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Panama Canal Museum Review

PCANAL
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00009

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00009

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00009

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00009


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VOLUME 8 ISSUE 1 SPRING/SUMMER 2008 Affiliations American Association of Museums American Association for State and Local History Dun & Bradstreet BuyforCharity.com Canal Zone Study Group Council of American Maritime Museums Florida Association of Museums Guidestar.com Isthmian Collectors Club Leave a Legacy Program Panama Canal Society, Inc. Panama National Institute for Culture St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce Seminole Chamber of Commerce Sociedad de Amigos del Museo Afro Antilleano de Panama World Ocean Observatory PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM Descendants of Roosevelt Medal Holders to be Honored Descendants of Roosevelt Medal holders will want to be sure to reserve tickets for the Panama Canal Society re union luncheon on July 5, 2008. A committee consisting of members of the Panama Canal Museum and the PCS has been formed to plan a special commemorative ceremony. The Society has invited Dr. Scott Parazynski a NASA astronaut and a relative of the Canal construction-day engineer, Col David DuBose Gaillard to be the guest speaker. On October 23, 2007, Dr. Parazynski took two of the Museum's Roosevelt Medals into space on the shuttle DISCOVERY. The journey of the medals "from Gaillard Cut to outer space" will be part of Dr. Parazynski's speech, after which he wi ll present one of the medals and an American flag, also carried into space, to Joe Wood Museum president. A special commemorative pin is bein g made in the likeness of the Roosevelt Medal and each Roosevelt Medal holder descendant in attendance at the luncheon will receive one. If your grandfather or great grandfather worked on the constructi on of the Panama Canal but you do not know whether or not he received a Roosevelt Medal, call the Panama Canal Museum at 727-394-9338 or Email: pancanalmuseum@aol.com Panama Canal Museum President Joe Wood and Panama Canal Society President Bob Russell take a few minutes after the luncheon with Teddy Roosevelt to discuss upcoming reunion plans.

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Message from the President In 1998, a small group of former Canal Zone and Panama residents met during a Panama Canal Society Reunion to fo rm the Panama Canal Museum. The United States at that time was still in control of the Canal and we felt an urgency to do whatever we could to preserve its history in Panama before the institutional me mory of those who lived through the American Era was lost forever. The early days of our existence were a bit of a struggle while we tried to establish our credibility and make people aware of the serious effort that was being put forth. Over time, we have overcome some of those obstacles and have seen steady growth in our membership, the number of items in our collection and library, and the number and quality of interesting exhibits and displays geared toward preserving our unique history. As we celebrate this tenth anniversary, we can look back with pride and satisfaction at what the original group created, and what has been accomplished since that time by those and many others who came forward to join the effort. There is no question that many of you share our passion for preserving our history and we hope we can continue to attract additional dedicated members like yourselves to help us in this worthwhile cause. While we have made great strides in the past ten years, we must keep our focus on the future and do what is necessary to ensure our continued viability. One important st ep we took recently was to hire a consulting firm to guide us toward a major fund raising initiative, whic h we hope will take us to the next level of funding. If we are successful in this endeavor, our continued stability will be assured and we will be able to provide our members with an enhanced, high-quality muse um of which you all can be proud. A final note about our Members-Only Spring Reviewfrom the inception of the Museum, Chuck Hummer has been our Review editor and has worked diligently over the years to bring you a firstclass publication. Chuck has now turned over the pleasure and challenges of this important work to one of the Museum's most energetic volunteers, Peggy Huff, who has already showcased her impressive talents by producing our other publication, the Panama Canal Museum Musings. Peggy has accepted the role with enthusiasm and is dedicated to continuing the high standards set by Chuckwe hope you enjoy this Members-Only Spring Review and all future issues. Joe Joe Wood President Page 2 Panama Canal Museum Review

