Title: Regional workshop : Assessment, Monitoring and Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP) and Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS)
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Title: Regional workshop : Assessment, Monitoring and Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP) and Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: UNU-INWEH
Place of Publication: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Publication Date: June 10-12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00095629
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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)I UNITED NATIONS
UNIVERSITY
UNU-INWEH


U


Regional Workshop:
Assessment, Monitoring and Management of Persistent Organic
Pollutants (POP) and Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) in the Coastal
Ecosystems of the Wider Caribbean Region
10-12 June 2008
Chaguaramas, Trinidad and Tobago


Report of the Workshop


INSTITUTE OF


MARINE AFFAIRS









Table of Contents

1. Intro du ctio n ............................................................................................................... . ............ 3

2. Sum m ary of the W workshop ........................................................................................ ................ ...... 4

SESSION 1 Opening and W elcom e................................................... .............................. 4

SESSION 2 Laboratory capabilities and POPs in the region..... ........................................ 5

SESSION 3: Baseline sampling, sampling design and monitoring....................................... 6

SESSION 5: Existing projects and Demonstration projects ............................................... 9

SESSION 6. Finalization and Summary Statement........ ...................................................... 11

3 W ay F orw ard ................................................................................................................... . ........... 12

4 A n n ex e s ................ ..... .............. ......... ........ ...................................................... ... ........... .......... 1 3


































2











1. Introduction


This workshop is a follow-up to the Planning Workshop held in Hamilton, Canada, 25-27 November
2007, and is part of the project: Assessment, Monitoring and Management of Persistent Organic
Pollutants (POP) and Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) in the Coastal Ecosystems of the Wider
Caribbean Region, which commenced in September 2007. It is being funded by the World Bank
through the Canada Persistent Organic Pollutants Trust Fund from the Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA). From now on the project will be referred to as the CCPP (Caribbean
Coastal Pollution Project).

The Planning Workshop held in November 2007 reviewed the status of POPs and PTS pollution in the
marine environment, rivers and other water bodies close to coastal areas of the eight countries covered
by the project (Belize, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, St Lucia and
Trinidad & Tobago). It discussed the obligations of these countries under the Stockholm Convention,
and presented an overview of other initiatives/partners dealing with similar issues in the region. It also
discussed and refined the scope and implementation modalities of the project.

The objective of this Regional Workshop was to consolidate commitment from the participants to join
a regional network including the eight participating countries and to finalize the program of activities
to be undertaken commencing during the second half of 2008 and during 2009. The plans for the
following activities were discussed and in some cases finalized:

a) The collection offish from agreed coastal locations in each country to develop a
baseline of PTS pollution of coastal waters;
b) The delivery of those samples to identified labs;
c) Formal evaluation of capacity in PTS analysis for each of the laboratories participating
in the project;
d) Capacity enhancement possibilities;
e) Initiation of regular monitoring for PTS in coastal waters; and
f) Possibility of developing demonstration projects.

It also aimed at identifying possible links, collaborations with other activities and/or partners in the
region, and to share knowledge and experience on POPs and PTS monitoring in aquatic environments.

The workshop was held 10-12 June 2008 at the Crews Inn Hotel Chaguaramas in Trinidad and
Tobago and was kindly hosted by the Institute for Marine Affairs (IMA). Simultaneous interpretation
in Spanish and English was provided during the workshop. It was attended by 35 participants
including country representatives, as well as representatives from The World Bank, the Organization
of American States (OAS), the UNEP GEF project, Integrating Watershed & Coastal Areas








Management (IWCAM), the UNEP GEF project, Reducing Pesticide Runoff to the Caribbean Sea
(REPCAR), and the UNEP Caribbean Environment Programme (CEP) office in Jamaica.

2. Summary of the Workshop


Day 1: 10 June 2008


SESSION 1 Opening and Welcome
Opening and Welcome

Commodore Anthony Franklin, Director IMA officially opened the workshop and welcomed the
participants to Trinidad and Tobago. Commodore Franklin mentioned that POPs and PTS pollution in
fresh -and coastal waters were serious issues in Trinidad and Tobago, and that we should keep in mind
the transboundary movement of coastal pollution and the need for a regional approach to fill gaps in
knowledge and get a complete assessment of the situation.

Next, Peter Sale, Assistant Director UNU-INWEH, welcomed the participants and presented the goals
of the project and aim and tasks for this workshop. He stressed that this project aims to add to what is
currently known of POPs and PTS pollution in coastal ecosystems in the project countries.

This was followed by short self-introductions by all participants. Then the topic was addressed in
three presentations:

Roberto Rivas, Environmental Specialist, GEF/BID/ COCATRAM/ CCAD Regional Project:
Environmental protection and maritime transport pollution control in the Gulf of Honduras.

* The Gulf of Honduras project looks at the issue of pollution from maritime transport and ports
and 5 major ports are being sampled within the project.
* Marine currents play an important role in distributing the pollution in this region.
* The main source of POPs in Honduras is the use of pesticides in agriculture.
* Some data is available on POPs and PTS in coastal waters, such as the data collected on the white
grunt in the MBRS project and data from a WWF study done.
* The objectives of this project are: 1) to reverse degradation of marine ecosystems; 2) enhance
control and prevention of maritime pollution; 3) improve navigational safety and 4) reduce land
based sources of pollution.

Steve Maber, Senior Operations and POPs Officer Middle East & North Africa Region, The World
Bank: World Bank activities with respect to POPs

* WB project on POPs storage and stockpiles in Honduras (1999-2001) was described. This project
was developed after hurricane Mitch (1998).
* This project focused on the storage of unlabeled chemicals and tested groundwater and breast
milk for DDE funded by AVR in the Netherlands.
* The Africa stockpiles programme was presented and the difficulties faced in implementing this
project.








* The project (commenced in 2005) focused on 7 countries the components include: inventories of
obsolete POPs stockpiles, repackaging, training of staff, safe guard, transport and disposal.
* Transport under the Basel convention was done to incinerators in Europe.
* It will take 15 years to clean up all obsolete pesticides.

Allison Astwood, Laboratory Manager, CEHI (and representing IWCAM): Update on activities.

