serious search for a new larger, perm anent home for the museum. Gerry DeTore the Buildings and Facilities Chairperson, has an aggressive search underway. With the assistance of Shawn Rupp of Prudential CRES Commercial Real Estate, over 21 properties have been surveyed or are being looked into. On the premise that an affordable suitable building outside the more popular accessible areas will get the biggest bang fo r the buck, the search committee is concentrating on the Largo, Seminole and Pinellas Park areas in the Tampa Bay area, although the search committee has looked at property in Tampa too. Rupp, also a descendent of a long time Panama Canal family, says the Prudential has the skills and resources to assist the museum in its property search as well as the development of viable financing mechanisms. He will assist the museum in negotiating a lease extension on its current space in Seminole while actively searching for pr operty for the longer range plans of the museum. The search has uncovered some ideally suited property, but in light of the present financial picture of the museum, the price range is out of reach. Property prices range from a low of $500 thousand for the least suitable to $4.7 million for the ideal property. DeTore says, ”There surely is some great property for the museum to allow it to grow to its full potential, but the present financial realities severely limit what we can do responsibly.” He goes on to say, “Our vision is a museum that has large exterior displays, like a towing locomotive, dipper dredge bucket and such, with expanded exhibits in the museum itself that will include a model of the canal, a visual historical time line with artifacts displayed typical to each period.” The library research capabilities have grown to a one of a kind reference library, particularly with the addition of nearly 900 publications in the Dick Bjorneby Collection the extensive collection of institutional records spanning from the Isthmian Canal Commission to the final phase of the Panama Canal Commission.” The Board of Trustees is investigating a wide range of possible funding sources to allow the museum to grow to its full potential. A wills and NEW BUILDING FOR MUSEUM? FALL/WINTER 2005 VOLUME 5 ISSUE 2 Affiliations American Association of Museums American Association for State and Local History Dun & Bradstreet BuyforCharity.com Canal Zone Study Group Florida Association of Museums Guidestar.com Isthmian Collectors Club Leave a Legacy Program Panama Canal Society, Inc. Panama National Institute for Culture Sociedad de Amigos del Museo Afro Antilleano de Panama St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce THE PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM bequests program is under development, and a search for grants is underway under the lead of Vice President, Pat Kearns But, museum president, Joe Wood says, “Our search for firm financial support is most likely to come from those who lived and worked in the Canal Zone, the many companies that either used the canal as a transport service or those that supplied the expertise and materials that sustained the canal over its history.” Wood, a former senior official with the Panama Canal Commission and a life long resident of the Canal Zone says, “We now have seven years of successful continuing growth of the museum, so we know it is a viable project. But we now have to reach out to extend our membership base and develop financial resources that will allow us to (Continued on page 4)

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Charles W. Hummer, Jr. Library for Historical Research and will henceforth be described, referred to and known as "The Dick Bjorneby Collection.” The Dick Bjorneby Collection is comprised of books, documents, photographs and artifacts collected over a long period by an avid and expert collector. The collection amounts to over 900 items that have been accessioned and catalogued to date and is a major resource to the museum’s library. Page 2 The Panama Canal Museum Review Museum's Collection Committee, presided over another ribbon-cutting ceremony to dedicate a collection of books and research materials donated to the museum by Dick and Pat Bjorneby A special plaque was placed in the library to acknowledge the collection and a similar plaque was presented to Pat Bjorneby and her daughter, Kristi Vanella in grateful appreciation for the donation of this outstanding collection. This plaque reads as follows: THE DICK BJORNEBY COLLECTION In grateful acknowledgment and appreciation to Richard "Dick" and Patricia (Leach) Bjorneby for the generous contribution of their extensive collection of books, pamphlets and other historically significant library materials, which will be housed in the In an impressive ribbon cutting ceremony held on September 24, 2005, the museum formally dedicated its library in honor of President Emeritus, Charles W. "Chuck" Hummer A special plaque, designed by museum trustee Joey Zornes was placed at the entrance to the library, with a duplicate plaque being presented to Hummer as part of the ceremony after he cut the ribbon to officially open the library. The plaque reads as follows: CHARLES W. HUMMER, JR., LIBRARY FOR HISTORICAL RESEARCH This library is dedicated to Mr. Charles W. Hummer, Jr., who, through his foresight, determination and intelligent guidance of the Panama Museum from its inception through its formative and most difficult period, transformed a dream into a reality by creating the museum as a lasting monument to the preservation of the history of the American Era of the Panama Canal. As a founder of the museum, and in his various roles as Executive Vice President, President and President Emeritus, he was a major catalyst in the development of the museum and this library, which houses an extensive collection of documents and other materials in the furtherance of historical research. Museum President Joe Wood welcomed the many guests in attendance, including several officers of the Panama Canal Society, members of the Board of Trustees of the Museum and special invited guests Pat and Christie Bjorneby Wood spoke of the significant contributions made to the museum by Hummer over the past eight years and the esteem in which he is held by his friends and colleagues. Following the dedication of the library, Dr. Paul Morgan Chair of the LIBRARY, MAJOR COLLECTION DEDICATION President Joe Wood presides over the ceremony de signating the museum’s library, Charles W. Hummer, Jr., Library for Historical Research and the Dick Bjorneby Collection Shown left to right, Joe Wood Chuck Hummer Kristi Bjorneby Vanella and Pat Bjorneby In the background are, Sandra Hummer, Jim DesLondes, Bob Zumbado and Bob Karrer JANUARY POTLUCK WILL FEATURE OPERATION JUST CAUSE. DATE AND TIME TO BE ANNOUNCED. SPEAKERS WITH STORIES ON OPERATION JUST CAUSE SHOULD CONTACT THE MUSEUM : president@panamacanalmuseum.org

