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Panama Canal Museum Review

PCANAL
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00005

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00005

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095849/00005

Material Information

Title: Panama Canal Museum Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Museum
Publisher: Panama Canal Museum
Place of Publication: Seminole, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal Museum (Seminole, Fla.) -- Records and correspondence.
Panama Canal (Panama) -- History.
Canal Zone -- History.
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Funding: Panama Canal Museum

Record Information

Source Institution: Panama Canal Museum
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 660020455
System ID: UF00095849:00005


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IN THE MUSEUM’S CLASSIC NEW PUBLICATION, “THE WRITE OF PASSAGE” The Panama Canal Museum is planning a special program to collect, compile and document the histories of the many families who lived and worked in the Canal Zone and Panama beginning from the outset of the Canal construction period and going through the end of the American Era in 1999. These histories will be published in a book, or series of books, entitled, Write of Passage Stories of the American Era of the Panama Canal.Ž Each book will document the stories of Canal Zone families beginning with the first member to arrive in the Canal Zone or Panama and profiling their familys growth thereafter. Proud and treasured possessions that can be handed down through generations, the books will also become a research database for historians and genealogists studying this important time in the history of both the United States and Panama. Classically elegant and distinctively designed, these hard-bound books will also be illustrated with a number of historically significant photographs of Canal scenes, representing all the periods of Canal history. Each family has a unique history of which it can be proud and the stories they can tell will be invaluable in keeping the legacy of the Canal Zone alive. Personal and intriguing, these publications stand to become the most interesting historical pieces ever to depict the American Era of the Panama Canal. The museum soon will be mailing out a Family History package that will describe the program in greater detail. Once the program package arrives in the mail, family members may return the postcard enclosed therein to indicate to the museum whether or not they would be interested in having their familys history included in the book. Based on the response, the museum will then be in position to determine the level of interest necessary to proceed with the program. To make sure your na me is on our mailing list to receive the package, please contact the museum at president@panamacanalm useum.org or call us at (727) 394-9338. PRESERVE FAMILY HISTORY SPRING/SUMMER 2007 VOLUME 7 ISSUE 1 Affiliations American Association of Museums American Association for State and Local History Dun & Bradstreet BuyforCharity.com Canal Zone Study Group Council of American Maritime Museums Florida Association of Museums Guidestar.com Isthmian Collectors Club Leave a Legacy Program Panama Canal Society, Inc. Panama National Institute for Culture Sociedad de Amigos del Museo Afro Antilleano de Panama St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce World Ocean Observatory THE PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM The Panama Canal Society and the Panama Canal Museum are commemorating the Society’s 75th anniversary in a collaborative exhibit at this year’s Panama Canal Society meeting at Orlando ’s Rosen Shingle Creek Resort on July 4-8. “To preserve American Ideals and Canal Zone Friendships” will be the theme of a variety of displays that are bound to delight Reunion goers. These displays include town site maps where viewers can record where their families lived when, pictures of friends many years ago and these same friends today, a timeline of Panama Canal Society and Panama Canal events during the past 75 years, scenes of life in the Canal Zone, a big painting of the SS Ancon and an opportunity for two people at a time to stage their own pictures behind a drop that will show them as SS Ancon travelers. Come and reminisce with us about all the good times we've had together! REUNION EXHIBIT FEATURES SOCIETY’S 75TH ANNIVERSARY

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Page 2 The Panama Canal Museum Review A SUGGESTION A REPLY Dear +++++++++, I read your email with a great deal of interest and shared it with the members of the museum's board of trustees. We believe, as you do, that there are many things we "need" to do to help us grow and develop into a more sophisticated and widely-acclaimed institution. There is no question that major funding from corporations or foundations would help us get beyond our current level, for which we presently rely main ly on contributions from individuals, most of whom had, or have, ties to Panama or the Canal Zone in one form or another. We, too, have a vision of enlarging our operation, purchasi ng our own building, hiring professional staff members, and developing exciting and far-reaching exhibits, both indoor an d outdoor, that could attract the general public and not just the former Canal Zone constituency, but the American public at large. Our Long Range Strategic Plan identifies the acquisition of our own building as one of our most important objectives, and we continue to work toward that and many other goals. You are right on the mark when you indicate that identifying a site and creating a concept model for a building to show people what the museum could look like would help generate interest and could give people a solid reason to donate to the cause. In that regard, we are currently in the process of developing a comprehensive capital campaign that would allow us to solicit from corporations, public institutions/f oundations and "deep-pocket" individuals the kind of money you are talking about to enable us to fund the acquisition of our own building. This campaign would target possible funding sources around the country and certain parts of th e world and would include specific plans for a museum. It should be noted, however, that we are dealing with certain realities that make those objectives easier to talk about than to attain. Some of those are: 1) Corporations, foundations and public funding agencies are besieged by well-meaning non profit organizations asking for money,, and there is a lot of competition out th ere. Many of those who do give money require one-to-one matching funds which makes it difficult for us to comply with at this time. Moreover, very few, if any funding sources give money for general operating expenses an d require, instead, that the receiving in stitution have in mind a very specific project with plans, budgets, specifications, personnel needs, etc. Our plan for a new building will have to include solid site and architectural specifications, cost projections (both for building it and maintaining it over the long term), financing available, other possible funding sources, etc., be fore any corporation or donor is going to send money our way. The time and cost of developing these plans could be considerable. 2) Funding a new building is only part of the expense of running a muse um. Administrative costs, personnel, security, conservation of our collection, maintenance, utilities, landscap ing, janitorial and many other costs have to be factored in. Additional money would be needed to develop and sustain ou r exhibits, and to create projects we believe are important to the operation, including a working model of the locks; an interactive, audio-visual, touch-screen information kiosk; a Editor’s Note: An individual who had copious suggestions and cr iticisms of the museum and its development recently sent the museum an email in which he referred to the progress as being akin to Chinese water torture. President Joe Wood prepared this very complete and thoughtful repl y. It addresses many issues that others may find nagging at them when they think of the museum and its progress. The Board of Trustees thought the reply was so compelling that it should be included here in its entirety.