* GEF-UNEP-UNDP project (2001-2010) has a budget of $112M, involving 13 Small Islands
including Dominican Republic, Jamaica, St. Lucia, and Trinidad & Tobago.
* Project Coordination Unit at CEHI. Aims to assist Caribbean small islands states to adopt an
integrated approach to watershed and coastal area management.
* Activities include 9 demonstration projects in integrated management, including our 4 island
nations: Dominican Republic (mitigation of industrial wastes), Jamaica (integrated management
of watersheds), Saint Lucia (watershed services) and Trinidad & Tobago (land-use planning and
watershed restoration).
* Laboratory Capacity enhancement component: needs assessment done in 2008 and strengthening
of lab capacity by purchase of equipment and training is planned.
* Criteria for lab selection developed and lab questionnaire sent.
* Suggestions to look at possible links with the St. Lucia demo project?

A general discussion followed these presentations.

SESSION 2 Laboratory capabilities and POPs in the region
Peter Sale: Introduction to the Laboratory Capacity Assessment Plan.

* The list of 9 laboratories selected for this project and the selection criteria and process were
presented. The criteria include:
mandate (this was the most important criterion)
-sustainability of lab (budget and facilities)
-recommendations from representatives
* After the labs were selected a questionnaire was sent for an initial evaluation.
* Laboratory capacity evaluation visits are planned for June August 2008 by a team of three lab
experts: Drs. Ken Drouillard, Chris Metcalfe and Gerardo Gold
* A final evaluation report with specific recommendations will be prepared and sent out after the
visits.
* Lab capacity will be enhanced through lab equipment upgrades and technical training.

Ken Drouillard, GLIER, University of Windsor, Canada: Laboratory needs to implement a baseline
POPs monitoring program.

* Presented three possible models for Laboratory Facilities for this project: 1) fully functional
independent laboratories in each country; 2) one or more regional analytical facilities; 3) regional
analytical facilities, and independent sample processing facilities in each country.
* Possibly No. 3 is most relevant to this project
* Priorities for Regional Analytical Facilities are:
Staff- lab manager + technicians
Lab quality assurance program








Analytical instruments
Sample processing facilities
* Presented minimal lab staff needs and their specific responsibilities and roles.
* Discussed a laboratory quality assurance program and what is needed for such a program.
* The implementation of laboratory QA/QC program is not easy.
* Regional lab facilities requirements are:
Needs to be fully functional laboratory
Needs to have QA/QC within its own lab
Needs to provide data management capabilities
Needs investment in staff
* Satellite laboratory facilities: needs will vary depending on sample matrix.
* Ideally satellite lab receives samples from field program and sends for analysis to regional
analytical facility.
* Cost estimate for each satellite lab (exclusive of equipment):
* Database management and data ownerships issues need to be sorted out, as do issues re
international shipping of samples for analysis.

A general discussion followed.

Miguel Garcia, Monitoring Specialist, MBRS project: Monitoring Pollution in the Mesoamerican
Barrier Reef System.

* Coral reefs well covered under this project but no data on the sea bed, mangroves and water
quality.
* In 2005 17 stations in four MBRS countries were sampled for fish and sediments.
* Different POPs and PTS chemicals were analyzed in sediment samples and livers of the white
grunt.
* The concentrations found of these different chemicals in the sediments and white grunts were
presented and show that in some areas the levels of hydrochloro-cyclohexanes in sediments
exceeded PEL (the probable effect levels) which means probable toxicity for marine fauna.
* 25 % of the sediment samples exceeded NOAA's PEL for lindane and PAH concentrations found
in the white grunt fish are high in some areas.
* Not possible with this data to find sources of pollution.
* 2006 some sites were added.


SESSION 3: Baseline sampling, sampling design and monitoring
Ken Drouillard: Field Sampling; designing appropriate field sampling programmes; how to implement
QA/QC in the field sampling process.

* In designing a sampling plan you need a clear project objective.
* Are you looking at spatial patterns of contamination or source identification and control?
* Are you looking at ecosystem health assessment or human health assessment?
* Utilizing of models in field sampling design.
* Calibrated models provide scientifically defensible interpretation of data bioaccumulation
models, hydraulic models, statistical designs.









* Weight of evidence assessments are used in absence of a management model framework (can
lead to biased conclusion).
* Important to decide on what we want to sample? Water, sediments, organisms?
* Need to decide where to sample individual countries.
* Food web sampling provides information on trophic transfer and human exposure to POPS via
food - indicator species what species to choose: invertebrates, phytoplankton, fish, seabird
eggs an option.

A general discussion followed dealing with identifying sites in each country, # of sites in each
country, labs responsible for samples from particular sites.

Day 2: 11 June 2008

Hanneke van Lavieren Programme Officer, UNU-INWEH. What is known of POPs and PTS in
coastal waters in the region? Overview of past studies.

* Presented an overview of available data and information on POPs and PTS in coastal areas in the 8
countries.
* This document will serve initially as an internal working document with information fact sheets
for each country- based on prior studies, NIPS etc.
* To use as background information for this project and to be updated regularly.
* Most data is incomparable but it provides some info on sources, where POPs and PTS is found in
coastal areas.
* Requested all representatives to update and correct the country fact sheets after the regional
workshop.

Andrea Salinas, Environmental Specialist, Dept. Sustainable Development, OAS: Towards a sound
management of hazardous chemicals in Latin America and the Caribbean.

* Started in October 2006 and focuses on broader chemical management than Stockholm
Convention.
* Aims at supporting implementation of SC, address challenges in sound management of chemicals
in this region, and identify gaps and priority needs.
* Activities include: Information sharing ; communication; strategic planning.
* Development of a network (reference lists of organizations, people etc.).
* Development of preliminary investigations of PTS (including POPs) and input into database.
* Online PTS and heavy metals inventory and database.
* Database structure includes info on sources, life cycles, uses, storage, import and export, disposal,
etc. It includes 48 PTS:
36 pesticides
7 industrial compounds
3 heavy metals
1 organometalic compound
1 unintended by-product
* Important gap in information is the importation of pesticides (no data).
* 4 Regional Workshops have been held for consultations on regional programme development.