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Page 3 The Panama Canal Museum Review New chairman of the Marketing and Communications Committee, Joey Zornes, presented his concept for a new marketing and communications strategy at the July Board meeting. In summary the Marketing & Communications Strategy for 2005 2006 is to increase museum awareness, therefore surpassing fundraising goals, while establishing a solid foundation on which to build strategies for the future. This will be achieved through a solid marketing and communications effort that will engage current members and increase membership acquisition. To do this, it is proposed to focus next year’s target NEW audience specifically to students, scholars, genealogists, journalists, historians and others who have an interest in the American Era of Panama. It is proposed to focus the majority of new initiatives so that they will be relevant to this new target audience. Additionally, we will work to increase our communication and relationship with our existing member base. COMMUNICATIONS. The primary goal for 2005 – 2006 is to simply expand market reach to a broader audience via the Internet. PUBLIC RELATIONS. Appoint a volunteer as Chairperson of Public Relations. This year, we will focus on 3 key initiatives: Increasing Public Relations in the online medium, enhancing our member communications and relationships, and keeping the print media up to date on our initiatives. FUNDRAISING. Piggy backing off of our 2005 Public Relations goals, we will focus on communicating with our members to help us determine some of our fundraising initiatives for the year. Additionally, we will work to start publicizing and optimizing our current fundraising initiatives, so that they will grow and become more profitable BRANDING. Image encompasses your firm or agency name, letterhead, logo, slogan, the appearance of office, Internet presence, and printed material or advertisements, and so on. A consistent image or set of images is crucial. If you design publicity materials with your overall image in mind, all the publicity works together as a “family” and the message is stronger. Every piece you create reinforces your overall image. In order for us to “look” as professional as possible, we will strive to have professionals design and produce the majority of our printed advertisements, and the museum will serve as the content creators/ project managers. As a follow through on this strategy, Zornes facilitated a brainstorming session for all trustees and volunteers at the September board of trustees meeting. The museum’s first quarterly brainstorm session, proved to be a great success. Museum board members and volunteers were able to think up over 50 new ideas which were voted down to 9 major projects to move ahead with. Each project was assigned a project manager, who will lead that project and take responsibility for its development and project timeline. In the weeks leading up to the board meeting, we had predetermined the topics of interest; Product Development, Membership Benefits, and the theme of the 2006 PCM Exhibit, The U.S. Military and the Panama Canal. For Product Development we decided to move forward with 3 projects which will be available exclusively at the Museum Shop at the museum, or online at the museum’s website: 1. Railroad Tie Product (Some kind of product using the railroad tie as the centerpiece) 2. A new Panama Hat (Multiple designs) 3. New line of Graphic T-shirts (designed towards GenX) For Membership Benefits we decided to move forward with six total initiatives, three geared towards new members and three geared towards existing members We spent a lot of the time answering the golden question, why should I become a member? The session was successful in answering that question, as well as coming up with a great plan on how to communicate it to everyone. As for the 2006 Panama Canal Museum Exhibit we spent a long while thinking up how we can raise the bar by telling the story of the U.S. Military and it’s involvement with the Panama Canal, focusing on 50 years (1939-1989). On this one, The ideas were too good to give a sneak preview. I guess you’ll have to just wait and see what was dreamed up at the next reunion! The brainstorm session will be an ongoing event at quarterly board meetings from here on out. The majority of the board made it a point to show up an ex tra day early to actively participate for 4 hours in this creative outlet. No idea was left on the table, it was a very collaborative effort with all generations present, each having an equal voice. BRAINSTORMING SESSION– NEW DIRECTIONS Brainstorming session in progress. Shown in the foreground left to right, Gerry DeTore in uniform, Shawn Rupp and Pat Kearns

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Page 4 The Panama Canal Museum Review make the next planned step to a larger permanent building to house the valuable collections entrusted to us.” “Our present member ship of around 700 is a good first step, but our goal to meet projected operating expenses is at least 2,000 members. I think that there is still some confusion that the museum is a part of the Panama Canal Society,” Wood says. “While the two organizations have a close relationship and are very supportive of each other, their finances, membership base and objectives are quite different,” Wood concludes. “The current museum space is bursting at its seams,” Collections Committee Chair, Dr. Paul “Buddy” Morgan, states. “We now have close to 10,000 items catalogued and stored in our collection. But to properly NEW BUILDING (Continued from page 1) display these items in meaningful exhibits requires space, professionally designed displays, and the labor to actually put these exhibits together,” Morgan goes on to say, “Up to now we have developed specific exhibits designed to highlight the museum’s presence at the annual reunion of the Panama Canal Society. There is so much more that we can and should do, but it requires more space and resources than we now have,” Morgan continues. “But I remain confident and committed to making the museum a one-of-a-kind resource for future generations of Americans, including descendents of those that built, operated, maintained and defended the canal over the time of the American Era,” Morgan says. “And this reflects the sense of the board and the many volunteers and supporters of the museum.” MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Loyal Museum Members, Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma took an enormous toll on hundreds of thousands of people in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and other bordering states. Last year, Fl orida took four direct hits and suffered untold damage. Almost all of us have felt the wrath of these devastating storms or have friends or relatives who have been harmed deeply by them in some way. There is no question that our priorities should be focused on helping those less fortunate than ourselves so they can begin to rebuild their lives. Giving generously to the relief and rebuilding efforts in all of those areas is just “the right thing to do.” Because so many people are hurting, and because many of you, I am sure, have already given generously to hurricane relief, it is very difficult for us now to ask our members to dig even deeper to help sustain our operations, which pale in comparison to the needs of the hurricane victims. But, obviously, we must ask anyway, because you r continued support is the lifeline that keeps us going. Non profit organizations like the Panama Canal Museum depend almost entirely on individual contributions from members and others for their financial well-being and without those donations we would quickly lose our ability to preserve your unique heritage and the history of the American Era of the Panama Canal. While giving to us may not be the most important way you can spend your charitable dollars right now, we do hope you will consider renewing your membership anyway and perhaps even adding a few dollars over and above your annual dues, all of which are tax-deductible. We would be most grateful and thankful for your thinking of us during this difficult time. We hope you enjoy this issue of the Review our “Members Only” publication, which highlights some of our recent programs and activities and shows how your contributions have been put to work. You can also check out our web site at www.panamacanalmuseum.org. to learn more about the museum and find great holiday gift ideas from our museum store. Joe Joe Wood President Museum Vice President, Pat Steiner Kearns is focusing on potential grants for specific projects. Steiner points out and “Grants require a museum to have been in operation for a number of years, have a stable visitor base and membership as well as a firm financial base.” “We have developed to a point where we now qualify for grants, and we are actively developing requests for grants and corporate donations,” Kearns says. She goes on to say, “We need more Leo Krzizas and wills and bequests who we would like to come forward to stimulate the financial growth and museum development. Certainly there are many Zonians out there who have become financially successful and who should come forward to help underwrite the museum.”

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Page 5 The Panama Canal Museum Review Although not born in the Canal Zone, “Gerry” did grow up there. His grandfather established the family roots there in 1906, an d his mother was born there. Gerry got to the Zone in 1946 when his father relocated from New York to get out of the cold weather and find a decent job. An Atlantic side boy, Gerry lived in 6 different houses and 3 different towns as 3 more siblings were added to the 3 already in the family as the years went by. Coco Solito, Coco Solo and Margarita were a ll places Gerry called home. Longing to go to the “States” like so many other Zonians did every so often, Gerry spent 1956 in Falls Church, Virginia, with an aunt before returning “home” to Coco Solito. Be it ever so humble, he was glad to be back. Schooled in Margarita Elementary, Cristobal Jr. High and Cristobal High Schools, Gerry has maintained his Tiger stripes to this day. He often tells visitors to the Museum that he is proud to be a member of the last class to graduate from CHS in the town of Cristobal. As he is today, Gerry was active in sports while growing up in the CZ. A star member of Chief Johnny Johnson’s Coco Solo Braves Little League team; a member of the Canal Zone All Star team that went to Hershey, Pennsylvania, and won the National Pony League championship; Outstanding Swimmer of the Year for CHS in 1959. After graduating from high school in 1959, Gerry joined the Air Force and spent more than 28 years roaming the world prim arily in the field of communications and electronics. His dream of becoming an Air Force pilot was dashed when he flunked the physical, but his drive and self determination resulted in his acquiring a civilian pilot’s license after duty hours. He eventually went on to fly not only civilian aircraft, but the Air Force’s F111 fighter bo mber and the OV10 Forward Air Control plane. Gerry retired from the Air Force in 1988 as the Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Commander of Tactical Air Command’s Communications Division. Settling in Seminole, Florid a, Gerry worked for E-Systems in St. Petersburg and more recently for Transitions Optical Inc. in Pinellas Park before “semiretiring.” He still works for Transitions, but now only on an as needed basis. This allows Gerry to volunteer time at the Panama Canal Museum. He says he has learne d more about his “home” in the Ca nal Zone in the almost 2 year s at the Museum than he did in the 13 years growing up there. In addition to helpin g out with accessioning, exhibit bu ilding and general operation of th e Museum, Gerry enthusiastically serves as a docent and gives lectures and Power Point presentations in the Museum and at various locations in the local communi ties. You may remember Gerry in another role; that of the dashing, white tuxedo clad gentleman ringing the Panama Line ship’s dinner gong at the Panama Canal Society Reunion this past summer. Gerry is also Chairman of the Museum’s Building and Facilities Committee and Co-Chairman of the Silent Auction Committee. Look for Gerry next year at the Reunion – but don’t be surprised at what this charismatic Zonian will be wearing to promote the Museum And don’t be surprised if he twists your arm or heart stri ngs for a hefty donation to the Museum to fund a new building. “W orld Class” and “Unbelievably Interesting and Informative” are words that describe Gerry’s plans for what the Panama Canal Museum will contain and look like if he gets your support. His wis h for the future? A grand opening of the New Panama Canal Museum on the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal. Board Profile—GERARDE C. DETORE TRAVEL WITH THE MUSEUM IN 2006! Have two wonderful vacations in 2006 while at the same time helping the museum raise funds to support its efforts to document t he American Era of the Panama Canal: Panama—February 16-23: Call Lori Stevenson Snow at 1-800-783-8847 for more information about this week of interesting activities in Panama! Alaska—June 3-10: June Barlow Riesz will once again be leading our group on what promises to be a beautiful cruise (extended to a cruise tour for those wanting a longer trip)—this one to scenic Alaska. Call Carlson Wagonlit Travel at 1-888-6 521365 for further details. A special 2007 cruise is in the planning stagesStay tuned and sign up early.

