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Caribbean Compass

Digital Library of the Caribbean
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095627/00070

Material Information

Title: Caribbean Compass the Caribbean's monthly look at sea & shore
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Compass Pub.
Place of Publication: Bequia St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Bequia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Publication Date: 07-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Boats and boating -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Yachting -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 54085008
issn - 1605-1998
System ID: UF00095627:00077

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095627/00070

Material Information

Title: Caribbean Compass the Caribbean's monthly look at sea & shore
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Compass Pub.
Place of Publication: Bequia St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Bequia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Publication Date: 07-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Boats and boating -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Yachting -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 54085008
issn - 1605-1998
System ID: UF00095627:00077


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ANTIGUA SAILING WEEK 2013 See story on page 16 TIM WRIGHT / WWW.PHOTOACTION.COM C A R I B B E A N C MPASS The Caribbeans Monthly Look at Sea & ShoreJULY 2013 NO. 214 On-line

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 2 Caribbean Duty Free List Prices. Check your local store for final pricing. GRENADA TRINIDAD ANTIGUA ST. MAARTEN/ ST. MARTIN ST. THOMAS NANNY CAY TORTOLA ST. CROIX CURAAO CURAAO BONAIRE BONAIRE GRENADA TRINIDAD ANTIGUA ST. MAARTEN/ ST. MARTIN ST. THOMAS NANNY CAYTORTOLA ST. CROIX ARUBA ARUBA ANTIGUA € ARUBA € BONAIRE € CURAAO € GRENADA € ST. CROIX € ST. MAARTEN € ST. MARTIN € ST. THOMAS € TORTOLA € TRINIDAD STAND UP PADDLEBOARDSTowablesStand up paddleboarding is the worlds fastest growing watersport. Fun, easy, and fantastic exercise, its a great new way to enjoy a day on the water! Get ready for a wild ride! Airhead and Sportstuff towables by Kwiktek available for 1 … 3 riders. Outrageous fun for the whole family! STARTING AT:US$ $633.55The Caribbeans Leading Chandlery www.budgetmarine.comFUN WATERLFP/LPI BM/SUP KWI/iPhone and iPad Protection TRB/100 TurboSwing is the solution to transform almost any boat with an outboard into a real fun Tubing/Wakeboard Tow or ski boat! € Saves up to 20hp € Fuel economy € Safely protects motor € For all brands of outboard motor € Keeps tow rope above the wake € Tow bar can be quickly removed STARTING AT:US$ $65.39 Water Proof, Dirt Proof, Snow Proof, Shock Proof and fits your iphone and ipad like a skin! Protect your valuables all the time, not just when you are going to the beach.Swim, take photographs and video underwater. Rated to seal out water at a depth of 6.6 feet for 30 minutes. STARTING AT:US$ $88.00Your choice of fiberglass boards in bamboo finish or color striped. STARTING AT:US$ $635.60

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Click Google Map link below to nd the Caribbean Compass near you!http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?t=h&hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=112776612439699037380.000470658db371bf3282d&ll=14.54105,-65.830078& spn=10.196461,14.0625&z=6&source=embedCompass covers the Caribbean! From Cuba to Trinidad, from Panama to Barbuda, we've got the news and views that sailors can use. We're the Caribbean's monthly look at sea and shore. JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 3 JULY 2013 € NUMBER 214www.caribbeancompass.com The Caribbeans Monthly Look at Sea & ShoreTurtle TalkReptiles at sea ......................12Standing ByHelp on hand in T&T ............19FreedivingBreathless in Bonaire ...........22A Sneaky LeakGot loose juice? ....................24Marley MagicA cruisers night out .............28 DEPARTMENTS Info & Updates ......................4 Business Briefs .......................7 Eco-News ..............................10 Meridian Passage .................11 Regatta News........................14 All Ashoreƒ ..........................20 Fun Page ...............................30 Saltys Beat ............................31 Cruising Kids Corner ............32 The Caribbean Sky ...............33 Book Review .........................34 Cooking with Cruisers ..........37 Readers Forum .....................38 Calendar of Events ...............41 Caribbean Market Place .....42 Whats on My Mind ...............45 Classified Ads .......................46 Advertisers Index .................46Caribbean Compass is published monthly by Compass Publishing Ltd., P.O. Box 175 BQ, Bequia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines. Tel: (784) 457-3409, Fax: (784) 457-3410 compass@vincysurf.com www.caribbeancompass.comEditor...........................................Sally Erdle sally@caribbeancompass.com Assistant Editor...................Elaine Ollivierre jsprat@vincysurf.com Advertising & Distribution........Tom Hopman tom@caribbeancompass.com Art, Design & Production......Wilfred Dederer wide@caribbeancompass.com Accounting............................Shellese Craigg shellese@caribbeancompass.comCompass Agents by Island:Antigua: Ad Sales & Distribution Lucy Tulloch Tel (268) 720-6868, lucy@thelucy.com Barbados: Distribution Doyle Sails Tel/Fax: (246) 423-4600 Colombia: Distribution Marina Santa Marta www.igy-marinasantamarta.com/en Curaao: Distribution Budget Marine Curaao curacao@budgetmarine.com Tel: (5999) 462 77 33 Dominica: Ad Sales & Distribution Hubert J. Winston Dominica Marine Center, Tel: (767) 448-2705, info@dominicamarinecenter.com Grenada/Carriacou/Petite Martinique: Ad Sales & Distribution Karen Maaroufi Cell: (473) 457-2151 Office: (473) 444-3222 compassgrenada@gmail.com Martinique: Ad Sales & Distribution Isabelle Prado Tel: (0596) 596 68 69 71 Mob: + 596 696 74 77 01 isabelle.prado@wanadoo.fr Panama: Distribution Shelter Bay Marina www.shelterbaymarina.com Puerto Rico: Distribution Sunbay Marina, Fajardo Olga Diaz de Perz, Tel: (787) 863 0313 Fax: (787) 863 5282 sunbay marina@aol.com St. Lucia: Ad Sales & Distribution Maurice Moffat Tel: (758) 452 0147 Cell: (758) 720-8432 mauricemoffat@hotmail.com St. Maarten/St. Barths/Guadeloupe: Ad Sales & Distribution Stphane LegendreMob: + 590 690 760 100steflegendre@wanadoo.fr St. Thomas/USVI: Distribution Bryan Lezama Tel: (340) 774 7931, blezama1@earthlink.net St. Vincent & the Grenadines: Ad Sales Shellese Craiggshellese@caribbeancompass.com Tel: (784) 457-3409Distribution Doc Leslie Tel: (784) 529-0970 Tortola/BVI: Distribution Gladys Jones Tel: (284) 494-2830 Fax: (284) 494-1584 Trinidad: Sales & Distribution David Bovell, Tel: (868) 497-1040 davidbovell.ads@gmail.com Venezuela: Ad Sales Patty Tomasik Tel: (58-281) 265-3844 Tel/Fax: (58-281) 265-2448 xanadumarine@hotmail.comCover photo: Antigua Sailing Week 2013. The granddaddy of Caribbean regattas still kicks „ and photographer Tim Wright clicks ZSUZSANNA PUSZTAICaribbean Compass welcomes submissions of articles, news items, photos and drawings. See Writers Guidelines at www.caribbeancompass.com. Send submissions to sally@caribbeancompass.com. We support free speech! But the content of advertisements, columns, articles and letters to the editor are the sole responsibility of the advertiser, writer or correspondent, and Compass Publishing Ltd. accepts no responsibility for any statements made therein. Letters and submissions may be edited for length and clarity. 2013 Compass Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication, except short excerpts for review purposes, may be made without written permission of Compass Publishing Ltd. ISSN 1605 1998MAURICE HOWLANDG. LALSINGH The Compass is an open-minded Caribbean magazine that I thoroughly enjoy reading, especially the destination articles, and thoughts and advice from other cruisers. Liesbet Collaert S/V Irie

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 4 Nav Light Missing in Prickly Bay, Grenada As this issue of Compass goes to press, the light is missing from one of the solid concrete-and-steel pile channel markers in Prickly Bay, Grenada. The pile farthest away from the Big Fish Restaurant at Spice Island Marine was apparently hit by a vessel and the solar light on top of it was damaged. Steps are being taken to replace it, but meanwhile beware of the unlit solid channel marker when navigating in Prickly Bay at night. Notice: Oil Drilling Rig North of Tobago The Diamond Offshore Ocean Lexington drilling rig was towed from Chaguaramas, Trinidad and installed on the Block 22 Cassra NW well site north of Tobago at 112932N, 604650W in mid-June, and is expected to be at the site through early August. During drilling operations, marine users should observe the Safety Zone of 500 metres around the rig. For more information contact the Centrica Energy Community Relations Officer on (868) 714-1280. Lite Propane Tanks Recalled The United States Department of Transportation has issued an emergency order mandating a recall of cylinders manufactured by The Lite Cylinder Company, Inc. (Lite Cylinder). The full recall order is available at http://go.usa.gov/bbyV. However the Lite Cylinder company has issued the following statement: Please be advised that The Lite Cylinder Company is no longer in business and is currently evaluating its legal options. The companys facility is now closed and unable to receive cylinders returned per the instructions detailed in US DOT … PHMSA Emergency Order No. 2013-002. Furthermore, the company is financially insolvent and will not be able to recompense cylinder owners, dealers and distributors for the expenses incurred in complying with this Emergency Recall Order.Ž Island Water World and Budget Marine are advising all their customers to discontinue using these tanks immediately. Both companies are offering limited assistance, as the Lite Cylinder Company is insolvent. They will offer to sell their customers any new propane tank close to cost, which equates to a 35-percent discount on all aluminum and composite tanks in stock. You are required to bring to one of their locations any empty Lite CylinderŽ tanks and proof of purchase from one of their stores. This offer is subject to propane tank availability in their various store locations. For more information on Island Water World see ad on page 48, and for more information on Budget Marine see ad on page 2. Guadeloupe Bridges Remain Closed Ariane Graf of Marina Bas-du-Fort reports: The Authorities of Guadeloupe have informed us that boaters can no longer use the shortcut through the Rivire Sale, as the bridges are now closed and are expected to remain closed for at least another year. The bridges need serious maintenance work, and because there have been some technical faults, sometimes they would not open and users were blocked on either side of the bridge. The decision has been made to leave the bridges down till the maintenance is completed. The Marina Bas-du-Fort manager apologizes for this major inconvenience caused to the visitors who wish to come to Marina Bas-du-Fort in Pointe Pitre. „Continued on next page Info & Updates

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 5 „ Continued from previous page They will now have to round the island, either by the leeward side (Deshaies, Pigeon Island, Basse-Terre) or by Saint Franois and Pointe des Chateaux to the east. The Marina assures visitors of a special welcome gift for making the extra effort to come our way. For more information visit www.marinaguadeloupe.com. Eight Bells € DR. CHARLES OWEN KING died on May 16th. Jonathan Everett reports: Charles Owen King was one of the founders of the St. Lucia Yacht Club; indeed, he was one of the four members who signed the Memorandum and Articles of Association of The St. Lucia Yacht Club Ltd. on December 5th, 1963, which gave it its legal entity. Unfortunately the Clubs early records seem to have been lost, but he was also one of the earliest Commodores, if not the very first. Owen was a keen sailor, and my first memories of Sundays at the Club in the early 1970s was of Owen racing his Shearwater Cat against the Venezuelan Consul, John Deveer. In those days we had two or three races almost every Sunday, in at least three racingŽ classes, with the then young lions sailing their new International Fireballs, the beginners their Mirror dinghies, and yours truly sailing the very first Laser in St. Lucia „ sail number 1122. Owen passed on his love of sailing to his family, with his late daughter Susan representing Oxford University against Cambridge „ thereby not only becoming the first woman, but also the first West Indian to win a BlueŽ for sailing „ and granddaughter Jasia now flying the flag for the latest generation. Owen was pre-deceased by his wife Anne, another great supporter of the Club. Those older members amongst us will remember both of them well, and along with all other members of the Club, will want to join me in sending our sincerest sympathy to our present Commodore, Stephen, his sisters, and all the many members of their families. € A friend reports: MOTT GREEN (born David Friedman), founder at the Grenada Chocolate Company, died by accidental electrocution on June 1st, while working on solar-powered machinery for cooling chocolate during overseas transportation. He was in the process of modifying a catamaran to sail Grenada Chocolate to other Caribbean islands. He had already done well over 60 chocolate deliveries from Grenada to Carriacou, 20 miles across a rough channel with a strong current aboard his 13-foot Hobie Cat „ adventurous stuff in a small boat. Wild sailing and fishing were his favorite leisure. Mott dropped out of college, took up squatŽ living in NYC, and ran soup kitchens. It was hard for his family to get mad because he was doing so much good. And it made him feel good. But he lost interest in American society and NYC winters are cold. He found Grenada, settled in, became a citizen. Mott was Grenada Chocolate, Grenada Chocolate was Mott. He made and marketed chocolate, ate it, drank it, lived and breathed it „ he literally lived in the chocolate factory, which he invented, equipped, reinvented, and expanded. He learned and practiced chocolate-making from scratch and taught his partners, workers, farmers, and others. Grenada Chocolate is now recognized among the worlds best. His sense of responsibility drove his total involvement over many years and would drive him still „ what a loss. The Grenada Chocolate cooperative has 12 organic farms. Mott felt there should be hundreds. Though bound to his task, Mott was a free spirit. He did all that his task required, but did it his way. One account calls him a Jewish anarchist chocolatierŽ. Of his Hobie Cat sailing and chocolate deliveries to Carriacou, one might say ill advisedŽ; to him it was a wild, rough rideŽ, one of his favorite things. He found Grenada safe enough to live life with reckless abandonŽ. Some are at a loss for words. Every time I went up there he had done... something amazing.Ž Amazing, enthusiastic, energetic, imaginative, determined, dedicated, hard working, all sorts of good words fit, along with likeable and caring. Mott was also an international traveler in the fine-chocolate world. There is now a flurry of micro-chocolate makers inspired by the success of his vision, enabled by small-batch chocolate machinery that didnt exist before „ Mott had to invent and build his own. Mott dropped out of engineering school; maybe they should give him a degree anyway. Motts contributions reach far beyond Grenada. The stores selection of Grenada Chocolate was low even though Mott, days before his death, had sailed the wild waters to restock us. I asked the cashier if people were buying more. She nodded. Respect for Mott?Ž You understand.Ž I understand.Ž Update: Second Life Sails for Haiti As mentioned last month, Second Life Sails serves as a conduit for getting cruisers old sails to traditional fishermen in Haiti who have a genius for repurposing materials for their sails and who will make excellent use of realŽ sailcloth in their sailmaking. Haitis fishermen labor under several challenges. They do not have motors. They are incredibly able sailors of handcrafted boats and handmade sails made of whatever materials present themselves, such as old bedsheets or plastic tarpaulins. They have to sail farther and farther out to reach productive fishing grounds. „Continued on next page

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 6 „ Continued from previous page Second Life Sails, a certified Seven Seas Cruising Association (SSCA) Clean Wake project sponsored by Free Cruising Guides, has successfully delivered its first cargo of used sails and sailcloth to Haitian fishermen on Ile--Vache. They were distributed by a free raffle. The two primary collection points are Minneford Marina on City Island, New York; and Marina Zar-Par in Boca Chica, the Dominican Republic. Used sails can be delivered or shipped to these locations where they will be readied for transport to several Haitian fishing villages for distribution. In addition, sails will be collected at the SSCA Gams in Annapolis, Maryland (September 27th through 29th) and in Melbourne, Florida (November 15th through 17th), to begin their journey to a second life in Haiti. For more information visit www.freecruisingguides.com or e-mail Catherine@freecruisingguides.com. Cruisers Site-ings The BVI is known to many as one of the best recreational sailing venues in the Western Hemisphere, but if you were a resident on Jost Van Dyke in the 1800s and early 1900s, sailing was anything but recreational. It was the only link to the rest of the world. The traditions and heroics of those bygone days are not to be forgotten. Several years ago, behind Foxys bar, the Jost Van Dyke Preservation Society embarked on the task of building an updated version of a Tortola boatŽ, as those distinctive-looking sailing sloops came to be known. Although Jost itself was not a major boatbuilding center, the residents have been celebrated as the best seamen and fishermen in the BVI. Sailing, fishing and the repair of the Tortola boats was a mainstay of life on Jost Van Dyke. The boatbuilding project is an educational effort that involves local school children. They learned the history of the boats as they helped to build the sailing craft from the keel up. Completion of this grand effort, named Endeavour II, is just a few months away. See photos at https://picasaweb.google.com/102515207783781048944/EndeavourIIS loopProject?feat=email. Dont Miss the Fundraising Fun in Carriacou! Its that time of year again! The annual Carriacou Childrens Education Fund (CCEF) dinner and auction are held in Harvey Vale, Tyrrel Bay, Carriacou. This years welcome Pot Luck Barbecue Dinner will be held at Tanty Lizzies Seaside Fountain on Wednesday, July 31st at 1700 hours (5:00PM). Bring a dish to share and there will be a grill for you to cook on. There will be lots of cold drinks to purchase and some very nice items for the raffle. The auction will be held at After Ours Disco (above Arawak Divers) on Friday, August 2nd around 1500 hours (3:00PM) There are lots of boat items, household goods, arts and crafts, paintings by various artists, certificates for dinners for two at many restaurants as well as a cake certificate, a massage certificate and a haul-out certificate. The ever-popular table of items for EC$15 and up will be loaded with goodies. John and Melodye Pompa, who spearheaded CCEF for many years and retired to Florida last year, are going to join the festivities this year „ another great reason to be in Carriacou at this time. The CCEF assists Carriacou children in financial need to ensure they receive the education they deserve. CCEF funds buy uniforms, backpacks, and lunches and provide two-year scholarships to TA Marryshow Community College for students graduating from Hillsborough Secondary School and Bishops College. CCEF and the Sue Kingsman Memorial Fund have provided 24 scholarships to date. CCEF is still accepting donations of cash, goods and boat items for this years auction. All donations can be given to Arawak Divers. For more information visit CCEFs new website, www.carriacouchildrenseducationfund.org. Welcome Aboard! In this issue of Caribbean Compass we welcome new advertisers Intouchable Marine of St. Martin, on page 9; and TMM Yacht Charters of St. Vincent, on page 12. Good to have you with us! FRANK VIRGINTINOAfter Ours is the venue for the CCEF auction, annually timed to coincide with Carriacou Regatta Haitian fishermen make sails from available materials

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 7 BUSINESS BRIEFSPerkins Service Parts Summer Sale Parts & Power are running a special 20-percent discount on more than 80 Perkins service parts from now to September. Please mention Caribbean Compass when placing your order! For more information visit http://www.partsandpower.com. Also see their new blog at http://partsandpower.wordpress.com. Grenada Marines Supervisors Boost Skills On May 6th, four Grenada Marine supervisors attended a Supervisory Skills Training Workshop conducted by Dr. Nella Roberts from High Impact Consulting, as part of Grenada Marines continuing effort to improve skills training and employee development. The workshop, hosted at the Grenada Public Workers Union conference center, covered topics such as time management, effective communication, conflict resolution and efficiency assessment. Supervisors attending from Grenada Marine were Isaac Thomas, General Services; Roland James, Fiberglass/Composite; Stefan Fletcher, Marine Mechanical; and Jimmy Bethel, Paint and Finishing. The supervisors are re-energized, re-focused and ready for the busy summer season! For more information on Grenada Marine see ad on page 10. Whisper Likes Her Biocop Bottom Whisper a 116-foot aluminum sloop from the Ted Hood Design Group, was built in 2003 by Holland Jachtbouw in Zaandam, Netherlands. She recently returned there from a winter in the Caribbean. Her Biocop TF teal bottom got a quick wash and was in perfect condition. Sea Hawk Paints Lloyds Registry approved Biocop TF was developed as an alternative to tin-based antifouling paints to protect against the harshest marine environments and provide maximum protection. A new dual biocide technology and revolutionary polymer binder system, PL3, produces an engineered biocide that leaves no harmful effects on the environment. For more information on Sea Hawk Paints see ad on page 5. Technicians Advance at McIntyre Brothers, Grenada Three technicians at McIntyre Brothers, Grenada have recently been recognized for their accomplishments. Yamaha Motor Company Ltd. recognizes Shanda St. Clair as a Yamaha Technical Academy Outboard Motor Bronze Certified Technician; Ford Motor Company recognizes Rickey Alexander as a Master Technician for Achieving Excellence in Service Training; and American Honda recognizes Jerome Joseph as a Honda Master Technician. Congratulations to all for achieving these certifications. For more information on McIntyre Brothers see ad on page 38. Caribbean Horizons, Grenada to Give Bird Tours Caribbean Horizons Tours & Services guides took part in an intensive weeklong birdguiding seminar in June in preparation for bird tours that will be part of the 19th Regional Meeting of the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds. The meeting is to be held in Grenada from July 27th through 31st at St. Georges University. The topic of the conference is Bird Conservation in a Changing Climate. „Continued on next page One of four participating staff from Grenada Marine, Stefan Fletcher, at left, during the Supervisory Skills Training workshop CARRIACOU REGATTA 2013AUGUST 2ND AUGUST 5THEXPERIENCE A WEALTH OF SAILING AND FUN! BE THERE! 2nd Trial race, of cial opening, local/regional calypso show 3rd Round the island race, open boat race, on shore activities, Queen show at night 4th Two races all categories, on shore activity from 1PM, wet fte from 7PM5th Final race all categories, on shore activity from 1PM, prize giving from 6PM followed by Glow from 10PMShanda St. Clair is among the three engine technicians at McIntyre Brothers receiving new certifications