* Surveys done at national and regional level on gaps and priorities.
* Next steps are strategic planning.
* www.oas.org/dsd/

Gerardo Gold, CINVESTAV, Merida, Mexico: The use of Biomarkers in Environmental Monitoring
and Assessment.

* Types ofbiomarkers: exposure, effect and susceptibility.
* Determine whether: high or low ecological relevance and short or long term response (to
exposure).
* Used in: Environmental monitoring and assessment, complement chemical data and screening.
* Ideal biomarker is: specific, sensitive, easy, cheap and reflects damages.
* Problems: most are not specific enough, there are changes due to season, sexual maturity, gender
and age
* Need to characterize biomarker for species used.
* Biomarkers are a great tool but you have to understand the species in question.

Chris Metcalfe, Environmental and Resource Studies, Trent University, Canada. Biomonitoring and
passive sampling techniques for evaluating contaminant trends.

* Described methods for biological monitoring.
* Bioassessment = community changes in abundance, diversity, biomass
* Bioindicators = degradation or healthy indication of species health
* Biomonitoring = concentration of contaminants in biota passive or active (transportation to
monitoring site)
* Basic questions: What is there, What are the levels, What are the spatial trends, What are the
temporal trends.
* Choice of biomonitoring organism (widely available, easily sampled, likely to accumulate
analyte).
* Problems: biological variability, availability of organisms, complex sample matrix.
* Passive samplers (SPMD and POCIS) were presented including sampler deployments in the Great
Lakes.
* Disadvantages of SPMDs are: subject to loss, reflect contaminant levels only in dissolved phase of
water; contaminant profiles don't always match biota profiles; difficult to calculate concentrations
of analytes in water.
* Presented Performance Reference Compounds (PRCs) and Exposure Adjustment Factors (EAFs).

Steven French Green Engineering, GENIVA: DDT Disposal project in Trinidad SWMCOL Hazco,
Green Engineering, GENIVAR.

* Discussed a project which disposed of obsolete stockpiles of DDT in Trinidad.
* Initially DDT was used for (malaria) mosquitoes then the use of DDT was stopped.
* The result was stockpiles of DDT where storage was not appropriate stored since 1950.
* Safety training course was held in 2007. Involved were the Ministry of Health and the Pesticides
Control Board.








* Next steps in the project were: site commissioning, emergency procedures established, DDT
repackaging, decontamination zone, site decommissioning and then shipped away in UN
containers.
* Disposal of old DDT containers: cut up, solidification of bedding sand, stabilization process and
mixing of bedding sand drums of solidified soil. Transport, disposal.

Doug Haffner, GLIER University of Windsor, University of Windsor: Case study: Overview of Fish
Contaminant Study in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

* Presence and concentration of chemicals is not enough, need to know exposure and effects.
* Biological monitoring is the best way to determine dose and develop cause-effect relationships. It
also provides information on environmental health.
* Great Lakes fish contaminant surveillance programme (1977-2005).
* Great Lakes food web changed in time.
* PCB levels 1977-2003 in Great Lakes PCB's banned in the 70s
* Whole fish monitoring data gave different results than monitoring data from sampling parts of the
fish (dorsal muscle, skin off fillet).
* Smelt introduced to Great Lakes became part of trout diet.
* Have changes in the lake food web influenced chemicals in birds?

A general discussion followed. Some of the points raised were:

* How do we select what to sample?
* It was noted that fish and birds do not have the same value in this region as they do in the Great
Lakes. So the link to tourism and human health has to be shown.
* There was some confusion on which chemicals we were testing for and where?
* Sediments are difficult to sample but how about biota, are passive samplers usable in coastal
environment too?
* Should we measure people directly if we want to show health effects?
* What can we achieve within the coming year? Is POPs really a problem? That is the key question.
* Equipment maintenance and outside supplies are a big issue for lab equipment.

Day 3: 12 June 2008


SESSION 5: Existing projects and Demonstration projects
Nadia- Deen Ferguson, Assistant Programme Officer, Assessment & Management of Pollution
(AMEP) sub-programme of UNEP CAR/RCU: Supporting Partnerships and Projects to reduce
POP's.

* Presented the UNEP CAR/RCU programme structure and the Cartagena Convention mandate and
the Land based sources (LBS) of pollution protocol:
* Specific obligations for priority sources: sources and categories of pollutants of concern (POPs);
domestic wastewater and agricultural non-point sources.
* AMEP sub-programme: helps countries to meet obligations on land based activities (LBA) and oil
spills
* Current projects to reduce POPS were presented (including IWCAM, REPCAR)








* Areas for collaboration: information management, training in methodologies, technical exchange,
information dissemination, lab capacity development, input to a regional report on LBA; regional
workshop in Sept, 08.

Luisa Espinosa, INVEMAR, Colombia: Advances in Coastal Monitoring Programme as part of
Colombia, Costa Rica and Nicaragua reducing Pesticide Run-off into the Caribbean Sea Project
(UNEP GEF-REPCar)

* The project was submitted in 2001 and approved in 2002. It started in 2006 (up to 2010).
* Aim: to mitigate pesticides runoff and promote good agricultural practices.
* Only 3 countries involved (Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua).
* Coordinated by Ministry of Environment of countries but involves other institutions as well
* Institute for Marine & Coastal Research INVEMAR (public and private) in Colombia Centre for
investigation in aquatic resources (CIRA-UNUN) in Nicaragua, Centre for investigation in
environmental pollution (CICA) and centre for research in marine and limnology sciences (CIMA)
in Costa Rica.
* Kingston workshop held in Feb 2008. Looked at:
defining sampling techniques
discussed progress
technical capacity review
selecting matrices and compounds to be used
assessing monitoring alternatives
* Technical Workshop on sampling and pesticide analysis techniques at CICA, San Jose Costa
Rica in July 2008

Nancy Valdez, IWCAM Demonstration Project in the Dominican Republic: Mitigation of Impacts of
Industrial Wastes on the Lower Haina River Basin and its Coast.