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Page 6 The Panama Canal Museum Review As of 9/23/05 19th TRANSIT Leo Krziza—Balboa Yacht Club 10th Transit Estate of Anna Ruth Werkhe iser—Bridge of the Americas 7th Transit James MacLaren— Amador Causeway Helen and Frank Leves—Gatun Locks Katherine E. Egolf— Cristobal Yacht Club 6th Transit Lucille Abernathy—Pedro Miguel Locks Anonymous—Gatun Locks 5th Transit S, Griffin McClellan—Pacific Entrance Robert & Marguerite Zumbado—Gamboa Grace Jones Carey—Gatun Locks 4th Transit Reginald & Beverly (Boyett) Hayden—Pacific Anchorage William & Virginia Lyons—Pacific Anchorage C. B. Fenton & Co., S.A.—Miraflores Lake Albert & Jane Nahmad—Miraflores Lake Isthmian Collectors Club —Pedro Migues Locks Dollar Club—Gatun Lake Lesley M. Litzenberger—Gatun Lake This page gives special recognition to all donors who have completed one transit on the Wall of Honor

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3rd Transit Curtis Fitzgerald—Pacific Entrance James C. Cook—Miraflores Lake 2nd Transit Alan R. Ford— Pacific Entrance John K. Brayton— Pacific Entrance Robert J. Roy, Sr.— Pacific Entrance Steve & Mary Vaughn— Pacific Entrance Olive L. Unruh— Pacific Entrance Robert & Colleen Mate— Pacific Entrance Grover Matheney— Pacific Entrance William E. LeBrun— Pacific Entrance BSA, Explorer Post 21 Balboa Canal Zone— Pacific Entrance Bob Redfield & Carolyn Merry— Pacific Entrance Class of 1954 Balboa/Cristobal High Schools— Amador Causeway Thomas R. Goethals— Balboa Yacht Club Lee & Marian Kariger— Balboa Yacht Club Joe & Beverly Bowman Wood— Balboa Yacht Club Blanche A. Browne— Balboa Yacht Club Richard & Bette Swearingen— Bridge of the Americas Hobey & Lisa Richey— Bridge of the Americas Charles & Maxine Keenan— Miraflores Locks Carol F. Meyer— Miraflores Locks John & Judith Engelke Montanaro— Miraflores Lake Capt. William & Connie Dawson— Miraflores Lake Paul D. Glassburn— Gaillard Cut Charles & Sandra Hummer— Gaillard Cut Richard & Julieta Morgan— Gaillard Cut Carol Ruoff Goulet— Gatun Lake Zelma R. Treadwell— Gatun Locks J. E. Dorn & Dolly Thomas— Gatun Locks Lewis & Sandra Taber— Atlantic Breakwater Page 7 The Panama Canal Museum Review

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Page 8 The Panama Canal Museum Review A Barry & Jackie Abels Lucille Abernathy Donald D. Adams Alan B. Albright Gertrude Foreman Alexander John M. Allensworth Jeanette Altman Milton & Shirley Altmark Donna H. Amick Ingrid K. Anderson Gary S. Anderson Virginia M. Angle Lori Anthony Rolf & Joan Arndt William E. Arnold, Jr. Pauline A. Arnold Aristea Arosemena Rosemarie Ashton Dave & Barbara Curles Aycock B Julie J. Baglien William A. Baldwin Robert C. Baldwin Melanie Trim Bales Steve Balmas Marvin R. Banton Louis J. Barbier Lawrence & Sue Barca Dorothy Irish Beall John & Ann Beers Neil Belland Sarah Belzer Christa E. Benard Kathleen Steiner Bennett Carl N. Berg Nellree B. Berger Jo (Scott) Bernard Frank Berry Bob & Ann Best Boyd M Bevington Terri Lynn Gramlich Bianchi James T. & Florence Bird Patricia Rogers Bisgrove Dale & Jacqueline D. Bishop Ruby Miriam Bissett Patricia Bjorneby Everett & Marian Evans Blair Robert Wallace Blake Betty J. Blanchette George A. Blumberg Andrea Armstrong Bogue Don & Geneva Boland Mary Bolton Dr. W. Eugene Bondurant Ray & Bird Bost James & Julia Boukalis Robert & Vicki Boukalis Robert & Mary Jill Bowman Audrey Benoit Bowman Betty O. Boyer Robert J. Brandenberger Hap & Beth Brandenburg Margaret Cauthers Braun Berta Briceno Retta Spitzer Brock John & Dona (Jones) Brophy Bill Browder Peggy Morgan Brown Phyllis Skeels Brown Helen Anderson Brown Pamela A. Brown Merrill R. Brown Blanche A. Browne Shirley Bruce Faith Brundage Dick & Ingrid Bryan Marjorie Blair Bulone John E. & Michele Bundy Susan & Jim Burk Jean & Doris Burns C Colin & Rosemary Campbell Jack Campbell Lori Campbell Clearwater Campus Library Nedra Carlson John W. Carlson Joan Anderson Carlson Stephen, Tina Johann, & Evan Cartotto Larry & Kathryn Castleman Vernon & Ruth Caturia Charles Cavanaugh, Jr. Felipi Cazobon Bob & Dorothy Hicks Chapman Enrique Chaves Richard Cheville Rupert & Shirley Chin Marie Susanne (Sue) Sartain Clark Howard & Emmy Lou Clarke Dale C. Clarke Jim & Karen Clary Orrin & Carol Clement John & Jane Kaufer Cochrane John P. Coffey James & Dulie (Wright) Coffey Mary Morland Coffey Patrick Coffey Jerry Coffin Thomas G. Coffin David M. Colclasure Clare H. Coleman Anna T. Collins Gary L. & Mary C. Collins James B. Coman, Jr. Neal & Susan Compton Mary L. Condon Robert & Maureen Copeskey Edward & Geraldine Corbett John B. & Joan V. Corliss Varney T. Cornwell, Jr. David, Marcy & Darien Corrigan Allen H. & Edie Cotton Geoffrey & Eileen Cowell Martha Hackett Cramer Edna (Hart) Crandall Rudolph & Delia Crespo Richard and Janet Cressy John & Valerie Cronan James & Evelyn Cullen Janet Potter Cunningham Richard & Lynn Cunningham Edward & Judith Cunningham Maria Dolly Currie Josephine Kuhn Curtis D David & Stacey Dahlstrom Joyce Masters Danford Bob & Jessie Daniel Richard J. Danielsen Margaret Elmore Dansie Tommie A. & Jennye A. (Stephens) Davidson Gordon H. Davis R. Alvera Davison Capt. William & Connie Dawson Robert K. Dawson Clifton L. Day, Jr. Virginia Glines DeGregory Joan Ridge DeGrummond Mary C. (Nehls) DeMartini Gerry DeTore MEMBERSHIP ROSTER As of 9/23/05 Dues paid through 12/31/05 or beyond