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Page 3 The Panama Canal Museum Review sophisticated educational program for increasing our public awareness in th e community and in schools; the continued maintenance and improvement of our web site; the continued gr owth and enhancement of our library; the digitalization of many old and historically important records and publ ications; and many, many others. It takes time, money, manpower and other resources to put together these plans an d projects and we currently are in short supply of those. 3) Corporate and public funding has not escaped our attention. We have take n a number of initiatives to obtain such funding. The State of Florida has informed us that grants fr om the State are given primarily to organizations that are designed to preserve Florida History. While we do not qualif y directly for those types of grants, we are in the process of developing a reasonable case for an indirect relationship between the Panama Canal and the State of Florida that will, perhaps, enable us to qualify for future State funding. 4) Historical connections of corporations with the history of the Panama Canal were a focus of our attention as well. We have researched and canvassed a large number of corporation s that have had, or still have, an interest in the Panama Canal, including many which provided su pplies, materials or equipment during the construction of the Canal; we approached over 150 organizations relate d to the maritime industry, including all the major steamship lines and steamship agencies who use the Canal; and we have contacted a number of Federal, State and local agencies to try to obtain funding. Except for a few relatively minor grants, the response to our re quests has been negligible and we have not been able yet to tap into all those valuable resources. We have not stopped tr ying, however, and our hard working volunteers continue to research grant and corporate sponsorship opportunities. 5) Running a museum, even a small one, like ours, is like running a small business. There are financial, administrative, operational and regulatory considerations that are involved on a daily basis; we develop exhibits and preserve the collection; we are meticulous in recognizing our donors and in keeping strict records of their dues and donations; we are constantly developing new products for our gift shop; we are in constant contact with several professionals to help us improve and update our Website; we provide research and historical information to many requesters; and we do hundreds of other tasks to keep the operation going. All of this takes an enormous amount of time, money and energy and for the most part, over the last nine years since we started, has been done with just a small number of dedicate d volunteers and supporters. Finally, on April 1, we felt we could afford to hire a full-time professional museum Director This action will help us gain some continuity in the administrative side of the house and give us additional expert ise in some of the areas of the museum operation. We still rely on our volunteers to continue to do a great number of tasks and will continue to need them for the foreseeable future. 6) The "Zonie" Community you mention has been supportive to a degree, but, up to this point, the overall reaction to the museum from that group has been disappointing. For example, each year for the past nine years we have appealed for support from over 4000 Panama Canal Society members; ye t from that group, only about 700 donate and become members of the museum. Moreover, only a handful of those o ffer to volunteer, despite repeated requests for help. Even with only that small number out of thousands of potential supporters coming through to help preserve their history, we still have been able to sustain a growing operation and to star t building up a reserve that can eventually be used to help The "Zonie" Community you mention has been supportive to a degree, but, up to this point, the overall re action to the museum from that group has been disappointing.

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Page 4 The Panama Canal Museum Review fund a new facility. Just think what we could do if all Society members and the former Canal Zone and Panama Canal community would pitch in and help out, both with money and some of their time. In that regard, our records show that you are not a member of the museum. I was surprised to see that, in view of what appears to be your passion for our future success. We would welcome you to join and help suppo rt this important effort. We also woul d encourage you to volunteer to help us out with the many projects we have on our plate. You don't have to live in the vicinity of the museum to help. Many of our programs are run by people who live in different areas of the country and they all contribute in a variety of creative, artistic, technological or other ways. Your reference to "Chinese Water Torture" may mean that, from your perspective, the progress we are making is too slow. Actually, we have come a very long way in a relatively short time and have created a fully functioning, albeit small, museum from absolute scratch. We are way ahead of other si milar museums at this stage of our development and plan on continuing to make progress in the years to come. From ou r perspective, the "Chinese Water Torture" we feel is the drip, drip, drip of an extremely burden some workload that will eventually ta ke its toll on our limited number of volunteers if we don't get others to share our vision for preserving the American Era of the Panama Canal. Joe Wood President Panama Canal Museum The reality of the situation is that, if our own community, yourself included, doesn't feel strongly enough to preserve their heritage and history by supporting their museum, can we realistically conclude that corporate America or the general US population will provide the funding source we need? That is a question we will find out the answer to when we go public with our capital campaign. If the previous article by Joe Wood hits home, then, why not do something about it today? As a member of the museum, you can actively help recr uit new members. Look at the last membership roster and see who is not there that you think should be, then ask them to join. If you have been meaning to make a donation to complete another transit on the Wall of Honor above your annual dues, then do it today. If you have forgotten to remember deceased friends or family members, then make a donation in their memory today. If you have put off donating historical material or artifa cts to the museum waiting to see if it would be a success, then make those donations today before those items are lost to some thrift store by family members who do not have the same connection to the history of the Panama Canal as you do. If you have considered giving up a day at the beach or on the golf course to give a hand as a volunteer, now is the time for you to come through for the museum. If you really think the museum has proven itself over th e past nine years, then show it with your active and enthusiastic support.