* This is an IWCAM demonstration project as mentioned by Allison Astwood (CEHI).
* Looks at mitigation of impacts of industrial waste in Haina River and its coast.
* Focuses on an integrated focus on watershed management.
* Secretaria de Estado de Medioambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARENA), Subsecrteria de
Gestion Ambiental (SGA) is the executing agency.
* Project runs for 4 years starting Nov 2006.
* Looks at reducing sources of pollution relevant policy, improve laws, monitoring water quality,
strategy for cleaning up river.
* Feb 2008 project coordinator appointed now designing plans to establish office.
* Mentioned that possible labs are available in DM for this project.
* Nancy to send lab info to Hanneke then Questionnaire can be sent.

Ken Drouillard. Why we should use Demonstration Projects.

* Project goals include tracing sources of POPs and PTS as well as baseline concentrations and risk
assessments.
* Demo projects provide richer data and hands on experience.
* Design requires project objective: spatial patterns of contamination, source identification,
ecosystem health assessment and human health assessment.








* White grunt for regional biomonitor? What part of white grunt is used for sampling? In MBRS it
is the liver. POPs are found in lipids so same lipid concentration in all tissues.
* White grunt supports project scope for establishing a baseline data set.
* Food web sampling as a possible demo project? Food web is an area of synergy with Gulf of
Honduras.

Chris Metcalfe. Possible type of demonstration project: Water quality monitoring in relation to karst
aquafers.

* Presented Karst geology and flow of ground water and potential contamination.
* Yucatan peninsula presented as example.
* Sources of pollution: urban (domestic wastewater); agriculture (pesticides); tourism and
recreation.
* Impacts of recreational activities such as wastewater discharges, hydrocarbons from boats and
vehicles and maintenance of lawns and turf for hotels and golf courses.
* Outline of study to evaluate contamination of Karst geological zones with passive samplers and
collection of biota and sediments.

A general discussion followed: highest concentrations of POPs are found in protected areas in the
Yucatan peninsula. Discharge can be found far from area of contamination. Geological aspect is
important in this issue. Maritime transport is important in Gulf of Honduras as in rest of region and
there is the added issue related to ballast water etc. How are we going to decide on a demo project?

SESSION 6: Finalization and Summary Statement
General Discussion

The discussion covered the following points:

It will be difficult to put the survey results into context because there are no baseline data
available.
Details of sampling were discussed in order to proceed such as: # of sites, budget available,
how many samples at each site, need for GPS locations of sampling sites, what to sample,
what level of replication we need, what size fraction would you analyze,
whether age of the fish is important, what other species are there?
The white grunt fish was suggested for sampling. It is already being sampled in MBRS. It
would be analytically more comparable.
In the 4 mainland countries, hotspot areas were suggested to be sampled: such as areas of river
discharges, industrial areas etc.
To take note that there is some available data on POPs in the coastal environment from WWF,
TNC and MBRS which we can keep in mind
In Kingston Harbour, Jamaica, UWI found no fine sediments because it had all washed away
(by tide and currents), so it may not be wise to sample marine sediments.
Do the things we sample give us different answers?
o Sediments accumulates broader range of chemicals (broader info) but you
lose a lot of sediments and concentrations are low so you need large
quantities
o Organism such as fish added value for human exposure








We need to get buy in from managers and politicians so we need to link it to human
exposure and health risks, as well as economic loss (i.e. in fisheries, tourism etc.).
Therefore fish is a good option.


Final Consensus Statement

A draft consensus statement was presented.

The participants broke out into country groups to discuss the draft consensus statement as presented to
the group and to agree on which agency and/or laboratory would be responsible for sampling, storage
and which locations should be sampled.

The results of this discussion were presented by each country and incorporated into the draft
consensus statement.

The final combined Consensus Statement was presented to the whole group and the participants
unanimously approved the consensus statement. This Consensus Statement is attached as Annex 3 to
this report. In this Consensus Statement the participants agreed upon:

* The baseline sampling design
* Roles for sampling and analyses
* Roles of countries, individuals and laboratories
* Sample sites and number of samples at each site
* Agreement on general statement of recommendation from this workshop


The workshop was closed by Peter Sale who outlined the immediate next steps for the project and
closing remarks were made by Commodore Franklin and Hanneke Van Lavieren.

3. Way Forward

* The consensus statement will be finalized and sent to all participants within two weeks of the
workshop (in English and Spanish).
* Commitment from Heads of Laboratories will be sought during July 2008.
* Where applicable, participants will seek approval of this consensus statement from their peers.
* Hanneke Van Lavieren will contact relevant agencies and laboratories during July- August 2008
regarding the sampling workplans and contracts.
* A sampling protocol will be sent to everyone during July 2008.
* The three laboratory experts will visit the 10 laboratories selected for this project during July-
August 2008.
* The final evaluation report of these laboratories, with recommendations for their roles within the
project, as well as specific capacity needs and plans for enhancement will be sent to all
participants during September 2008. This will also include details of methods for processing and
analysis.
* Follow up in terms of laboratory staff training will be done during October 2008.








* Two research projects will be developed during the summer and sent to the participants during
October 2008.


ANNEXES


ANNEX 1


Workshop Agenda

10 June 2008


08.30-12.00 SESSION 1 -Opening and Welcome

08.30 Commodore Anthony Franklin, Director IMA. Welcome and Opening Speech.

08.45 Peter Sale, Assistant Director UNU-INWEH. Welcome and Opening Remarks.

09.15 Self-introductions by all participants.

10.00 Coffee break

10.30 Roberto Rivas, Environmental Specialist, Gulf of Honduras Project GEF/BID/ COCATRAM/
CCAD. Regional Project: environmental protection and maritime transport pollution control in the
Gulf of Honduras.

11.00 The World Bank and POPs, Steve Maber, Senior Operations Officer Middle East & North
Africa Region

11.15 IWCAM/CEHI representative update on activities.

11.30 General Discussion.

12:00 Lunch


13.00 -15.30 SESSION 2 -Laboratory capabilities and POPs in the region

13.00 Peter Sale: List of Laboratories Selected and Introduction to the Laboratory Capacity
Assessment Plan.

13.20 Ken Drouillard, GLIER, University of Windsor, Canada: Laboratory needs to implement a
baseline POP monitoring program.

14.00 General Discussion.









14.30 Miguel Garcia, Monitoring Specialist, MBRS project: Monitoring Pollution in the
Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System.