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Page 9 The Panama Canal Museum Review Randy & JoElla Deakins Terry & Sue Deakins Louis & Barbara Dedeaux Jon & Debra Dedeaux Robert E. Dell Norman & Cecile Demers Florence Dempsey James & Linda DesLondes Dan & Mary DesLondes Damon DesLondes Doug & Patricia (Thomas) Deyak Hindi Diamond William Diez Madeleine Dolan Judith Rogers Domenicucci Edward Doolan Bruce & Claire Douglas George & Ann Downing Marie Pierobon Drake William & Hide Drew Jim & Clover Shobe Duffus Dorothy Englebright Dunn Bill & Betty Dunning Clare Dyer E Paul & Connie Ebdon Carene Brown Edwards Bruce & Sue Egolf Mary B. Egolf Katherine E. Egolf William & Carol Egolf George & Roberta Egolf Mary Ann Seibold Eldridge David A. Ellis Bonnie Engel John & Laurie Engelke Karen R. Engeseth COL (Ret) & Mrs. Edward & Andra Nash English Evo & Joan Ersalesi Abraham & Sieglinde Espino Elisabeth Esser Joel C. Esslinger Mary Esslinger Helen (Wikingstad) Ethridge Roberta L. Evans Marie Jenkins Everett Lois C. (Johnson) Evitt F Murray and Candy Falk Prentice Family Jani Faris Guy & Mary Linda (Wells) Fealey George F. Fenton, Sr. Christine Huff Fewell Jo-Anne Fields Sarah G. Finkelstein Suzanne Shutt Griffin Annabelle Lee Grills T. Richard & Diana Grimison Rick, Lynn & Alessandra Gritt Alice O'Neal Grove Mary (Torstenson) Gruman Vincent & Pam (Maedl) Gutowski H Philip A. Hale Susan G. Hall Patricia Howard Hall Penny L. Hall Liza Hall & Jesse Easudes Mary Ann Hughens Hallett Edward H. Halsall Jerry Halsall Annie Laurie Halvosa Mary Jane Woodruff Hamlyn Milli Sandrone Hammer Max William Hanna John D & Vera L Hanna Kathryn (Kay) Hanson Jerry and Betty Harrell Robin E. Harrison-Baker Arthur S. Harry Louis C. Hasemann William J. Hatchett John N. Hatgi H. Joann Hummer Haugen Reginald & Beverly (Boyett) Hayden John D. Hayes Mark, Katherine (Simons) Heddaeus Carol Heintz Dona A. Helmerichs Jack & Fran Hern Richard & Ruth Hern Joe & Pam Herold Elaine E. Heyd Thomas J. Hickey Joseph Hickey James Hicks Bernice Sanders Hill Bernice A. Hill Jack & Marian Hilliard Rita Duran de Hofmann Iris D. Hogan Roy G. & Marlys Hohmann Helen Holland Ann Keigley Holshouser Chris Holt John M. Hood Carol Sergeant Hoover Larry & Mary Elle n (Stacy) Horine Gordon & Joan Hoyt Willard & Kathleen Huffman James E. & Joan A. Huffman Charles & Sandra Hummer Greg & Vicki Fischer Mabelle Fitzgerald Curtis Fitzgerald George T. Fitzgerald Peter & Rae Flynn Merrilyn Forbes J. Thomas & Julee L. Ford Mary (Sherry) Ford Jacquelyn R. Forrest William W. Forsstrom Peter W. & Marjorie Foster Charles E. French Gene French Robert E. French Kathleen F. French Ernie Freudman Egon & Dorothy Friedman Gilbert L. Fritts, Sr. Gene S. & Carol A. Fritz George Fryer Kenneth & Fern Fugleberg Monica Rios Fulton Norris Fussell G Alvin L. Gallin, USN Claire (Spencer) Gambel Clara E. Gath Dick and Marilyn Gayer Richard Gayer John & Velma Geisinger Frank J. Gerchow, Jr. James & Dorothy Gerhart William R. Gianelli Marie (Wright) Gibson C. Robert Gibson Rosemary M. Gilead Norman & Donna Gillis JoAn Gilman Juanita Jones Girand Jimmy & Hilda Givens Luke Givens Paul D. Glassburn Kenneth E. Goldsberry, Jr. Suzanne Schmidt Goldstein Thomas A. & Susan A. Gomez Frank & Sharon Gonzalez John Gough II Carol Ruoff Goulet Liz Simons Grafe Robert N. & Penny Graham William R. & Susanne K. Graham Beverly A. Gramlich William H. Grant, Jr. Richard & Beverly Grassy Barbara Green Jonathon J. Green Arlene E. Greene