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 8 TO ENTER THE CHALLENGE, PLEASE SEE MARINA MANAGER Simon Bryan | +758.572.7200 sbryan@igymarinas.com ST. LUCIAS PREMIER SPORTFISHING DESTINATION.www.igy-rodneybay.com RBM@igymarinas.com | +758.572.7200 THE IGY MILLION DOLLAR An IGFA all-tackle world record catch.„ Continued from previous page In addition to the mid-conference field trips on Grenada there will be trips on August 1st and 2nd to Carriacou and Union Island to see the bird communities in these two Grenadine islands. For more information on the conference or to book a birding tour, visit www.caribbeanhorizons.com or call Joann or Ann at (473) 444-1555. For more information on Caribbean Horizons Tours & Services see ad on page 38. Two New Guides to Cuba € Captain and author Cheryl Barr has published her latest book, Cruising Guide to Cuba This 224-page, full-colour cruising guide will be a welcome addition to any cruising library. Cruising Guide to Cuba (Volume 1) has invaluable up-to-date information for the coastal waters from Varadero westward and around to Cienfuegos. The guide is filled with colour chart illustrations and photos, detailed descriptions including pertinent GPS co-ordinates for harbours, anchorages and inside passages; crucial information about weather; route advice and passage planning; hurricane holes and much more. All of Barrs navigational research and data is superbly written and presented in a large, easy-to-read colour format. Barrs other cruising guides include The Down East Circle Route and The Canadian Maritimes Find information on her Atlantic Canada guides at www.yachtpilot.ca. Barr has spent over a dozen seasons in Cuba sailing aboard a 62-foot Herreshoff schooner. She has a 200-ton Yachtmaster License, has made numerous yacht deliveries worldwide, and is also a certified welder and a marine biologist. Read more about Barrs Cuba voyages at www.cruisingincuba.com. Barrs Cruising Guide to Cuba is available at bookstores and from the author at yachtpilot@eastlink.ca. € As more and more cruisers thoughts turn to Cuba, another guide to the largest island in the Caribbean is on the horizon. A Cruising Guide to Cuba by Amaia Agirre and Frank Virgintino will be available the first week of August at www.freecruisingguides.com as a free PDF download. The eBook version is scheduled to appear in eBook stores during the first week of September. The authors of this free guide have created a comprehensive work that should also be on the bookshelf of every cruising sailor who contemplates cruising Cuba. The guides more than 400 pages are packed with current information. Complete with harbor-by-harbor and anchorage-by-anchorage coverage of the entire island, Agirre and Virgintinos A Cruising Guide to Cuba also includes an annotated bibliography. Agirre and Virgintinos A Cruising Guide to Cuba will be available the first week of August at www.freecruisingguides.com. For more information of Free Cruising Guides see ad on page 35. Blue Haven Marina Opens in Turks & Caicos Blue Haven Resort & Marina, located on the leeward side of the island of Providenciales, is now open. With a draft restriction of eight feet (at mean low tide), the marina caters to yachts up to 220 feet with no beam limitations. Blue Haven Resort & Marina is just 575 nautical miles from Florida and is perfectly positioned as the gateway to the Caribbean. Sailors who have visited St. Lucia will be glad to see that Adam Foster, former manager of Rodney Bay Marina, is now the Marina General Manager at Blue Haven. The marina offers its guests the use of a conference room with complimentary WiFi, showers, workstations, volleyball and horseshoe courts, and is also located only minutes away from Provo Golf Course. „Continued on page 35 Lucky bird watchers might get a glimpse of the critically endangered Grenada Dove on a tour with Caribbean HorizonsGREG HOMEL

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 9 Regular readers of the Compass will know that I wrote The New Caribbean Home Garden Handbook a book about Caribbean foods, gardening, and cuisine. Writing was the easy part, organizing my knowledge. But from proofreading to publishing it seemed a never-ending series of expensive educational incidents. And I had never even considered transport. As an author I should meet booksellers, yet that never entered my mind when I was jotting the how-tos and recipes. Inexpensive cellular phone plans make inter-island conversations easy for the small-business budget. Almost anything can be accomplished over the Internet; high-speed connections and Skype help make things possible. But the Net is a variable medium, meaning you never know who got your message. To me it is less personal than the phone. And Skype? I guess I just feel uncomfortable when seen on the modern computer screen. Like me, many owners of small businesses need to travel between various islands in the Caribbean. My intention was not for carrying freight, but just for making a face-to-face meeting. Many such business trips are one-day visits, just to take orders or acquaint stores with product distribution. Commercial inter-island air transport consumes a good part of a day „ if the flight happens and is on time. In the current economy it is difficult to determine if an airline will continue in business when you need to travel. Add long Customs and Immigration linesƒ. If the time and a boat are available, you can sail or motor. Ive met a few other authors of Caribbean reference books like mine. Alexis Andrews of Vanishing Sail fame literally sails his beautiful Carriacou sloop to book-business meetings. Chris Doyle of cruising guide distinction does the same on an exquisite catamaran. But the waters not moving under my boat these days; the grass is growing. What to do? Time and money are the factors that led me to consider business via cruise ship. Go ahead and laugh. Think it is an extravagant, bourgeois mode of getting between the islands? Consider a plane fare „ maybe US$200 will get you from one Caribbean city to another. Figure in your departure tax, etcetera. The last time I flew my actual flight was reasonable, then I had to pay for the fuel surcharge, seat and airport tax, and gate fees on each end. Two islands for meetings, no meals and no hotel, and I hit 500 dollars. A day in most airports leaves you tired and feeling haggard. A decent cruise visiting five islands doesnt cost much more, combining room, board and even entertainment „ while somebody else caters to Immigration and Customs. You know for certain you will be at a certain island by 10:00AM, well rested with a belly definitely full. My cruise ride to visit many island bookstores cost less than US$50 a day! With a bit of skill and calling using the Net, arrangements can be made to board at any island, not necessarily in Florida. I Googled all of the major cruise lines and contacted them with e-mails. As long as you are prepared to pay the full cruise fare, even though you may be eliminating days/islands for your passage, travel between specific islands can be done. My cruise started in Miami, but I could have jumped on or off at any of the islands on the itinerary „ St. Thomas, St. Maarten, St. Lucia, Dominica, or Barbados. You follow their itinerary, but must give written notice of your intention to embark or disembark at a certain island at least two weeks in advance „ the more advance notice the better. Get a written statement of agreement from the cruise line and be able to show an address to stay and enough money to purchase a return passage from that island if necessary. Requirements of what is termed the Assured ArrivalŽ process (requests for downline boarding or early departure) must be in writing. You must include your name, ships name with sailing date, booking number, and the name of the island(s) where you wish to board or depart with the date of boarding/departure. Dot all the is and cross the ts and make certain you include your e-mail address or fax number for return confirmation. The cruise ship may be the ultimate aggressor of the seas, but they are comfortable and, despite recent incidents, usually dependable. Remember, cruise ships are still impressive and now the main mode of island tourism. Arrange your meetings on every island in advance, and, if you are lucky, someone from that company or store will meet you at the dock to provide transport. You must organize to accomplish every meeting within the allotted time ashore. Then return to the ship, take a hot shower, relax, and perhaps pig out till the next port. My book cruiseŽ was a definite success. I hit a lot of bookstores and now they all know my face and now I know who I am calling or e-mailing. Consider the cruise ship as inter-island transport. I recommend it for every small business owner to mix business and pleasure without spending a fortune. While underway you may relax in a hot tub or sauna, see current movies, and exercise away the calories you consume. My business visits were well organized so they didnt take long, and even book signings were just an hour or two, so I still had plenty of time to see the islands. And I didnt have to clear out, re-supply the galley, or haul the anchor.Island-Style Business Trip „ by Cruise Ship!by Shirley Hall Playing tourist with a friend in St. Maarten „ and taking care of business the same day

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 10 CARIBBEAN ECO -NEWSFunds Committed to Regional Marine Protection In a joint effort to safeguard and bolster the Caribbean regions tourism-dependent economy, representatives of 15 Caribbean governments and 17 corporations met on Necker Island in the British Virgin Islands on the weekend of May 18th and committed approximately US$64 million to preserve and protect the regions marine and coastal environment, and accelerate efforts to transition to renewable energy. Sir Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Group, said, The energy challenge and marine conservation challenge in the Caribbean go hand in hand: we cant have a healthy economy without a healthy environment, nor a healthy environment without a healthy economy.Ž The event, launching the second phase of the Caribbean Challenge Initiative (CCI), was co-hosted by the Prime Minister of Grenada, Dr. Keith Mitchell; the Premier of the British Virgin Islands, Dr. The Honourable D. Orlando Smith; and Sir Richard Branson. The events sponsoring partner was Tiffany & Co. Foundation, and the event was organized by The Nature Conservancy, with support from Virgin Unite, and the Carbon War Room. The high-level dialogue resulted in consensus on the urgent need to protect sharks and rays across the region aiming for a region-wide sanctuary within two years, increasing the number of marine protected areas, and accelerating the transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources over the next five years. Glenn Prickett, Chief External Affairs Officer for The Nature Conservancy, said, This event has demonstrated that no longer is protecting nature viewed as a luxury, it is critical to the success of the regions economy.Ž In addition to these commitments, Defend Paradise, a campaign designed to generate funding for marine conservation in the Caribbean and raise consumer awareness of the marine environment was launched. From Carriacou, a Story of Hope Olando Harvey reports: On May 31st, at approximately 2:10PM, a leatherback turtle braved the hot sun and relatively crowded Paradise Beach, Carriacou within the Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected Area (SIOBMPA) to lay her precious eggs. HopeŽ, which some onlookers named her because she emerged and laid directly in front of Hopes Inn, provided an excellent educational opportunity for beachgoers along with students and teachers of the LEsterre Rosary School. Onlookers were able to experience firsthand the awe-inspiring feat of sea turtle nesting. This relatively rare daytime nesting allowed a unique perspective into an activity that is usually masked by the cover of darkness from the lucky few that are able to experience nesting under typical circumstances. Hope went through all of the typical stages of sea turtle nesting, over a period of approximately one hour and 45 minutes before returning to the sea. She was fitted with a new pair of flipper tags by a member of the Kido Foundation, a local NGO that conducts sea turtle monitoring and wildlife rescue on the island. These tags would allow Hope to be identified on future nesting visits to the region, as female turtles return to the area where they were born to deposit their eggs. Leatherback sea turtles are critically endangered globally. The Atlantic leatherback turtles usually nest between the months of March and July. They typically make five or six nesting episodes during a single season and nest every other year once they reach adulthood. They lay between 60 and 90 yolked eggs and several smaller yolkless eggs. These yolked eggs hatch roughly 60 to 65 days after they are laid and the hatchlings typically emerge at night and make their way to the ocean. Leatherback turtles and their nests are fully protected within the jurisdiction of Grenada and her sister islands of Carriacou and Petite Martinique. That is, no one is allowed to catch, sell, purchase or have in their possession leatherback eggs, meat or products at any time. Also the Marine Protected Area (MPA) legislation prohibits the capture or harassment of turtles and their nests within the boundaries of any MPA year round. The SIOBMPA would like to wish Hope a safe voyage as she makes her way back up to the feeding grounds in the North Atlantic at the end of the nesting season and are looking forward to her next visit in two years. To report any nesting, or any other SIOBMPA related activity please feel free to call our hotline at (473) 538-5851. Antiguas First Lionfish Hunt Bags 77 At 3:00PM on June 2nd, the Antigua Yacht Club Marina Dock saw the successful culmination and weigh-in of the first-ever Antigua Lionfish Hunt. This hunt was organized by Mamora Bay Divers and the St. James Club in partnership with the Antigua Conservation Society, and in association with the Fisheries Division of the Department of Agriculture and Antigua Yacht Club Marina. Six boats took part and a whopping 77 fish were speared and landed. First Prize went to Mamora Bay Divers, who landed a very impressive 28 lionfish. Second place went to S oul Immersion with 20 fish, and third was Tin Tin with nine. The lionfish, a native of the Indo-Pacific region, is thought to have been introduced into Caribbean waters accidentally some 20 years ago, but appears to have only just arrived in Antiguan waters within the last two or three years. „Continued on next page

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JUNE 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 11 JULY „ Continued from previous page These non-native fish are a big problem not only because of their poisonous spines, which can cause very severe injury if you touch or tread on them, but also because as voracious predators they are a massive threat to fish stocks. The lionfish hunt, which it is hoped will become a regular tri-annual event, was conducted as a way to control the numbers of these dangerous invaders. For more information on capturing lionfish see http://www.coral.org/node/4620. Cayman Students Win Ocean Literacy Scholarships As reported in the June 7th issue of the Caymanian Compass newspaper, 50 students from government primary schools in the Cayman Islands have been awarded Ocean Literacy Scholarships by the Central Caribbean Marine Institute as a result of winning their One Ocean, One PlanetŽ competition. The competition, held earlier this year, invited students to submit visual and written pieces explaining why the underwater environment is crucial for the Cayman Islands and its tourism product. George Town Primary (pictured) won first place in the competition. As a result, 25 Year 5 students travelled to Little Cayman where they spent two days and two nights at the Little Cayman Research Centre. While there, students snorkelled over seagrass beds and coral reefs „ a first for many of them „ and learned to identify fish and coral. They also learned about Caymans cultural history, terrestrial conservation and had a close encounter with rock iguanas. Throughout their stay, they were taught about the threats to the natural environment and protection measures. The second prize went to Red Bay Primary School. Twenty-five Year 5 students were joined by CCMI staff on the Nautilus semi-submersible boat for a tour of the harbour in George Town. An underwater learning adventure, the tour took students over the wreck of the Cali the Balboa and Cheeseburger Reef, where they were able to identify fish, stingrays, jellyfish and turtles. CCMIs One Ocean, One PlanetŽ competition, which has been sponsored by KPMG for the past five years with Cayman National Bank and the Department of Tourism also being partners, enables the marine research, education and conservation organization to teach young students about the environment. Carriacou Cleans Up Diane Martino reports: June 8th, 2013 was Ocean Day, a worldwide celebration. The Carriacou Environmental Committee (CEC) coordinated a Beach and Shoreline Clean-Up at Hillsborough to raise awareness, among KayaksŽ and visitors alike, that careless dumping of land-based waste „ particularly plastics and other non-biodegradable trash „ adversely affects our marine environment and beaches, both of which are vital to the islands tourism and economic viability. More then 50 persons took part in the debris collection on shore and underwater from Silver Beach up to the Lauriston Airport; the Hillsborough Secondary School Environmental Club, a group of students from Hillsborough and LEsterre, and staff and customers of Lumbadive participated. Nearly two tons of debris were collected, including tires, steel, building materials, plastic and glass bottles, caps, bags, food containers, condoms, diapers, cigarette butts, lighters, plastic and styrofoam plates and utensils, etcetera. Every participant received a certificate of recognition from CEC Chairman Luther Rennie (pictured). A light lunch was served and prizes were given. The CEC thanks all sponsors who generously supported the event by giving trash bags and bottles of water. Special thanks to Wayne Car Rental, Paddys Enterprises, Vena Bullens Supermarket, the Grenada Board of Tourisms Carriacou Office, The Family Store, Lumbadive PADI 5-Star, Fidel Productions, the Fountain Wine Bar & Restaurant, Lambi Queen, Peach Heaven, Hills & Valley Pharmacy, and the Co-Operative Bank. Human activities are the biggest threat for the environment. The beach cleanup is one effort to give back what was taken from Mother Nature. CEC encourages everyone to make a small action every day „ grab just one piece of paper you see while walking on the street and put it in a garbage can. Its a start. Crossing the channels between Caribbean islands with a favorable tide will make your passage faster and more comfortable. The table below, courtesy Don Street, author of Streets Guides and compiler of Imray-Iolaire charts, which shows the time of the meridian passage (or zenith) of the moon for this AND next month, will help you calculate the tides. Water, Don explains, generally tries to run toward the moon. The tide starts running to the east soon after moonrise, continues to run east until about an hour after the moon reaches its zenith (see TIME below) and then runs westward. From just after the moons setting to just after its nadir, the tide runs eastward; and from just after its nadir to soon after its rising, the tide runs westward; i.e. the tide floods from west to east. Times given are local. Note: the maximum tide is 3 or 4 days after the new and full moons. For more information, see Tides and CurrentsŽ on the back of all Imray Iolaire charts. Fair tides! July 2013 DATE TIME 1 0641 2 0728 3 0814 4 0902 5 0949 6 1032 7 1125 8 1212 (new moon) 9 1258 10 1343 11 1428 12 1512 13 1556 14 1642 15 1729 16 1820 17 1914 18 2021 19 2112 20 2214 21 2314 22 0000 (full moon) 23 0016 24 0114 25 0207 26 0259 27 0348 28 0436 29 0523 30 0613 31 0656 August 2013 1 0746 2 0834 3 0922 4 1009 5 1056 6 1141 (new moon) 7 1226 8 1311 9 1356 10 1441 11 1528 12 1616 13 1708 14 1802 15 1900 16 1959 17 2100 18 2159 19 2257 20 2352 21 0000 (full moon) 22 0045 23 0136 24 0226 25 0315 26 0403 27 0452 28 0540 29 0628 30 0716 31 0804 MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE MOONJULY AUGUST 2013 CCMIThe winning crew with their haulJASON PICKERING

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 12 Turtle! Turtle!Ž the cry goes up from one of our friends holidaying with us. Weve just anchored off the islet of Baradel in the Tobago Cays Marine Park in St. Vincent & the Grenadines. About five metres abeam of us a turtles head pops out of the clear turquoise water, the brown shadow of its shell visible just under the surface. The turtle regards us solemnly, gulps air and then dives again to continue feasting on the turtle grass growing on the seabed. We hurry to don masks, snorkels and fins and swim over towards the beach, ducking under the floating rope and buoys that cordon off the area where anchoring and fast boats are prohibited, protecting both turtles and snorkelers from rotating propellers. We spot one „ no, two, three „ turtles grazing together on the seabed. They seem unperturbed by us as we float on the surface close by them, almost as though they know they are protected here. Another turtle swims to the surface, passing between two of us as it rises through the blue sunlit water; it dives again and we swim after it, marvelling at the graceful way it slowly moves its front flippers to move languidly ahead. Here in the turtles world its so peaceful; theres no schedule to keep to and no reason to hurry. You dont swim? No need to worry, you can sit on the foredeck with a cool drink and spot plenty of turtles from there. By Day Two the turtles are so numerous our friends have become blas: Another turtle? Oh, okay.Ž Their interest is piqued again when we spot a large turtle with two remoras clinging to its shell. Remoras are about two and a half feet long and use their hosts „ commonly turtles, whales and sharks „ as transport and protection, and also act as cleaner fish and feed on materials dropped by their host. This turtle doesnt seem to appreciate the hitchhikers and every so often it tries to brush them off with an irritated flick of a flipper. When the turtle surfaces to breathe the remoras transfer to its underside until it dives again, when they go back to feasting from its shell. When my husband, Kevin, and I first cruised the Caribbean I seem to remember seeing loads of dolphins but no turtles; now the situation appears to be reversed. Instead of spotting dolphins playing in our bow wave as we sail between the islands we now see turtles floating by with the current or swimming in numerous anchorages from Grenada to Guadeloupe. The most spectacular of these are giant leatherbacks the size of dustbin lids, the knobbled curve of their shells floating above the waves as they drift past us. Turtles can also be seen close up at the Old Hegg Turtle Sanctuary in Park Bay, Bequia. It was opened in 1995 by Orton G. BrotherŽ King, a retired local skindiving fisherman, to help with conservation of the Hawksbill turtle, threatened with extinction by hunting for its meat, eggs and beautiful shell. Starting with a few hatchlings in a plastic tub in 1995, Mr. King says that to date he has raised almost 900 turtles and released them into the sea. The turtles at the sanctuary are housed in several large round pools according to their age; they range from a couple of months to four and a half years old. (Mr. King collects the hatchlings and releases them when they are about five years old.) In the wild they eat jellyfish and small crustaceans, but Mr. King feeds them tinned fish as he cant provide enough of their natural diet. Every three weeks or so the older turtles are taken out of their tanks and scrubbed to clean their shells of algae, the same job wed seen the remoras doing at Tobago Cays. Kevin asked where the name Old Hegg came from and Mr. King introduced us to her, a female with a damaged flipper who lives at the sanctuary permanently as she would be unable to survive in the wild. Mr. King is passionate about his project to save the turtles, even in the face of scientists telling him his tank-raised turtles wont survive in the wild and local fishermens indifference, but he sees hope in the fact that the local schoolchildren love coming to the sanctuary and then go home and educate their parents about the benefits of conservation, and he is now marking the young female turtles shells so he can prove that they do survive and return to the beach where they were born to lay their own eggs. To get to Old Hegg Turtle Sanctuary you can take a local taxi from under the almond tree by the ferry terminal in Port Elizabeth or if you prefer some exercise, the walk takes about 40 minutes one way, with fine views of the windward bays on route. „Continued on next page Talking of Turtles by Christine GoochAbout five metres abeam of us a turtles head pops out of the clear turquoise water !"#! $ #"%!$& "" #$ %& %%

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 13 „ Continued from previous page One of the most amazing sights I have ever witnessed was on the beach at Great Courland Bay in Tobago. One evening, as soon as the moon had risen, Kevin and I dinghied ashore and joined a group of people on the beach. They were watching a giant leatherback turtle digging a hole in the soft, dry sand to lay her eggs. Volunteers from SOS (Save Our Sea turtles) Tobago were keeping an eye on her and answering questions. They said she was medium sized and 35 years old; she looked pretty big to us „ about four feet from her nose to the tip of her shell and around two feet tall at the highest point of her shell. Ive seen photos of them in the daylight and they are a beautiful blue colour. Leatherbacks are the worlds largest sea turtles, weighing up to 500 kilos (1,100 pounds). Nowadays they are critically endangered: in 1980 there were an estimated 115,000 nesting females; in 1995 this was down to 34,500. Having seen turtles come briefly to the surface to breathe, Id been wondering for some time where they sleep. A volunteer told me they look for water of a certain depth and can then sit on the bottom holding their breath for up to an hour, or sometimes they doze while floating on the surface. Every year between March and June turtles return to the beach where they were born and lay 100 to 150 eggs, at least 40 of which will be blindŽ and turn to mush a fortnight later and others will be damaged by fungus or bacteria. The mother dug a big hole three to six feet deep using her huge flippers. While she was doing this we were allowed to be only a few feet away, so we could see her in the red light a volunteer shone. Youre not allowed to take flash photos as the bright light disturbs the turtles. This one didnt appear to have chosen a particularly good site as it was right under the beach volleyball net, but the volunteer said that the eggs would be deep enough to be safe. Once the turtle was ready to lay her eggs we were asked to move farther away. While she was laying, she made an eerie sound, like someone blowing across the top of a glass bottle. It was too dark to see, but apparently they secrete tearsŽ to keep their eyes clear while they are out of the water; you could almost imagine she was crying for all her babies that wont survive „ out of 1,000 hatchlings only a handful reach maturity. When she had finished laying she flicked the sand back into the hole with her flippers, turning round as she did so. Then she heaved herself back down the beach, into the surf and swam away. The whole process had taken about two and a half hours. Watching it was an amazing experience, especially knowing that this has been happening for the last 100 million years, since the time of the dinosaurs. We found out later that two other turtles had nested farther down the beach that night. After 60 days the hatchlings emerge and instinctively start crawling towards the light, which unfortunately in this case is towards the lights of the hotel, so volunteers collect them in buckets and put them in the sea at the waters edge. Having seen BrotherŽ Kings turtle sanctuary, snorkelled with turtles in the wild, and witnessed the moving spectacle of a nesting leatherback turtle, next on my Turtle To Do ListŽ is seeing the tiny hatchlings crawl into the ocean and swim away. Two tour operators well-known to cruisers „ Jesse James in Trinidad and Cuttys Island Tours in Grenada „ organize trips to turtle nesting sites in those islands; we visited Great Courland Bay independently but Peter Cox Nature Tours and Tour Tobago Ltd. offer organized trips on Tobago. Some sites in Trinidad require a permit to visit them. For more information on Caribbean sea turtles and how and where to watch them, visit www.sos-tobago. org, www.turtlevillagetrust.org or www.widecast.org. In the meantime, here are some turtle Dos and Donts: € Do not attempt to touch turtles or ride on them, however tempting this may be. Keep a safe distance and stay behind nesting turtles. € When visiting nesting beaches keep the use of torches/flashlights to a minimum. Dont use flash photography. € Dont drive on beaches where turtles nest „ you may crush the eggs in a nest. € Dont litter „ turtles may mistake plastic bags, etcetera, for jellyfish and try to eat them, leading to a slow and painful death. Brother King estimates that hes raised some 900 sea turtle hatchlings, releasing them after they are less susceptible to predatorsGOOCH GOOCHThe Tobago Cays Marine Park is a great place to photograph Hawksbills. Note the hitchhiking remora in the lower photo