15.00 Coffee Break



15.15- 17.00 SESSION 3: Baseline sampling, sampling design and monitoring


15.15 Ken Drouillard: Field Sampling; designing appropriate field sampling programmes; how to
implement QA/QC in the field sampling process.

15.45 General Discussion. Identifying sites, # of sites in each country, labs responsible for samples
from particular sites. Led by Ken Drouillard.

17:00 Meeting adjourned


11 June 2008

08.30 -12.00 SESSION 4 Baseline sampling, sampling design and monitoring, continued.

08:30 Hanneke van Lavieren Programme Officer, UNU-INWEH. What is known of POPs and
PTS in coastal waters in the region? Overview of past studies.

8.45 Andrea Salinas, Environmental Specialist, Dept. Sustainable Development, OAS: Towards a
sound management of hazardous chemicals in Latin America and the Caribbean.

09.00 Dr. Gerardo Gold, CINVESTAV, Merida, Mexico: The use of Biomarkers in sampling and
risk assessment.

09.15 Dr. Chris Metcalfe, Environmental and Resource Studies, Trent University, Canada.
Biomonitoring and passive sampling techniques for evaluating contaminant trends

9.45 General Discussion. Sampling methods.

10:15 Coffee break

10.30 Solid Waste Management Trinidad and Tobago export of DDT from Trinidad.

11.00 Doug Haffner, GLIER, University of Windsor. Case study: Overview of Fish Contaminant
Study in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

11.30 General Discussion. Finalize selection of sites, # of sites, kinds of samples, kinds of analyses
in each country, identification of actors. Led by Chris Metcalfe.









12:00-17.00 FIELD TRIP










12 June 2008

08.30 -10.30 SESSION 5: Existing projects and Demonstration projects

08.30 Nadia- Deen Ferguson, Assistant Programme Officer, Assessment & Management of
Pollution (AMEP) sub-programme of UNEP CAR/RCU: Supporting Partnerships and Projects to
reduce POP's

8.45 Luisa Espinosa, Invemar, Colombia: Advances in Coastal Monitoring Programme as part of
Colombia, Costa Rica and Nicaragua reducing Pesticide Run-off into the Caribbean Sea Project
(UNEP GEF-REPCar)

9.00 Ken Drouillard. Why we should use Demonstration Projects: example of Lake Izabel.

9.15 Chris Metcalfe: possible type of demonstration project: Water quality monitoring in relation
to karst aquafers.

9.30 Nancy Valdez, IWCAM Demonstration Project in the Dominican Republic: Mitigation of
Impacts of Industrial Wastes on the Lower Haina River Basin and its Coast.

9.45 General Discussion.

10.30 17.00 SESSION 6: Finalization and Summary Statement.

11.00 Peter Sale: Preparing a Summary Statement for this workshop.

11.30 General Discussion.

12.00 Lunch

13.30 Break Out into country groups to discuss and prepare a summary statement per country on
baseline sampling plan including: who does sampling, who does analysis, where, which laboratories.

14.00 Presentation of Summary Statements by each Country

14.45 General discussion on summary statements

15.15 Coffee Break

15.45 Presentation of final combined summary statement

16.00 Discussion of and agreement with final summary statement from workshop
Agreement on baseline sampling design
Agreement on roles for sampling and analyses
Agreement on roles of countries, individuals and laboratories
Agreement of sample sites
Agreement on general statement of recommendation from this workshop









16.50 Immediate next steps and Closing remarks

17.00 Workshop Adjourned.

Social Evening offered and organized by IMA.










ANNEX 2




Participants List


Bessie 0liva


bessieolivaiqryahoo.com
bessie2 Ltintelnett.com


Departamento de Analisis Inorgamco, Laboratorlo de
Investigation.
Facultad de CCQQ y Farmacia de la Universidad de San
Carlos de Guatemala.
Tel (502) 52026232; 22887808
Fax: (502) 24767728


2 Francisco Garcia fragaflo(agmail.com Director, Centro de Estudios y Control de
Contaminantes CESCCO
Secretaria de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente (SERNA)
Oficina:(+504)239 0194 / (+504)232 6317
Cel: 00 504 927 4361 www.cescco.gob.hn

3 Roberto Rivas robrivasa@vahoo.com Gulf of Honduras Project
Puerto Cortes,
Honduras
Tel: (504) 665 23 43
Tel/fax: (504) 665 3072
4 Belgis Chial belgis.chial@int- Puerto Cortes,
marconsult.com Honduras
Tel: (504) 665 23 43
Tel/fax: (504) 665 3072
5 Alejandro del Rio aleiandro.delrioiint- Gulf of Honduras Project
marconsult.com Puerto Cortes,
Honduras
Tel: (504) 665 23 43
Tel/fax: (504) 665 3072


6 Dwight Neal dwightneal@aimail.com Consultant
Belize
7 Isaias Majil isaias.maiil@amail.com Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries
& Cooperatives
P.O. Box 148, Princess Margaret Drive
Belize City, Belize
Tel: 501-223 2623 ext. 24

8 Gerardo Gold Bouchot ggoldAmda.cinvestav.mx Departamento de Recursos de mar, CINVESTAV
Unidad Merida, Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso
Merida, Yucatan 97310 Mexico
Tel: +-52- (999) 981 2927














Inarana Lavaia


azavala(L.eXOSUr-grOO .mx


ing. Aariana /Lavala ivienaoza
Resp. Lab. Institucional de Quimica
ECOSUR-Unidad Chetumal
Av. Centenario Km. 5.5 C.P. 77014
Chetumal, Quintana Roo. Mexico.
Tel. 01 983 83 5 04 40 ext. 4800
Fax 01 983 83 5 04 54


10 Jose Juan Dominguez Calderon jdominguez@conanp.gob.mx Subdirector T6cnico
Region Peninsula de Yucatan
Calle Venados 71 y 73 SM20 MZ 18
Centro, Cancun, Q. Roo, MEXICO
TEL: 52 998 8921413
FAX: 52 998 8871997
E-Mail: jdominguez@conanp.gob.mx
Messenger: explorerl043 @hotmail.com