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Page 5 The Panama Canal Museum Review This story comes under the heading of "once a zonian, always a zonian." Tom Zane Registrar of the Ponce De Leon Lighthouse Museum at Ponce Inlet, Florida, was stationed in Fort Clayton from 1966 to 1968 while in the US Army; and he still maintains his love and appreciation for the canal area. Some time ago Jack R. Ward, a Canal Pilot from 1970 to 1991, now deceased, donated a collection of personal memorabilia to the Lighthouse Museum. Among other things, the collection contains Captain Ward's ship tr ansit logs, personal documents, awards, a sextant and one hundred beautiful shipping line cups from the ward rooms of ships the world over that Captain Ward piloted through the Canal. Tom Zane, mindful of his days in the Canal Zone, felt that this wonderful collection, though dealing with things maritime just as the Lighthouse Museum does, needed a more appropriate home. Thus, he contacted Nancy Van Siclen Secretary of the Panama Canal Society, in search of that more suitable home. Nancy immediately and enthusiastically put the Panama Canal Museum and the Lighthouse Museum into a collaborative mode. At this point, Kathy Egolf and Panama Canal Museum Collections Chairman, Gerry DeTore exchanged correspondence with Tom Zane to establish that the Ward collection would have a proper home in our museum; and the transfer was scheduled. Early in February 2007, Bob and Marguerite Zumbado along with a squad of Zonians Joe and Marcia Cicero and Bob and Lotty Orvis were treated to a tour of the Lighthouse Museum and grounds by Tom Zane and Ellen Henry the Curator. During the visit Bob Zumbado took possession of the collection for the Panama Canal Museum. Bob deli vered the items to the museum, where they will be incorporated in to our library and exhibits. Those interested in lighthouses in the US, and their histor y will find the Ponce De Leon Lighthouse and Museum to be one of the most interesting lighthouses in America. A visit to their webs ite, www.ponceinlet.org, will certainly spur you on to an on sit e visit; Bob Zumbado, Exhibits Chairman for the Panama Canal Museum accepts the donated artifacts from Ponce De Leon Lighhouse Museum’s Registrar, Tom Zane Artifacts Come Home to Museum As the museum actively recruits volunteers it is apparent that a Volunteer Coordinator must come first. The museum is hunting for a Volunteer Coordinator to go out and find volunteers of all kinds to help at the museum. Volunteers are needed for a variety of jobs, such as: Gift store workers Tour guides Library worker Membership data input Collections data input the workload dictates. That will give some exciting opportunities to learn new skills. It is a great way to put unused time and skills to work for a good cause. Work schedules will be flexible but in order to keep the operations reliable, a good commitment of the times volunteered isdesirable. Those interested in volunteering their time as an operations volunteer or as the Volunteer Coordinator are asked to contact the Museum Director. Graphic designer Volunteering is not a full time job by any means and can be done away from the museum. What is needed is people from the community, not necessarily with any connection to the Panama Canal, to give four or five hours a week or a month on a regular basis. Training will be given to those who come forward. Because of the nature of the operations a volunteer may be assigned to a number of tasks as

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Page 6 The Panama Canal Museum Review MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT The Panama Canal Museum Board of Trustees met in March to continue to chart the course of the museum for the future. The board took the following actions: Approved the appointment of Elizabeth Neily as the museums first full-time salaried Director … a significant step to ward enhancing the museums professional status among similar institutions. Confirmed the appointment of Larry Siegel as the newest board member. Approved an operating budget for FY 2007 in the amount of $126,000, with dues and donations estimated to bring in $73,000; gift shop revenues almost $30,000; and the balance in interest and other income. Approved the development of a Family History Project to collect and publish the histories of Canal Zone families during the American Era. Approved the allocation of $5,000 for professi onal expertise to create an interactive audio/visual touch screen kiosk to enhanc e the Panama Canal experience for visitors. Approved the initiative to proceed with a Capital Fu nd Drive to raise funds for a new museum facility. Reviewed the museums Long Range Strategic Plan. Reviewed plans and preparations for a joint Panama Canal Society-Panama Canal Museum exhibit on the 75th Anniversary of the founding of the Society, to be held at the Reunion. Received committee reports on educational programming an d community outreach; potential grant opportunities; new products for the Museum Store; the Roosevelt Medal Certificate Program; silent auction preparat ions for the reunion; and the 2007 and 2008 museum cruises and trips to Panama. Established a Centennial Commemoration Committee to plan for the commemoration of the Canals 100th Anniversary in 2014. Carolina Bunco Champs … Cecil Krimminger, Carol Goodwin, Debbie Swearingen, Susan Burk, Lenora Topp, Carl and Renee Krimminger Space Coast Panazonian Bunco winnersTom Grimison, Tinker Hollowell, Nancy Grimison, and Rosa Fishbough,