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 14 Regatta NewsSt. Barth Mini-Bucket Grows Up! The fifth edition of the St. Barth Mini-Bucket, held on May 11th and 12th, attracted 61 participants. Staged on the beach of Public, headquarters of St. Barth Yacht Club, the growing event is one of the major dinghy regattas in the area for young sailors of St. Martin, St. Maarten, Anguilla and St. Barth. As usual, the conditions were ideal „ good weather, good breeze and a great sailing area. The youngest group (six to 12 years) of seven novice sailors, Optimist Optilene sponsored by Bar de lOubli, was dominated by Lorenzo Mayer. The next three behind him fought a fierce battle, with Tom Petit and Illan Le Deun tied for points (Tom was awarded second place) and Kylian Guillemassy just one point behind. The largest fleet consisted of 18 in Optimist Competition, also sponsored by Bar de lOubli. These sailors eight to 14 years old were already experts in maneuvers, tactics, rules of racing and preparation of their boat. Top honors went to Nathan Smith, who started with a second place and then won the next five rounds. Second place was won by Baccon Luke and Alan Strok finished third. With the RS Feva class supported by Camper & Nicholson, the age group of 12 to 16 years climbed to a more technical and performance dinghy with spinnaker. St. Maarten sailors won the first two places with Leonardo Leol and Bart Van Uliet in first place and Alec Scarabelli and Johanna Looser second. Third place was taken by the Anguillian crew of Kemani Gumbs and Rene Thomas. The Olympic Laser class, sponsored by St. Barth Properties, was for sailors aged 14 years and up. In the 4.7s, Benjamin Groc had no competition. In Radials, Herv Brin edged ahead of his sister Cindy, with Hennis Hasani third. Laser Standard saw the invincible Benoit Meesemaecker prevail, followed by Rhne Findlay and Francis Whimbrel. Finally, the spectacular, high-performance F18 catamarans sponsored by FBM Automobiles raced on an elongated path suited to their impressive speed. The crew of Turenne and Patrick LaPlace won five races brilliantly, ahead of David Guiheneuc and Noah Turtshi. Stphane Geoffroy and Alexandre Guiheneuc came third. Proud of its recent partnership with Island Water World, who has equipped all the sailors with beautiful lycra sailing shirts, the St. Barth Yacht Club is pleased to see the growth of this multi-class and multi-generational event. For more information visit stbarthyachtclub.com. ARC Announces Cape Verdes ARC+ Demand from sailors worldwide for spaces in the 2013 Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC 2013) has been unprecedented. The 30 extra boat slips recently installed by the Las Palmas Port Authority has enabled the ARC to grow to a maximum of 245 yachts for 2013; despite this, the ARC was full by the end of January, with the waiting list closed a month later. With numerous fresh enquiries continually being received, ARC organizer World Cruising Club has been working on a way to provide extra capacity for more cruisers to join the worlds most popular cruising yacht rally. Having considered many options of how to satisfy the wishes of sailors to take part in this international cruising rally, and listened to feedback from previous participants, World Cruising Club has launched an alternative start for the ARC, which also includes a stopover in the Cape Verde Islands. Called ARC+ the new route will depart from Las Palmas de Gran Canaria on November 10th, two weeks ahead of the traditional ARC start, and includes a full week of activities, seminars, and social functions before the departure, all included in the entry fee. Additionally, cruising sailors will benefit from all the discounts associated with participating in the ARC, including substantial offers at 18 marinas en route from Northern Europe. A stop in the Cape Verdes has been added to introduce ARC sailors to another archipelago en-route to the Caribbean, and gives an attractive route alternative to those owners returning to the ARC for whom this is not their first Atlantic crossing. The ARC+ fleet will re-group in the Cape Verdes before setting off with the tradewinds across the Atlantic to Rodney Bay, St. Lucia for a tremendous Caribbean welcome, and a full programme of social activities and tours for which the ARC is renowned. ARC+ will be limited to 50 cruising boats, and will be run very much in the spirit of the ARC, maintaining the unique atmosphere that has developed within the Rally over the preceding 27 years. On this new route there will be no competitive racing, only fun results calculated for those whod like to join in. Benefitting from the experience and knowledge of World Cruising Club, plus the support of the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers sponsors in Gran Canaria and St. Lucia, ARC+ is an exciting extension to the worlds largest trans-ocean sailing rally. For more information visit www.worldcruising.com. Whos Who Match Race for November in St. Thomas The 6th Carlos Aguilar Match Race (CAMR) will set sail in St. Thomass scenic Charlotte Amalie harbor from November 21st through 24th. New this year, explains regatta director Bill Canfield, We will have three days of racing instead of four, which is normal in other events like this held around the globe, and eight boats instead of six to make it more exciting on the course and give us time to run a double round-robin, semis and finals.Ž The ten Open teams, which represent a combination of highly ranked men and women and active successful match racers from the past, will put their skills to the test in fast-paced highly competitive sailing action along the spectator-friendly Charlotte Amalie Waterfront. „Continued on next page

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 15 „ Continued from previous page Invitees to date include defending champion Sally Barkow from the USA (10th ranked Women, 26th ranked Open), the USAs Stephanie Roble (35th ranked Women), Dave Dellenbaugh and Don Wilson (33rd ranked Open), and the USVIs Taylor Canfield (5th ranked Open) and Peter Holmberg. At least four slots are still available and skippers are welcome to request an invitation. Past winners of the CAMR read like a Whos Who of sailing: the USAs Sally Barkow and Finlands Staffan Lindberg won the Open Division in 2012 and 2011, respectively, while the USAs Genny Tulloch triumphed in 2008 and 2010 and Frances Claire Leroy in 2009 in the Womens Division, and it was the USVIs Taylor Canfield in 2008 and Peter Holmberg in 2009 and Portugals Alvaro Marinho/Seth Sailing Team in 2010 who won in the Open Division. The CAMR is known for introducing young sailors to the sport, working cooperatively with the VI government and VI Department of Tourism in its efforts to get more kids out on the water. In 2013, each Open team will have a VI high school (under age 18) sailor as a member. The CAMR is an International Sailing Federation (ISAF) provisional Grade Two event. The Virgin Islands Sailing Association (VISA) is the organizing authority for the CAMR, named for the late Carlos Aguilar, who was an avid sailor and match racer. The Chicago Match Race Center (CMRC) is a major sponsor. For more information visit www.carlosmatchrace.com. All Set: Grenada Sailing Week 2014 Its definite … the dates for the next Grenada Sailing Week will be January 30th to February 4th, 2014 Starting with the Skippers Briefing on Thursday January 30th, the format will be similar to that of the 2013 edition „ two days of racing, a mid-regatta lay day, followed by two more days of racing, giving serious sailors a series to get their teeth into, visiting sailors some time to explore Grenada, and of course plenty of nights to party. It is intended that the six days starting from the last Thursday in January will be the ongoing time slot on the Caribbean racing calendar for this start-ofthe-season event, which has the sanction of the Grenada Sailing Association and the Caribbean Sailing Association. Grenada Sailing Week Board members who got the regatta up and going last year „ Marc DeCaul (Chairman), Richard Szyjan, Mike Bingley and Patrick Brathwaite „ will continue for the 2014 edition. Joining them this year is Shawn Jardine, who was born in England and moved to Trinidad at a young age. There he got involved in sailing and power boating, racing sailboats competitively for the past 39 years and cruising with his 36-foot sailing sloop. Catbird In June 2011 he joined Island Water World Grenada, bringing with him marketing and management experience from his years in wine retail (he is a qualified vintner) and the automobile industry, as well as six years as manager of Peakes Chandlery in Chaguaramas, Trinidad. Since settling in Grenada he has demonstrated his commitment to the Grenada sailing community, both professionally and personally. The 2013 edition drew a creditable 29 entries and succeeded beyond expectations, despite the very short time frame for preparation. Using the lessons learned from the first event, this lean and keen board, with the support of the GSW Action Group and committed sponsors, aims to build an even better Grenada Sailing Week in 2014. So diarize these dates, make your travel plans and before you know it you will be Sailing de SpiceŽ again! For more information visit http://grenadasailingweek.com. New GSW board member Shawn Jardine, seen here with racer Robbie Yearwood at GSW 2013 Sally Barkow (far right) and Dave Perry battled for first in the 2012 FinalsDEAN BARNES

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 16 Louay Habib takes a look at the action and atmosphere at Antigua Sailing Week 2013, one of the longest running regattas in the Caribbean and the last major international event of the 2013 Caribbean racing calendar. I have been lucky enough to attend many regattas in the Caribbean this season and the competition and sailing ability at Antigua Sailing Week was definitely the best of all of them. The 46th edition of Antigua Sailing Week had one of the largest big-boat turnouts for years, with ten yachts of 60 feet or over. However, the most intense competition was in the smaller yachts. Phil Lotz Swan 42, Arethusa was rightly awarded the Lord Nelson Trophy for the best performance by any of the 103 yachts competing at the regatta. Taking on last years overall winner, Richard Wesslunds Florida-based J/120, El Ocaso the Swan from Rhode Island was exquisitely sailed by Lotz and his team. Giving away a huge time handicap, Arethusa aced six out of eight races. At the Awards Ceremony, Lotz led his team onto the stage and smiled with glee as he accepted one of sailings most prestigious trophies. It feels great! It hasnt sunk in yet, but I want to thank the whole crew who have put so much skill and effort into this win. I would also like to thank the organizers of Antigua Sailing Week for putting on such a well-polished event.Ž An astounding 26 different countries were represented at Antigua Sailing Week 2013, ranging from Australia to Trinidad to Finland. His Majesty King Harald of Norway returned to race at the Caribbeans most prestigious and internationally recognized regatta. The regatta experienced light winds on all but one day, when 20 knots of full tradewind power returned to produce exciting sailing conditions. The light conditions, unusual for Antigua, fashioned tactically demanding racing, testing both the competitors and the organizers. A very high standard of sailing and race courses were required „ and that is exactly what was delivered. Class in Every Class In CSA 1, Eduardo Wong Lu Vegas Soto 48, Kuankun flies the Peruvian flag and the crew come from the highly competitive Soto 40 class. Kuankun won all bar two races and their precision starts were a big part of that, hitting the line with pace on the BŽ of the BangŽ. HM King Harald of Norway, racing the RP78 Whisper was second to Kuankun with Jose Arozamenas American Farr 73, Maximizer third. In CSA 2, mainly composed of high performance cruising yachts, the heavier displacement yachts included the two largest yachts at Antigua Sailing Week 2013: the 94-foot Frers, Bristolian and the 92-foot Nelson Marek, Locura All week, the two heavyweights enjoyed a gentlemens bet for a case of champagne. Hector Velardes Locura beat Bristolian, skippered by Patrick Wynn, on handicap, but Bristolian beat Locura over the water on more occasions, so honours were even. The Class win on corrected time, however, went to Christian Potthoff-Sewings German JV53, Auliana II which enjoyed the light conditions. In CSA 3, Arethusa was the champion with El Ocaso second, but there was a fantastic battle for third place between three lightweight flying machines. Peter Peakes Trinidadian RP37, Slippery made the last podium place by just 32 seconds in the last race, narrowly beating Antigua National Sailing Academys young crew on the Cork 1720 Digicel Challenger In CSA 4, it went right to the wire between Philippe Falles Grand Soleil 43, Quokka 8 and Lucy Reynolds First 40, Southern Child Going into the last race, Quokka knew they had to make the top three to win the class. Quokka got away well and Southern Child sped after them. Literally throwing caution to the windŽ, Southern Child hoisted their spinnaker on a tight reach to try to reel the opposition in, but Quokka held on to take the class title, with Southern Child second and Jeremy Thorps First 40, Lancelot II in third place. „Continued on next page ANTIGUA SAILING WEEK 2013 ALL PHOTOS: PAUL WYETH / PWPICTURES.COM / ANTIGUA SAILING WEEK ANTIGUA DELIVERS!CSA 1 was composed of high-performance racing yachts crewed by professional sailors from the Americas Cup, Olympics, Volvo Ocean Race and Vende Globe Above: Bareboats, a large part of the Antigua Sailing Week 2013 fleet, were competitive Right: Aerial view of the racing

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 17 „ Continued from previous page Carlo Falcones one-off, Caccia alla Volpe, and Ross Applebeys Oyster Lightwave 48, Scarlet Oyster, had an epic battle in CSA 5. Both yachts traded tacks all week and the overall lead changed hands four times during the eight-race series. In the end, Caccia all Volpe won the last race of the series to win the class by a single point. Peter Morriss Frers 43, Jaguar from Trinidad, was third. In CSA 6, Geoffrey Pidduck won all seven races with his Six Meter, Biwi Magic „ an astounding achievement for a man who is 75 years of age. Geoffrey has been coming to Antigua Sailing Week for 40 years, but this is the first time he has achieved a perfect score and Biwi Magic was rightly named Best Antiguan and Caribbean Boat at the regatta. Sir Hugh Bailey can be considered the grandfather of sailing in Antigua, knighted for his contribution to sailing. His Antiguan-flag spinnaker is an iconic symbol of Antigua Sailing Week and this year it was flown in all its glory above his new CS40 U-Go Immaculately prepared and beautifully sailed, U-Go won all of the seven races in CSA 7B. In 7A, Jorge Borns Uruguayan Jeanneau 57, Batucada was the clear winner with French Beneteau 473, Ormeau skippered by Alain Charlot in second and Phil Mundays British Jeanneau 52.2, Great Escape of Southampton, in third. This year there were four multihulls, and 29 yachts racing in the Bareboat Classes. Maas Hanens Outremer, Teora, won the Multihull Class by one point after a tight contest with the Lipari 41 Salako In Bareboat 1, Alfred Geissers Swiss entry, the Dufour 455 KH+P Sea You Later was in fine form: the team won their class in 2011 and returned this year to take the Bareboat 1 Class title and the Overall Bareboat title, winning five out of seven races. The crew celebrated by throwing Alfred into English Harbour! There was fierce fighting in Bareboat 2 with some of the closest racing in any class. Christoff Nielsens German KH+P Bageal, tied on points with Coleman Garveys Irish team on the Jeanneau SO 44i Warvor It took a countback on number of first places to decide the winner, Bageal Antigua Sailing Week veteran Alexander Pfeiffer had a very inexperienced team racing another KH+P Balaou but the German team was delighted with third in class. ASWs Changing Atmospheric Conditions The conditions at Antigua Sailing Week made for a somewhat peaceful regatta atmosphere this year, which might surprise some readers who remember the regatta as it was years ago, when the professional crews raced hard and the bars were a sea of beer bottles. Well, Antigua Sailing Week has changed. Three years ago the newly formed Regatta Organizing Committee set out to deliver a high standard both on and off the water, with well-drilled race management and evening social occasions suitable for all the family. Events such as the Nonsuch Bay RS Elite Challenge typify the social scene now prevalent at Antigua Sailing Week. The fleet racing event, right off Pigeon Beach, was a spectacular occasion with Olympic and world champion sailors delivering a high calibre performance of sailing skills. On shore Nonsuch Bays Mitchell Husbands showed why he is a former Caribbean Chef of the Year, delivering a fantastic beach barbecue. Antigua Sailing Weeks motto is Where sailing comes firstŽ and that is very true „ the standard of race management is as high as anywhere in the Caribbean. But another apt motto might be Quality rather than quantityŽ. Antigua Sailing Week may be smaller than it was decades ago but the standard of the event, both on and off the water, is probably as good as it has ever been. For full results visit https://regattaguru.com/asw. Left: Arethusa won the coveted Lord Nelson Trophy for Best Yacht Overall Below: Bidding farewell to the 46th edition of Antigua Sailing Week with another spectacular awards ceremony and party at Nelsons Dockyard Scarlet Oyster, Jaguar and Sea Gal climbing to windward in a highly charged CSA 5 class

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 18

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 19 Johnson Hardware Ltd. Chain & Rope Anchors & Fenders Electric Wire Marine Hoses Bilge Pumps Lubricants & Oils Stainless Fasteners Stainless Fittings VHF Radios Flares & Life Jackets Snorkeling Equipment Fishing Gear Antifouling Paint Paint Brushes Epoxy Resins Sanding Paper & Discs Hand & Power Tools Houseware & Cookware FOR YOUR MARINE HARDWARE, AND MORE Rodney Bay, St. Lucia Tel: (758) 452 0299 Fax: (758) 452 0311 e-mail: hardware@candw.lc Escorted by a dozen dolphins „ for good luck, we always think „ we sailed our yacht, Witte Raaf out of the Boca de Monos near Chaguaramas, Trinidad bound for Suriname. But because the wind was southeasterly, we changed our plan and decided to stop for ten days in Tobago, awaiting more favourable wind directions plus a neap tide to diminish the effects of the infamous Guyana Current. From Charlotteville we headed for Castara, where we anchored close to Paradise Beach right next to a beautiful coral reef. But after two days the romance was abruptly disturbed when we heard: tick tick … tick … tickŽ. The rudder. The problem was immediately clear to us as the fingers inside the rudder had been broken before and were renewed and re-welded in Suriname a couple of years ago. Now, obviously, again they had broken off the rudder shaft. Without those fingers the shaft in the rudder has no connection with the rudder blade and if more play develops, the boat may lose her steerage. We concluded that we needed advice and support from the Coastguard. But according to Murphys Law, our cell phone was not working in Tobago, so we dinghied up to Castara Beach where help came rushing towards us when two local fellows immediately came to our rescue as we went almost upside down while beaching our dinghy in a breaking wave caused by the considerable swell. Murphys Law, remember! We related our story to both helpful people and one of them, Junior, immediately called the Coastguard for us and lent us his phone. It soon became clear that we had better see the Coastguard in person, and the other helpful man, Michael, took us to the Coastguards Tobago headquarters in Scarborough, where we explained the situation to four friendly officers. They were all very understanding and helpful, which was a huge relief. One of the officers, AB Pierre, was especially assigned to our case and he even contacted Customs in Charlotteville for us to explain why we would not be able to clear with them before we left Tobago. The Tobago Coastguard was very concerned about our safety and we agreed that we would keep in contact by cell phone while we were still in Tobago. They promised to be standing by on VHF16 and on HF distress frequency 2182 Mhz. As our old cell phone was not working (it appeared to be incompatible with the new antennas on the island!) Michael took us to the right shop where we bought a new phone and then drove us back to Castara. The same afternoon we sailed to Store Bay, keeping our promise to phone the Coastguard upon departure and arrival. We did not actually sail, but used the engine to minimize pressure on the rudder (the more pressure, the more risk of play). The following day the Coastguard came alongside Witte Raaf to have a look at our situation in person. This made us feel much more secure and we felt less reluctant to venture the 60 miles back to Chaguaramas, in the knowledge that help was indeed nearby. To our question about how quickly they would be able to get to us in case of an emergency, they responded: Depending on your position, 45 minutes tops.Ž In the afternoon we cleared with Customs in Scarborough and the following day we returned to Chaguaramas. When we reached the north coast of Trinidad, a helicopter came hovering over our heads. We were not sure if it had actually come out especially for us, but it added to our sense of safety and we arrived safely in Chaguaramas without further problems. Only if we think of what could have happenedƒ. We cleared Customs immediately and they appeared to have been waiting for us, as they said: Oh good, youre the guys with the rudder problems, the Coastguard asked us to confirm your arrival.Ž Yes, the Trinidadian authorities were completely on top of things! Lieutenant Commander Issac, Chief Petty Officer Roberts, Petty Officer Solomon and Able Seaman Pierre, we thank you for your efficient support. Because we knew you were monitoring us, we felt less insecure „ although of course we were still nervous during the trip and had two grab bags at the ready. Witte Raaf was hauled out at IMS, where they are always helpful but now even more so (if thats possible). With a borrowed grinder we made a hole in the rudder and our suspicions proved to be correct. According to the chief welder at IMS, the Surinamese welds were shoddy and he applied some professional and solid lap joints. The holes were filled with epoxy resin and microballoons and finished with glassfibre, and Witte Raaf is ready to sail to Suriname, safe and sound. Bago and Trini, thanks a lot! Petra and Jan Willem Versol are a Dutch couple who live in Suriname but keep their 40-foot ketch, Witte Raaf in Trinidad during the hurricane season. They have been cruising the Caribbean for seven years and consider the southeastern Caribbean „ from Trinidad up to Dominica „ their new home waters. Visit their website at www.witteraaf.info.MUCH APPRECIATED HELP FROM T&T AUTHORITIESby Petra and Jan Willem Versol Arriving and at anchor in Castara Bay, where we realized we had rudder trouble. Thanks to helpful Tobagonians and a caring Coas tguard, a potentially worsening problem resulted in no drama

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 20 This trail near Portsmouth, Dominica takes you through lovely farmland then into rainforest. It is a loop hike, about four hours long, tough enough to be challenging at times, but swimming holes at both ends will allow you to cool off. A good part of the hike is on Section 11 of the Waitukubuli Trail, but in this shortened version you are going to walk out of Portsmouth and take a path to join the trail, and then bail out when not too far from the medical school. The trail and some parts leading into it are marked with blue and yellow paint and sometimes with red numbers. These are painted on rocks, stones and trees. If four hours is too long, either end of the trail can be used for shorter walks. More about that later. The best place to leave your dinghy is at the dinghy dock at the Indian River. From there, walk back into town, and turn right by the bus square, going along the main road out of town in the direction of Calibishie. Some ten to 15 minutes walking will bring you to a wide grassy road on your right. At this point you can see the top of a big aerial ahead of you, probably some horses on your right, maybe the stables sign still on your right, and some kind of industrial thing with cement trucks and a big fenced compound on the other side of the grassy road. Turn down the grassy road; it is lovely, with guava trees lining it some of the way. The road crosses the upper reaches of the Indian River with bathing pools for a quick dip. The road continues up through delightful farmland. Just before a fairly sharp right turn in the road is a big dark rock on your right. „Continued on next page SAILORS HIKES BY CHRIS DOYLE This trail provides a splendid view over Portsmouth town and anchorage Inset: A suspension footbridge takes you over the Picard River A Farmland and Mountain Loop, DOMINICA ALL PHOTOS: CHRIS DOYLE