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Page 10 The Panama Canal Museum Review L. Phyllis Hummer Greta N. Hummer Louise R. Hunt Jim Hunt William R. & Dorothy E.Hunter Kristine (Fox) Hunter Ellie Foley Husum Patrick B. Hutchings, Jr. Margaret S. Hutchison I Betty Crooks Ingram Gary & Judy (Beeby) Inman Isthmian Collectors Club J Eugene F. Jaworski Dixie Stoudnor Jeavons Richard L & Barbara Schnake Jeffers John P. Jenkins Olga S. Jennings Robert & Carolyn Johnson Nira Reyes Johnson Richard & Vilma Johnson Kristi Amick Johnson Harvey & Vickie van't Veld Johnson Charles E. Johnston Don & Melinda Johnston Henry K. Johnstone Hubert & Margot Jordan Jean Dough Judge K Joseph P. & Lucille Kane Lee & Marian Kariger Robert L. & Donna Kariger Robert J. Karrer, Jr. Paul & Margaret Karst Jean W. Kaufman James & Patricia Steiner Kearns Charles & Maxine Keenan William H. Keenan Carol A. Kelly Charlotte Kerksiek William F. Kessler Loretta (Lori) King Edward T. Kirchmier, Jr. Ann C. Kirrane Walter H. & Suzanne Kleefkens Ross & Beatrice Wohlfarth Kongable Kathleen Kredell Leo J. Krziza Len & Maria Kujawa L Barbara Whitman Lancaster William & Debra Lane Martin & Nancy (Kaufer) Lanfranco Peter & Mary Lou Lang LaVerne Larrabee Raymond N. Larson Irene R. McCracken Judi McCullough Thomas F. McCullough Don & Karen McCullough Sheila McDaniel Charles J. & Jean McGinn Edward & Jill McGrath Jon P. McGraw Bob & Kathy (Malin) McInturff Don & Joan McKeon William J. McKeown, Jr. Bill, Margaret & Allison McLaughlin Barry F. McLaughlin Gail McNally & Herb Dawson Children John & Tilly McTaggart Virginia McLaren McWilliams Sis Paige Medinger A. James Meigs Gus & Nelly Mellander Malena Bremer Merriam John Metivier Carol F. Meyer Nicole Meyer Margery A. Connard Meyer James W. & Sofia M. Meyer Kathyleen R. Miller Carole Walker Miller Robert Bud & Patti Mills Elizabeth B. Moore Florence Ann Barbour Moore Lars K. Morales John A. & Margaret K. Morales Richard & Julieta Morgan Paul & Stacia Morgan John & Marie Morris Diane Vestal Morris Kenneth L. Morris, Jr. Fern Morse John & Joann Morton Paul Moser Frank & Marilyn Mott William & Jean Muller John W. Muller Agnes Mulroy Glenn Murphy Don & Dorles Musselman N Stephen Nehring Dan & Patricia Rudge Nellis James R. Nellis Andy J. Nicolaisen Hilda Nies O Jim & Gemma O'Donnell Jerry & Alyce A. (Thomas) O'Neal Mary V. Larson Charles & Alice Latimer Charles & Lucille Sandy LeBrun Kathleen LeBrun Aurora F. LeBrun William E. LeBrun Bonita Ensey Leavitt Frank A. & Deborah J. Lee Bea Lee Cherie Danielsen Lee David J. Leeds Roland J. & Patricia C. Lees Margaret Leigh LTC Robert R. Leisy Janet G. Len-Rios Frank R. & Helen F. Leves Elaine Vestal Lewis Lynn Raymond Lewis Herbert Lewis Susan Knapp Light Carole Lightell Gene & Diane Linfors Michael & Elaine (Peterson) Little Lesley M. Litzenberger Isabella Z. Lively John & Joan Long Agnes Fettle Lyman Mary Griffin Lynch William & Virginia Lyons M Al & Joy Maale Daniel H. MacElrevey, Capt. John & Veta MacLaren James P. MacLaren Martha Adelaide Mackereth Gloria Sigl Maisano Craig & Carol Malin Richard Mallett John M. Mallia Louis A. Mallia Robin Mannila & Carolyn Hamrick Dottie Manthorne Mark F. Marczak Carly Marczak Annette Kelly Marsh Diane McKenna Marsh Norma (Stillwell) Martin Robert & Colleen Mate Peggy Flynn Mattey John Mayles Joanne Reccia Mays Edgar R. McArthur, Jr. LTGen D. P. & Ka thleen McAuliffe Pat & Peggy Ann McCarragher Richard A. McClean S. Griffin McClellan III William J. McConaughey

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Page 11 The Panama Canal Museum Review Anita J. Oberholtzer Russell E. Oberholtzer Marjorie McCauley Ochstein Ed, Joan & Jason Ohman Capt. Ted & Lourdes Oliveira Thomas C. Orr Florence M. Owen P Hedy Kellman Page Gloria M. Parker Deborah Pate Harriet R. Patterson Mary Jane Paulson Rev. Clarence C. Payne Diane Pearson Arthur C. Perry (USMC Ret.) Tom & Barbara Peterson Ernie Peugnet J. E. Phelan Chuck & Sharon Phelan Jerry & Kay Frangioni Pierce Donna Daniel Pierce Linda Fussell Pierce Gloria Dahlstrom Potocek Sheila Randolph Price Lynn Pridgen Burley & Peggy Pruett Mary Lou Clegg, Genealogy Periodicals Q Patricia Quinn R Louise C. Rainier Virginia Rankin Bobbie Jo (Oglesby) Rebennack Mary Rebhan Bob Redfield & Carolyn Merry James & Janet Reece Walter R. Reeves, Jr. Nancy Remak Michael and Christine (Cartotto) Ressa Beatrice M. Rhyne Annie Nicolson Rice Martha Eunice Richard James J. Richardson Hobey & Lisa Richey June Barlow Riesz Lee Rigby Jeffrey J. Riley Jim & Marie Riley, Jr. James W. Riley, Sr. Patt Foster Roberson Jody & Dolores Roberson Hal C. Robertson, Jr. Joanne (Steiner) Robinson Capt. Hal Robinson Michael & Elaine Stephenson Betty Brooks Stergion Clarke Steven John B. & Joyce Stevens Marilynn Stevens James B. Stevens John T. Stevens Davis & June Stevenson Joanne Jay L. Stewart Philip Stewart Thomas E. Stoakley Annette Godby Stocking Freda F. Stohrer Malcolm J Stone Duncan W. Summerford Frances E. Summerford Richard & Bette Swearingen Carl L. Swenson Clarence (Chick) E. Sykes T Lewis & Sandra Taber Mark T. Tartar Teresa Tartar Dale & Mary Jane Sylvestre Taylor Kathryn Argo Taylor Captain Charles H. Taylor Howard T. Tettenburn Neyle Theriault J. E. Dorn & Dolly Thomas Tony & Stephanie Thomas Charles & Josephine Thomas Chuck & Cynthia Thomas Ben Thomas Mary Alice Thomas Jed & Janice Thomas, Jr. Judean Judy Thompson William R. Thrift George & Arlene Tochterman Gayle Hasemann Tolbert Capt. & Mrs. Philip L. Tomlet III David Tooke & Family Aaron & Joan Hensler Toscar William G. Toston Jess & Gail Totten Frank & Marvel Townsend Joan R. Townshend Helen L. Trotman John & Lynn Turner U Sara Collinge Ulrich Olive L. Unruh Mary G. Urey V Cpt. Robert Valentine Capt. Wilbur & Mrs. Dorothy Vantine Angel Vazquez (Continued on page 12) Archie Rodaniche James J. Roddy Burton & Carolyn Rodman Al & Marilyn Romaneski Ned Rose John N. & Wanda I. Rourke Mary Lynne Rowe Sam & Beverly Rowley Robert & Jeanne Rupp Robert & Cheryl Russell Wally & Dee Dee Russon Vera H. Ryan Don & Joni Ryter S Jayne A. Samson Colleen (Barnett) Sandberg Agnes Santomenno Karen Saum Catherine W. Schafer Gerard K. Schear James N. Scheibeler Douglas & Sharon Schmidt John C. Schmidt, Jr. John E. Schmidt, Jr. Ben & Florence Schoenleber Valeria Schroeter George & Virginia Schultz Lillian Norris Schwarz George B. Schwindeman Alan Scott R. David & Betsie W. Scott Anthony & Raquel Scottino, Jr. Kathleen Lavallee Sears Kaye Sergeant Anne (Magee) Severy Paul H. Shacklette Leo, Grace & Karen Shadeck Rogelio A. Shan Helen M. Shapiro Frank L. Sharp Jeanne Shoemaker Charles A. & Norine (Dillman) Simms Frank M. Smith Gila M. Smith Gilbert M. & Pauline Sue Pincus Smith John R. & Evelyn Tommy Smith Lester & Andrea Smith Betty C. Snow Lori Stevenson Snow Larry D. Solien Herbert S. Soltman Lois A. Spencer Lloyd & Margaret Spradlin Al & Marsha Sprague Ed & Adrienne Stallworth Ellen (Clute) Starkey