11 Ramon Antonio Delanoy de la Cruz ramondelanov@vahoo.com Lab. Ciencias Nucleares
Institute de Fisica
Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo
Santo Domingo. Republica Dominicana
Tel.: 1 809 689-7184 Cel.: 1 809 330-2709
12 Nancy Valdez Guerrero nancyvaldez 2@hotmail.com Head of the Monitoring Department
Subsecretaria de Gestion Ambiental (SGA)
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic


13 Paulette Kolbusch pkolbusch@nepa.Rov.jm Acting Director
Legal Standards and Enforcement Division
National Environment and Planning
Agency
10 Caledonia Avenue
Kingston 5, Jamaica
Tel: +876 754 7540 Fax: +876 754 7599
Mobile; 876-878 1271
14 Tony Greenaway anthony. reenawav@ uwimona.e Senior Lecturer
du.m Applied Chemistry
The University of the West Indies
Mona,Kingston 7. Jamaica.
Tel: 876 9271919, 876 5123029
977 1835 (fax)

15 Raymond Reid rrreidl @vahoo.com Senior Analyst
ravmond.reid@uwimona.edu.jm Department of Chemistry
University of the West Indies
Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica
Tel: 876-927-1910; 876-512-3116; 876-970-3878
(i .... i 1. .I.c 876-426-6978 (Cell)
Fax: 876-977-1835; 976-970-3878

















IU vv1LU) INUI VII'lll wlIlul v'h1 LV l hll c V. U LL .tt1 VC 1L'L U11L, i h/ V LLLhLltL
Institute of Marine Affairs
Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas
Trinidad and Tobago, W.I.
Tel.# (868) 634-4291 Ext.307 Fax # (868) 634-4433

17 Richard A.I. Brathwaite Richard.Brathwaite@sta.uwi.ed Professor of Agronomy
u Department of Food Production
Faculty of Science and Agriculture
The University of the West Indies
St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies.
Phone: (868) 662-2002 Ext. 3320
Fax: (868) 645-0479 Mobile: (868) 684-8052

18 Denise Beckles dbecklespifsa.uwi.tt Lecturer
Department of Chemistry
Faculty of Sciences and Agriculture
University of the West Indies
St Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, W.I.
19 John Agard John.Agardhsta.uwi.edu Senior Lecturer
Department of Life Sciences
Faculty of Sciences and Agriculture
University of the West Indies
St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, W.I.

20 Hasmath Ali hasmathl avahoo.com Ag. Registrar Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals
Chemistry Food and Drugs Division
Ministry of Health
#27 Frederick Street,
Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago W.I.

21 David Persaud dpersaudi@pubutilenv. gov.tt Environmental Manager
Senvironmentvitstt.net.tt Environmental Policy and Planning Division
Ministry of Planning, Housing and the Environment


22 Yaneldis Boullon Anthony vanedelgado@igmail.com Chemical Engineer
Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Board, Ministry of
Agriculture, Lands, Forestry and Fisheries
Greaham Louisy Administrative Building
Waterfront, Castries
Saint Lucia
Tel: (758) 468 5600/4
Fax: (758) 450 3206
23 Allison Astwood aastwood@icehi.org.lc ; Laboratory Manager, CEHI (Through Vincent Sweeney
astwood cehi@,vahoo.com Coordinator, UNEP GEF IWCAM project)
c/o Caribbean Environmental Health Institute P.O. Box
1111, Castries, St. Lucia
Tel 758-452-1412/2501 Fax 758-453-2721














z2 Ken urouillard Kgd(aiuwnmsor.ca Head Urganic Analytical Laboratory,
Associate Professor Biological Sciences,
Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research,
University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Ave., Windsor,
ON, Canada, N9B 3P4
Tel: (519) 253-3000 ext. 4744.
Fax: (519) 971-3616
24 Doug Haffner haffnerguwindsor.ca. Canada Research Chair, Great Lakes Research,
University of Windsor
401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9B
3P4
Tel: 519-253 3000 ext. 3449
25 Chris Metcalfe cmetcalfeAitrentu.ca Professor
Environmental & Resource Studies Program, Trent
University And Director, Watershed Sciences Centre
1600 West Bank Drive
Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 Canada
Tel: (705) 748-1011 ext. 7272 FAX: 705-748 1569
26 Peter Sale saleauwindsor.ca Assistant Director, Coastal Zones UNU-INWEH
Environment & Health (UNU-INWEH)
175 Longwood Road South, Suite 204
Hamilton, ON L8P OA1, CANADA
27 Hanneke Van lavieren vanlavAinweh.unu.edu Programme Officer, Coastal Zones, UNU-INWEH
Environment & Health (UNU-INWEH)
175 Longwood Road South, Suite 204
Hamilton, ON L8P OA1, CANADA
Tel: +1 905 667 5494


28 Steven Maber smaber(alworldbank.org International Waters Specialist
MC5-523, The World Bank,
1818 H Street, NW
Washington DC, 20433, USA
Tel: 1 202 473-1061
Fax: 1 202 522-0367
29 Miguel Garcia mgarciaAoceanus.org.mx Monitoring Specialist
mgarcia@mbrs.org.bz MBRS Projects
MBRS Project Coordinating Unit
Coastal Resources Multicomplex Building
Princess Margaret Drive, P. 0. Box 93
Belize City, Belize
30 Luisa Espinosa lespinosaAinvemar.org.co Marine and Research Institute, INVEMAR
Cerro de Punta Betin
Santa Marta, Colombia
Tel. (57-5) 4214775, Fax: (57-5) 4315761
31 Nadia-Deen Ferguson ndf(acep.unep.org AMEP Assistant Programme Officer
UNEP CAR /RCU
14-20 Port Royal Street
Kingston
Jamaica WI
Tel:(876) 922-9267
Fax:(876) 922-9292
32 Andre peter apsouthsystd@carib-link.net Southern Systems Limited
Sales, Service repairs and Installations
3 & 5 Hilda Lazzari Terrace, Les Efforts East, San
Fernando, Trinidad
33 Andrea Salinas USDECPR8@oas.org Department of Sustainable Development
Organization of American States-OAS
1889 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006









































































22








ANNEX 3


FINAL CONSENSUS STATEMENT

Regional Workshop

Assessment, Monitoring and Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP) and
Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS) in the Coastal Ecosystems of the Wider Caribbean Region

Trinidad and Tobago 10-12 June 2008


Consensus Statement

We the participants agree to undertake the following activities as the next steps in the project, to be
completed over the next 8 months.

