Title: Transcripts of interviews conducted by Gwendolen M. Carter, 1972-1985
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095707/00063
 Material Information
Title: Transcripts of interviews conducted by Gwendolen M. Carter, 1972-1985
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Carter, Gwendolen M.
Copyright Date: 1985
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Bibliographic ID: UF00095707
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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i
hinnie KTandpls, Jcn 1085, Johannesbeg. Jas )'

Nelson predicted this in 1960's. He said they would have to come to him.
See the problem of the Afri6Cner mind--they think that tl e present
leadpership must be wiped out while they are talking about releasing the
old. Silence the noisy UDF while releasing the old.
'76 came as such a shock, the childrPn were out standing in thp strpFts.
The tragedy of the white man who is prepared to decieve himself to
the gravr. The Africaner, he is a pathetic little creature, afraid of
poluting his culture. You get the feeling in the Free State that thty
ever cam. back from the Lager---that Africaner mentality is so closed.
Tomorrow there 'ill be a South Africa from which h no one can exclude us.
No one can exclude the man in the street who the country rightfully belongs
to.
The condition is reduced to two camps---Black and White.
The government conscientized the black man.
Fear of what the African is is a fear of what he never thought
he would have to reckon w"ith---to bring this Sowete aggitator -nd put
hnr in their'midst.....


They try to make believe that the hungry man is a communist, that the
Black man is a communist.
'W don't know what communism is. But if to be anti-apart fltj is to
be a communist then we all are.
It has been so costly, the final end will be bitter. Some have nmid
th' supreme price vith their life. South Africa belongs to all. How can
we use this.language? If it is.asking for'jail, death, then we keep on
asking.
How confused, ours will be no vietnam, ours will be the costliest yet.
...if you deal with people like that---the' fact that Americr-ns think
that there has been change lets the South Africans bluff themselves into
thinking there has been change. They want to believe that the conditions
are not as deteriorated as they are. Now they have to call in the Army.
The Economy is in the doldrums. The workers are ang ry, the children are
hung ry. They can no longer contain the workers. They cannot contain the
violence.
The worker is the mainstream. He is th- man shot in the township. He
is not changed by being in the lilf/y white w.orld.
VhirP we breath our air, god's air, is determined by the white man's


cP n.




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