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Page 7 The Panama Canal Museum Review As the granddaughter of Canal builders, Patricia Steiner Kearns was born and raised in the Panama Canal Zone. Pat, or Patty, attended Canal Zone schools, graduated from Balboa High School in l955 and the Canal Zone Junior College in l957. That special bond created among Zonians lasts forever and I am delighted to now be working with the Panama Canal Museum to help ensure we preserve our history. My Virginia license plate is 1 ZonianŽ so you can recognize and wave to me as I cruise down the highway. Life in the Canal Zone was wonderful, yet at the time, most of us did not realize what a fantastic place we lived in. When I think of it now, we had freedom, friendships that last, excellent schools, tr ips on the Panama Line, Gorgona, walking the Las Cruces Trail, sliding on cardboard down the Admin hill, burning Christmas trees and eating marshmallows, skating, St Marys church, lots of big family parties and so many, many cousins. I still remember people saying to me You mean you are related to them, too?Ž I married Jim Kearns at Ft Amador and our Army moves began as we moved from Panama to Michigan, South an d North Carolina, Virginia, California, Germany, Panama, Texas, and back to Virginia. We have three wonderful grown children and eight fabulous grandkids. While in Texas, I returned to college to finish my B.A. and we nt on to get my M.S. in Healthcare Administration at Trinity University, San Antonio. My residency was done at Brooke Army Medical Center, a real ly bustling facility with the returning POWs from Vietnam. We began to feel like we were Texans after six years! We also called the Alps of Germany home for six years; that coun try holds a special place in our hearts. We jokingly refer to the tour in Germany as a hardship tourŽ since we lived in Berc htesgaden and Garmisch! I loved the snow (guess it was because we were so deprived growing up in the CZ). I was the biggest kid around when it came to making snowmen, snow villages, sledding, and skiing. Upon graduation from Trinity University, my goal was to achieve Fellowship in the American College of Healthcare Executives … a goal I accomplished. I was determined to become a Fellow and I did love my work in healthcare. I always felt I had the best of both worlds when I found my way into Qualit y Management where I worked closely with the medical and administrative staffs, patients, and attorney s. I served as a consultant for the Air Force, traveled to numerous facilities, a nd published articles on quality healthcare. I continued my education in 1982 when I received a fellowship to the Yale School of Organization and Management, Advanced Healthcare Management Program and then in 1994 I attended the International Health Executives Program at Cornell University. How fortunate I was when the military offered me the opportunity to survey healthcare facilities under the auspices of the Joint Commission of Healthcare Organi zations and then when I was selected as an evaluator for the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Program, Na tional Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. Since retirement, I stay busy as a volu nteer on the boards of Olde Towne Medical Center, Williamsburg, VA, and the Panama Canal Museum. My best retirement job, however, is taking care of two loca l grandchildren after school and summers. We have fun going on excursions, learning, swinging, jumping and just playing. Life is full! In March 2005 we took our children, their spouses, and our ei ght grandchildren cruising to the Panama Canal. What an opportunity for me to share my life in Panama and ensure the grandchildren are as proud of their pioneering ancestors as I am Board Profile—Pat Steiner Kearns, Vice President

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Page 8 The Panama Canal Museum Review SILENT AUCTION RETURNS It’s reunion time once more, and the museum will have a tribute to the 75th Anniversary of the Panama Canal Society. Don’t worry, though: The silent auction will be going strong bringing inte resting items for your bidding. This will be your opportunity to look for something memorable or that gift certificate you want. We have something new this year for sele ct items; it’s called “Buy it Now.” This new feature is for the person who can’t wait until Saturday or must leave before the reunion ends. The price of “Buy it Now” items will be published on the bidding sheet. The “Buy it Now” price is fixed and non-negotiable. Only certain items will be available on a “Buy it Now” basis and as they are sold new ones may be added so check the auction table early and often for such items so that the treasure you want doesn’t get snapped up by someone else. All auction items are subject to norma l bidding, including the “Buy it Now” items not bought, until 5:00 PM on Saturday, when the bidding stops, the high bids are announced, and high bidders can claim and pay for their treasures. Marguerite Zumbado, who heads up the Silent Auction Committee, says there will be a huge official clock to signal the close of bidding. Museum president, Joe Wood has recruited a small army of monitors to insure the close of bidding does not result in some of the disputes experienced in past auction closings. MUSEUM GIFT STORE AT THE REUNION The museum store is gearing up for the Reunion by designin g and obtaining new items and restocking popular items„with some new twists! This years collectible ornament will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the transfer of the position of Chief Engineer of the Panama Canal from John Stevens to George Goethals. Joe Wood created the basic design, Paul Glassburn prepared the art work for the ornament company, and the Store Committee members enjoyed addi ng special little touches. We are sure youll be delighted! The museums 2008 Panama Art calendar is already off the press and takes its place beside the 2007 Panama Art calendar as a beautiful work of art. Cheryl Russell Chairperson of the Calendar Committee, and Elizabeth Neily the designer of the calendar, had wonderful material to work with from artists Linda VanEmster Potter Neva Brown Sherry Acker Eid, Frances T. Gilley Robert Hammond George Scribner Lesley Hendricks Ruth Campbell Gerke Karen Hammond McCullough Beatrice Sturtevant Gardner Ruth Foster and Leslie High The ever popular wooden bateas, napkin rings, and paper towel holders that Bruce and Chris Homa obtain for us from El Valle will be back„featuring appealing turtles, hibiscus, parakeets, hu mmingbirds, and toucans. But be sure, too, to check out the g olden frogs and iguanas this year! You probably have already bought some of our attractive Tervis Tumblers with the museum logo patch in them. Do take a look, though, at the new patches that are now also available in the mugs and tumblers: a golden frog and a beautiful hibiscus on a m olalike background. Another very special item available will be th e museums historic t-shirt designed by Elizabeth Neily. Based on a cover from a souvenir booklet in the museums library, the shirt is bound to fly off our vendors table! Dont delay if you want to be sure to get one. As always, the museum will have an extensive collection of b ooks about Panama, the Panama Canal, and the Canal Zone„the museums prize winning Opening the Gates to Canal Cuisine Cocina Panamena Kurt Muses Six Minutes to Freedom and Robert McMillans Global Passage to mention just a few. Since no article can mention everything, be sure to visit the mu seum, the museums vending table at the Reunion, or our website (panamacanalmuseum.org) at your earliest convenience in order to see everything!