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 21 AMENITIEST: 787.863.0313 F: 787.863.5282E: sunbaymarina@aol.comParcelas Beltrn, Bo. Sardinera, Fajardo, Puerto Rico € Professional and Courteous Sta € 282 Fixed Slips € Wide Concrete Finger Piers € On-Site Fuel Dock and Diesel Delivered on all Slips except on Dock AŽ € Safety, Cleanliness and Service is our Primary Concern € Whole Area Patrolled by 24 Hour Security € Camera Surveillance€ Ocial Cruising Station of SSCA¡ VISIT US! at Fajardo our webpage www.sunbaymarina.com or at the Administration Oce at the Marina, open 7 days a week from 8:00 am to 4:00 pmTHE DIFFERENCE IS what we do and the way we do it. what we do and the way we do it. Join us today and be part of our family.€ Complementary Cable TV and Wi-Fi € Water and Electricity € Restrooms and Showers € Laundry Facilities € Nearby Ship's Chandlery and Convenience Store € Near Small Eateries and Upscale Elegant Restaurants such as El Conquistador Hotel and Casino € US Custom and Immigration Located 1/2 mile Away by Dinghy € Ample Parking is a tradition, in family boating is a tradition, in family boating ... is a tradition, in family boating is a tradition, in family boating ... Close to: „ Continued from previous page Your trail continues on up the road, but if you take a tiny path down past this rock it brings you very shortly to a small pretty spring, one of the sources of the Indian River. Higher up the road you will come to a major road division; you take a right turn here, clearly marked the Waitukubuli Trail. The road will soon turn into a path and you will have been walking now about an hour. The path is uphill, but good walking. At one point you pass right between two little farm huts. The path continues up and up and you think you are going to the top of a mountain, but happily there is a trail sign and you come to a clear division (about one and half hours from town). The sign points up the mountain, but you want to make a right turn here into the forest. You have now come off the feeder into the Waitukubuli Trail and are on the main trail; this where the hike gets a little challenging. The trail is muddy and slippery in places. It is mainly well marked, though very small and often steep. Many steps have been cut in, but lots of these have washed out. Luckily you are in the forest so trees serve as handholds much of the time. You are going deep into the forest here, so take your time and avoid a fall. Be prepared for some butt slides if you feel more comfortable. The path takes you steeply down into a deep ravine, and then up and up on the other side. It then takes you along attractive ridge lines for some of the time and here it is easier. But there is still some tricky downhill work to be negotiated. About three hours into your hike you come to a delightful covered shelter with a picnic table with a panoramic view over Prince Rupert Bay. You can breathe a sigh of relief here; the path that was used to carry all the building material cannot be as bad as the one you have come along. However, it is steeply downhill and still quite challenging. You come down to the river where a fabulous suspension bridge will take you across. Walk on up to the road. Here you will be turning right to get off the trail and back into civilization. However a short way down you will find access to the river and a great swimming hole called Basin Powell. If you are hungry and thirsty, Riverside Restaurant is just a short walk away, and the quickest way to get back to the Indian River is to pass through the Customs area and follow the coast. If you hike the trail the other way round, you do the difficult part more at the beginning of the hike. From the Riverside Restaurant, come out to the main road and turn right, cross the bridge and pass the supermarket. Take the first road on your left, which is right beside a utilitarian part of the medical school. Continue a long way up this road. Look for the Waitukubuli Trail sign pointing downhill on your left. However, you are really going to have to look, as it is aligned for people coming the other way along the trail. A little higher than the sign is a building, under construction when we passed, with water pipes stacked up. If you want a shorter walk, the first part of this hike, to the Indian River water source, is a perfectly lovely and easy walk. Return the same way you came. From the other end, you could take a picnic across the suspension bridge and up to the shelter with a view. Afterwards you can return, turn left on the road and follow it up to the old water source, and spend some time playing in the river. Chris Doyle is the author of the Sailors Guide to the Windward Islands and the Cruising Guide to the Leeward Islands Visit his website at www.doyleguides.com. Face to face with the forest. This fabulous foliage means abundant rainfall, so be prepared for slippery parts along the trail

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 22 Full Service Marina Mini Market Free WiFi A/C Power 110/220 Fuel Dock Showers Car Rental Dive Centre Sail Loft/Canvas Shop Beach Bar Black Pearl Restaurant Prince & Queens Boutique Book Exchange Laundry Mooring BallsSunsail Marine Centre Come rediscover the magic of Saint Vincent… …your one stop marine centre in the Grenadines PO Box 133, Blue Lagoon, St. Vincent, West Indies Tel: 1 784 458 4308 Fax: 1 784 456 8928 sunsailsvg@vincysurf.com www.sunsail.com Nearly the first time I met Leo Hoogenboom I was floating in 100 feet of gin-clear water off the coast of Bonaire. Leo had invited me and a dozen friends to witness his freedive on the Hilma Hooker a famous shipwreck well known to scuba divers. Hoogenbooms plan was to dive down to the ship, enter at the stern hatch, swim the length of the 235-foot vessel, and ascend from the fore hatch „ all in one breath. I always wanted to dive the Hilma Hooker ,Ž says Leo. I am used to swimming down to a hundred feet. Thats a depth Im really comfortable with. The only thing that changes is swimming through the wreck. Its a stable, very open wreck so the only barrier is in my mind. You cannot go up during that horizontal stretch. You just have to put things into perspective.Ž And that is just what he did. Nearly three minutes later, the young Dutch diver broke the surface. Mission accomplished. But freediving for Hoogenboom is not necessarily about going deep. For a sport that has a reputation for the extreme and the daring, I expected to hear the sensational. But speaking with this fit, 30-something freediver was more like conversing with a Zen master. He talks a lot about the meditative qualities of taking the plunge and being in the nowŽ. Freediving is very personal for me. Its more of a mental experience than a physical experience. Every time I go down its a different journey. Im awake. There are no thoughts. Its all encompassing. A lot of elements in our daily life are artificially created „ stress, societal pressures, etcetera. But when I dive, thats all gone. There is only nature at its purest. When you go out on a reef here, you see more than if youre in a rainforest. The biggest reward is that it is almost a spiritual journey when you go down.Ž Hoogenbooms affinity for water started at a young age. He grew up in Holland on a lake where his family operated a watersports business. Later, he became a scuba diver, but loved snorkeling and diving under while being free of all the equipment. In 2008, Leo went to Sharm el Sheik, Egypt for an eight-day course and became a licensed freediving instructor through the Apnea Academy. He now operates FLOW, an adventure service on Bonaire that specializes in mountain biking, caving, hiking and, of course, freediving. Our freediving course is focused on personal development in terms of breathing, relaxation and swimming technique. Certainly, I teach and certify people. But the goal of the course should be that you gain inwater confidence, that you become more aware of your breath, mental state and relaxation. When you relax your mind, your body will follow.Ž The clientele at FLOW ranges from extreme-sports types in their 20s to older folks who want to have a unique underwater experience. Hoogenboom tries to accommodate the needs of all. I had two 65-year-olds, both a bit overweight, who were not comfortable in the water but wanted to work on their skills. By the end of the course, they were diving down to ten to 15 feet of water and were very relaxed. You need to remember that it is natural for us to be in the water. We have a heritage in the water. Theres a collective memory. Every single person starts his or her life in the water with nine months in the womb. Youre hovering, not dealing with gravity as we normally do. Once you learn to activate that sense which comes with training and more awareness, you can use that connection, that memory of the water. Were more related to marine animals than terrestrial animals.Ž Leo shows me a basic freediving kit. The fins are extra long and stiff, almost brittle. This allows one to descend quickly for more bottom time and also delivers efficient propulsion for a speedy ascent. The masks are basic black and fit close to the face, limiting the pressure that occurs on a fast descent. And the snorkel is a simple, flexible tube made for easy breathing. It hooks on the back of the mask strap so that it stays out of the way underwater. No need for the snorkel once under. This quality package costs $15/day to rent at FLOW and less than $400 if purchased. Other than perhaps a weight belt, that is all the essential gear needed to freedive. FLOW is located in front of the famed Bonaire dive resort, Captain Dons Habitat, and shares a small building with BonPhoto, a sister company. Gracing the walls are the stunning underwater photographs of BonPhotos Zsuzsanna Pusztai, Leos wife and business partner. In a former life, Zsuzsanna was a social worker in her native Hungary. But I grew up on Jacques Cousteau so I always knew I wanted to do things underwater.Ž Years later, she learned underwater photography. Then her husband taught her how to freedive and the skill set was complete. Zsuzsanna says that 50 percent of her photos are now done freediving because it allows her better access to underwater animals. The fish sense you when you first come down and they move away,Ž says the freediving photographer. But the fun part is that they come back. „Continued on next page ZSUZSANNA PUSZTAI TAKING A DEEP BREATH by Patrick Holian Above: Zsuzsanna and Leo. Freediving is more of a mental experience than a physical experience Left: No bubbles, no troubles. Freediving allows Zsuzsanna to take close-up shots of unspooked sea creatures

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 23 BAREBOAT CHARTERS FULLY CREWED CHARTERS ASA SAILING SCHOOL PO Box 39, Blue Lagoon, St Vincent, West Indies Tel. 1-784-456-9526 / 9334 / 9144 Fax. 1-784-456-9238 barebum@vincysurf.com www.barefootyachts .com Barefoot Yacht Charters & Marine Centre € Doyle Sail Loft & Canvas Shop € Raymarine Electronics € Refrigeration Work € Mechanical & Electrical Repairs € Fibreglass Repairs € Laundry € Vehicle Rentals € Showers € Air Travel € Ice & Water € Diesel & Propane € Moorings € Island Tours € Surftech Surf Shop € Hotel Reservations € Quiksilver Surf Wear € Restaurant & Bar € Boutique € On-site Accommodation € Wi-Fi / Internet Caf € Book Exchange Since 1984 „ Continued from previous page They make the formation again. You dont get that with scuba and all its bubbles. I have this thing though „ I get so interested in my subjects that I sometimes lose track of time. I have to pay better attention but its so easy to get involved.Ž One recent involvement was with a friendly octopus off the coast of Klein Bonaire, Bonaires offshore islet. There it was at 25 feet. I followed him. At some point I got a few inches away. And instead of swimming off, the octopus opened up all the way. I took two photos. The octopus and I just looked at each other then. That moment took me away. I didnt realize how special the photo was until afterwards. But it was the experience. The contact with the octopus, thats what drives me. That is why Im doing this. How many people can say that they experience nature this way?Ž Apparently, there are more than Zsuzsanna ever imagined. Leo Hoogenboom finds Bonaire to be the perfect island for this up and coming sport. Bonaire has great reefs and deep water right next to shore. You truly can swim out from the surface and do a worldrecord event. There are not a lot of places where you can do that.Ž These ideal conditions have certainly captured the attention of those in South America. Carlos Coste, a world-record holding freediver from Venezuela, brings in a group of students a couple of times a year to conduct freediving workshops on Bonaire. The weeklong training is held at Eden Beach in cooperation with Wanna Dive, a full service dive shop. And then there is Karol Meyer, the decorated Brazilian diver who has come to the island since 2009 to break deepwater records. I like Bonaire because of the high quality of services and structure at the Buddy Dive Resort and the hospitality of the Bonaire people. That combined with the perfect conditions to practice the sport allows us to improve performance with plenty of security.Ž Meyer is an eight-time world record holder and is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records. I asked her what motivates her to dive so deep. Its the challenge of the dive plus the pressure, the blue and the silence. I enjoy going where few people have been. In the future we hope to offer yearly freediving classes for Brazilian divers, so they can get to know this beautiful place.Ž But even with all this new buzz of record-setting dives, Bonaire has known freediving for generations. Just ask Gielmon FunchiŽ Egbreghts, who started diving as a young boy 45 years ago. We didnt have many cruise ships back then. But when they would depart the island, it was a big event. The passengers would throw their coins into the water. All of us kids would dive for the money. It was about 40 feet down. That is how I started making freedives fast. Fast money!Ž He laughs. Then I would run to the bank and deposit my coins. That was my freediving school.Ž Like many, Egbreghts took those hard-earned skills, and as a young man, fished under water. He would collect conch, spear fish and harvest lobster. In the old days, we hunted the Nassau grouper when they migrated here from Venezuela looking for deeper water in which to spawn.Ž Today, it is difficult to find grouper, and spearfishing and conch harvesting are prohibited. But freedivers like Egbreghts are still allowed to collect lobster when in season. I learned to stay under for four to five minutes looking for lobster. They can be anywhere from four to 80 feet. I would catch one or two each dive. If I got two, I would have one on the gaff and one in my arm coming up.Ž Funchi shows the scars from lobsters spiny shells on his forearm and grins. Its dangerous work.Ž At 54, Egbreghts still freedives nearly every week. At times, he removes fishing line and netting, hazards that can entrap and kill sea turtles. On other dives, he scavenges wrecks for lead ballast, wood, and chain „ anything that he might be able to use or sell on land. The Bonairean freediver covers a vast area doing this. You have to understand,Ž says Funchi, I freedive along the entire coast of the island.Ž Have you found any treasure?Ž Oh yeah, I found treasure.Ž What kinds of things?Ž Myself. Im a treasure.Ž He laughs again. Just like the sport freedivers, Egbreghts is attracted to the simplicity of taking the plunge. His passion goes far beyond the hunt. I still like the challenge in life. The last two times I went without the weights, just like the old days. Thats the real meaning of freediving. You dont have your watch. You dont have your knife. You dont have anything. Its just you, your body and the sea.Ž €€€ Once again, I find myself floating in the water with Leo Hoogenboom. He has just attached a line to an old wreck, La Machaca 35 feet below. This is the house reef for Captain Dons Habitat. Holding on to the platform, a bright yellow, rectangular float attached to the line below, Leo reviews the basic steps for my descent. Relax horizontally in the water. Breathe slowly and deeply two to three times. Hold in your last breath and bend at the waist. „Continued on page 45 Above: A French angelfish. The fish sense you when you first come down and they move away. But the fun part is that they come back Right: Leo loves being underwater with only the simplest gear. I want to inspire people to be comfortable in the water

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 24 Upon arrival at Marina Bas-du-Fort, on the south end of the French island of Guadeloupe in the Lesser Antilles, we plugged in to a 220 volt, 50 amp outlet „ and promptly blew the circuit breaker on the power pole. A marina employee who was dispatched to assist quickly decided that there was something wrong with our boat „ oui I declared that our boat was fine at the last two marinas: Rodney Bay in St. Lucia and Port Louis in Grenada, so something must be wrong with their equipment. Later, a French-Canadian electrician explained that yes, my boat probably worked fine on the English-speaking islands using US/Canadian equipment, but French islands use European standards that include a very sensitive Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt (GFCI) combined with a residual-current circuit breaker with overload protection (RCBO), and that I have a leakingŽ boat. In the US and Canada a residual-current device (RCD) is most commonly known as a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) or shortened to ground fault interrupter (GFI). In other countries they are sometimes known as safety switches, trips or simply RCDs. RCDs are designed to disconnect the circuit if there is a leakage current. By detecting small leakage currents (typically five to 30 milliamperes) and disconnecting quickly enough (<30 ms), they may prevent electrocution. Leakage current threshold, response time and the method of deployment of RCDs varies from country to country. RCDs operate by measuring the current balance between two conductors. If these do not sum to zero, there is a leakage of current to somewhere else (to earth/ground, or to another circuit), and the device will open its contacts. More on how we can use this information to test our boats later. The technical definition for a ground fault with Alternating Current (AC) is: an unintentional, electrically conducting connection between an ungrounded conductor of an electrical circuit and the normally non-current-carrying conductors, i.e., metallic enclosures, metallic equipment or earth. Boats built according to ABYC standards have the AC and DC grounding systems connected together at the back of the boats electrical panel, and the boats bonding system connects all the underwater metal objects like bronze sea cocks, rudder posts and strut mounts together electrically via a green 8 AWG wire. An AC leak will exit via the underwater metal as it tries to find a path back to its source. If (a big if) you are plugged into the dock, and if that docks grounding system is in good shape, some of the leakage current will follow your power cord back to the source. We were oblivious to our boats electrical leak for hundreds of miles and numerous marinas before that finicky French marina would not play nice with us. So, what is the big concern? A leaking boat can kill. If a swimmer enters into the current path in the water around the boat, they are going to get shocked. Depending upon the actual amount of current they get run through their heart, the shock can range from undetectable to lethal. Most of the research that led to RCDs/GFIs was accomplished by Charles F. Dalziel, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. In his 1961 paper he describes subjecting 134 men and 28 women to electrical shocks and measuring the let-go threshold.Ž He was then able to determine the values needed to prevent electrical shock. Other tests were made with dry hands, hands moist from perspiration and hands dripping wet from weak acid solutions.Ž They just dont make college students like that anymore, or let you do those kinds of tests on them! Even current below lethal amounts (1 amp AC) will cause extremely fast and damaging corrosion. If you are replacing your shaft and hull zincs at a rapid pace, you or your neighbor probably has an electrical leak. If you are not catching fish, you may have an electrical leak. Yes, scientific research has proven that fish are both attracted and/or repelled by electricity. Commercial fishermen have effectively used electricity to help herd menhaden and shrimp into purse seines. Attracting fish using electricity is probably best left to the experts.Ž We should probably only concern ourselves with not repelling dinner. But, how do we know if our boat is leaking? For the electrician in Guadeloupe, finding the offending electrical equipment was easy. He simply had me turn all the breakers off, reset the GFCI/RCBO switch at the power pole, and then watch as I individually turned the equipment back on. It turned out that we had two offenders, the inverter/ charger and the oven. The First mates solution for the oven was that we could eat out. However, we found that by disconnecting the seldom-used broiling element the leak was plugged. The offending inverter/charger had to be replaced. But what if you are not plugged into a finicky French marina? Remember above where I said that the way RCDs work is by measuring the current balance between two conductors? If these do not sum to zero, there is a leakage of current to somewhere. Normally when using a clamp-on amp meter you are measuring amperage flow through a conductor so you clamp only around one wire. To look for current leakage clamp around the whole cord. With alternating current (AC) the current flow is really in two directions, it is alternating. It must cancel itself out, or be a sum zero situation. If your boat is not leaking the amp meter should read zero. „Continued on next page A LEAKING BOAT by Maurice Howland Top: Grounded seacocks Above: Replacing the shaft zincs on Motivator At marinas in English-speaking countries, the author didnt realize that Motivator was leaking Motivators electrical panel

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 25 „ Continued from previous page The best way to take this measurement is to turn on your AC appliances one by one and see if the reading changes, just like the electrician in Guadeloupe had me do. If you get a reading that keeps going up as you turn on appliances, then you have what is called a false groundŽ whereby there is a neutral to ground connection (common in land-based electrical connections) either at the panel board or at an appliance that should not exist. A check should also be made for stray current in the water especially to ensure your boat is not driving fish away and eating zincs. This is best performed away from the dock so that you are not reading your neighbors leakage. A silver chloride electrode is the best type of reference electrode for detecting stray current and testing for cathodic protection corrosion systems (zincs) in seawater environments. The one available from BoatZincs.com has an electrode that plugs into your multimeter for ease of taking readings (directions included). An improvised stray current detector can be constructed by attaching a 5-by-7 inch sheet of copper flashing to a broomstick. Then attach a wire to the copper and use cable-ties to secure it to the pole. Set your multimeter to DC voltage and connect the wire from the copper plate to the positive side of your multimeter. The negative side of the multimeter should be connected to a negative battery terminal or a reliable ground. Stick the copper plate in the water and walk around the boats parameter looking for a voltage change. The voltmeter should show a natural reading of around 0.6 to 0.9 volts. If, as you activate DC components you see a jump of 0.05 volts or more, you have found at least one of the leakers. Now, switch your multimeter to AC and do the same thing with the AC components. Once you have detected and repaired any leaks, you are ready to catch the big ones „ happy hunting. Maurice and Pollie Howland are cruising the Caribbean aboard the DeFever 49 Motivator. Top left and rightA handy digital clamp multimeter can be used with a silver chloride electrode (left) or over a shore cord (above left) Electrical leaks are said to repel fish; stopping leaks certainly worked for the author! Caption

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 26 STUNNING UNDERWATER PHOTO TIP!Hard, reflective light such as on the seabed comes from sunny days with wind over the water. Overcast days with dispersed light are much better for taking photos. If surface light is reflected, use a "fill flash" to soften the shadow effect. Excerpt from "How to Take Stunning Underwater Photos Using Inexpensive Point and Shoot Cameras" by Scott Fratcher, available on Kindle, Apple, and ebook. In order to reduce the risk of being a victim of crime while cruising, you must know where crime occurs and how it occurs. Each area or location is different and gives rise to different variables; pay attention to where you are at all times. On Land As cruisers we need to go ashore to reprovision, find replacement parts and repairs, eat at restaurants, and even just walk around. Those who want to burglarize your boat watch to see when you leave the boat so they can board it. Others may follow you to see where you go, how often and by what route. There are measures you can take to reduce risk. PRE-EMPTIVE MEASURES € No matter whether they are armed or not, or what weapon they have, what a robber wants is your wallet (i.e. your credit cards and your money) and to get away fast. Help them do that by being ready for them. Always carry throw-away cashŽ. Throwaway cash is a wad of small bills that appears to be all you have. It can be 20 singles with a $10 bill on top, folded in half and kept together with a rubber band. Most street muggers want to do the act and get away, and will not stop to examine a wad of cash. If you have expired credit cards, do not throw them away. Carry them in a dummy wallet alongside the throwaway cash. € Never carry your wallet in your back pocket or in your purse if the purse is the type that can be snatched. Carry credit cards and wallets in a buttoned pocket that is not obvious. In addition, never carry all of your credit cards in one place; separate them among different pockets or divide them with a person who is with you. Be sure to keep a list of all cards and their numbers so that if the cards are stolen you can make a quick report. € Never wear realŽ jewelry to town. Remove anything of value or that appears to have value. Local beads and cheap watches are good to wear in case the mugger wants more; it gives you something to give. € Never walk in a remote area where there are no tourists unless you are with a local guide that you can trust. € Avoid dark streets and dark places. If you like to hang out in bars until the wee hours and then make your way back to your boat, you must understand that those that mean to rob you know what you do and when you do it; they have been watching you. Do not repeat the same routine daily. Stagger (no pun intended) your hours and also where you go to lime (hang out). € If you use an ATM machine, never go alone if you can avoid it and never go at night. Go only to the busiest banks and only during the day. When you make your withdrawal be sure no one is watching and never take a large sum of money in one shot. REACTIVE MEASURES If accosted, the only course of action that you can safely utilize in all cases is not resisting. (Forget the moves you have seen in action movies.) No amount of money or personal possession is worth risking injury. Follow these procedures: € Do not resist. Stay as calm as you can and make no sudden movements. € Be cooperative and forthcoming with meeting their demands. € Do not look the mugger in the eye. € Do not become aggressive or angry. € Let them have what they want so they can leave quickly. In Marinas and Boatyards Marinas in the Caribbean are usually beautiful places. Many have facilities that include restaurants and pools, bars and even a variety of different stores. It is the type of setting that is easy to feel safe in. Most marinas have security that patrols the marina and keeps an eye on things. What are the risks? Generally speaking, it is less than likely that you will be mugged in the marina; most marinas go out of their way to ensure that does not happen. However, if you leave your boat in a marina and leave it there for some time, there are many in the marina who will take note. This can include other boatowners, workmen on other boats, crew on other boats, and all who come and go. That innocent fellow who offers you a beer and admires your boat might have more in his mind than just admiring your boat after you show him all of its ins and outs. Marinas are not liable in most cases if you are burglarized. The first thing the management will say is that they did not know what inventory you arrived with and therefore cannot ascertain what you claim to be missing. Moreover, they are likely to add that they do not have a history of theft in the marina and that you are an exception to their experience. In other words, they are not responsible. In most cases, if you take a marina to court for negligence, they need only prove that they provided reasonable care. Getting into an argument with the marina will not get your equipment back. If you have insurance, file a claim and your insurance company will follow up. Insurance or not, the best method is to prevent the theft in the first place. What can be done to protect your boat while it is in a marina? PRE-EMPTIVE MEASURES € Always lock your boat completely when you leave and be sure to dog all hatches securely. € Do not leave electronics such as laptops and iPads lying around in plain sight. Be sure that nothing valuable inside is visible from the outside; draw all shades and curtains. € Lock your outboard motor when it is on the dinghy and also when it is on the stern rail. If you leave the dinghy in the marina next to your boat, be sure both the dinghy and the engine are locked. „Continued on next page Caribbean Cruising and Crime Prevention Part 2: THE SPECIFICSby Frank Virgintino BETTY KARLBoats at anchor may be watched