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Theodore Roosevelt's administration was marked by an active approach to foreign policy. He saw it as the duty of mo re developed nations to help the underdeveloped world move forward. Roosevelt's most famous foreign policy initiative, following the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, was the construction of the Panama Canal which upon its comp letion shortened the route of freighters between San Francisc o and New York City by 8,000 miles. Colombia first proposed the canal in thei r country as opposed to rival Nicaragua, and signed a treaty for an agreed-upon sum. At th at time Panama was a province of Colombia. According to the treaty in 1902, the U.S. wa s to buy out the equipment and excavations from France, which had been a ttempting to build a canal since 1881. While the Colombian negotiating team had signed the treaty, rati fication by the Colombian senate became problematic. The Colombian senate balked at the price and asked for $10 million over the originally agreed upon price. When the U.S. refused to renegotiate the price, the Colombian politicians proposed cutting the original French company that started the project out of the deal and giving that difference to Colombia. The original deal stipulated that the French company was to be reasonably compensated. Realizing that the Colombian senate was no longer bargaining in good faith, Roosevelt tired of these last-minute attempts by the Colombians to cheat the French out of their entire investment. TRs big stick approach became evident in Panama. Roosevelt ultimately decided, with the encouragement of Panamanian business inte rests, to help Panam a declare independence from Colombia. In 1903, after a brief revolution of only a few hours, independence was declared and Colombian soldiers were br ibed $50 each to lay down their arms. The presence of a large American naval force, c onveniently in the area, prevented Colombian troops from putting down the rebellion. On Nove mber 3,1903, the Republic of Panama was created, with its constitution written in advance by the United States. Shortly thereafter, a treaty was signed with Panama granting the U.S. rights to the Canal Zone. The U.S. then paid $10 million to secure rights to build on and control the Canal Zone. Construction began in 1904 and was completed in 1914. Page 3 Panama Canal Museum Review Theodore Roosevelt: Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick

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One of Theodore Roosevelts proudest and most politically controversial accomplishments was acquiring the U.S. rights to building and operating a canal in Pa nama. He understood the strategic significance of a canal and in 1904 negotiated for the United States to take control of its construction. He believed that the Canal's completion was his most important and historically significant in ternational achievement. He traveled to Panama to sign a U.S. executive order on how the work of the canal organization was to be administered. No president had ever before left the United States during his time in office and that trip became the talk of the country. With the roundtrip voyage to Panama in November 1906, he was away from the U.S. for two weeks. He chose November because it was the height of the rainy season and he wished to see Panama at its absolute worst. It would have been impossible to see the work going on under more unfavorable weather conditions. I tramped through the mud, he wrote with satisfaction. He sailed to Panama on the Louisiana the largest battleship in the U.S. military fleet, escorted by two other war vessels. Accompanying him were his wife, personal physician, three secret service men and no reporters. He stayed at the Tivoli Hotel, whose construction had began the year before, but far from finished, was rushed ahead. One wing was finished and furnished in six weeks because President Roosevelt wished to live on shore and in the Zone. His visit lasted three days, which he later stressed to the U.S. Congress was insufficient time for an exhaustive investigation of the minutiae of the work. He deviated often from the schedule planned by chief engineer John Stevens. Rather than having an official lunch at the Tivoli, he and Mrs. Roosevelt joined unannounced several hundred gold roll men in a La Bo ca employee mess hall for a 30-cent lunch. He walked railroad ties, leaped ditches, splashed through work camps, and made impromptu speeches in the driving rain. You are doing the biggest thing of the kind that has ever been done, and I wanted to see how you are doing it. He inspected quarters for both white and black workers, and poked about in kitchens and meat lockers. Theodore Roosevelt never returned to Panama; he never saw the Panama Canal. The passage of the Pacific fleet through the locks in 1919 took place seven months after his death. Page 4 Panama Canal Museum Review The Man with the Sun in his Eyes (David McCullough, Path Between the Seas) Photo: New York Times The President Climbs a Canal steamshovel. That famous moment occurred impromptu on day 2 at Pedro Miguel Locks. He was at the controls of the 95-ton Bucyrus for 20 minutes. A single scoop took up three tons of rock and earth and could load a dirt car in eight minutes. The photograph became part of American folklore.