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Page 9 The Panama Canal Museum Review BUNCO TOURNAMENTS RAISE FUNDS Fund Raiser Training at PC Society Reunion The staff of the Panama Canal Museum will ho st an afternoon of bunco on Thursday, July 5th, in the Gatlin Room (E-3) at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort in conjunction with the Panama Canal Society annual reunion. The event will begin at 3:30. Experienced players and novices interested in learning th e game are invited to attend. Bunco is a very simple dice gam e; if you can count to three, you will be a bunco pro within minutes. Peggy Huff and Renee Krimminger will be on hand to teach the game and share tips on how to organize a fund raiser. Last ye ar, a group of Space Coast Panazonians in the Merritt Island/Coco a, FL, area held their first bunco fund raiser for the PC Museum. There were two events this year Space Coast Bunco II was held in Cocoa Village and the first Carolina Bunco Tournament was held in Charlotte, NC. (See write-up above.) It is hoped that bunco fever will catch on and annual fund raisers wi ll be held in other areas of the country. The mission of the Panama Canal Museum is to preserve the history of the American era of the Panama Canal (1904-1999). Financial support is an on-going requirement. Anyone interested in finding out how easy it is to sponsor a bunc o fund raiser should pl an to attend. You are guaranteed an afternoon of fun with your fellow Zonians. Admittance to the event is $5.00 per person. Advanced registration is not required; but if you plan to attend please contact Kathy Egolf at PANKEE@aol.com (727-394-9338); Peggy Huff at phuff@cfl.rr.com (321-455-1649; or Renee Krimminger at Cateyes713@aol.com ( 704-527-5745 ). Peggy and Renee are willing to go to other areas to help when it can be arranged. The mission of the Panama Canal Museum is to preserve the history of the American era of the Panama Canal (1904-1999) Financial support is crucial to this endeavor. Two fund rais ing events for the museum were held on April 14, 2007 … one in Charlotte, NC, and one in Cocoa Village, FL. Rene (Ballou) Krimminger hosted the first Carolina Bunco Tournament Fund raiser to benefit the Panama Canal Museum at the Dilworth Neighborhood Grill in Charlotte, NC. Because a large majority of original participants were not able to make it, the group of seven proceeded to enjoy the day with a few rounds of Bunco; appealing prizes; and a ch ance to meet some new Zonian friends. Even though this was a (very) small group, wi th the assistance of GhostŽ sponsorships by Sue & Mark Burbine of Bedford, MA; Allen Cotton of Prattville, AL; Janet & Jim Reece of Charlotte, NC; Kathy Egolf of Pinellas Park, FL; Ellen Loflin and Jeff Highfills both of Charlotte, NC, they were able to present the Museum with a check for $320. THANK YOU to all who assisted in making this happen: the participants; Joan McCullough Ohman Kathy Egolf & Chuck Hummer for their moral support; the Museum for its raffle prize donati ons; the GhostsŽ (who didnt do too badly in playing) and the Krimminger family. Keep watching for a notice of the 2008 Ca rolina Bunco II Tournament so that we can continue our Bunco voyage through the canal as we raise funds for the museum! The 2nd Space Coast Bunco Fund Raiser for the Panama Canal Museum was held at the Dog n Bone Pub in Cocoa Village, FL. Pubmeister Richard Lemon hosted the event. Event organizer Peggy Huff presented him with a PC Museum tumbler to show the groups appreciation for letting the Space Coast Panazonians gather once again at his pub. Prizes provided by Peggy, the Dog n Bone Pub, Diana Grimison Joe (President of the PC Museum) & Bev Wood Joan Ohman and the Panama Canal Museum added to the fun. Space Coast Panazonian rollers attending the event were: Donita McConaughey Louise Hunt Jerri Farnsworth Janet Watkins Leanne Watkins Dawn Watkins Nancy Grimison Tom Grimison Tinker Hollowell Rosa Fishbough Elsie Woodruff Darleen Hunt Lisa Aide Joanne Armstrong Sheryl Alberga Al & Dee Burkett Peggy & Dennis Huff Natalie McClenahan Laurie Simmons Marianne Hockin Diana Grimison Christina Volonnino Jim & Pam Reid Sue Fisher Bob & Rosa Fishbough Fran Meyer Nikki Meyer Maria Felgar Diane Croce, Wanda Ewell Betsy Vosburgh JoElla Deakins Janet Sutherland Grace Barnwell Melinda Neimeyer and Janice Scott. Of the 39 attendees, 21 were new players. Making contributions but unable to attend were Rebecca Pletcher Tom & Connie Stoakley Blanche Stabler, Nancy McMillan and Kathy Egolf. Funds raised at the event were applied to th e Space Coast Panazonians transit record on the Wall of Honor. They are now at the Balboa Yacht Club on their second transit. The 2008 Space Coast Bunco III event will be held mid-April.