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 27 Visit: marinazarpar.com email: info@marinazarpar.com Tel: 809 523 5858 VHF Channel 5 € High Quality Sheltered Moorings € Slips to 120 with depth 10 € 70 Ton Travelift (30' beam) € ABYC certified machanics € Shore power 30, 50 and 100 amps € All slips with fingers € Showers, Laundry, Restaurant, 24 hr security € Immigration office in the marina for clearance € Free WIFI and Free Internet € Dinghy Dock € 12 miles East of Santo Domingo & 7 miles East of International Airport Marina Zar-Par THE FOCAL POINT FOR CRUISING YACHTSMEN 18.25.50N 69.36.67W M M M M a a a a a r r r r i i i i i Z T T „ Continued from previous page € Never bring anyone you dont know well inside your boat unless you absolutely must. If you must bring someone aboard who is not known, be sure everything worth anything is put away out of sight. If it is an unfamiliar worker, show them only what needs to be worked on and nothing more. € In some marinas, if you are going to leave the boat for any period of time, it is a good idea to hire a responsible local person to watch your boat. Once you do that, it is very hard for another local person to target the boat as it is in conflict with the person watching it; most often everyone knows everyone else and what he or she is doing. € Be sure to keep a list of all of your valuable gear, including manufacturer names and serial numbers. This is very important because if you have a loss and want to report it, the authorities will ask you for such details. If you have insurance you will not be able to process a claim without a police report having been filed. SECURITY ON THE HARD Boats being worked on ashore are natural targets because they are easily accessible. Thieves know that at the end of the day you will be tired and go to take a shower before going out to get something to eat. The thief may be anyone „ a workman or a cruiser „ who has been working on a boat in the area and who has noticed you and how you behave. € Be sure whenever you leave that the boat is securely locked, even if you are only making a quick run to buy parts or get lunch. € Take notice during the day who is working in the boatyard near or around you. Get a sense of who they are and, if tradesmen, note the companies they work for, what car or truck they came in and what time they quit work. Many yards require outside labor to sign in and out. It is always best to leave your boat after most have gone home; that way fewer people know your schedule. For those who will leave the boat for a number of months during hurricane season or for long-term storage, the risks are even greater. Yards claim to have security but virtually every boatyard will not take responsibility for your loss. How can they? They did not know what you had on the boat in the first place. € The best way to secure the boat on the hard for extended storage is to leave the door to the main cabin unlocked. This may sound crazy, but I have had many years of experience owning and managing boatyards and by leaving the companionway unlocked you avoid theft and reduce the risk of damage. It is a simple matter to break into virtually any boat: a small crowbar will do the trick nicely If you remove all valuable gear when the boat is decommissioned, there is no reason for the companionway door to be locked. Ask the boatyard if they have separate storage for your electronics and other valuable gear and remove it all, even if it takes longer and generates additional cost. When there is nothing to steal, nothing gets stolen. € If you must leave valuable gear on board or do not want to remove it, then other precautions are necessary. Everything must be locked up as securely as possible. In addition, all hatches and entrances must be made secure. Put everything you can out of sight. If you leave your dinghy on deck while you are gone and the engine on the stern rail, there is a high probability that they will not be there when you return. Ask the marina to hold the dinghy and engine for you even if you have to pay extra. At Anchor or on Moorings Being anchored or moored among other boats inspires a sense of safety and camaraderie. However, the sense of security is anything but real. Boats at anchor are watched by many people. It could be the boat boy or the fish vendor who tells his friends in the business of theft who is on board and what is available. It could be the fellow cruiser who covets your equipment. € Stay very conscious of the fact that loose lips sink ships.Ž When someone asks you innocently if you will be aboard whenever, always say yes. € Always lock your boat securely. Carry a VHF to maintain contact with the anchorage. € Be sure to stow out of sight everything that has any value and which can be stolen easily, for example laptops, cameras, etcetera. € When leaving the boat at night, leave on lights and a radio loud enough for those passing by to hear. € If you must leave the boat for any significant amount of time, have someone watch it. Ask a neighbor to keep an eye on it or get references and hire a responsible local person to boat-sit while you are gone. € Sad to say, if you are going to go ashore as part of a locally sponsored picnic or barbecue, or another event with a lot of other cruisers in the anchorage also attending, you are at high risk „ too many people know when a bunch of boats will be vulnerable. Unless a good harbor patrol is in place, leave someone aboard or hire a boat-sitter. Underway The type of thief who will look to overtake and board your boat at sea usually has weapons and knows how to use them. Unless you are prepared to get into a firefight with them, it is best not to resist or you can be seriously hurt or even killed. Most often what they really want is to take what you have and get away. They do not want to seriously hurt or kill anyone as that raises the stakes and leaves them open to being hunted down. € If boarded, try to stay as collected as you can, given the circumstances. Make no eye contact with anyone and let them take what it is they came for. Hopefully, they will take what they want and leave quickly. If they ask you for more, give it to them and do not play cute. You can replace what it is they may steal; you cannot replace your life! Reduction of Risk is the Key to Cruising Security The surest way to reduce your risk of being a victim of crime is to avoid the incident. The best way to avoid the incident is to reduce the probability. The best way to reduce the probability is to avoid areas where the probability is highest. Some areas have much higher crime rates than other areas. Consult databases that can give you accurate information on past instances of crime against yachts. Noonsite is excellent and free; it can be found at www.noonsite.com. Another excellent free resource for crime information is www.safetyandsecuritynet.com. Both of these sites provide data on crime. Also free, www.freecruisingguides.com offers the Caribbean Security Index (CSI), which will give you the probability of crimeŽ in different areas of the Caribbean. Use it to choose anchorages and route course and destinations. In towns, dont wear real jewelry or carry all your credit cards in one placeROSIE BURR

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 28 I am addicted to my retirement lifestyle of being aboard by sunset, early to bed, rising around first light, and avoiding crowds and loud music. But this is Ky-Mani Marley, a son of the Legend, a first, perhaps biggest, for Carriacou, and a benefit for causes that I support. The paddle ashore begins after dark, even though I am early. A mini-bus appears at a time arranged by others, two of whom „ a couple who have been visiting Carriacou for 12 years „ are already aboard. The bus loads at 7:30 even though the concert beginsŽ at eight. Ive heard the actual schedule: DJ music from 8:00 to 9:00, local musicians until 10:00, more DJ until 11:00, then Ky-Mani until half twelve, zero hours thirty... way past my bedtime. Pretty much on time, I was told to expect, with Ky-Mani coming on about midnight. Then DJ music til whenever, sometime after my usual waking time. I declare my limit to be midnight, even if the son hasnt yet come on. More passengers board along the way, one a local who will also be going to the concert, but not yet. He wonders why we visitors are going so early? The driver makes a clear and logical excuse for us about finding good seats ahead of the crowd. While that might make sense to visitors, it would be nonsense to a West Indian. But Kayaks are polite to visitors so nothing more is said „ respect. Our driver grew up with Bob Marleys music, a kid in a poor family. Marley spoke to him and his people. But he also tells us that Marley spoke to everyone, rich and poor. He was a prophet of Rasta with a message for all. One Love. Will our driver go to the concert? There is reverence in his reply. This is Bob Marleys son. Yes, he will see him perform. We arrive at Heritage Village, the venue for the show and for other local events including the Carriacou Maroons String Band Music Festival (April), Carriacou Regattas Queen Show (August), and Parang (December). We are not the first, but among them. We are the punctual, mostly foreigners, visitors, even habit-bound expats who should know better. For my part, Ill just say that I cant help it and usually regard it as a virtue. Allison, stunning in her Rasta-colors outfit, and Olando are handling admission, I am greeted by friends. The DJ is already at work and his music is loud and clear at the gate. The stage is alive in dancing lights of many colors and patterns; music is booming from stacks of large speakers on either side. For now that is the show that most of the early birds are watching. But the music is loud and clear everywhere so I wander the grounds looking for, as our driver suggested, the best spots. There is a path between the food stands leading a short way down the slope away from the lights to where the treetops open to a large view of the starry sky and the sound of the big speakers is significantly less, where a couple of locals are having a smoke. Another zone of relatively low volume is in the shadow of the former plantation greathouse, which is lighted here and there in various changing colors, a subtle light show that makes no attempt to compete with the stage. Here also are three small buildings with wooden steps that make comfortable seats. They are two gingerbread houses and the Village bar, used by vendors at other cultural events. The lampposts along the paths are two-legged stick figures of pipe, each in a different stance, standing in the pool of light from their heads under which I write my notes. Braving a close look at the stage, I pass within feet of speakers that are pounding the air into waves that make my chest throb and that my fingers can feel in the fabric of my shirt. The sound, almost unhearably loud, is clean and clear. These are good speakers operating within their intended range. I slowly walk close in front of the stage pausing to see what I can of the set and the lighting. Then I roam the amphitheater, a cleared slope up the hillside backed by a forest of straight and stately trees. Centered on the stage halfway up the slope is a small covered pavilion full of high tech controls and instrumentation, which I presume controls the lights. The audience, now perhaps 200 strong, is scattered between there and the stage, watching the light show, listening to the music Behind the crowd are several police, keeping an eye on things „ that is their job. Being a sailor, I usually carry a sharp knife, but left it at home tonight „ Im on their side. Peace officers. Respect. Compared to most places I hear of, Carriacou is peaceful anyway. At 9:30 the DJ announces that the show is about to begin. His music has transitioned from mellow for the early visitors to more energetic for the gathering local audience. The DJ says, Respect to all true Rasta man inside.Ž Xtrak, the local band, comes on amid smoky vapors that have been added to the light show. Then the local artistes each take their turn backed by Xtrak, the warmup show, Kestor, Goldn, Major Dickson, Shanda, and Super Star. Big up Charlie!Ž is mixed into the announcements. Hes the one who put this together. Charlie Kingsman, Free House Music. After the local talent warms up the audience, the DJ, Carriacous DJ SpecialistŽ, comes back to keep us moving until Ky-Mani and his band come on. By now the audience is perhaps a thousand and growing. Though midnight, the curfew I had declared, I stay through the show and the encore... but not for the hours of DJ partying that follow. Ky-Manis band plays a rousing reggae fanfare, a piece of length and intensity. Then Ky-Mani comes on with Rasta talk and no pause, the show is rolling, the message has already begun, and the energy of the performance is amazing. During the performance I discover a viewing point much better than trying to see out of or over the crowd, where I am alone but close, beside the stage looking over the soundman and his controls with a side view of the lights and action. Being so close to the right speakers, the sound is seriously loud and monaural. This is also a good vantage point for the part of the light show that is playing on the audience and the trees behind them. The energy is astounding. It ends with Redemption SongŽ, with which I sing along, though unable to hear my own voice above the speakers. We sing it everywhere!Ž Ky-Mani declares at the end of the song, Everywhere we go!Ž Does the audience want more? The crowd makes noise. Really? The crowd makes more noise. The encore begins with Armed and DangerousŽ and includes an incredibly fast rap by KJ, Ky-Manis son. The set ends with One LoveŽ. The DJ takes over the party as those who came for the show begin to stream out. €€€ The concert was scheduled for shortly after Bequia Easter Regatta, so Id expected Tyrrel Bay to fill with yachts come for the big event. Not so. High season in the Grenadines ends several days after Easter Regatta. I suspect that many of the wouldhaves were bound by the bane of modern man, schedule. Merlin however, a magical little cutter, home to the Brown family and pets, sailed up from Grenada. Martin (saxophone) and young Adam (guitar) do gigs with Barracuda. Bela, who makes beautifully fun drawings for some of my stories, is learning to play bass. They came for the concert. Martins assessment: Really excellent!Ž I have since re-listened to my CD, LegendŽ (Tuff Gong, His label), a compilation of original Bob Marley, from his own mouth, in his own style. No Woman No CryŽ is a live performance, audience singing along. How long since Id really heard the lyrics of Get Up Stand UpŽ? Then Stir It UpŽ, its exotic music (for back then) followed by One LoveŽ, the mantra that Marley imprinted upon Rasta, contagious in other cultures. Redemption SongŽ is just Bob and a couple of guitars, folk music that can be played around the fire. Marley the Legend rose from Trench Town, a ghetto of Kingston, Jamaica, where life was hard. Ky-Mani the son grew up in a Miami ghetto where life is harder. Bob was nearly my age. Ky-Manis concert was for the current age. Ky-Mani also does hip hop and rap and writes his own songs, but most of his songs for us were the works of the Legend. CARRIACOUS KY-MANI MARLEY CONCERTby Jim Hutchinson One Love. Ky-Mani Marley, son of the reggae legend Bob Marley, brought the message to the tiny Grenadine isle of Carriacou for one magical night in aid of local charities

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 30 parlumps marooned JULY 2013 ARIES (21 Mar 20 Apr) Let romance sail its own course this month. Put any communication problems in deep stowage while you go ashore and entertain yourself with friends to get your mind off cruising life for a while. TAURUS (21 Apr 21 May) So whos the captain here?Ž Shipboard love life could be a clash of egos for the first three weeks. If you cant remain objective it could have a negative effect on your creativity in the last week. GEMINI (22 May 21 Jun) Complete any projects on board before the 14th, as your energy levels will hit the doldrums after that. CANCER (22 Jun 23 Jul) Keep on your current creative heading even though communications could get garbled in other areas of your life. You will get fair winds in your sails and renewed enthusiasm for boat projects after the 14th. LEO (24 Jul 23 Aug) Enjoy freshening breezes and following seas in romance until the 23rd. VIRGO (24 Aug 23 Sep) Your love life will get interesting after the 23rd when Venus, the goddess of love, sails into your sign. That gives you the prior three weeks to get things shipshape on board so you will be free to devote your time to pleasure. LIBRA (24 Sep 23 Oct) Communications on board will be sluggish after the 14th and new ideas will be backwinded. It may be best to just take time off and sit on the hook until these aspects pass. SCORPIO (24 Oct 22 Nov) Your imaginative efforts and verbal skills, plus high enthusiasm, will pay off in boat business. Dont let any rough seas in personal relationships interfere with these positive aspects. SAGITTARIUS (23 Nov 21 Dec) Your head will be in the clouds. Romance, or its potential, will consume most of your thoughts this month. CAPRICORN (22 Dec 20 Jan) Contrary currents affecting innovative projects onboard will be complicated by static in verbal communications. Dont let impatience make things get further off course. AQUARIUS (21 Jan 19 Feb) Love will be tough sailing and will impact your ingenuity in the first three weeks. Youll sail free of romantic problems after that. PISCES (20 Feb 20 Mar) Youll be creatively inspired during the first three weeks. Even though communications may encounter some head seas, enthusiasm and energy will make up for it and set you on a course toward clear weather for projects on board. The Joys of a Simple LifeNo matter what when I rise up on a new day feel the jolt of fresh-squeezed orange juice while the cabin of the boat fills with the smell of freshly ground and brewed coffee which I carry up on the deck and feel the wind that blows the trees brush my face as well I look up at the blue of the sky and the always-changing configuration of the clouds While the birds soar in an out of my vision it is enough for the growing smile on my face to precede a feeling of peace. It is then time to sit down for the mornings writing to be followed by two hours at the gym and then to observe what new understanding the grandkids have achieved and what new questions and abilities they are testing. A glass of wine and dinner with friends Adagio for StringsŽ and a quiet dialogue with Spinoza Finally sleep comes to the rocking of the boat. I lived the day Tomorrow may come I harmed no one As Dickens taught if ones income, no matter how small, exceeds expenses and while health lasts I am At peace and there is no need for immortal promises or requests. „ Arnold Sherman I s l a n d Island P o e t s Poets PARLUMPS@HOTMAIL.COM

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 31 Bioluminescence: THE WEIRD, WONDERFUL LANGUAGE OF COOL LIGHTHave you ever wondered what makes a firefly glow? Or how strange sea creatures light up the deepest depths of the ocean? In the deep-sea world where sunlight cannot penetrate, many organisms have adapted to create their own light, usually a glowing blue or green that can be seen easily underwater. The phenomenon of light emission by living organisms, bioluminescence, is quite common, especially in marine species. Many animals use the light they produce the same way people use flashlights or searchlights. Traditional light bulbs create light through incandescence. A filament inside the bulb gets very hot and emits light. This process isnt particularly efficient, since generating enough heat to create light wastes an enormous amount of energy. Bioluminescent life forms have an entirely different approach „ they make their own light and carry it around in their bodies. Glowing animals typically create light through luminescence. In luminescent animals, chemical compounds mix together to produce a glow. Luminescence is far more efficient than incandescence. It neither requires nor generates much heat, so its sometimes known as cold light. Who Glows There? Why Animals Make Light Bioluminescence is used by living things to lure unsuspecting prey, defend against predators, attract a mate, and execute other vital activities. Organisms that use bioluminescence rely on the reactions of other organisms to a glowing object. In general, light in dark places attracts other creatures. Flashes of light repel them. Most marine organisms use blue bioluminescence because it travels much farther than red under water. As a result, most marine organisms have photoreceptors that are only sensitive to blue light. Some species of single-celled plankton called dinoflagellates glow when disturbed. Tides, storms, swimming marine life and passing ships can cause large numbers of these plankton to produce light simultaneously. Dinoflagellates are responsible for the phenomenon known as the milky sea, which causes the ocean to glow. Milky seas can be seen from space in tropical waters and, in some cases, this glow is so bright that it interferes with marine navigation. The burglar-alarm theoryŽ is a possible explanation for how this response to disturbance helps the plankton survive. If a small fish begins to feed on the plankton, the disturbed plankton emit a flash of light. The light attracts larger fish, which are likely to be the smaller fishs predators. In other words, the flash of light is an alarm that warns nearby big animals of the presence of little animals. However, this system doesnt seem to be as foolproof as some of the better-understood uses for bioluminescence. What Are the Main Uses for Bioluminescence? € COMMUNICATION: Fireflies, also known as candleflies, flash at one another in a species-specific pattern, often in order to find a mate. Adult fireflies light up to attract mates. Most flashing fireflies are male. € LOCATING FOOD: In the twilight depths of the ocean, some fish species use their light like a spotlight to find prey. Dragonfish, also called loosejaws, have adapted to emit red light; most fish can only see blue light, so the loosejaws have an enormous advantage when they light up a surrounding area. They can see their prey, but their prey cant see them. € ATTRACTING PREY: Some species, like the anglerfish, use luminous lures to attract prey. The anglerfish has a long protuberance on the top of its head. On the end of the protuberance is a ball that the anglerfish can light up. Smaller fish, curious about the light, swim in for a closer look. The anglerfish simply snaps them up in its huge jaws. € CAMOUFLAGE: In the darker parts of the ocean, its hard to see anything below you, but its easy to see the silhouette of whats above you. For this reason, some species, like squid, produce spots of light on their undersides, which blur their outlines and allow them to blend in with the light from above. This is also known as counter-illumination. € MIMICRY: The cookie-cutter shark has one unlit patch on its underside, which resembles a smaller fish when viewed from below. When a large predator approaches, the shark can take a large bite and then flee. This allows the cookie-cutter shark to prey on animals that are much larger and more powerful than it is. € SELF-DEFENSE: When threatened, some animals release a cloud of bioluminescent fluid, similar to the way squid defend themselves with a cloud of ink. Others use a bright flash to blind predators. € OFFENSIVE ADAPTATIONS: Biologists think that some species of sharks and whales, such as sperm whales, may use bioluminescence even though they are not bioluminescent themselves. A sperm whale may seek out a habitat with large communities of bioluminescent plankton, which the sperm whale does not eat. As the planktons predators (squid) approach the plankton, however, the glowing alerts the whale. The whale eats the squid. In the ocean, bioluminescence is not as rare as you might think. In fact, most types of animals, from bacteria to sharks, include some bioluminescent members. Scientists estimate that about 90 percent of the animals living in the open waters above the sea floor are bioluminescent. Chemical Reactions! Whats Going On? The light we know best „ incandescent light „ is associated with heat. Bioluminescence, on the other hand, is cold light. This means when bioluminescence is produced, the process creates very little heat. Nearly all the energy used in a bioluminescent chemical reaction is converted to light. In contrast, only three percent of the energy used by a light bulb is converted to light. The rest, 97 percent, is wasted as heat. Some creatures manufacture their own light-making chemicals. Many more get their chemicals from the organisms they eat. A few borrowŽ their light by forming partnerships with glowing bacteria. And others fluoresce rather than luminesce; they absorb one color of light and emit another. So what creates bioluminescence? The light emitted by a bioluminescent organism is produced by energy released from chemical reactions occurring inside (or ejected by) the organism. In the animal world, these chemical reactions take place in special luminescent cells called photocytes. Three components are needed for a bioluminescent chemical reaction: oxygen, luciferin (a molecular substrate) and luciferase (an enzyme). In the presence of oxygen, luciferase acts upon luciferin to produce light. These are aggregated into complex light organs, in which the intensity of light is regulated by nerve impulses, and in which light can be modulated with the help of reflectors, lenses and filters. By these means, organisms can adjust the wavelength, diffusion and intensity of light according to need. Different organisms produce different versions of luciferin and luciferase, but the chemical reaction remains the same. But the exact mechanisms behind these processes remain shrouded in mystery. Eighty percent of all bioluminescent groups inhabit the worlds oceans. At certain depths, nearly all the organisms glow. On land, things are quite different. There are bioluminescent fungi and insects, but no flowering plants, birds, reptiles, amphibians, or mammals that glow. Bioluminescence is a cool light. To learn more, check out The Bioluminescence Coloring Book by Edith Widder „ a marine science workbook, complete with glow-in-the dark paint kit. Its available at Amazon.com. SALTYS BEAT BY NATHALIE WARD See answers on page 44 ACROSS 6 type of animal that uses counter-illumination as a form of camouflage 8 allows animals to blend with their surroundings 9 cold light 10 animal that reminds one of candles 11 single celled plankton that glows when disturbed DOWN 1 the name of phenomenon which causes the sea to glow 2 phenomenon of light emission by living organisms 3 nickname for dragonfish 4 traditional lightbulbs create this 5 type of fish that use luminous lures to attract prey 6 to bait This is a dragonfish, also known as loosejaws. By emitting red light, loosejaws can see their prey but their prey cant see them „ most fish can only see blue light