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The Buzz . Creating the Museums Future We are stakeholders in the success, the very future of the Panama Canal Museum You can feel it! Its in the air! You can touch it! Ther es a special excitementa buzz of energy and enthusiasm for the Panama Canal Mu seum. Beyond delivering creati ve exhibits, funding educational outreach, bringing our unique hist ory to the annual Panama Canal Society Reunion, beyond telling our story the staff, volunteers and trustees are gearing up for two major initia tives over the next three years: A broad ranging member outreach within Fl orida and throughout the United States Focused actions to generate sustained giving, so all stakeh olders can help achieve the Museums vision and mission. Vision To achieve national and international recognition as the foremost source of historical information uniquely dedicated to documentation of the United States participation in the history of Panama. Mission The mission of the Panama Canal Muse um is to document, interpret, an d articulate the role played by the United States in the history of Panama, with em phasis on the construction, operation, maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and the contribution s by people of all nationalities to its success In a nutshell, a board retreat was conducted in late September 2007 to reaffirm and ex pand the boards vision, the Museums mission and goals, and identify high-priority initiatives essential to expanding the Museums value nationa lly and internationally. As a result of the retreat, trustees, staff, and volunteers are now engaged in Phase 1 of a 3-phas e initiativethe launching of a th ree-year major gifts program. The focus? Organizations with st rong ties to the Canals past, pres ent, and futureorganizations like General Electric, Bucyrus, DuPont; individual and family stakeholders; foun dations and organizations whose mission is to aid in the de velopment and success of Americas historical museums. We will be transferring the excitement and the Museums future into the hands of individuals and families within and beyond our Zonian community. All of us are stakeholders in a significant, unique ly American undertaking. More than memorabilia, more than a historical footnote, the Museum is our lega cy to future generations of Americans. Step up! Join! Volunteer! Let us together make a real difference in realizing the visi on of the Panama Canal Museum! Its Our Story! Page 6 Panama Canal Museum Review

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Long-time volunteer and trustee, Paul Glassburn has been the Museums treasurer since 2002. Paul was born in Pensacola, Florida, and with his mother Zelda (nee Eggleston) and sister Connie moved to the Canal Zone in 1945, where his roots trace back to his grandfather, Captain Dan Eggleston who was a Canal pilot from 1929 through 1941 Paul, who retired after twenty-seven years with General Telephone and Electronics, has a son, Stephen ; a daughter, Tracy ; and two granddaughters, Joanna and Meghan. Concerning his affiliation with the Museum, Paul says The best thing about working at the Museum is that for two days every week Im back in the Zone. Page 7 Panama Canal Museum Review Marian Evans Blair was born at Gorgas Hospital, Ancon, Canal Zone to Albert, Sr. and Sophie Evans A brother, Albert, Jr. completed the Evans family. The Canal Zone was her residence for 21 years and ended after her marriage to Everett Blair. Everett was statione d at Fort Clayton for his military service. Marian is a graduate of Balboa High School and Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie-Mellon University), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They are blessed with a son Mike; a daughter Sharon Bowman; and five grandchildren. After retirement in 1995 they moved to Pinellas County, Florida. They reside in Seminole. Marians volunteer work at the Museum is accessioning the donated items and serving as a member of the collections co mmittee. Volunteering at the Museum has given her the opport unity to renew Canal Zone friendships and acquaintances and learn more about the history of the building of the Canal and employees family life on the Isthmus. Volunteer Profile Marian Evans Blair Board Member Profile Paul Glassburn