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Page 10 The Panama Canal Museum Review The Panama Canal Museum was invited to attend the Stevens-Goethals Reunion at The Homestead, Hot Springs, VA, on March 30-31, 2007, honoring their ancestors on the Centennial of the transfer of authority for building the Canal from Stevens to Goethals, on midnight, March 31, 1907. The invitation was extended to Bob Karrer a friend of Frank Stevens Hawks grandson of John Frank Stevens When Bob could not attend, the invitation was extended to anyone else on the board and Pat Steiner Kearns volunteered to represent us. Frank Hawks was a very gracious contact and spoke to Pat initially upon checking in. He expected about 33 family members at the reunion and it turned out there were 38 people in attendance, including some small children. At the dinner on Friday night there were three tables. Pat and her husband sat at Frank's table with his wife, daughter, friends of family and the Saturday night speaker The speaker was a Panamanian Notre Dame graduate, Carlos Guevara Mann PhD, now a political science professor at University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Guevara did send Pat a copy of his excellent paper, The Panama Canal Expansion Project: U.S. Interests and Other Considerations.Ž Pat said she thinks that some day Carlos will be publishing a book! A room was set aside to display the families memorabilia and the items Pat brought from the museum to show the families. There was a wonderful presentation (thanks to Chuck Hummer ) which ran continuously showing pictures of the Canal construction years and focusing on John Frank Stevens and George Goethals The show was popular with the families. The museum donated a disc to both Frank Hawks for the Stevens family and Al Goethals for the Goethals family. Pat also presented a copy of book to Frank Hawks in appreciation for the invitation. The Museums custom Christmas ornaments were a big hit and the families were especially interested in the 2007 ornament which will feature both Stevens and Goethals on the same ornament commemorating the centennial of the transfer of authority for building the Canal from Stevens to Goethals. Pat received a copy of the letter written by John Frank Stevens to President Roosevelt on January 30,1907, which was taken by TR as a letter of resignation although Frank said it was not meant to be. There were Panama Canal Museum handouts for family members including membership applications, museum information, including the Panama Canal Museum website, and Roosevelt Medal Certificate information. Al Goethals noted that the certificate chairman, Dorn Thomas, lives in Richmond and planned to contact him regarding the certificates. The museums prize winning cookbook, Trivia game, and a few shirts were also displayed Pat was presented a beautiful bound book dedicated to the Panama Canal Museum by Josef J. Goethals titled,  A Forgotten Family„the Flemish Roots of General George Washington Goethals (1858-1928), Builder of the Panama Canal .Ž Jeff, as the author is called, is from Belgium, and was very charming and into genealogical research. Pat also presented him a copy of the MacMillan book on behalf of the Panama Canal Museum. The families expressed a strong interest in the museum and its goal of preserving the history of the American Era with which their families played such an important role. STEVENS & GOETHALS FAMILY REUNION Dr. Carlos Guevera-Mann, Henry Goethals (t he grandson of George Goethals) Al Goethals, Frank Stevens Hawks, John Stevens Hawks

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Page 11 The Panama Canal Museum Review

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Page 12 The Panama Canal Museum Review For the third year Team Panama Canal Museum walked to support President Emeritus, Chuck Hummer in the Tampa Walk to dfeet ALS. The walk is the signature annual fundraising event for the Florida Chapter of the ALS Association. The Museum Walkers led the 40 teams participating by raising over $17,000. Chuck opened the walk with Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio by saying, It is all about awareness; making those with ALS aware that the ALS Association is here to help and making the public aware that the ALS Association and those of us with ALS need their support.Ž The museum team was made up of: Sandy Hummer, Kathy Egolf, Paul Glassburn, Dick and Lynn Cunningham Dick and Julieta Morgan, Buddy and Stacia Morgan, Bill and Lucy Gluth, Mary Rogers, Gil Neher, Al and Doris Monaco, Elizabeth Neily, Bob and Marguerite Zumbado and Gerry De Tore Over 500 showed up for the walk at the Tampa Lowry Park Zoo on March 10th. The walk raised over $115,000 this year. Chuck served as the chairman of the walks Family Team Committee and also serves as co-chair of the Florida Chapters Public Policy Committee. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrigs disease, is an incurable neuromuscular disease that leads to paralysis of all voluntary muscles. The mind is unaffected and the average life span of those diagnosed with ALS is only 35 years, but there are cases like the famous physicist, Stephen Hawking, who have survived the disease for over 40 years. Chuck, was diagnosed with ALS in 2004, is confined to a power chair but still stays active with the museum. Chuck says he is out to break Hawkings record. MUSEUM WALKS FOR ALS TEACHER WORKSHOP AND PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM IN A TRUNK On August 9, the Panama Canal Museum will be offering a workshop to teachers as part of Pinellas County Cultural Affairs, Arts in the Classroom initiative. Local artist, Nellie Engelke and William Puckett formerly Education Coordinator for the Florida International Museum recently joined Kathy Egolf Gerry DeTore and Director, Elizabeth Neily on the Educational Programming Committee to help plan a presentation that will include a hands-on activity. This workshop presents a wonderful opportunity to introduce teachers to what our museum can offer to the classroom experience. In order to comply with the museums Strategic Plan to Pursue Community Involvement and Educational Outreach,Ž the Education Programming Committee is planning to develop the Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk," a pilot project for creating lesson plans for other K-12 grades. Included in the Panama Canal Museum in a TrunkŽ will be teacher lesson plans, maps, artifacts, and support materials such as books and videos that discuss the construction and operation of the Panama Canal and contributions of people from around the world. The lesson plans will focus on social studies, math and science, language arts, and artist skills. Once the pilot project is complete, the "Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk" will be marketed to school media centers all over the United States. VOLUNTEER Education professionals and members are invited to submit a proposal for the design and development of the Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk.Ž We are also looking for someone to help us with our PowerPoint programs that are part of the school programs and used for the Speakers Bureau programs. BECOME A SPONSOR The museum is also offering a sponsorship opportunity to members and businesses that would like to help fund one of the ten initial "Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk. A donation of $1,500 to develop and produce a trunk will also count as one full Transit on the Wall of Honor. A steamer trunk, on which the sponsor's name(s) will be listed, will contain all the materials for the Panama Canal Lesson Plans. For instance it can say Sponsored by "Mary Smith" or "XYZ Company For more information about this exciting new initiative, please contact the Panama Canal Museum at director@panamacanalmuse um.org or (727)394-9338. EDUCATION OUTREACH