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 32 BEQUIA MARINA Open 7 days 8:00am 6:00pm or later!Look for the Big Blue Building Water & Dockage available new Services coming soon! Electric: 110V 30Amp € 240V 50Amp € 3 Phase 100Amp, 50 Hz Bequia Marina, Port Elizabeth, Bequia St. Vincent & the Grenadines VHF 68 B & C FUELS ENTERPRISE Petite Martinique The best fuel dock in the Grenadines for: FUEL € OIL € WATER € ICE Cheapest prices in the Grenadines Unobstructed dock in calm water 16-18 feet of water alongside Suitable for Large Power Yachts Easily approached from Carriacou, Union I., Palm I. & PSV Contact: Glenn Clement or Reynold Belmar Tel/Fax: (473) 443-9110 email: bandcfuels@gmail.comSharks are really gentle!Ž Thats what my friend Astrid says, and she has been diving for 17 years. Astrid loves diving and she loves sharks. I would be a bit frightened to see a shark in real life but I would get less frightened the more I saw them and would grow to love them like Astrid. Once, Astrid did a special dive to feed the sharks. She wore chainmail and she had a long stick to pick up the food with and hold it out. Astrid didnt give them much food because they still have to hunt. She gave them fish tails. Its like a treat for the sharks. Astrid said, when the sharks take the food from the stick she hardly feels it. Thats why she says they are gentle! Astrid has seen lots of sharks. She has seen Reef Sharks, Tuppich, White and Black Tip, Nurse Sharks, Leopard Sharks and Mako. Her favourite shark is Big Mama, who lives in the deep seas around St. Martin. She is called Big Mama because she is so big! Sadly, she got caught by a fishing line. The hook was stuck in her jaw with about a metre of fishing line hanging from it. The last time Astrid saw her, Big Mama had a big cut in her jaw; she had somehow pulled the hook out. Big Mama can hardly eat now because of her jaw. Its really mutilated and shes lost a lot of weight. Astrid learnt to dive in a lake in Germany. Now she teaches diving in St. Martin where the water is hotter! Her favourite animals are the octopus and shark because they are very intelligent. The octopus can change colour and shape to protect itself from predators. An octopus has no bones, so it can squeeze itself into small spaces to hide. The female octopus dies when her eggs hatch. She has to stay with the eggs at all times to protect them and they cant move so she cannot go out and hunt. Its sad isnt it? She sacrifices her life for her babies. Astrid lives on her boat in the same boatyard as me. There was also a rusty red boat full of holes. Astrid thought it could be sunk and the wreck would make a good home for fish and other sea animals. First everything had to be taken out of the boat to make room for the fish and not to pollute the sea. A huge amount of junk was piled underneath the boat until it was empty. My brother and I took a lot of things that were useful for playing with. We picked out plates and cutlery. From pieces of wood we made a table. Then we made mud pies and soup and invited grownups over to eat. When the boat was empty it was put in the water. All the holes were above the waterline so it still floated. Then they towed the boat out to the dive site and sank it by opening the seacocks. The open seacocks let in the water and the person who opened them had to get out before the boat filled up with water. The boat has been on the seabed for a month now. It will take some time for a reef to start growing on the wreck but fish are already swimming in it and I hope making new homes. Astrids favourite dive was when a whale family swam past. There was a mother and father and calf. The father was about 15 metres long. Astrid saw the baby nuzzling up to the mother like it was drinking the mothers milk. They swam together for a while, not too close. It must have been amazing. I wish I could see a 15-metre whale! I would have taken a photo of a lifetime if I could. I saw a whale when we were sailing across the Atlantic. It was about five metres long. My dad was on watch and called me and my mum up. My brother was sleeping. I was nervous in case the whale decided to play with our boat, Oum A whale is very strong and might play too roughly and put a hole in the hull and we could sink to the bottom of the sea. Astrids scariest dive was when she did her first night dive because in the dark you cant see the fish when they come swimming towards you and it can be really frightening when you feel them going past you. As you get used to it, its a real adventure. At night there are different sea animals you can see. Astrid sees more crabs at night and you can see their claws snipping and snapping while they eat. I think Astrid is very lucky. I wish I could dive and have a job like hers. You have to be ten years old to dive. On my tenth birthday I hope Astrid is here so she can take me diving! I am excited to see the wreck. By the time Im ten I hope there will be a beautiful and colourful reef growing on it. And, I hope to see an octopus hiding in a cubbyhole of the boat! CRUISING KIDS CORNER My Friend Astrid Loves Sharks!by Grace Cheasley Astrid, diving with a shark in St. Maarten. Eight-year-old author Grace says, I wish I could dive and have a job like hers

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 33 The Sky in July 2013 by Scott WeltyThe Planets in July 2013 MERCURY Maybe you can catch it just after sunset in the west, early in the month. Mercury then pops up before sunrise in the east, late in the month. VENUS Appearing ever higher in the western sky at sunset during the month in Cancer and then moving up into Leo. EARTH Still thinks the whole world revolves around her. MARS A morning star all month, rising sometime after 0500 hours in Taurus. JUPITER Another morning star rising just after Mars until the 22nd. Then Jupiter rises before Mars. In any case, Jupiter is the bright one! SATURN Rising in the afternoon and setting in the wee hours, riding in Virgo. Sky Events This Month 8th New Moon. 10th Crescent moon and Venus set together (Figure 1). 16th Saturn and the moon ride together in Virgo. Thats Saturn just off to the northwest of the moon. 22nd Mars and Jupiter rise together (Figure 2). Full Moon. Venus and Regulus set together. 30th Jupiter, Mars and Mercury visible in east just before sunrise. Summertime is Scorpio Time What a beautiful sight (Figure 3) „ sitting on the deck of your boat, looking south on a clear night and easily picking out the giant constellation of Scorpio against the backdrop of the Milky Way. Scorpio is one of the few constellations that look somewhat like its name! And, theres a lot to see looking that way. First of all, when you look toward Scorpio, youre looking roughly toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Theres some spectacular business going on, too, as we now know there is a giant black hole living there. From the motion of a nearbyŽ star we can calculate that the black hole at the center has a mass of about four MILLION solar masses. Thats four million suns packed into a mathematical point. A black hole is the collapse of all this mass, owing to its own gravity with no force to counteract it. A singularity, as theyre called, means infinite density. It seems now that most galaxies typically have a super-massive black hole at their center. The brightest star in Scorpio is Antares, a red giant. Red giants occur when a star runs out of hydrogen fuel and begins to burn helium and even lithium. These reactions burn hotter and cause the star to inflate and glow more in the red region of the spectrum. Our Sun will do the same in a few billion years, at which point the boundaries of the Sun will be beyond the orbit of Mars. Yes, that will finally convince some (but probably not all) of global warming! Because you are looking into the busiest and densest part of the galaxy, there are a number of star clusters and nebulae that are probably visible with your Steiners. Try it! Finally, the tail of the scorpion is a star called Shaula, from the Arabic word for tailŽ. Surprise! Interesting in that it is a rare triple star system. About half the stars you see are actually double stars „ one star orbiting another. Shaula is a triple, though, with a star orbiting a star and them together orbiting yet another star. (Sorry, Steiners wont resolve the individual stars.) If there are planets there, imagine the sunsets! To Contemplate While Having a Glass of Wine on Deck The Caribbean from space... Looking for some interesting pictures of our beloved Caribbean from space, I stumbled upon this one (Figure 4), taken from the space station as the shuttle passed underneath! But over WHAT island? The headline just refers to crystal clear CaribbeanŽ. Let the discussion ensue! Scott Welty is the author of The Why Book of Sailing Burford Books, 2007. THE CARIBBEAN SKY: FREE SHOW NIGHTLY! FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4Figure 1: Crescent moon and Venus just after sunset on the 10th Figure 2: Mars and Jupiter rise together on the 22nd Figure 3: Scorpio and the Milky Way, looking south on July 12th

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 34 BOOK REVIEW BY J. WYNNER Greater Trouble in the Lesser Antilles by Charles Locks. Scarletta Press 2006 Edition. 296 pages. ISBN 13: 978-0-9765201-3-9. ISBN 10: 0-9765201-3-3. Captain Brian Clancy has his eye on a much younger woman, the enchantress Billie, but cant imagine the rest of his life with her. After returning to St. Judas on his boat, Island Trader, from a business trip to Venezuela where everything goes wrong, he learns of the murder of a friend, Leif the Thief, from Billie „ who nudges him to investigate. Leif was a thief, but he was also a likeable guy. As long as he didnt touch you for too much, you were inclined „ after getting over the initial anger „ to laugh and shrug your shoulders, but you couldnt just laugh and shrug your shoulder when his corpse turned upƒ.Ž And there is even Greater Trouble in the Lesser AntillesŽ with local cop, Officer Richards, and one from the mainland called The Shirt harassing Captain Brian to reveal what he knows of cocaine on St. Judas. At one point, The Shirt asks Captain Brian, Which are you „ sailor or pirate?Ž to which the captain replies, Island trader.Ž So, the island trader has his hands full, not only with investigating Leifs murder, but also of being investigated by the cops in what remains essentially a sea-based adventure tale, or rather an adventure tale about a sea captain. Starting off slowly, the book eventually gains a nice and easy pace, even if the love story between the narrator, Captain Brian, and the enchantress reads like a Mills and Boon romance. Charles Locks develops subplots and an island and continental cast, some with memorable names like Diver Vaughn, Jason the Argonaut, Pirate Dan, Mechanic Jim, Pony Mon, and Easy always hovering around in the story, but its all Captain Brians show, from page one to 296. Locks certainly knows his characters. Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, Locks lived on St. John in the US Virgin Islands for 15 years. There he owned and operated Lucys Restaurant and met most of the colourful characters who inspired those who people this book. Combined with all that he has to deal with, the maverick Captain Brian takes on a few projects that do not sit well with the law. High on Captain Brians agenda is his promise to Valerie, his deceased friend, to build a playground in her memory for children of the area. He hires a contractor and the playground gets going without relevant documentation, much to the chagrin of Officer Richards who is once more on the Captains case. Then, there is the Captain reluctantly agreeing to look into Leifs murder. The police had already concluded their probe. Their idea of an investigation was to stop people on the street and ask them if they did it. But the cops questioning of the captain never stops. Lets talk about the cocaine,Ž The Shirt said, taking his chair. Specifically, where it is...Ž When I looked up, I saw assholes illegally boarding Island Trader Whos on my boat?Ž The Shirt shrugged... Want help?Ž he askedƒ Thanks, but were too late.Ž I pointed to a runabout off in the distance, heading towards the mouth of the bay. Thats probably them. Theyve searched my boat regularly for five years looking for cocaine. I suspect theyve decided to make the job of finding it easier. If they bring it aboard, they know its there, and they know exactly where to look. Assholes!...Ž When I reached my boat nobody was aboard. I first searched the obvious places and found what I was looking for in a locker in the galley „ a clear plastic bag that contained a whole kiloƒ It had to be the Shirts doing. He apparently liked to play games. Making matters worse, The Shirt is seeing the captains former girlfriend, Sarah. And so the games continue between the captain and officialdom and the crooked cops, which culminate in a royal battle at sea in which Island Trader goes to the bottom with a bang. But although his boat is lost, he soon acquires another from a friend who is selling out and quitting the island. Captain Brian tests his new purchase by sailing it into a storm. At the conclusion of the story, he can certainly paraphrase the lyrics to Paradise: I have been to paradise and I have been to me.Ž The author locks his audience on the leisurely, desert island of St. Judas with vivid and delightful prose. Locks witty way of turning a sentence gives pleasurable reading and keeps readers smiling all the time. Available at Amazon.com. L 1 e th J to o „ b to g y s A fr C S B The Island TraderGetting TogetherA Life Without Borders by Carla Gray BeDell. 2013 Alegria Press. 382 pages, color photos. If youve ever wondered whether or not it would be a good idea to give up your career, yank your children out of school, throw them on a sailboat and start wandering the Caribbean, read this book. The author, Carla Gray BeDell, says, In January 2007 we were in search of a better life for our family, a life that had more meaning. After selling our house, quitting our jobs and giving away most of our possessions, my family and I (husband and two young children) sailed away on a four-and-a-half-year adventure. We werent experienced sailors, but we learned along the way. We sailed down the Caribbean island chain through the Greater and Lesser Antilles, sailed over to Aruba, then left the boat there and backpacked through Peru and Chile. The next year we made our way through Ecuador and Colombia. In between, while waiting out hurricane season, we even took a train and then an RV across the US. My plan when we returned to the US, was to write a book. I wanted to let people know about the generous people we met in the cruising community and also the kindness we experienced in every country we visited. My story, A Life Without Borders is not about the techniques of sailing, but is stories of people and places, stories of the kindness of strangers and the incredible sense of community we felt from the beginning in the cruising community.Ž Carlas tale evolves from a chapter called Who Said This Was Supposed to be Fun?Ž to one entitled What Matters MostŽ. The heartening take-away from this well-written and often humorous account is that the family coalesced from a typically fragmented modern suburban family „ Dad goes to work here, Mom goes to work there, the kids go to school somewhere else „ into a tight sailing-and-traveling team in which each member knows they can count on the others and each has meaningful responsibilities to the group. Tessa, a six-year-old who complains that We never have any funŽ as the story begins, proves to be an intrepid and happy explorer. Her slightly older brother, Tristan, competently takes over the task of organizing everyones safety harnesses before rough passages. After being together 24/7 for more than four years, Carla says, We learned that we will always be stronger when we are together.Ž Available in print and as an e-book at Amazon.com. 2 g o th 2 li q s d th th A BOOK REVIEW BY BLOSSOM BROWN Real sailors use Streets Guides for inter-island and harbor piloting directions, plus interesting anecdotes of people, places and history. Streets Guides are the only ones that describe ALL the anchorages in the Eastern Caribbean. In 1980 Street said in print that if anyone could come up with an anchorage safe for a boat that draws seven feet that he has not covered in the guide he would buy the drinks. Thirty-two years have gone by and he has never had to buy drinks. Real sailors in the Windwards, Leewards and Virgin Islands circle in Streets Guide the anchorages that are NOT described in the other popular guides. Do the same and you will have quiet anchorages. HURRICANE TIPS! Visit www.street-iolaire.com for a wealth of information on tracking & securing for a storm Streets Guides are available at Island Water World and Johnson Marine Hardware in St. Lucia, Sully Magras in St. Barts, and Blue Water Books & Charts in Fort Lauderdale, or contact channelsales@authorsolutions.com GOOD GUIDES ARE TIMELESSUntil Don Street wrote his first guide in 1964, the guide he used was Norie and Wilsons Sailing Directions to the West IndiesŽ, published in 1867.

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 35 Compliments of: Marina Zar-Par Boca Chica, Dominican Republic www.marinazarpar.com FREE CRUISING GUIDESDominican Republic Cayman Islands Haiti Jamaica Trinidad ABC Islands Puerto Rico Lesser Antilles in 3 volumes www.freecruisingguide.com „ Continued from page 8 Salt, a new crew bar and grill at the marina, has recently opened. Marina guests have access to a wide selection of resort amenities including a 34-condominium hotel with an infinity pool, private beach and gym. Surrounded by the third largest barrier reef in the world, Turks & Caicos offers watersports enthusiasts some of the best diving and fishing grounds in the region. For more information visit www.bluehaventci.com. Boat Repairs in Bequia After 10 years working in the boat business in Germany, Brenton George, a.k.a. Munk ManŽ, decided it was time to come home and venture out on his own. Although his new business just opened in Bequia in March, Munk Man has already worked in boating repairs throughout the Grenadines. His business offers a range of services such as boat, engine and dinghy repairs, and fiberglassing. So, having a bit of hiccups on your boat or dinghy? Stop in at Munk Mans Repairs at the Bequia Marina in OCar or phone Munk Man at (784) 530-4667 or his associate, Dinghy, at (784) 497-1831. Tales of an Island Spirit Captain Marks Way a book filled with true Caribbean sailing yarns and life changing one-page philosophiesŽ, is now available as an eBook. Author Mark Denebeim says, Check out this recollection of the crazy life and times of over 33 years of Caribbean madness „ as only I can recall and lie about. You might find a story, or photo, about you in there!Ž Available at Amazon.com, with the first 30 pages free at www.smashwords.com/ books/view/320962. Nadge says Au Revioir to Douglas Yacht Services Nadge Ifebe writes: After four years of a rich and exciting working experience at Douglas Yacht Services in Martinique, I decided to leave my job on May 31st, to continue my path in life on a new continent! I would like to thank all the suppliers and crewmembers that I have been working with hand-in-hand for these four years. I would like to thank my current and former colleagues Cline, Stphanie, Martial, Nathalie, Gwladys and Gino. Last but not least, I would like to thank Douglas „ my boss and mentor!! Nathalie will replace me as executive assistant; you will get to start working with her this summer and next season. Best wishes to all! Left to right: Cline, Stphanie, Douglas and Nadge

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 36 We offer an excellent selection of imported cheese, exotic meats, salami, turkey, prosciutto, juices, etc. Seafood, shrimp, prawns, smoked & fresh salmon, fish, lamb, steaks, frozen bread such as baguettes, petit pain, multi grain breads, croissants, etc. Provisioning for yacht charters, large or small orders for restaurants, hotels, villas or simply to enjoy at home are accepted. WE ARE SITUATED IN CALLIAQUA, ST. VINCENT or you can call us at Tel: 456-2983 or Fax: 456-2987 gourmetfood@vincysurf.comALSO IN BEQUIATel: 458-3485 Ocar, Downstairs Coco’s info@marigotbeachclub.com www.marigotbeachclub.com Prickly Bays Rescue 1 „ To the Rescue!by Denise SimpsonSince its launching at the beginning of May 2013, Rescue 1, based in Prickly Bay, Grenada, has been busy! The big orange-clad inflatable operated by Darren Turner, Managing Director of Prickly Bay Marina, offers its services as a supplement to those provided by the Grenada Coast Guard. Rescue 1 is only operational in the Prickly Bay area at night but from St. Georges to Le Phare Bleu in the daytime. Every week there seems to be a vessel dragging anchor around the bay that needs assistance. Rescue 1 also goes out after hours in response to reports of suspicious activityŽ in the bay „ which usually turn out to be local fishermen, but Darren says, Rather safe than sorry!Ž Rescue 1 provides a free service but donations for services provided are much appreciated to offset fuel and other running costs. Rescue 1 has rescued a 50-foot monohull sailboat just outside the bay, drifting towards the reef with engine failure. It also rescued a boat that dragged her anchor and went walk-aboutŽ, floating out to sea „ the owner, upon his return, was horrified to find his boat gone, then so happy to find her safely tied up to the Prickly Bay Marina dock! On June 3rd, a 57-foot monohull set sail from Prickly Bay for Trinidad with only the owner and a female passenger on board. That afternoon a squall of 45-odd knots left the yachts genoa in shreds so the owner turned back for Grenada. At 10:33PM, Rescue 1 received a phone call from the elderly captain of this vessel asking for urgent assistance as, when entering Mt. Hartman Bay, his engine had failed and the boat ran aground in an upright position on the edge of the reef between Mt. Hartman Bay and Hog Island. Rescue 1 phoned the Grenada Coast Guard requesting a rescue vessel, as the yachts captain felt that his vessel could possibly be pulled off the reef at this time. Darren then left immediately with Rescue 1, however the sea was far too rough for him to navigate in the dark, so he went to the Coast Guard base before the midnight shift change. At 2:10AM a Coast Guard vessel left for Mt. Hartman but turned back before getting to the stranded vessel. Coast Guard then reported to Rescue 1 that they saw the stranded vessel but could not make contact with it. Upon testing, it was found that the Coast Guard vessels VHF radio was not working on Channel 16. The captain of the stranded vessel then phoned Rescue 1 to report that his vessel was now listing badly so Rescue 1 maintained hourly radio contact with him so that if the situation deteriorated, they could phone the Coast Guard again or call out on Channel 68 to all nearby cruisers for help in the dark. At 5:45AM, first light, Rescue 1 left Prickly Bay for the stranded vessel. The captain and female passenger were thrilled to see somebody and that their long scary night on the reef was coming to an end. Rescue 1 helped recover their damaged dinghy and outboard. The Coast Guard arrived and organized a shallow-draft tug (actually a WWII landing craft), Pine Grove to come from Calivigny Island. The Coast Guard also put a Coast Guard crewmember aboard the yacht to assist the exhausted captain, and removed the female passenger to safety. While waiting for the tide, Rescue 1 returned to Prickly Bay Marina for fuel, extra equipment and extra crew, and returning 25 minutes later found that cruisers had arrived to help. Anchors were laid to prevent the grounded boat from moving farther onto the reef, ropes were tied onto her mast for leverage and, when the tide came up, with some tugging and pulling by Pine Grove driven by Mr. Colins, she came loose. The Rescue 1 diver checked the yachts undersides and saw there were two large rocks, one fore and one aft, pinning her in so the Calivigny Island tug pulled her sideways into deep water and finally to safety, with only minimal damage. There was lots of blaring of all the vessels horns in appreciation of the team effort! The yachts captain fixed the engine glitch and motored back to Prickly Bay Marina with Rescue 1 at the yachts side (just in case of engine failure again!). Commercial divers checked her undersides, and only then was the all clearŽ given and the exhausted captain and female passenger could relax and start to recover from nearly seeing everything lost to the sea. Full thanks for great teamwork go to the morning-shift crew on the Grenada Coast Guard vessel, the Calivigny Island tug captain and crew, all the cruisers who helped, the Prickly Bay Marina staff and restaurant staff who helped comfort the female passenger, and of course, to Rescue 1 Rescue 1 at Prickly Bay Marina can be contacted on VHF Channel 16 or phoned after hours on (473) 418-8151. The Grenada Coast Guard can be contacted via Police Headquarters on (473) 440-3999.