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Page 8 Panama Canal Museum Review The Panama Canal Museum will once again travel to Orlando to the Panama Canal Society Reunion at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort on July 2. Because the maps of the Canal Zone town sites were so well received last year, this year's exhibit, "Living and Learning in the Canal Zone," will also feat ure the maps where viewers can write their names on the houses where they lived. In addition, there will be pictures of schools and former students can sign the lists for their school s. The Cristobal High School bell will also be on display as well as some very special Bal boa High School treasuresone of which is so big it has never yet been exhibited in the United States! Other exhibits will focus on Teddy Roosevelt on this 150th anniversary of his birth; the West Indians' participation in the construction of the Panama Canal; and David Gaillard items that should be of interest. His relative, Astronaut Scott Parazynski, will be speaking at the Panama Canal Society luncheon where Roosevelt Medal descendents wi ll be honored. He will present one of the Museum's Roosevelt Medals that went into space with him to Joe Wood, president of the Museum. (More details on the l uncheon appear on page one.) We have been receiving some wonderful items for this year's silent auction, including some lovely clothing items; unusual wines; two nights at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort; and books, to name just a few. Check us outthat unique item you've been looking for will likely be there. Again this year we will have the "buy it now" feature so everyone will be able to take part in the auction. If you have items you would like to donate to the silent auction please contact the Museum or Marguerite Zumbado (bobzmarz@aol.com). Besides our exhibits, the luncheon and silent auction, we will have a number of tables of interest set up in the Museum exhibit room. Among those who will be available for consultation at a table will be financial advisor Fred Bremer Don't forget to stop by the Museum's tables in the vendors room. New items will include our 2008 collectible ornament, our 2009 calendar, bateas with royal blue butterflies and iguanas, new books and maps. If you bought pink hibiscus mola coasters a couple of years ago, now you will have a chance to add yellow hibiscus mola coasters to your set! They make a wonderful gift, too. And we will have some old favorites like the Panama Canal Museums award winning cookbook, Opening the Gates to Canal Cuisine. Your reunion visit to the Panama Canal Museum on its tenth anniversary should be fun, interesting and informative. Be sure to come and take it all in! MUSEUM ACTIVITIES AT THE PC REUNION

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NEW ACQUISITIONS The bell from the Panama Canal tugboat Gatun is now on display in the Museum. The Gatuns sister tugs, Trinidad and Cardenas, are also represented with items recently donated by Richard Roscoe The Trinidad II was designed and built by Southern Shipbuilding Corporation of Slidell, Louisiana in 1968 and we now have the brass builder's plaque for that tug. Also new in the Museum is the emergency maneuvering signal (bell) from the tug Cardenas This unique dual clapper bell was designed for use if engine control from the bridge was lost. All three items give a glimpse into the history of the tugs assisting ships transiting the Panama Canal. A review is underway of 90+ stories submitte d by construction day family descendants for the Museum's book project "Write of Passage Stories of the American Era of the Panama Canal." The histories have been wonderful reading for the volunteers involved. The February deadline for story submission has passed and the Museum now has an accurate picture of book content and is pursuing printing bids to publish this wonderful treasure, the sale of which will benefit the Museum. Stay tuned for our next communiqu about th e book's price. A complimentary copy will be provided to the families who submitted stories and there will be extras ordered for those who would like to purchase copies. An October availability is planned. Page 9 Panama Canal Museum Review Page 9 Panama Canal Museum Review

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Frank and Deborah Mokray Lee are shown here with their latest purchase made through the Panama Canal Museum store a model of a Bucyrus steam shovel similar to many used during the construction era of the Panama Canal. Frank says, "We are SO pleased with it!" Bucyrus Steam Shovel Model Available at Museum Store The Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk educational outreach project is moving along. Two trunks have found sponsors with Judy Engelke Montanarro of Silver Spring, Maryland, stepping up in January to sponsor the first trunk. Al Lombana, trustee and education committee chai rman, put out a challenge to other board members to sponsor the second trunk. These sponsorships combined with a recent grant from the Pinellas County Cult ural Affairs Department, will allow the Museum to hire a part-time education coordinator to develop lesson plans and materials for the trunk as well as develop the Museums program in schools and the community. Teachers who have had the chance to look at the trunk are very enthusiastic about its potential as a teaching tool. Why not involve your family or group and leave a legacy to future generations? The sponsors name(s) will be placed on the trunk. Sponsorships are available at $1,500 per trunk and are tax deductible. If you are inte rested in sponsoring a trunk for a school district in your area as an individual or member of a group, please contact the Museum director, Elizabeth Neily at director@panamacanalmuseum.org. Museum in a Trunk Page 12 Panama Canal Museum Review