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21st Transit $31,200-$31,299 Cristobal Harbor S. Griffin McClellan III 19th Transit $27,200-$27,299 Balboa Yacht Club Leo J. Krziza 10th Transit $14,100-$14,199 Frank R. Leves 10th Transit $13,800-$13,899 Estate of Anna Ruth Werkheiser 8th Transit $10,600-$10,699 Amador Causeway Lucille Ritter Abernathy 7th Transit $10,400-$10,499 Atlantic Breakwater Katherine E. Egolf 7th Transit $9,900-$9,999 Barro Colorado Island Anonymous Donor 7th Transit $9,100-$9,199 Amador Causeway James P. MacLaren 6th Transit $7,700-$7,799 Balboa Yacht Club Bob & Marguerite Neal Zumbado 6th Transit $7,600-$7,699 Amador Causeway Lesley M. Hendricks Litzenberger 5th Transit $7,100-$7,199 Gatun Locks Grace Jones Carey 5th Transit $6,600-$6,699 Pedro Miguel Locks William & Virginia Lyons 5th Transit $6,200-$6,299 Balboa Yacht Club Isthmian Collectors Club 4th Transit $5,300-$5,300 Gamboa Reginald & Beverly Boyett Hayden 4th Transit $5,000-$5,099 Miraflores Lake Albert & Jane Nahmad 3rd Transit $3,500-$3,599 Miraflores Lake James C. Cook 3rd Transit $3,200-$3,299 Balboa Yacht Club Curtis Fitzgerald 3rd Transit $3,000-$3,099 Pacific Entrance Lewis & Sandra Taber Dave & Elizabeth Jane Hilliard J. E. Dorn & Dolly Thomas 2nd Transit $2,800-$2,899 Cristobal Yacht Club Joe & Beverly Bowman Wood Richard & Julieta Preciado Morgan 2nd Transit $2,600-$2,600 Gatun Locks Carol Ruoff Goulet Zelma R. Treadwell William E. LeBrun 2nd Transit $2,500-$2,599 Gatun Lake Paul D. Glassburn Carol F. Meyer 2nd Transit $2,400-$2,499 Barro Colorado Island Charles & Sandra Hummer Richard & Ruth Mallett 2nd Transit $2,200-$2,299 Gamboa Charles & Maxine Swanson Keenan 2nd Transit $2,100-$2,199 Gaillard Cut Capt. William & Connie Glassburn Dawson Bob Redfield & Carolyn Merry 2nd Transit $2,000-$2,099 Miraflores Lake Blanche Adler Browne Edward & Geraldine Pierce Corbett R. Alvera Davison John & Judith Engelke Montanaro Hobey & Lisa Williams Richey, MD 2nd Transit $1,900-$1,999 Miraflores Locks Olive L. Unruh 2nd Transit $1,800-$1,899 Bridge of the Americas Marian Smith Kariger James & Patricia Steiner Kearns Peg Milliken Richard & Bette Swearingen 2nd Transit $1,700-$1,799 Balboa Yacht Club Peter G. Flynn Family Thomas R. Goethals Space Coast Panazonians 2nd Transit $1,600-$1,699 Amador Causeway Larry & Kathryn Castleman Class of 1954 Balboa/Cristobal High Schools Alan R. Ford Robert & Colleen Lawson Mate Willian McKeown. Jr. Ed (Lucky) Wilburn 2nd Transit $1,500-$1,599 Pacific Entrance BSA, Explorer Post 21 Balboa, Canal Zone John K. Brayton Peter & Mary Lou Dailey Lang Grover Matheney Frank & Marilyn Mott Robert J. Roy, Sr. Steve & Mary Clement Vaughn Page 13 The Panama Canal Museum Review As of 4/15/07 The entire Wall of Honor will be published as a separate publication and mailed separately. The entire Wall of Honor will be displayed at the Panama Canal Museum Exhibit Room at the Panama Canal Society Reunion.