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Page 12 The Panama Canal Museum Review R. Trendon Vestal John H. Viall Lillian M. Vogel-Suter Raymond K. Kulig and Barbara M. (Hall) Vose-Kulig W Sharon (Stahl) Wacha Jeanne Wagner Jacqueline E. Wagner Stuart & Corina Waldman James & Stacia Walsh Ed Wardlow/Vicki Sizemore John C. Watson Lisa Weber Fred E. Wells Virginia Ryter Wennik Carroll Adams Werling Barbara R. Wetherington Robert W. Wheeler Robert and Pat (Heitman) Whitam Robert W. White Thomas L. White Joseph H. & Marilyn White, Jr. John & Muriel Whitman Janice E. Whitney COL Roy P. Whitton, USAF (Ret) James Faulkner & Ethel (Sandmann) Wich Michael Wiggins Edward K. Wilburn Giff & Evelyn Wilde Rose Marie B. Wildsmith Valerie Shaw & Kevin/Alexander Wilke Irene Will James M. Will Beverly Williams Richard A. Williams Beth Baglien Williams COL Nevin R. W illiams, USA (Ret) Judy Buehler Williamson Arline Schmidt Winerman John R. Wise Mackin Withers Maria Martinez Witte Elizabeth Woll Harriet Keenan Wollmers Joe & Beverly Bowman Wood Craig & Heather Wood Brian & Karina Wood Elsie Woodruff Wayne & Katherine Worthington William H. & Judith Wymer Y Ybor City Museum Society, Inc. Elizabeth L. Yerxa William D. & Virginia M. Young Jean E. Young Z Richard S. & Virginia Zornes Joey Zornes Bob & Marguerite Zumbado HISTORY OF VINCENTIAN PRIESTS The order of Roman Catholic priests that was most involved with life in the Canal Zone was the Congregation of Missions or commonly called, The Vincentians.Ž Contacts between the museum and two of the priests that served in Panama, Frs. Robert Brandenberger and John Kennedy led to the donation of a small book,  Missionary & Founder: The Story of Thomas J. McDonald, C.M.Ž written by Fr. Charles Shanley, CM to the museum. Fr. McDonald was the first Vincentian sent to Panama to provide spiritual service to Panama Canal workers in 1904. Follow up correspondence recently led to the donation of a list of all Vincentian priests sent to Panama from 1904 to 1999 and the years that each was stationed in Panama during the period 1950 … 1999. The list shows that over the history of the American Era, over 130 priests served the communities in Panama and the Canal Zone. St. Marys Mission in Balboa served as the mother house in Panama, and churches were located throughout the Canal Zone and in a number of towns in the Republic of Panama. Some priests, like Fr. Kennedy, spent many years in Panama and remain a part of the community by attendance at the annual reunion of the Panama Canal Society. The museum welcomes histories and stories of the many other churches and clergy that played such an important role in the lives of those that lived and worked in the Canal Zone. The museum also has the histories compiled for the Union Churches of the Canal Zone. To complete the important role that churches played in the history of the canal, the museum is actively soliciting material from these churches. St. Mary’s Mission in Balboa served as the mother house for the Vincentian presence in the Canal Zone and Panama. The church built on the lower level of Sosa Hill was a familiar sight to Zonians for many years.

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Page 13 The Panama Canal Museum Review The Panama Canal Museum Store has been in operation for 6 years now, and on the internet for most of its history. Hundreds of people have purchased a wide variety of items from our store, and by all measures it can be judged to be a success. We continue to try hard to select or create merchandise that is timely, themed, varied and priced reasonably for our customers. Have you ever wondered how an item gets selected and handled for stocking in our museum store? A recent new item introduced for the 2005 Panama Canal Society Reunion offers a good example of how the process works. The item is the colorful and useful hibiscus design set of four Coaster Stones™ currently stocked at the store. The process begins with someone’s idea – in this case that of a member of the board of trustees of the museum – of what would be a good museum store product. The originator of the idea is first tasked to do the basic research into the product, determining things like: from what and how many companies is it available; what ar e the differences in quality and conditions and cost; what looks like the best overall value; what are the quantity and cost break levels; how long is the order period for delivery; what are th e alternatives for design and presentation. In the case of the absorbent stone coasters, there were many companies marketing a variety of alternatives at all price levels. The basic research took about 16 hours on the computer. The next step is for the originator to write up a propos al for electronic dissemination to a museum store committee, six or so members who consider the proposal, decide yes or no on a consensus basis, and arrive collectively at a quantity to order and retail price decision. In this case, the originally proposed design also was changed by committ ee agreement into the striking red and black mola hibiscus design that one of the members proposed during the review. 16 to 20 hours of work. Result: Reunion and sales through August of 56 sets @ $22 for a total of $1232. 44 sets remained in the museum store in Seminole for local and internet sale. You be the judge: Was this a HIT or a MISS? Footnote: At the museum we all loved the design and the coaster itself. Some thought it would sell well, a few did not. No one has the perfect crystal ball for predicting these things. Most of the work is performed on a volunteer basis by officers, trustees and committed workers who believe in the mission of the museum. We welcome suggestions from our members on merchandise to stock in the store as well as other museum operations – just be prepared to help us decide by doing the initial research! And, by the way, there are still sets of coasters left if you didn’t get yours yet! They make a great holiday gift item! This step probably took an aggregate of 10 to 12 hours, and resulted in a decision to “chance” a purchase of 100 sets of four each coasters at a delivered cost of $14.08 ap iece – an outlay of limited museum funds on an untested new item of $1,408. The committee collectively decided to sell the new item for $22 per set, a markup of only 36 percent of the retail price. This price is several dollars cheaper than a similar product is retailed for at other locations in the country. Once the decision was made by the committee, the design had to be computer processed into reproducible copy suitable for production of the coasters. Then the order had to be made to the manufacturer in time for the products to be delivered well before the July reunion. Once received and paid for, the products had to be stocked in inventory, counted and inspected, and carried to Orlando for sale exposure, altogether possibly another MUSEUM STORE ITEM – A HIT OR A MISS? Because the rose colored mola hibiscus coasters proved so popular and have sold out, we are now offering similar absorbent coasters featuring a beautiful yellow hibiscus on a blac k and white mola design background.

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Page 14 The Panama Canal Museum Review 2006 REUNION EXHIBIT FEATURES HISTORY OF THE DEFENSE OF THE PANAMA CANAL Barrage balloons dominated the skies in the Canal Zone during WWII. Special military armed vessels accompanied vessels through the canal during Operation Just Cause in 1989. The museums special reunion exhibit for 2006 will feature the history of the defense of the Panama Canal from 1939 to 1999. This will bracket WWII and Operation Just Cause. All armed services, their units and operations will be included. The museum is encouraging units and individuals involved in the defense history to provide artifacts, photographs, stories and any other items that will allow the exhibit to properly display and recognize the many military elements that make up the history in Panama. The 33 RCT is challenging other units to highlight their histories as they have formed a special committee to prepare their own history.