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A new exhibit honoring the si gnificant Role of the West Indians 1904 to 1914 in the building of the Panama Canal opened April 5th. It has been said that it was American technology and innovation that bu ilt the Panama Canal. But it was the muscle, blood and sweat of a labor workforce comprised primarily of West Indians from the Caribbean that created the partnership that led to the projects success. Director Elizabeth Neily says that the Museums mission recognizes the contribution to the Canal success by peoples of all nationalities. However, most of those laborers came from the Cari bbean islands of Barbados, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Trinidad, St. Kitts, British Gu iana, St. Lucia, Grenada, Jamaica, and Curacao. A total of 30,641 West Indians, working under dangerous conditions, insufferable heat and humidity, tropical diseases, and low wages, did not falter until the project was completed. They also worked as police, teachers, cooks, maids, drivers, groundskeepers and many other support positions. Americans working for the Isthmian Canal Commi ssion during the canal construction period between 1904 to 1914, were awarded a Roos evelt Medal. In conjunction with this exhibit, the Museum is reaching out to the families of non-Americans who worked during that period. We hope that des cendants of non-American canal workers will visit or contact the museum to register their family names with us, says Neily. Visit the Panama Canal Museum at 7985 113t h Street, Suite 100, Seminole, FL, in the Seminole Office Center next door to the Seminole Mall. For more info call 727-394-9338 or visit the web at www.panamacanalmuseum.org. Page 13 Panama Canal Museum Review Museum President Emeritus Chuck Hummer, who had a big hand in preparing the material for the West Indian exhibit, poses with a Swirling Silk designed for the exhibit by Elizabeth Neily using a photograph from the museum's collection that depicts a West Indian wedding party. Panama Canal Museum Honors West Indian Laborers

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Page 14 Panama Canal Museum Review BENEFACTORS WITH DONATIONS OVER $7,500 (Higher donations listed first) S. Griffin McClellan III Leo J. Krziza Harry & Mary Egolf-Charitable Remainder Trust Frank R. Leves Lucille Abernathy Estate of Anna Ruth Werkheiser Anonymous Donors Katherine E. Egolf James P. MacLaren Bob & Marguerite Neal Zumbado Lesley M. Hendricks Litzenberger 5th Transit ($6,000$7,499) LIFE MEMBERS (Higher donations listed first) Grace Jones Carey Isthmian Collectors Club William Lyons Reginald & Beverly Boyett Hayden 4th Transit ($4,500$5,999) (Higher donations listed first) Dollar Club Albert & Jane Nahmad C.B. Fenton & Co., S.A. 3rd Transit ($3,000$4,499) (Higher donations listed first) John & Judith Engelke Montanaro Panama Canal Society of California Joe & Beverly Bowman Wood James C. Cook Lewis & Sandra Taber Curtis Fitzgerald J.E. Dorn & Dolly Thomas Richard & Julieta Preciado Morgan William E. LeBrun Dave & Elizabeth Jane Hilliard R. Alvera Davison 2nd Transit ($1,500$2,999) (Higher donations listed first) Charles & Sandra Hummer Carol Ruoff Goulet Paul D. Glassburn Zelma R. Treadwell Carol F. Meyer Bob Redfield & Carolyn Merry Blanche Adler Browne Richard & Ruth Mallett Charles & Maxine Swanson Keenan Edward & Geraldine Pierce Corbett Hobey & Lisa Wilkins Richer, MD Capt. William & Connie Glassburn Larry & Kathryn Castleman Olive L. Unruh Peter G. Flynn Family James & Patricia Steiner Kearns Peg Milliken Richard Swearingen Marian Smith Kariger Barbara Peterson John N. Hatgi Space Coast Panazonians Steve & Mary Clement Vaughn Thomas R. Goethals Ed (Lucky) Wilburn Virginia Kleefkens Rankin Class of 1954 Balboa/Cristobal High Schools William McKeown, Jr. Peter & Mary Lou Dailey Lang Robert & Colleen Lawson Mate Frank & Marilyn Mott Alan R. Ford Angel Snapper Vazquez BSA, Explorer Post 21, Balboa, Canal Zone Grover Matheney Frank M. Smith Douglas & Sharon Booth Schmidt Robert J. Roy, Sr. John K. Brayton Brian Albright As of 3/16/08