1. Laboratory Assessment
2. Laboratory Capacity Building
3. Sampling to extend the baseline of information on the prevalence of POPs and PTS in
coastal waters of the 8 countries
4. Analysis of those samples and preparation of a report to the 8 countries

Laboratory Assessment and Capacity Building


The participating laboratories are:


Country Laboratories
Belize To be determined

Dominican Republic To be determined
Guatemala Department of Inorganic Analysis, Research laboratory. Faculty of
CCQQ and Pharmacy of the University of San Carlos of Guatemala
Honduras Centro de Estudios y Control de Contaminantes (CESCCO) -
Secretaria de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente (SERNA)
Jamaica National Environment and Planning Agency
(NEPA) Laboratory
Jamaica Pesticide Residue Laboratory, University of the West Indies, Mona
Mexico Department of Marine Resources, CINVESTAV Unidad Merida

Mexico Laboratorio Quimica de El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, ECOSUR-
Unidad Chetumal
St Lucia Caribbean Environmental Health Institute (CEHI)
Trinidad and Tobago University of West Indies (UWI) St. Augustine Chemistry
Department
Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) Marine Chemistry Department










Laboratory assessments will be carried out by Drs Drouillard, Gerardo Gold and Chris Metcalfe by
means of a questionnaire and a site visit. Written evaluation will be prepared for each laboratory,
including recommendations on steps to take to improve capacity for evaluation of pollution in coastal
waters. The evaluations will be constructive, forward looking documents that may help laboratory
directors in their efforts to strengthen their institutions.

The project will provide resources (in kind or financial) to complete the initial steps in capacity
building at each laboratory during 2008-2009.

Baseline Sampling Design

Sampling to extend the baseline of POPs and PTS occurrence will occur during the summer/fall 2008
in every country. On average 6 sites will be sampled per country. At each site, three fish will be
sampled, of 300gm to 500gm in weight. Fish will be white grunt, Haemulon plumieri, wherever
possible. In sites where that fish does not occur, another grunt species can be substituted. If no grunts
are available, another benthic-feeding, non-pelagic fish may be substituted. We agree that it is vital to
attempt to collect white grunt from all sites. Smaller countries may sample fewer sites than the larger
countries. Specific plans are as follows:

Belize

Sites

1. Corozal Bay Wildlife Sanctuary (unless Mexican colleagues monitor nearby Sanctuario del
Manati).
2. Bacalar Chico Marine Reserve
3. Caye Caulker
4. Sapodilla Cayes
5. South Water Caye/ Dangriga Region
6. Port Honduras
7. English Caye (will replace Corazal Bay if latter is not monitored).
8. Belize River (being sampled through the Gulf of Honduras Project)
9. Placencia Lagoon (being sampled through the Gulf of Honduras Project)

Agencies responsible:

The Belize Fisheries Department will spearhead all monitoring logistics for the sites with assistance
from collaborators and / or co-managers of our marine reserve network. Same efforts and set up shall
apply as used under the MBRS SMP pollution monitoring component. Every effort shall be made to
include the Belize Department of the Environment and the University of Belize as full participants in
the implementation of the project.

Contact Person:

The focal point for the implementation of the project shall be Isaias Majil with specimen storage at the
Fisheries Department Evidence Room.








Isaias Majil
Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries & Cooperatives
P.O. Box 148, Princess Margaret Drive
Belize City, Belize
Tel: 501-223 2623 ext. 24
isaias.majili@gmail.com

Dominican Republic

Sites
1. Playa Azua
2. Playa la Salina
3. Mouth of Haina river
4. BocaChica area
5. San Pedro
6. La Romana

Agencies responsible:

No laboratory has been determined for the Dominican Republic as of yet. The chemistry laboratory at
the Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo will be contacted to see if they can do the analyses, and
are interested in participating in the project.

Contact Person:

Nancy Valdez Guerrero
Subsecretaria de gesti6n ambiental
Direcci6n de calidad
Departamento de monitoreo de calidad de agua
Tel: (809) 4721194 y (809) 4721195
Celular: (809)- 2992834
nancvvaldez 2(@ihotmail.com

Ramon Antonio Delanoy de la Cruz.
Lab. Ciencias Nucleares
Institute de Fisica
Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo
Santo Domingo. Republica Dominicana
Tel.: 1 809 689-7184 Cel.: 1 809 330-2709
ramondelanoy@yahoo.com








Guatemala


Sites

1. Rio Polochic: important since it belongs to the high part of the river basin
2. Rio Dulce: this river comes together in the Bay of Amatique.
3. 7 altares: towards the north of the Bay of Amatique, important because near a reef which is part
of the mesoamericano reef system.
4. Rio Sarstun.

Two additional sites may be added after discussing with relevant authorities in Guatemala. Three
additional sites will be monitored within the Gulf of Honduras Project:

5. Port Districts,
6. Port Santo Tomas de Castilla and
7. End from Manabique.

Agencies responsible:

Sampling to be done by the Faculty of Chemical Sciences and Pharmacy, Universidad de San Carlos
de Guatemala, and the biological station, Centro Concervacionista Choc6n Machacas (CECON).
Laboratory analyses will be done by the Department of inorganic analyses, Laboratory of the Faculty
of Chemical Sciences and Pharmacy of Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala.

Contact Person:

For sampling and analysis:
Bessie Oliva
Unidad de Investigaci6n -GIA-
Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmacia
Telefono: (502) 2476 7728
Celular: (502) 5202 6232
bessieoliva(@yahoo.com

Contact person at University:
Dr. Oscar Manuel C6bar Pinto
Decano de la Facultad de CCQQ y Farmacia
Edificio T-12 Segundo Nivel
Ciudad Universitaria Zona 12

Honduras

Sites

1. Omoa in (Cortez)
2. Rio Sn. Alejo (Tela, Laguna Los Micos)
3. Rio Canepejal (Ceiba)
4. Rio Agrean (Col6n)








5. Rio Patuca, (Gracias a Dios)
6. Roatan Island (Bay islands)

Agencies responsible:

Will talk to biodiversity Dept, SERNA, in Honduras first to see if they can sample and to decide
who will actually do the sampling. Has to be discussed with people there.