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Page 15 The Panama Canal Museum Review Sometimes questions posed of the Panama Canal Museum are about items we know nothing about! That occurred recently when a mother and daughter, Patti Whipple and Nikole Lembke, e-mailed us from the state of Washington about a Panama Canal Celebration Souvenir Program they came across in a box of old family belongings. Dated February 22, 1910 (over four years before the official opening of the Panama Canal!), the program documents the Panama Canal Celebration and Civic Parade held in Tampa, Florida, that week. None of the antique dealers and appraisers they had checked with had ever seen one (nor had we!), and Patti and Nikole were in search of another one or at least wanted to find out the value of the document they had. We, too, checked with some local book stores to see if they had any copies of the program; they didn't. Nor did the Rinaldi Printing Company, which published the program. However, the company's historian said it would be TAMPA-PANAMA CONNECTION willing to buy the sisters' program for $100. In the meantime, we had become so interested in the program that we asked Patti and Nikole if they would e-mail copies of some pages to us, which they did. We thought "Review" readers would enjoy this sketch from the program as much as we did! The sketch hints at the future advantages of the Panama Canal to Tampa, an opportunity that is being capitalized on now as Tampa and Panama officials work to forge stronger ties between the Port of Tampa and the University of South Florida and Panama and promote together a new tourism initiative. Patti and Nikole have decided to keep the program and have offered to lend it to the Panama Canal Museum some time in the future when we may have an exhibit that ties in with the program. Thus, their question resulted in a learning opportunity for us now and a possible museum exhibit enhancement in the future. Regarding books, periodicals, and other library donations, we try to keep the best three copies so that we have back up copies for use in research. As with the artifacts, copies of books and periodicals beyond our needs may be sold or auctioned off to support the museum. Because of this policy, it is very important for donors to contact the museum as soon as they are considering contributing some item. In this way, we can communicate the conditions under wh ich we will accept the item before the donor commits to sending it. This is important since we are unable to return the item if, after receiving it, we discover that we cannot use it in the collection. We want to thank all of our donors for their continual support of the museum's collection, exhibits, and overall mission. Without you, there would be no Panama Canal Museum. We at the museum believe that it is very important for potential donors to be fully aware of our collection policy so that no one donates something under any misconception. Understandably, when donors contribute items that have meant a great deal to them, they want to know that the museum values this donation. Therefore, if we are contacted prior to the donation, we try to alert the donor of the conditions under which their donation would be accepted. Our collection po licy is to accept items that fit within the scope of the museum's mission (the American Era of the Panama Canal) and which we do not already have. If we already have an artifact or object in the collection, we will accept a duplicate as long as the do nor realizes that we only keep the best of a particular item and offer the others for sale in the gift shop or in our silent auction. In both cases, money raised is used to support the museum. QUESTIONS TO EXHIBIT ARTIFACTS Sketch in program alludes, accurately, to the importance of Tampa and the Panama Cana l to world maritime trade. POLICY CLARIFICATION Former Zonian, Tamp a Port Director, Richard Wainio, and Tampa Mayor, Pam Iorio, operate the controls at the Panama Canal locks during a recent trip to Panama. The Port of Tampa has signed a cooperative agreement with Panama, and the trip by the Tampa delegation established new relationships between the city and Panama. The Panama Canal Museum offers a local window to the Panama Canal.

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In recognition of the Roosevelt Medal and its importance to honor the contributions of dedicated American workers, the museum established a Roosevelt Medal Certificate Program. Under the tutelage of trustee, J. Dorn Thomas, special custom certificates are available that list the medal holder, the number of his or her medal and the number of service bars, if any, are contained on the certificate along with the names of the descendent of the medal holder. Certificates can be ordered directly from Thomas at the address below: J. Dorn Thomas Roosevelt Medal Certificate Program 1809 Elmart Lane Richmond, VA Email: panmule@erols.com Page 16 The Panama Canal Museum Review ROOSEVELT MEDAL RECIPIENTS REMEMBERED The Roosevelt Medal was awarded to American employees who were employed for at least two years during the contruction of the Panama Canal, 1904—1914. Marc Quinn a descendent of a Roosevelt Medal holder, formed an organization of descendents of the awardees. Membership is open to any descendent of a Roosevelt Medal recipient. Quinn, a retiree of the Panama Canal Commission, still resides in Panama and organizes a ceremony commemorating the opening of the Canal each August. Below is an excerpt of his remarks at the ceremony that took place in August 2005. At this time, as we celebrate the anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal to world commerce, Roosevelt Medal des cendants honor our forefathers, the thousands of skilled American workers who, together with laborers mainly from the British and French West Indies, and from Southern Europe, made the Canal’s construction finally possible. Many of us are familiar with the fame of the great American builders of the Canal, legendary figures such as Stevens, Goethals, Gorgas and Gaillard. On this occasion, I would like to recall briefly the story of the broader American work force throughout the period of the Canal’s construction, from 1904 to 1914. So it was that the first American Canal workers to arrive on the Isthmus were young engineers, carpenters, mechanics and foremen obtained through U.S. Federal Civil Service procedures. Monotony and boredom would drive many of these early American construction workers back to the United States, homesick and disgusted. In mid-1905, a yellow fever epidemic broke out. Some Americans became victims of the disease. More began to leave Panama in large numbers. In April, May and June alone, over 500 of them returned home. Those who returned to the United States spread news of the bad conditions existing in Panama. This was picked up and fueled by the American press, which had been hostile to an American-built Canal in Panama from the outset, citing the failed French experience and complaining that the dirt was not flying . As news of improved conditions on the Isthmus began to be disseminated, the labor situation changed. A new U.S. citizen work force began to take shape. In mid-1906, there were approximately 2,500 American employees employed by the Canal organization. By mid1907, there were more than 4,400. With the arrival of newly-acquired modern American machinery, industrial work shops were erected near construction sites. Locomotives, railroad cars, cranes, steam shovels, were brought to the Isthmus on ICC vessels as component parts to be reassembled, adapted and repaired by skilled American industrial workers. Finally, the dirt began to fly. The territory known as the Canal Zone operated under United States laws requiring the various elements of civil government : courts, police and fire departments, customs houses, schools, hospitals and medical facilities. To obtain greater stability in the American work force, management encouraged married employees to bring their families. Commissaries with cold storage plants were opened to provide Canal families with meats, fresh produce, ice (and ice cream), as well as dry goods and general merchandise at relatively low prices. Despite these benefits, each year during the Construction Era, almost half of those on the gold payroll returned to the United States with less than two years of service in Panama, and were replaced by new recruits to fill the more than 5,000 Construction Era positions for skilled workers. When construction of the Panama Canal came to an end in 1914, positions for a permanent U.S.citizen work force then considered necessary to operate and maintain the Canal were reduced to some 2,700. Over the ten-year Construction period, from 1904 to 1914, there were over 7,300 Americans who came to build the Canal and remained for more than two years. In recognition of the special dedication of these American workers, President Theodore Roosevelt, while visiting the Isthmus in November 1906, directed that the United States Government award a medal to its citizens who performed more than two years of honorable service in the construction of the marvel that is the Panama Canal. We are the proud descendants of the recipients of the Roosevelt Medal. Today, we pay tribute to the very significant American participation in the building of the Canal. It has to be said,however, that the greatest testimony to their effort is to be found in the magnificent Panama Canal that we still know and admire almost a century later. Marc Quinn Roosevelt Medal Descendants August 12, 2005 Panama