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Board of Trustees President Emeritus Charles W. Hummer, Jr President Joseph J. Wood Vice President Patricia Steiner Kearns Executive Vice President Katherine E. Egolf Secretary Barbara D. Peterson Treasurer Paul D. Glassburn Buildings & Facilities Shawn Rupp Collections Committee Gerry DeTore Educational Development Alfredo E. Lombana, Ph.D. Exhibit Committee Robert F. Zumbado Finance & Development Larry Siegel Information Technology J. Patrick Coffey Marketing & Communications Vacant Membership Committee Vacant Oral History Richard D. Morgan Store Committee Katherine Egolf Webmaster Joey Zornes Trustees Faith Brundage John Carlson Dick Cunningham Robert Dell Frank Stevens Hawks Robert Hughes, Ph.D. Robert J. Karrer, Jr. J. Dorn Thomas Paul Morgan, Ph.D. Board of Advisors Robert K. Dawson William R. Gianelli Thomas R. Goethals Walter P. Leber D. P. McAuliffe Robert McMillan PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM 7985 113th Street, Suite 100 Seminole, Florida 33772 Tel. (727)-394-9338 Fax (727)-394-2737 Museum Hours: MondaySaturday 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Email: office@panamacanalmuseum.org EIN 59-3532182 This newsletter is publis hed by the Panama Canal Museum for its members, donors and benefactors. Additional copies can be obtained by writing or emailing the museum. The Museum is staffed by a museum director, two part-time clerical assistants and volunteers who graciously dona te their time and skills to carry on the work of the museum. We acknowledge and thank our many benefa ctors, donors, volunteers and friends who continue to assist this important project. Membership Representatives Arizona Carl Berg carlnberg@aol.com Southern California Joan De Grummond Tina Cartotto Ressa zonejoan@aol.com Carolinas Alice Latimer compcouns@aol.com Miami, Florida Hindi Diamond hindi@bellsouth.net Ormond Beach, Florida Mickey Walker Fitzgerald mickeyftz@aol.com Pensacola, Florida Barbara Egolf Dedeaux dedeaux1@cox.net Barbara Vose-Kulig czbarbv@hotmail.com Sarasota, Florida Barbara Peterson tommypete@worldnet.att.net Tampa Bay, Florida Muriel Whitman Cristobal43@ta mpabay.rr.com Atlanta, Georgia Marie Drake mariedrake@bellsouth.com Pacific Northwest Dan & Pat Nellis chdarwin9581@toast.net Poconos Gordon Davis Gdavis1@comcast.net Kerrville, Texas Jo-Anne Fields Joanne_fields@hotmail.com Seattle, Washington Marilynn Abreau Stevens momthept@aol.com Alabama Larry Siegel larrysiegel@bellsouth.net www.panamacanalmuseum.org Page 15 Panama Canal Museum Review Both book and audio book are available through the Museum store. ". . an absolutely gripping account of the canal's conception and construction ." LA Times New Store Item Dues are $26 per calendar year.

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THE PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM MISSION AND VISION The mission of the Panama Canal Museum is to document, interpret, and articulate the role played by the Unit ed States in the history of Panama, with emphasis on the construction, ope ration, maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and the contributions by people of all nationalities to its success. The vision of the Panama Canal Museum is to achieve national and international recognition as the foremost source of historical information uniquely dedicated to documentation of the United States participation in the history of Panama. Page 16 Panama Canal Museum Review Chris, who was born and raised in the Canal Zone and spent much of his time in Panama in recent years, was an enthusiastic member of the Panama Canal Museum's board of trustees for nine years, serving first as chairperson of the buildings and facilities committee and later as chairperson of the special projects committee. We appreciate his involvement in Museum projects in both Panama and the United States and miss him greatly. Chris (right) is pictured here in Panama in December with Hermann Trappman (left) and Elizabeth Neily, Director of the Panama Canal Museum, when Hermann and Elizabeth were visiting Panama for the first time. IN MEMORIAM We Remember Christian S. Skeie February 6, 1944January 11, 2008