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ESTATE AND INVESTMENT PLANNING SEMINAR AT REUNION Fred Bremer Certified Financial Planner, will be hosting an educational seminar on Estate and In vestment Planning at the Panama Canal Society Reunion on Thursday, July 5 at 2:00 p.m. in Gatlin Room E3. All attendees at the reunion are invited to attend this informative session. Admission is free and Fred will be happy to answer any questions on this important subject. He will al so be available Friday and Saturday from 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Museum Exhibit Room (E-1, E-2) to answer questions and provide additional information. Fred was born and raised in the Panama Canal Zone, is a Curundu BoyŽ and a 1971 graduate of Balboa High School. He obtained a BA in 1975 from Mount St. Marys College in Emmitsburg, Md., an MA from San Diego State University in 1977 and, af ter pursuing his professional career for several years, received his MBA from the University of Miami in 1984. Fred is currently employed as a regist ered investment advisor associate for G. A. Repple & Co., an independent fi nancial planning firm established in 1982 and located in Casselberry, Florida. In that capacity, Fred is in a position to provide unbiased and objective advice to clients. He is a strong advocate of client and investor education and can provide specific advice in the areas of financial education, portfolio management, tax consulting, retirement planning, risk management, college funding, estate planning and the advantages of charitable giving. As the Museums official investme nt advisor and financial planner, Fred has recommended sound investment strategies and has developed a customized investment portfolio designed to maximize the museums resources and help it reach its financial goals. Page 14 The Panama Canal Museum Review Continuing to bless the Largo/Clearwater, Florida, area where they settled after leaving the Canal Zone, Norman and Cecile Demers recently gave a sizable donation to the St. Patrick Catholic School in Largo that made possible a computer lab that will benefit many students in the years to come. On May 9, the school held a dedication of the Norman and Cecile Demers Computer Lab. Norm and Cele an d guests saw the unveiling of a beautiful plaque in the Demers' honor and students working on the computers. They were also entertained by the middle school bell choir and elementary school singing groups, including a solo sung by a student who was the reci pient of a scholarship provided by Norm and Cele. Unfortunately, Norm died two weeks after the lab dedication. But with their latest donation to the school, their large donation to Morton Plant Hospital last year, and the many items they have given th e Panama Canal Museum from their Panama Canal days, Norman and Cecile shared their good fortune over the years with others who will appreciate their generosity for many years to come. DEMERS CONTINUE TO GIVE BACK We are sorry to report that Norman Demers died on May 22.

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Page 15 The Panama Canal Museum Review Page 15 VOLUME 7 ISSUE 1 Board of Trustees President Emeritus Charles W. Hummer, Jr President Joseph J. Wood Vice President Patricia Stei ner Kearns Executive Vice President Katherine E. Egolf Secretary Barbara D. Peterson Treasurer Paul D. Glassburn Audit Committee Jack Hern Buildings & Facilities Shawn Rupp Collections Committee Gerry DeTore Development Committee J. Dorn Thomas Educational Development Alfredo E. Lombana, Ph.D. Exhibit Committee Robert F. Zumbado Finance Committee Davis Stevenson Information Technology J. Patrick Coffey Marketing & Communications Joey Zornes Membership Committee Vacant Nominating Committee Paul Morgan, Ph.D. Oral History Richard D. Morgan Special Projects Christian S. Skeie Store Committee Katherine Egolf Strategic Planning Patricia Stei ner Kearns Webmaster Joey Zornes Trustees Faith Brundage John Carlson Dick Cunningham Robert Dell James DesLondes Reginald M. Hayden, Jr. Robert Hughes, Ph.D. Robert J. Karrer Joan Ohman (Society Liaison) Larry Siegel Board of Advisors Robert K. Dawson William R. Gianelli Thomas R. Goethals Walter P. Leber D. P. McAuliffe Robert McMillan PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM 7985 113th Street, Suite 100 Seminole, Florida 33772 Tel. (727)-394-9338 Fax (727)-394-2737 Email: office@panam acanalmuseum.org FEIN 59-3532182 This newsletter is published by the Panama Canal Museum for its members, donors and benefactors. Additional copies can be obtained by writing or emailing the museum. The Museum is staffed by a Museum Director, two part-time clerical assistants and volunteers who graciously donate their time and skills to carry on the work of the museum. We acknowledge and thank our many benefactors, donors, volunteers and friends who continue to assist this important project. Membership Representatives Arizona Carl Berg carlnberg@aol.com Southern California Joan De Grummond Tina Cartotto Ressa zonejoan@aol.com Carolinas Alice Latimer compcouns@aol.com Miami, Florida Hindi Diamond hindi@bellsouth.net Ormond Beach, Florida Mickey Walker Fitzgerald mickeyftz@aol.com Pensacola, Florida Barbara Egolf Dedeaux dedeaux1@cox.net Barbara Vose-Kulig czbarbv@hotmail.com Sarasota, Florida Tom & Barbara Peterson tommypete@worldnet.att.net Tampa Bay, Florida Muriel Whitman Cristobal43@tampabay.rr.com Atlanta, Georgia Marie Drake mariedrake@bellsouth.com Pacific Northwest Dan & Pat Nellis chdarwin9581@toast.net Poconos Gordon Davis Gdavis1@comcast.net Kerrville, Texas Jo-Anne Fields Joanne_fields@hotmail.com Seattle, Washington Marilynn Abreau Stevens momthept@aol.com www.panamacanalmuseum.org Second in a series of full color art by artists from Panama

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Page 16 The Panama Canal Museum Review THE PANAMA CANAL MUSEUM MISSION The mission of the Panama Canal Museum is to preserve the history of the American era of the Panama Canal (1904-1999). The museum collects artifacts, documents and other items of historical importance and interest, which are accessible in person and on the Internet. Its purpose is to enable research and education in the history of the accomplishments of the United States of America in the construction, operation, maintenance and defense of the Panama Cana l as a service to the World’s maritime and naval communities in the twentieth century. It also colle cts, documents, catalogs, preserves, stores, exhibits, interprets and enables research on a variety of items il lustrative of the lives and work of the Panama Canal workforce and supporting communities. It is intended to be of particular interest to former residents of the Canal Zone and their descendants as well as students, scholars, genealogists, and others who have an interest in this unique achievement. The emphasis is on memorializing the contributions of individuals, families and organizations of the United States, as we ll as those of the French, West Indians, Panamanians and others who helped to create and operate the Panama Canal. Dues are $26 per calendar year. Email: president@panamacanalmuseum.org