Contact Person:

Francisco Garcia
Centro de Estudios y Control de Contaminantes CESCCO
Secretaria de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente (SERNA)
Oficina:(+504)239 0194 / (+504)232 6317
fragaflo@gmail.com

Jamaica

Sites

A final decision will select up to eight of the following sites :

1. Kingston Harbour
2. Morant Bay
3. Port Antonio
4. Ocho Rios
5. Discovery Bay
6. Montego Bay
7. Negril
8. Black River
9. Portland Bight
10. St. Margaret's Bay
11. Bluefields Bay
12. Martha Brae

Agencies responsible:

NEPA and UWI Center for Marine Science will coordinate the sampling with assistance from others
as follows:


Site # Sample Collection By
Kingston Harbour 2 Port Royal Marine Lab
Morant Bay 1 NEPA
Port Antonio 1 Portland Environment Protection Association
Ocho Rios 1 Friends of the Sea
Discovery Bay 1 Marine Lab
Montego Bay 1 Montego Bay Marine Park
Negril 1 Negril Coral Reef Protection Society









Black River 1 NEPA
Portland Bight 1 Peter Espeut
St. Margaret's Bay 1 Portland Environment Protection Association
Bluefields Bay 1 Bluefields Citizens' Association
Martha Brae 1 Trelawny Environment Protection Association


Contact Person:

Paulette Kolbusch
Legal Standards and Enforcement Division
National Environment and Planning
Agency (NEPA)
10 Caledonia Avenue
Kingston 5, Jamaica
Tel: +876 754 7540 Fax: +876 754 7599
Mobile; 876-878 1271
pkolbusch(@nepa. gov.i m

Mexico

Site selection

Our goal is to repeat monitoring in areas where Mexico already has some data through MBRS/SAM
Project. We also plan to sample 9 sites, provided that CONANP is able to absorb the cost of field
collection at all sites. This will be confirmed on return to Mexico.

1. Xcalak
2. Mahahual
3. Punta Allen
4. Cozumel
5. Puerto Morelos
6. Cancun
7. IslaMujeres
8. Holbox
9. Banco Chinchorro

Agencies responsible:

CONANP for logistics, field collection and CINVESTAV-Merida for analyses.

Contact Person:

Gerardo Gold (for samples quality and analyses):
Departamento de Recursos de mar, CINVESTAV Unidad Merida, Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso
Merida, Yucatan 97310 Mexico
Tel: +-52- (999) 981 2927
eold(,mda.cinvestav.mx









Jose Juan Dominguez Calder6n for logistics
Region Peninsula de Yucatan
Calle Venados 71 y 73 SM 20 MZ 18
Centro, Cancun, Q. Roo, MEXICO
TEL: 52 998 8921413
FAX: 52 998 8871997
jdominguez@conanp.gob.mx

The senior administrator of CONANP in this region of Mexico is Alfredo Arellano Guillermo
arellano(@conanp.gob.mx.

St Lucia

Sites

1. Castries Harbour
2. Vieux Forte Bay
3. Fond D'or Bay
4. Roseau Bay
5. Ciceron Bay 6. Anse Le Raya Bay

Agencies responsible:

Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries Division will be contacted to explore whether they are able and
interested in participating. Alternatively, CEHI can do the sampling.

Contact Person:

Allison Astwood, Caribbean Environmental Health Institute (CEHI)
P.O. Box 1111,
Castries, St. Lucia
Tel 758-452-1412/2501 Fax 758-453-2721
aastwood(cehi.org.lc

Yaneldis Anthony
Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Board, Ministry of Agriculture, Lands, Forestry and Fisheries
Greaham Louisy Administrative Building
Waterfront, Castries
Saint Lucia
Tel: (758) 468 5600/4
Fax: (758) 450 3206
vanedeleado(a mail.com








Trinidad and Tobago


Sites

1. Trinidad, West Coast: Scotland bay
2. Trinidad, West Coast: Point Lisas
3. Trinidad, North Coast: Toco
4. Trinidad, East Coast: Guayaguayare or Ortoire
5. Tobago: Mount Irvine Bay
6. Tobago: Charlotteville

These will be confirmed following discussion with local fishermen as to the availability of the white
grunt at these sites.

Agencies responsible:

IMA (Wendy Norville) for sample collection and UWI (Denise Beckles) for sample storage.
Sampling done by personnel from the Institute of Marine Affairs together with local fishermen.

Contact Persons:

Wendy Norville
Institute of Marine Affairs
Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas
Trinidad and Tobago, W.I.
Tel.# (868) 634-4291 Ext.307 Fax # (868) 634-4433
wnorville@,ima.gov.tt

Denise Beckles
Department of Chemistry
The University of the West Indies
St. Augustine
Trinidad, West Indies

Phone: 868-662-2002 x 3534
Fax: 868-645-3771
Denise.Beckles@sta.uwi.edu

Sample Analysis

Analyses of the samples will be done through cooperation of participating laboratories with varying
capacity. Details of the collaboration will be finalized following the laboratory assessments. But the
initial steps are to deposit samples from each country at the following labs.


Belize: Still determining laboratory in Belize. CINVESTAV in Mexico to do the analyses (or
it could be ECOSUR)








* Dominican Republic: to be determined


Guatemala: Unidad de Investigaci6n -GIA- Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmacia
Honduras: CESCCO laboratory

Jamaica: NEPA Laboratory freeze and chemical extractions and UWI lab to do conclusions
Mexico: CINVESTAV, ECOSUR
St. Lucia: CEHI can do storage of sampling. Analysis capacity is not available at CEHI yet, so
it depends when the analysis is planned
Trinidad and Tobago: Samples stored in UWI lab. Chemistry dept. IMA and UWI will do
analyses.


Details of methods for processing and analysis will be provided with the report from the laboratory
assessment process. In the meantime, each collected whole fish will be placed into a separate plastic
bag, with date and site information, and stored frozen until ready for processing.

12th June 2008
Trinidad




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