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Page 17 The Panama Canal Museum Review On the first fimdraising cruise in February 2004, the idea of compiling a Panama Canal Museum cookbook was discussed with sever al museum board members. Few of us realized that not only would the cookbook be a historical collection of recipes from the American Era of the Panama Canal, but it would make history by breaking all previous sales records of items sold by the Panama Canal Museum store! The first printing of 557 b ooks was sold in two days at the 2005 Panama Canal Society Reunion. Currently the growing list of orders indicates that the sec ond printing, due out in time for holiday giving, will be as successfiil a seller as the first printing. As work began on the project, Cookbook Committee Chairperson Sarah Finkelstein and committee members Cissy Collins and Sis Paige Medinger tested some and edited all the recipes sent to them fr om Canal Zone area cooks, thei r family members and friends. In January 2005, the cookbook committee met at the museum in Seminole, FL, with Catherine Goodrich, Jerry Fields and museum board members to evaluate the progress of the project. Catherine had already begun collecting money for ads and tributes to help defr ay the cost of publishing the cookbook. Jerry Fields whose artwork became the focal point of the book cover and divider pages, made valuable suggestions for page and font colors. Joey Zornes unable to attend the meeting, talked with Jerry via telephone from Columbus,OH, to coordinate the artwork and layout to insure the visual appeal of the cookbook. The meeting was most pr oductive and ultimately resulted in this successful "more than just a cookbook" publication. The project continued to flourish as the committee we nt through various design and layout considerations before d eciding on the very attractive final design. The book is in looseleaf form and the committee envisions periodic adde ndums for sale in the future. The cookbook committee went a lot further than developing this popula r publication. They also designed and executed a truly in novative and fun promotional campaign at the annual Panama Canal Reunion. An em panada tasting competition between three recipes contained in th e cookbook was held with officers of the Society and the Museum serving a judges. They held a raffle and had trustee Gerry DeTore decked out in a dinner jacket and ringing the dinner chimes of the Panama Line ships at intervals during the reunion. It is the combination of a very attractive, well thought out and designed cookbook as well as the promotional campaign that mad e this project a major fundraising project for the museum. The Panama Canal Museum Board of Trustees gratefully thanks the Cookbook Committee and all who have supported the project with their talents, ad, tributes and purchases. Copies of the cookbook are availa ble at the Museum Gift Store or on the museum’s website at www.panamacanalmuseum.org. MUSEUM COOKBOOK BREAKS ALL PREVIOUS MUSEUM SALES RECORDS Carolyn (Rowley) Dillon claims the first place ribbon for BEST EMPANADAS of the tasters' contest. It's all in the preparation and presentation of the treats for the "cookbook tasters” activity. Sis Medinger and Sarah Finkelstein roll the super chocolate cookie dough in confectioner's sugar and Cissy Collins is ready to complete the spicy walnut recipe As the Review goes to press, we have been info rmed by the cookbook publisher that it has been named one of the top ten and is in the running for the best cook book of the year in its cookbook contest.

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Page 18 The Panama Canal Museum Review Opening the Gates to Canal Cuisine : A Panama Canal Museum bestseller! Now taking orders for the second printing. $25. Mola Coasters: Set of four absorbent coasters painted with a beautiful yellow colored hibiscus with bright green le aves against a black and white mola background. $22. Panama Canal Trivia Game: The museum’s version of this popular game is a “must have” for all families with an interest in the Panama Canal. $22. 2006 Molas Calendar: Glossy pages featuring colorful molas from the museum’s recent mola exhibit. $10 or $30 for all six of the museum’s calendars dating from 2001. 2005 Panama Canal Museum Collectible Ornament Featuring Panama Railroad: Commemorates the 150th anniversary of the first transcontinental railroad with the striking red and white PRR logo and the 299 locomotive! $16 or $50 for all four of the museum’s collectible ornaments. HOLIDAY SHOPPING LIST

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Page 19 VOLUME 5 ISSUE 2 Board of Trustees President Emeritus Charles W. Hummer, Jr President Joseph J. Wood Vice President Patricia Stei ner Kearns Executive Vice President Katherine E. Egolf Secretary Barbara D. Peterson Treasurer Paul D. Glassburn Assistant to Treasurer Joan McCullough Ohman Audit Committee Jack Hern Buildings & Facilities Gerry DeTore Collections Committee Paul Morgan, Ph.D. Development Committee J. Dorn Thomas Exhibit Committee Robert F. Zumbado Finance Committee Davis Stevenson Information Technology J. Patrick Coffey Marketing & Communications Joey Zornes Membership Committee Gayle Hasemann Tolbert Nominating Committee Jim DesLondes Special Projects Christian S. Skeie Store Committee Katherine Egolf Strategic Planning Patricia Stei ner Kearns Webmaster Joey Zornes Trustees Faith Brundage John Carlson Richard Cunningham Robert Dell Gerarde DeTore Reginald M. Hayden, Jr. Robert J. Karrer Richard D. Morgan Muriel Whitman Board of Advisors Robert K. Dawson William R. Gianelli Thomas R. Goethals Walter P. Leber D. P. McAuliffe MUSEUM WANDERINGS PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM 7985 113th Street, Suite 100 Seminole, Florida 33772 Tel. (727)-394-9338 Fax (727)-394-2737 Email: office@panam acanalmuseum.org FEIN 59-3532182 This newsletter is published by the Panama Canal Museum for its members, donors and benefactors. Additional copies can be obtained by writing or emailing the museum. The Museum is staffed by one part-time office manager and volunteers who graciously donate their time and skills to carry on the work of the museum. We acknowledge and thank our many benefactors, donors, volunteers and friends who continue to assist this important project. Membership Representatives Arizona Carl Berg carlnberg@aol.com Southern California Joan De Grummond Tina Cartotto Ressa zonejoan@aol.com Carolinas Alice Latimer compcouns@aol.com Miami, Florida Hindi Diamond hindi@bellsouth.net Ormond Beach, Florida Mickey Walker Fitzgerald mickeyftz@aol.com Pensacola, Florida Barbara Egolf Dedeaux dedeaux1@cox.net Barbara Vose-Kulig czbarbv@hotmail.com Sarasota, Florida Tom & Barbara Peterson tommypete@worldnet.att.net Tampa Bay, Florida Muriel Whitman Cristobal43@tampabay.rr.com Atlanta, Georgia Marie Drake mardrake@juno.com Pacific Northwest Dan & Pat Nellis chdarwin9581@toast.net Poconos Gordon Davis Gdavis1@comcast.net Kerrville, Texas Jo-Anne Fields Joanne_fields@hotmail.com Seattle, Washington Marilynn Abreau Stevens momthept@aol.com Museum Office Manager, Elizabeth Neily in her montuna and Marketing & Communications Chair, Joey Zornes enjoying the Panama Canal Society Reunion in Orlando. The “ticket” to the Panama Canal Museum’s exhibits at the Panama Canal Society Reunion in Orlando tells the whole story.

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THE PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM MISSION The mission of the Panama Canal Museum is to preser ve the history of the American era of the Panama Canal (19041999). The museum collects artifacts, documents and other items of historical importance and interest, which are accessible in person and on th e Internet. Its purpose is to enable res earch and education in the history of the accomplishments of the United States of America in the construction, operation, maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal as a service to the World s maritime and naval communities in th e twentieth century. It also collects, documents, catalogs, preserves, stores, exhibi ts, interprets and enables research on a variety of items illustrative of the lives and work of the Panama Canal workfo rce and supporting communitie s. It is intended to be of particular interest to former residents of the Canal Zone and their descendants as well as student s, scholars, genealogist s, and others who have an interest in this unique achievement. The emphasis is on memorializing the contributions of individuals, families and organizations of the United States, as well as those of the French, West Indians, Panamani ans and others who helped to create and operate the Panama Canal. Page 20 The Panama Canal Museum Review Dues are $24 per calendar year Email: president@panamacanalmuseum.org