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 37 The Caribbean is loaded with fruits. Everyone who visits any of the islands has tried mangos and bananas, and tasted guavas in fruit punches. Pineapples and various citrus, from oranges to limes, abound. If you are lucky you might find a soursop. The next time you are trekking around your present island anchorage ask the locals if there is a cherry tree in the vicinity. Be certain to say you want the sweet, red West Indian or Barbados cherry; few know it by its common Portuguese name, acerola. As with so many of the islands fruits and foods this cherry goes by various names. Malpighia Punicifolia L. is generally accepted as the correct botanical name. It can also be called the Puerto Rican, Jamaican, French or Barbados cherry, the native cherry, sweet cherry or garden cherry. In Spanish it is named acerola, cereza, or cereza colorada. There is another yellow, cherry-like fruit called the sour cherry or gooseberry that will pucker your face. I pick all the West Indian cherries when I locate a tree. The red ones are so sweet and tasty, but the green immature cherries actually have twice the vitamin C than the full-grown deep red. The West Indian cherry is extremely high in ascorbic acid, having perhaps the highest vitamin C content of all fruits, and is now cultivated for medicinal purposes. Acerola cherries high vitamin C content has been used to treat dysentery, severe colds, and fever. These cherries can also reduce joint inflammation from arthritis and prevent infections. A single cherry can have as much as 81 milligrams of vitamin C, 25 percent more than the recommended daily allowance. One hundred grams has 32 calories and is high in potassium and iron, as well as vitamin C. Botanists believe this fruit tree originated in Mexicos Yucatan Peninsula. West Indian cherries can be found in all of Central America, throughout the Caribbean, and parts of South America and Southeast Asia. The West Indian cherry is relatively common to the Lesser Antilles from St. Croix to Trinidad, and is also found in Curaao, Margarita, and as far south as Brazil. If you are looking for a very hard, dense wood, this is the tree. The wood is surprisingly hard and heavy; it wont burn, even when treated with flammable fluid, unless perfectly dried. Pitted cherry pulp can be frozen with additional sweetener and blended into a sorbet. Milk may be added to either make a shake or to refreeze into ice cream. West Indian Cherry Juice Strain seeded West Indian cherries until you have two Cups of juice. Mix with an equal amount of water. It is slightly acidic, so add sugar to taste. Pour over ice and enjoy. This juice blends well with another favorite juice, such as orange or pineapple. Or add a banana and some ice and blend until smooth. Tropical Frozen Blend Strain seeded cherries until you have one Cup of juice. Mix in a blender with one Cup of orange juice, a quarter Cup of pineapple chunks, and two ripe bananas. Add ice to the blenders capacity. Cover and blend until smooth. Guava and apple are also good combinations with West Indian cherries. West Indian Cherry Concentrate Strain seeded cherries until you have two Cups. Put into an uncovered pot over medium heat. Stir constantly until half of the liquid evaporates. Remove from heat and cool before pouring into containers for freezing. Keep as a cold remedy or as flavoring for drinks, cakes and frozen desserts. West Indian Cherry Sorbet Make two Cups of seeded cherry pulp. Add two Tablespoons of sugar and one teaspoon of lime juice, and blend with a tray of ice cubes. Freeze until slushy, blend again and refreeze. A Cup of milk may be added; in that case the amount of ice should be reduced by half. Exquisite Cherry Ginger Bread 1 Cup milk 3 Tablespoons butter 3 teaspoons active dry yeast 1/4 Cup firmly packed brown sugar 1/4 Cup fresh lemon juice 1/4 Cup fresh cherry juice 1 teaspoon salt 4 Cups bakers flour, divided 1 Cup West Indian cherry pulp 1 Cup toasted coconut, divided 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel 1 Tablespoon minced fresh ginger Combine milk and butter in a small pan and heat just until butter melts. Remove from heat, pour into a large bowl and stir in yeast. Let sit for five minutes before adding brown sugar, lemon and cherry juices, salt, and two Cups of the flour. Combine thoroughly, electric mixer preferred. Add remaining two Cups of flour and mix until the dough doesnt stick to the bowl. (Add water by Tablespoons if too dry.) Blend in cherry pulp, a quarter Cup of the coconut, grated lemon peel, and ginger. Knead dough until it is elastic and let sit in a warm place until it doubles in size „ usually about an hour. Punch it down and place in a greased baking pan and let it sit for another hour. Rub remaining coconut into the top. Bake at 350F for an hour or until a toothpick or knife pulls out clean. For the Caribbean Home Gardener This is an excellent backyard tree because, with proper fertilizing and watering, a West Indian cherry tree can bear as soon as its third year. At five or six years old, it will fruit three times a year, and can bear fruit for 20 years. The West Indian cherry is grown from seed, cuttings, or grafts. Just look around the base of another cherry tree and you may find a sprout. It is an attractive tree with dark green leaves and pink or white blossoms. It will grow to about 15 feet and can be shaped by pruning. Keep the tree to a height that can be easily picked, otherwise the birds and bats will get most of the cherries. It can adapt to most environments found in tropical regions and is able to withstand even a severe drought. Its shallow root system can be uprooted by strong winds. It is self-pollinating and loves the sun. For the tree to produce abundant fruit, regular watering is necessary with adequate drainage. This tree can also be grown in sizable pots where it will get sun. The pots should have good drain holes and the potting soil kept slightly alkaline. Shirley Hall is the author of The New Caribbean Home Garden Handbook. Stock Upon the widest selection and the best prices in Grenada at our two conveniently located supermarkets. Whether its canned goods, dairy products, meat, fresh vegetables or fruits, toiletries, household goods, or a fine selection of liquor and wine, The Food Fair has it all and a lot more.HubbardsJONAS BROWNE & HUBBARD (Gda.) Ltd. The Carenage: Monday Thursday 8 am to 5:30 pm Friday until 8:45 pm Saturday until 1:00 pm Tel: (473) 440-2588 Grand Anse: Monday Thursday 9 am to 5:30 pm Friday & Saturday until 7:00 pm Tel: (473) 444-4573 Read in Next Months Compass : Message in a Bottle The Day We (Almost) Sank Scooting Around Marie Galanteƒand much more! BLUEBEARD ENTERPRISES 4734407260 OR 4734097260EMAIL US BLUEBEARDSPICEISLE.COM THE WEST INDIAN CHERRY SERVING AT SEA BY SHIRLEY HALL

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 38 HURRICANE COMMENTS Dear Compass David Lymans Hurricane Survival StrategyŽ in the May issue of Compass is an excellent article to which I would like to add a few comments. When they are approaching the Eastern Caribbean, hurricanes never alter course more than five degrees in 24 hours and very seldom alter course to the south. The approach and danger zone may be plotted using Streets Law of Probability (see www.street-iolaire.com). Once the hurricane passes through the islands of the Eastern Caribbean, it can do anything. It is impossible to do more than guess where it will go. The tracks of hurricanes that start in the western Caribbean or Gulf of Mexico are impossible to predict, as are hurricanes as they travel up the East Coast of the States. The Caribbean has become so crowded with boats that there is no such thing as a safe hurricane hole. Even if your boat is properly secured and surviving, the chance of another boat dragging down on you is very high. If a skipper is in Grenada and decides to go south because of a possible storm threat, he (or she) should not go to the crowded anchorage of Chaguaramas, Trinidad, but rather head to the south end of Trinidad and anchor off San Fernando. At 1015N, San Fernando is 105 miles south of the southern end of Grenada, well clear of any hurricane. Don Street Glandore, Ireland THE CUT OF A MANS JIB Dear Compass Readers, I would like to take this opportunity to reply to, and clarify for, Chris Long who wrote in June regarding my September 2012 article Cruising with(out) FearŽ. When I made the statement that there are those of us who fear being out of the sight of landŽ I was not referring to myself but to those of us in the cruising community who have that fear. I have spent more than 40 years sailing often out of the sight of land and also sailing during the night. I would like to add that while I agree with Chris regarding certain skills that some of todays cruisers have lost „ skills that I admire and have worked all of my life to improve „ I do not agree that todays cruiser must have those skills to be a real cruiserŽ. Certainly there is a valid topic called seamanship and, as Chris points out, we can relate that to the cut of a mans jibŽ. However, what has changed is that cruising no longer has only one definition. Everyone is not cut out to sail offshore out of the sight of land and not everyone wants to sail during the night. With the advent of better weather forecasting and better navigation tools, some cruisers define their seamanship in a more limited form and do go very carefully from one marina or mooring to the next „ and are quite happy doing so. He wonders why (such) people bother cruising at allŽ and adds that it is worse when there is an intense fear of the sea (Thallasaphobia). The answer to this is that everyone does not have to know how to splice the mainbrace while waiting for their rum ration to enjoy the sea and cruising. Well perhaps not splice the mainbrace, as the rum ration can make for a nice end to a wonderful day. There are as many different ways to go cruising as there are people who cruise and the boats they cruise on. No single way fits the bill for everyone „ notwithstanding that Chriss way, as he describes it, is a wonderful way and the one that I was brought up on. For some cruisers, making a distance of a hundred miles, while never venturing offshore and while never sailing at night, is just perfect, and if those who do so want to take a mooring or go into a marina as that is their preference, that does not make them any less of a cruising sailor. Being a cruising sailor is more a state of mind and a way of life than a type of drill to see who can handle the heaviest seas. Add to the definition of the cruising sailor the camaraderie of others who enjoy cruising and you will find some wonderful cruising sailors who rarely leave the anchorage or their marina. To all the cruising sailors who have ever dreamed of cruising, regardless of the size and scope of your dream, I believe that you should pursue it as you like it and not as someone else defines it. Frank Virgintino, Author Free Cruising Guides www.freecruisingguide.com NEVIS MOORING NOTE Dear Compass We have recently sailed to Nevis, where the Port Services have placed moorings for yachts and request they be used in lieu of anchoring. BEWARE! We took three different moorings. All are sand screw type. The first had a broken strand on the main line from the sand screw. The second had been reconditioned and appeared sound. The third had a 3/4Ž shackle that had corroded down to approximately 1/8Ž of metal. I spoke to the Port Authority, who said their repair boat was not working. I recommend captains inspect the mooring tackle before leaving a vessel unattended on a mooring in Nevis. John Freeland S/V Mary Ann II TOBAGO CAYS MOORING NOTE Dear Compass A few years ago, moorings appeared in the Tobago Cays Marine Park. They looked good because the buoys were new and of a uniform size. One could be forgiven for assuming that they were placed by the authorities of St. Vincent & the Grenadines and would, therefore, be reliable. I didnt use them because the holding is good. The following year, I anchored close to them and when I snorkelled my anchor, I got a shock! A line tied to a sea-floor anchor was suspended at propeller depth beside my boat. Obviously, the buoy had broken away. I moved and anchored a safe distance away. I reported the problem to the Marine Park rangers when they came to collect the park fee. Two weeks ago, I was back and noticed that there were fewer mooring buoys. I anchored a safe distance away and later noticed a boat that seemed to be anchoring close to the buoys. I was below when I looked out the portlight and saw the boat almost on mine. I came up and learned that it had caught a line around the propeller. The skipper had deployed the anchor and we put out fenders. Luckily, he had scuba gear and was able to free his prop. Later, while swimming over to the turtle-viewing area, we found other lines tied to sea-floor anchors and floating where they will foul propellers. This situation needs to be cleaned up. Meanwhile, beware the hazards in the area with mooring buoys. Obviously, since they are breaking free, they are not reliable, whether placed by the government or not. Sincerely, Robert Mills My Mistress Dear Robert, We asked the Tobago Cays Marine Park management for a response to your letter, which follows. CC Dear Compass We welcome the opportunity to respond. Firstly we want to apologize deeply for any problems or inconveniences that the sailor might have encountered at the time of the unfortunate incident. As you are aware, we strive to ensure that visitors to the Tobago Cays Marine Park enjoy their experiences in a beautiful, clean and safe environment. We have discussed the issue at hand with the park rangers, who are directly responsible for the maintenance of the moorings. They were very surprised at the claims made by the writer. According to the rangers, because of the weight of the ropes used and the fact that no buoys are attached to them, it is impossible for the rope to float and affect a propeller. They admitted that there are a couple of ropes and anchors on the seabed in the park, which will serve as markers for the location of the anchors when they embark on their replacement exercise this week. We have had a number of challenges since the introduction of the moorings in 2008. We have had some anchors uprooted and have had to replace others. Our major challenge however, is the cutting/chopping of ropes and buoys by the propellers of boats, mainly due to negligence by the boat operators. These acts mainly take place after the rangers leave the park at the end of their workday. We want to appeal to all persons within the park, especially those in motor craft, to be extra vigilant when in the areas where moorings are placed. The TCMP has embarked on an extensive exercise to ensure all our moorings are safe for use. Currently we are assembling new moorings, which we hope will be available for use in the next three months. „Continued on next page YAMAHAParts Repairs Service Outboard Engines 2HP-250HP Duty-Free Engines for Yachts McIntyre Bros. Ltd.TRUE BLUE, ST. GEORGES, GRENADA W.I. PHONE: (473) 444 3944/1555 FAX: (473) 444 2899 email: macford@spiceisle.com TOURS & CRUISES CAR & JEEP RENTAL www.xmarine.info info@xmarine.info 1-473 435 0297 office 1-473 415 0297 Mark 1-473 415 0180 Nicolas Technical Project Yacht Management Design and Composite Fabrication (Vinylester, Epoxy, Carbon, Kevlar) Finishing Services, Gel Coat, Painting (Awl Grip Certified) Systems Engineering, Electrical, Mechanical Installations & Repairs T e c h n i c a l S e r v i c e D o c k a n d O f f i c e s Technical Service Dock and Offices a t L a g o o n R o a d at Lagoon Road, S t G e o r g e s G r e n a d a St George's, Grenada Available in 7 Convenient Sizes50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 & 500 Gal.PROUDLY MADE IN RANGE EXTENDERSpace SavingAlways In Stock!DESIGN>Gasoline and Diesel CompatibleSimply Unfold & Fill with Std. Nozzle> +1-201-825-1400boatbladders.comatl@atlinc.comRamsey, NJ USA ORDER NOW! R E A D E R S READERS' F O R U M FORUM

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 39 Marine Insurance The insurance business has changed. No longer can brokers talk of low rates. Rather, the honest broker can only say, Ill do my best to minimize your increase!Ž There is good insurance, there is cheap insurance, but there is no good cheap insurance. You never know how good your insurance is until you have a claim. My claims settlement record cannot be matched.I have been connected with the marine insurance business for 47 years. I have developed a rapport with brokers and underwriters at Lloyds and am able to introduce boat owners to specialist brokers in the Lloyds market.e-mail: streetiolaire@hotmail.com www.street-iolaire.com „ Continued from previous page We are confident that the new system will better guarantee the safety of the users. Regards, Lesroy Noel Tobago Cays Marine Park www.tobagocays.org YOURE A CRUISER IFƒ Dear Compass Readers, Did you ever have another boat overtake you without checking the trim of your sails? Did you ever say Were cruisers, not racersŽ when another boat overtook you? Did you ever try leaving a dock with one line still attached? Did you ever leave the anchor to drag in the water to wash the mud off, and not remember it till you got to the next anchorage? Did you ever wonder why you kept that drawer full of broken bits and pieces? Did you ever realize the spring from that broken shackle you threw out last week when you cleaned out that drawer of broken bits could have fixed the thing youre trying to save now? Did you ever question your balance between must haveŽ and KISSŽ? Did you ever meet another cruiser and then, after talking for half an hour, realize youd met each other before? Did you ever meet anyone who hasnt raised their waterline since they started cruising? Did you ever realize on a gentle beam reach that your mind had been completely blank for the last while? Did you ever wonder, in answer to the Customs question, Do you have any illegal drugs aboard?Ž if anyone ever answers YesŽ? Did you ever wonder why fronts go through and anchors drag only in the middle of the night? Did you ever notice that your compass is the only piece of navigation equipment on board that doesnt have a lawyers warning not to use it for navigation? And last „ Did you remember each day to say, Arent we lucky/blessed/fortunate (pick as many as you wish) to be doing what were doing?Ž Jock Tulloch S/Y Unleaded CHARITY KAYAKERS SEEK SUPPORT BOAT Dear Compass Readers, My name is Michael Houston. I am a 21-year-old Brit and this summer I am attempting to kayak from Grenada to Puerto Rico with three friends. We are currently looking for a support boat to accompany us on our longest crossing, from Anguilla or St. Maarten to the BVI. The distance is about 75 miles and will take us at least 30 hours, which is why we are looking for a support boat. We are willing to pay good money to anyone that can offer us a support boat! Many thanks Michael Houston www.thekxkayakers.co.uk Dear Readers, Michael and his friends are attempting an 800-milelong expedition along the island chain from Grenada to Puerto Rico in tandem sea kayaks, to raise money for two UK-based charities: The Centre for Childrens Rare Disease Research at Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Lyla Nsouli Foundation for Childrens Brain Cancer Research. In the process, they aim to be the youngest team ever to have traveled this route in kayaks. With many stints being over 30 miles long, the team will often be kayaking for over 12 hours non-stop, sometimes through the night. For more information visit www.thekxkayakers.co.uk. If you can help Michael and his team by providing a support boat for the St. Maarten to BVI leg of the journey (or in any other way), please contact him at mcwhouston@ googlemail.com. CC MOTT, SAILING AND CHOCOLATE Dear Compass Mott Green lived an adventurous, avant-garde life. He started the Grenada Chocolate Factory using handbuilt, improvised, and antique machinery. The factory produces some of the best chocolate in the world. He made it so successful that more people probably now associate Grenada with chocolate than with the 1979 revolution. In doing so, he followed his own sense of egalitarian justice to make sure everyone involved, from farmers to retailers, was treated fairly and he made everything as organic, energy-efficient and solarpowered as possible „ a rare and magnificent example in todays world. He died a legend, with many obituaries, including those in the New York Times Haaretz of Israel and The Telegraph in the UK, as well as in Grenadian publications. As the Ancient Greeks would have said: A lucky man, who led a great lifeŽ. But for those of us he left behind, his death was far too soon. Most know Mott because of his chocolate, but he was also an excellent sailor. He loved to sail, which I found out when he joined a group of us for the 2003 Round Grenada Race on my cat, Ti Kanot His mind worked on many ideas at once, and long before he was ready, he bought the wooden John Hanna-designed Carol ketch Prana with the idea of using her to deliver chocolate up and down the islands. This turned out to be a dead end: too much maintenance and not enough time. He eventually gave her away, and her remains lie in Tyrrel Bay. He later owned a 14-foot beach cat, which he kept at the lovely little hotel Petit Anse in Sauteurs at the north end of Grenada. He started by sailing way out into the rough waters, going well to the east, and before long he was trolling for fish as he sailed. Mott used this cat to deliver chocolate to Carriacou and Union Island, fishing as he went. My friend Andy Smelt told me that Mott could arrive in Tyrrel Bay, gut a fish he had caught, and have it in the pan in less than a minute (chatting non-stop as he worked, no doubt). The little beach cat was not designed for ocean work, and some of us thought he was pushing the envelope, but he carried a cell phone and had many friends, so once when his rudder pintle broke, he called Dominique, who has the floating metal workshop in Tyrrel Bay, and Dominique went out and rescued him. After that he sailed with a spare pintle. For shipping to Europe, Mott packed large quantities of his chocolate on Tres Hombres an engineless sailing brigantine, and he went along for the trip. This year, the Grenada Chocolate bars were distributed in the Netherlands by volunteers on bicycles. Not too long ago I was cycling near Hog Island and saw a very fast, very beautiful ten-metre Rush catamaran painted all over with Grenada Chocolate images. This was to be the next step. Mott and Chris Long had formed a company called Rush Trading to do both day trips and deliver chocolate up the islands. The cat, being designed for day charter, could carry over a ton of chocolate and had been modified with insulated hulls, which were to be chilled using solar power. It was while working on this project he had his fatal accident. Mott dreamed a lot, and lived his dreams. He did so in a hands-on way, building, tinkering and planning all the time. Because he had a good heart, his endeavours bore fruit for all of us who love Grenada. The best memorial he could have is the continuation of what he started. Let us hope for that. For those who never met Mott, Savannah Buffet (daughter of Jimmy) made an excellent short video about him: www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_ detailpage&v=3o2UwvVp2iw. Chris Doyle Ti Kanot www.doyleguides.com WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Dear Compass Readers, We want to hear from YOU! Be sure to include your name, boat name or shoreside address, and a way we can contact you (preferably by e-mail) if clarification is required. We do not publish individual consumer complaints or individual regatta results complaints. (Kudos are okay!) We do not publish anonymous letters; however, your name may be withheld from print at your request. Please keep letters shorter than 600 words. Letters may be edited for length, clarity and fair play. Send your letters to: sally@caribbeancompass.com or Compass Publishing Ltd. Readers Forum Box 175BQ Bequia VC0400 St. Vincent & the Grenadines In Grenada, visitors checked out the engineless brigantine Tres Hombres while Mott Green and his Chocolate Company team stowed quantities of organic chocolate to sail to Europe

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 40 2008 89 Catana  4.900.000 2007 73 E xecutive $ 2,000,000 1999 60 Fountaine Pajot $619,000 2007 50 Catana $950,000 2008 50 Lagoon $749,000 2000 47 Catana  340,000 MONOHULLS Amel 54 2008 full options 599 000 Amel Super Maramu 2000 Superb 259 000 Beneteau Oceanis 500 1988 Charter version 100 000 US$ Hunter Marine 2007 Private boat full options 179 000 Beneteau 50 2007 Owner Version 179 000 DUFOUR 385 2005 ATTRACTIVE PRICE 89 000 Jeanneau SUN ODYSSEY 37 1996 Owner boat 49 000 CATAMARANS Lagoon 500 2011 3 Cabins Like New 550 000 Lagoon 470 2002 3 Cabins New Engines SOLD Lagoon 410 S2 2003 Owner Version 220 000 AMEL 54 2008 110 HP Volvo! Genset Water Maker Air Cond Full options 1 Year Amel Warranty Like New 599 000 Lagoon 410 S2 2006 Charter Version 4 Cabins / 4 heads 2* 40 HP 160 000 ST. THOMAS YACHT SALESCompass Point Marina, 6300 Est. Frydenhoj, Suite 28, St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00802 Tel: (340) 779-1660 Fax: (340) 775-4803 yachts@islands.viwww.stthomasyachts.comSail37 1997 Hunter AP, sugar scoop, clean 63,000 40 1992 Caliber, 2 strms, 2 heads, great cond. 98,000 44 1977 CSY full bimini and dodger, new main 69,000 47 1983 Vagabond Voyager, needs work 60,000Power26 2001 Twin Vee Extreme Twin Honda 4 strokes, trailer 28,000 35 2002 Maxum 3500 Mercruiser 320 HP, genset 66,900 40 2000 Cruiser Express, 2 strms, AP, 125,000 48 2004 Dyna Craft MY 3 strms, A/C 250,000Call, fax or visit our website for a complete list of boats for salewww.stthomasyachts.com 62 1984 Gulfstar Sailmaster $339,500 45 1987 Hatteras SF $199,000 Dear Compass ,This is our second season in the Caribbean, and we have been travelling with our King Charles Spaniel, Murphy. Murphy has traveled 8,000 miles at sea, much of Europe and some of the USA by land, and has experienced several long-haul flights. He is an unusual breed in the Caribbean, and we get a lot of positive attention from locals who find him interesting and cute. He is often the means of recognition for other boaters, as he is much more memorable than we are. Murphy loves the Caribbean, and revels in his exploration of new islands, and particularly his constant hunt for crabs on the wonderful beaches. We have had very little problem taking him ashore on many islands, and have found Customs officials to be helpful and friendly in processing his entry. This season we have sailed from Grenada to St. Kitts, visiting nearly every island on the way. Murphy has a UK Pet Passport, as that is his place of birth, we have maintained his rabies vaccinations on a yearly basis, and he has the 30-day titre for rabies antibodies, plus he is in excellent health. The rabies part of his paperwork is the most important. The French islands such as Martinique and Guadeloupe just require an up-to-date rabies vaccination, and Murphy went ashore with us just declaring him at Customs. Dominica had a wonderful vet in Roseau; he checked Murphy at the dock and we paid a few EC dollars to let him come ashore. In Antigua we contacted the government vet in advance with the paperwork. When we arrived, the Customs in English Harbour called the vet and again Murphy was checked at the dockside and was allowed to come ashore after a small payment of US dollars. Montserrat Customs called the vet, who saw Murphy when we landed and after checking his paperwork he entered the island for free. Murphy has also been to Grenada, St. Lucia and Les Saintes. Tomorrow we go to St. Kitts & Nevis and have spoken to the vet in advance, who said we can call him when we arrive to arrange a dockside check. We wanted to let other boaters know that dogs are welcomed on most islands without too much red tape, and Murphy has not had to stay on our boat while we explored the islands. We do respect that not everyone likes dogs, keeping him on a lead, cleaning up after him and putting him in a Sherpa (pet-carrying bag) on buses and anywhere he might offend others. We are biased as we love him, but he is polite, small, quiet, friendly and cute, all of which helps. So dont leave your dog behind as they too can enjoy the Caribbean!John and Julia Freeland, and Murphy the Sea Dog S\V Mary Ann II Letter of the Month

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 41 CALENDARJULY 1 Public holiday in Antigua & Barbuda (Vere Cornwall Bird Sr. Day) and the BVI (Territory Day) 2 Public holiday in some CARICOM countries (CARICOM Day), Curaao (Flag Day) and Cayman Islands (Constitution Day) 6 … 7 21st Annual Firecracker 500 & Chili Cook-off, Tortola. West End Yacht Club (WEYC), Tortola, BVI, tel (284) 496-8685, martin@sailsistership.com 6 8 KATS Chief Ministers International Youth Regatta, Tortola. www.katsbvi.com 7 Mango Melee food and fun fair, St. George Village Botanical Garden, St. Croix. infoatthegarden@gmail.com 10 Public holiday in the Bahamas (Independence Day) 13 Bequia Fishermens Day Competition. www.bequiatourism.com 14 Barbados Cruising Club Regatta. Barbados Cruising Club (BCC), alene@barbadoscruisingclub.org 14 Bastille Day. Celebrations on French islands; yole races in Martinique, http://yoles-rondes.net 14 PCYC Hobie Cat Match Races, Grenada, www.pcycgrenada.com 20 Guy Eldridge Memorial Trophy Race. Royal British Virgin Islands Yacht Club (RBVIYC), tel (284) 494-3286, sailing@royalbviyc.org, www.royalbviyc.org 22 FULL MOON Parties at Trellis Bay, Tortola; West End, Tortola; and Nevis 22 … 25 5th Annual BVI Billfish Tournament, Virgin Gorda. Bitter End Yacht Club (BEYC), binfo@beyc.com, www.beyc.com 24 30th Annual Christmas Eve in JulyŽ Waterfront & Marina Celebration, Virgin Gorda. BEYC 25 … Aug 7 Nevis Culturama festival. (869) 469-1992 25 … Aug 10 BVI Emancipation Festival, Road Town, Tortola. www.bvitourism.com 27 … Aug 6 Antigua Carnival. http://antiguacarnival.com 28 … Aug 5 48th Annual Carriacou Regatta. www.grenadagrenadines.com 28 … Aug 4 Tour des Yoles Rondes, Martinique. http://yoles-rondes.net 31 Carriacou Childrens Education Fund Annual Welcome Potluck Barbecue. ccefinfo@gmail.com AUGUST 1 Public holiday in many places (Emancipation Day) and Jamaica (Independence Day) 2 Carriacou Childrens Education Fund Annual Charity Auction. ccefinfo@gmail.com 2 Nevis Fruit Festival. Dept. of Agriculture: (869) 469-5603/7302 2 … 4 Bonaire Heineken Jazz Festival. www.bonairejazz.com 3 … 6 48th Carriacou Regatta Festival Sailing Races. See ad page 17 4 … 5 Carriacou Junior Sailors Regatta. www.facebook.com/carriacoujuniorsailing 5 Public holiday in Grenada (Emancipation Day Observance) 6 7 Public holiday in St. Kitts & Nevis (Emancipation Day & Culturama) 8 Public holiday in Trinidad & Tobago (Eid al Fitr) 9 … 11 Aruba Regatta. Aruba Regatta Foundation, http://aruba-regatta.com 10 Public holiday in Anguilla (Constitution Day) 12 … 13 Grenada Carnival. www.grenadagrenadines.com 18 Windward Cup Local Sloop Races, Carriacou 20 FULL MOON Parties at Trellis Bay, Tortola; West End, Tortola; and Nevis 25 Carib Great Race (powerboats) from Trinidad to Tobago 31 Public holiday in Trinidad & Tobago (Independence Day)All information was correct to the best of our knowledge at the time this issue of Compass went to press „ but plans change, s o please contact event organizers directly for confirmation. If you would like a nautical or tourism event listed FREE in our monthly calendar, please send the name and date(s) of the event and the name and contact information of the organizing body to sally@caribbeancompass.com For more information contact: Elvis Gooding Tel: 784-493-7177 jadeninc@vincysurf.comSpeed cruising: 25kts Engines: 2 x MWM = 4700HP Location: St. Vincent & the Grenadines HIGH SPEED FERRY FOR SALE LOA: 115' Beam: 31' Passengers: 218 Speed max: 34kts PICK UP! Ahoy, Compass Readers! When in Trinidad, pick up your free monthly copy of the Caribbean Compass at any of these locations (advertisers in this issue appear in bold ): CHAGUARAMAS AREA Bay Island Yachts Skinners Yard Budget Marine Skinners Yard Caribbean Marine Electrical, Power Boats Coral Cove Marina CrewsInn Marina (also Customs, Hotel and YSATT Office) Dynamite Marine Skinners Yard Echo Marine Mariners Haven Electropics Tropical Marine IMS Yacht Services Marc One Marine Supplies Mariners Haven Peake Yacht Services Power Boats Sweet Water Marina Tardieu Marina Tropical Marine West Palm Hotel Zanzibar Restaurant, Peake Yacht Services HARTS CUT AREA Caribbean Propellers Trinidad & Tobago Sailing Association (TTSA) CARENAGE AREA Pier 1 PORT OF SPAIN AREA Trinidad & Tobago Yacht Club (TTYC)

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 42 continued on next page Caribbean Compass Market Place MID ATLANTIC YACHT SERVICESPT-9900-144 HORTA / FAIAL, AZORESProviding all vital services to Trans-Atlantic Yachts! Incl. Chandlery, Charts, Pilots, Rigging EU-VAT (16%) importation Duty free fuel (+10.000lt)TEL +351 292 391616 FAX +351 292 391656 mays@mail.telepac.pt www.midatlanticyachtservices.com THIS COULD BE YOUR MARKET PLACE AD Book it now: tom@caribbeancompass.comor contact your local island agent CARRIACOU REAL ESTATELand and houses for sale For full details see our website: www.carriacou.net or contact Carolyn Alexander atCarriacou Real Estate Ltd e-mail: islander@spiceisle.comTel: (473) 443 8187 Fax: (473) 443 8290We also handle Villa Rentals & Property Management on Carriacou TechNick Ltd.Engineering, fabrication and welding. Fabrication and repair of stainless steel and aluminium items. Nick Williams, Manager Tel: (473) 536-1560/435-7887 S.I.M.S. Boatyard, True Blue, Grenada technick@spiceisle.com Jeff Fisher … Grenada (473) 537-6355 www.neilprydesails.com Check out our website or contact us directly for a competitive quote on rugged and well-built sails that are well suited to the harsh environment of the charter trade and blue water cruising. NEILPRYDE Sails Grenada Open 11.30 2.00 for Lunch 6.00 9.00 for Dinner Tuesday to Saturday Sunday Brunch 11.30 14.30 Reservations recommended Phone (473) 443 6500 or call CH 16 Situated on the South Side of Tyrrel Bay. Bar open all DayTyrrel Bay, CarriacouUse our new Dinghy Dock DOMINICA YACHT SERVICES Relax! Leave the work to us -Hubert J. Winston18 Victoria St. Roseau & Bay St. Portsmouth Dominica +767-275-2851 Mobile / 445-4322 +767-448-7701 Fax info@dominicayachtservices.com www.dominicayachtservices.com REMEMBER to tell our advertisers you saw their ad in Compass! RIVER LODGEFronteras Rio Dulce Guatemala Tel: 502.5306.6432 www.tortugal.com holatortugal@gmail.com H o t e l M a r i n a R e s t a u r a n t Hotel Marina Restaurant LE MARIN, MARTINIQUEwww.caraibe-marine.fr contact@caraibe-marine.fr Tel: +(596) 596 74 80 33 Cell: (596) 696 27 66 05 Rigging Shipchandler Electricity Electronic

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 43 Caribbean Compass Market Place continued on next page Marine Electrics Zac artimer Le Marin, Martinique FWITel: + (596) 596 650 524 Fax: + (596) 596 650 053 yescaraibes@hotmail.com Watermakers G O L D E N GOLDEN T A S T E TASTE R E S T A U R A N T RESTAURANT & & B A R BAR Genuine local and international cuisine right in the heart of Gros Islet For reservations & information Tel: (758) 450-9792 G R E N A D I N E S S A I L S GRENADINES SAILS & C A N V A S & CANVAS  B E Q U I A   BEQUIA Located opposite G.Y.E. (northern side of Admiralty Bay) Tel (784) 457-3507 / 457-3527 (evenings)e-mail: gsails@vincysurf.com VHF Ch16/68 NEW SAILS, SAIL REPAIRS, U/V COVERS FOAM LUFFS, BIMINI, DODGERS AWNINGS, DINGHY COVERS TRAMPOLINES,STACKPACKS & LAZY JACK SYSTEMS "IF WE DO NOT HAVE IT, WE WILL GET IT" GOLDEN HIND CHANDLERIES LTD. WICKHAMS CAY II NEXT TO THE MOORINGS TEL: 1 284 494 7749 FAX: 1 284 494 8031 EMAIL: GHC@SURFBVI.COM ONE STOP SHOP FOR ALL YOUR BOAT'S NEEDS! BEQUIA VENTURE CO. LTDappointed agents in St. Vincent & the Grenadines for Primer, Epoxy, Top Coat, Antifouling, ThinnersPORT ELIZABETH, BEQUIA Tel: 784 458 3319 € Fax: 784 458 3000 Email: bequiaventure@vincysurf.com € SPRAY PAINTS € ROLLERS € BRUSHES € TOOLS €€ CLEANING SUPPLIES €€ NAILS € HOSE CLAMPS €€ FILLERS € STAINLESS FASTENERS € ADHESIVES € UNION ISLANDSt. Vincent & the GrenadinesTel/Fax: (784) 458 8918 capgourmet @vincysurf.com VHF Ch 08 BOAT PAINT & STUFFTime Out Boat Yard Saint Martin info@boatpaintstuff.com ANTIFOULING SPECIALIST : US NAVY PRODUCT (PPG Ameron) COPPERCOAT Permanent Antifouling (10 years and moreƒ)Fiberglass + Epoxy & Polyester Resins Epoxy primer + Polyurethane Top Coat Phone: + (590) 690 221 676

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 44 Caribbean Compass Market Place Makes Stainless Steel Sparkle. No Rubbing. No Scrubbing. No Polishing.Spotless Stainless Spotless Stainless beforeafter Available at Caribbean Chandleries orSpotless Stainless.com Available at Caribbean Chandleries orSpotless Stainless.comMakes Stainless Steel Sparkle. No Rubbing. No Scrubbing. No Polishing. Brush ON Rinse OFF Brush ON Rinse OFF Haunting as we sail into cold fronts, storms, and hearts of darkness ...Ž … Sailing magazine Now available as an ebook on Amazon.com (US$9.95) REMEMBER to tell our advertisers you saw their ad in Compass! Saltys Answer WILFRED DEDERER

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 45 „ Continued from page 23 ƒFreediving Dont kick until your fins are under the surface. Once below, I try to follow the line, clear the pressure by pinching my nose and kick wide and gentle strokes. Before I know it I am hovering above the sunken ship. I try to suppress my desire for more air and stay a bit longer, looking. Fish swim by. I am grinning. Then I turn to the vertical and quickly kick to the surface. I break the water and gasp for air. Not too bad for a 64 year old. Leo is smiling and gives me encouragement as well as helpful suggestions on how to improve my technique. He also invites me to an upcoming FLOW event. Yeah, its called Breathless Monday. Its a gathering of locals and others to get together and freedive. FLOW supplies the platform and basic safety instruction. We only have one rule, and that is to dive safely. I want to inspire people to freedive and be comfortable in the water, but also to become more aware of the underwater world. By becoming more aware of your surroundings, you get more respect for nature. It also inspires a more healthy lifestyle.Ž Patrick Holian is a freelance writer living on Bonaire. He writes stories about adventure travel, the islands, sailing and the environment. You can read his blog at http://worldkid66.wordpress.com. Above: How many people can say that they experience nature this way? Right: Instead of swimming off, the octopus opened up all the wayƒ the octopus and I just looked at each other I first met Mott Green in Tyrrel Bay Yacht Haulout in Carriacou while he was underneath Prana an old wooden boat he had recently purchased to pursue the dream of delivering chocolate by yacht throughout the Caribbean. Instantly we had a bond. I had already owned two wooden boats and could sympathise with the endless work that needed to be done to make his boat navigable. Weekend after weekend my wife, Di, and I would meet Mott for a cup of tea after he arrived on the ferry from Grenada and Mott would discuss his latest progress, usually going more backwards than forwards. He was eccentric and wiredŽ but a very likeable person and after we gave up working on boats for the day (I would help him with projects on Prana whenever he needed a hand), we spent hours solving the worlds problemsŽ or discussing the latest aspects of his dream or making dinner together. Prana didnt work out for many reasons but while he still had her, I admired his relentless enthusiasm to make the dream happen. Setbacks were merely a challenge for Mott, who needed ways to burn off all that excess energy anyway! Mott kept inviting us to see his part of the world in Hermitage, Grenada so one day we went up there, staying in an old house at the edge of the nutmeg forest at the top end of the road past the chocolate factory. Once through the tour of the factory and making a lunch of oil downŽ with vegetables from his organic garden, Mott decided to show us the trail to his bamboo house where he lived on and off for many years while he experimented with processing chocolate and cocoa teaŽ by hand. Barefoot, confident and still moving at warp speed, Mott set off through the heavy forest growth and slick red mud with us stumbling along behind, trying to keep up with him. Mott talked constantly of the years he spent here with only solar power and living off the land while he dreamed of making chocolate to sell commercially. After that, whenever I went to see him, I would help Mott with electrical projects or we would throw around ideas for factory extensions or machinery improvements. Over the years, after the initial first couple of visits, Di and I spent only our daylight hours with him, preferring to stay the evenings in the village of Sauteurs at the beautiful beachside suite he negotiated for us, as the factory and old house offered only pretty basic living conditions. It suited him, anyway, as he could check on his Hobie cat nearby, the one he sailed often to Carriacou to drop off chocolate or just go out to sea to catch fresh fish. Our days were spent more often traveling around Grenada to check out cocoa farm co-ops who contributed to his cocoa factory, or watching him maintain his machinery, stumbling through the nutmeg forest or having lunch at Belmont Cocoa Estate. One of our fondest memories is a chocolate deliveryŽ he made to St. Lucia via air because several of us cruisers were missing our Grenada Chocolate fix and no one had been recently to Grenada to bring any back. He met the first plane of the day personally and hand carried the Styrofoam cooler with ice packs to the pilot with specific instructions not to let the chocolate be delayed anywhere along the way. He then phoned the St. Lucia Customs to check on its arrival and arranged by phone for immediate release to the M/V Epicurus so we could all indulge in the 110 chef-sized bars without further ado! Now that is personalized service, Mott style! Another time Mott flew up to St Lucia to personally deliver chocolate to us, while he investigated options for selling to outlets in St. Lucia. From Hobie cat to engineless square-rigger, Mott pursued his dream of delivering Grenada chocolate under sail to specialty lovers in NYC, London and Amsterdam. He would call us on Skype from different harbours that the brigantine Tres Hombres stopped at to let us know how everything was going with the chocolate during its first experimental year with the refrigerated holds he had installed himself, using solar energy. He was meticulous about monitoring the temperature and condition of the shipment and about ensuring that the delivery at each destination went smoothly, even if it meant flying the last part of the way to be there when the ship arrived. He raved about all the wildlife he had seen and how fulfilled he felt to be part of this groundbreaking method of providing fair transportŽ to overseas Grenada Chocolate outlets. This was taken from our last IM chat with Mott while waiting for a canal transit date to head into the Pacific: [5/29/2013 12:04:29 PM] grenadachocolate: now working on new cat here for inter-island deliveries. it is all painted with blue and cocoa pods like our van and cool chambers built. much work to do still though, maybe another month or two. [5/29/2013 12:14:23 PM] Phil and Di: well that must keep you busy when you are not at the factory. Are you still working on the cool storage for the chocolate? what else besides the painting needs to be done before you sail her to Grenville? [5/29/2013 12:15:25 PM] grenadachocolate: we are putting in some new hatches, an underwater generator, solar panel holder out the stern, building a sail/ rowing dinghy, wire-up, etc [5/29/2013 12:17:59 PM] Phil and Di: we are so thrilled that you are now truly living the dream you have had for so long and this is so much more exciting for you than sailing a boat like Prana For a man who had spent more than ten years working to make Grenada Chocolate Company an internationally recognized and respected business, he still exuded the same energy and enthusiasm for his latest project to deliver chocolate inter-island as he did for the ill-fated chocolate ship-to-be Prana in 2003. It is very sad that his life ended so quickly, but that is how he lived life „ always at warp speed. We will miss him: his energy, his nuttiness, his ingenious ideas, his eccentricity, his infectious enthusiasm „ it was all part of who he was. Not many people knew the real Mott we got to know. RIP, my friend; you will be missed greatly by many, and very deeply by Di and me. Phil and Di Cook cruised the Caribbean aboard the yacht Matira and have recently transited the Panama Canal into the Pacific. Editors note: Mott Green touched many lives in many ways. In the March 2013 issue of Compass Frank Pearce wrote of Mott helping a shipwrecked sailor: Mott Green, proprietor and manager of the Grenada Chocolate Factory, was contacted by phone and immediately set off for Halifax Bay (Grenada) by road. Anyone knowing that remote bay will recall that there is no easy land access. Mott, having struggled through the undergrowth, got to the waters edge with emergency rations: a can of sardines, granola bars and a spare cell phone for Paul in a watertight bag.Ž WHATS ON MY MIND Memories of Mottby Phil Cook

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JUNE 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 46 JULY ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# CLASSIFIEDS FOR SALE 2001 Leopard 42 245.000 US 2007 F.Pajot Orana 44 375.000 US 1978/2000 FORMOSA 56 156.000 US 1996 BENETEAU 503 145.000 US1992 WARWICK Cardinal 46cc 165.000 US 1987 IRWIN 44 MK II 95.000 US 1986 OYSTER 435 135.000 GBP 1983 34ft VIND 45 59.000 US 2007 JEANNEAU SO 32i 69.000 US 2006 JEANNEAU SO 40.3 112.000 Euro E-mail ulrich@dsl-yachting.comTel (758) 452 8531 50 BENETEAU M500 1989 Newly re-built Perkins 90HP, 4 en-suite dbl cabins. In good condition. Ideal for chartering. Lying Blue Lagoon, St.Vincent. E-mail: pukasail51@hotmail. com Tel: (784) 433-3334 E-mail: vthadley@vincysurf. com Tel: (784) 457-3362BOATS FOR SALE IN TRINIDAD Tel (868) 739-6449 www.crackajacksailing. CALYPSO MARINE V-34 SPECIAL 2 x Yanmar diesel inboard engines, great fuel efficiency. Tel: (784) 4543474/495-4930 E-mail: wefishin@vincysurf.com ENDEAVOUR 40 Center cockpit, cruising ready, complete w/solar panels, wind generator, electronics. Will trade for real estate. E-mail: velerofia@ gmail.com 33 MORGAN OUT ISLAND 1979, Perkins, All amenities. US$18,000 Bunny, Tel: (868) 637-3244/316-2215 E-mail: bunny171 @yahoo.com 44 MOTOR CATAMARAN SeaquariumŽ 2x250 HP Yamaha four stroke, capacity 50 persons. Registered in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. US$140,000 Email: windandsealtd@gmail. com Tel: (784) 493-3128 57 HERBULOT 2 guest cbns w/ 2 guest shwrs/heads. Crew cbn w/ shwr/head85HP Perkins, AB Rib/5 HP Tohatsu. Valued at US$28,000 by reputable Marine Surveyor, asking US$15,000 E-mail:danny@cnportlouismarina.com 1979 HUNTER 30 IndigoŽ shoal keel, mainsail/genoa. Recent upgrades include Furlex 200S roller furling, new S/S standing rigging, 2xYamaha 15hp OBs, bimini cover. Lying Rodney Bay, St. Lucia. Contact Michelle Tel: (246) 253-0484 E-mail: missy.martinez@gmail.com. BRISTOL 32 1977 centerboard. Cute, sturdy, shallow draft cruiser with lots of extras, ready to go. Lying Grenada. US$24,500. More info and pictures E-mail: juncojax@yahoo.de 1969 COLUMBIA 36 Easy single person sailing, a joy to sail! All new seacocks and thru-hulls, Yanmar 30HP, ready to sail. Lying Bequia, named "Akemi", formerly known as "Duppy". Due to illness. US$18,000 OBO. E-mail: tom@smudge.com Tel: (784) 528-9163 Details and photos at www.smudge.com/ akemi_for_sale 63FT DYNAMIQUE. An elegant sailing yacht, she combines exceptional cruising and sailing performance with stylish, comfortable living areas. Built 1985 refitted 1998 and 2008. Lying Bequia. E-mail: clairetabor@hotmail.com Tel: (784) 432-5201/457 3377 ERICSON 38 1977 Lying Trinidad US$10,000 Tel: (868) 634 4346 E-mail: don@ powerboats.co.tt PROPERTY FOR SALE BEQUIA-HOUSE, MUST SELL Friendship Bay, 8 yrs. old, 2 Bed, 1 Bath, 8027 Sq/ft. Fenced lot. $212,000 USD, OBO E-mail: Bequiahouse@gmail.comBEQUIA BELMONT House 1600sq ft on 1/2 acre. 2 bed/2 baths. Very private location, beautiful view, fruit trees. Tel: (784) 455-7580 E-mail: willrow@telus.net BEQUIA-MACS PIZZERIA, Waterfront location, Bequias most popular restaurant. Same ownermanager for 31 yrs. Complete, land, buildings, equipment. Island Pace Realty Tel: (784) 458-3544 E-mail: Emmett@islandpace.com BEQUIA Bequia Book Shop Building. 152 Sq/Ft. on 1st floor. Ideal for office or commercial enterprise, best location in Pt. Elizabeth. Tel: Ms. Josea Mason, Island Cloud Realty (784) 527-0986 or landlord 456-9016. BEQUIA PORT ELIZABETH 3 Bdrm house, Large Master Suite with ensuite bathroom and porch on 2nd floor, great view of harbor. Above ground basement great for business ventures, walking distance to everything! beaches, markets, restaurants, etc. US$$300,000/EC$801,000 Tel: (784) 495-5014/528-7273 BEQUIABUILDING LOT Near La Pompe, oceanfront property with spectacular view of Petit Nevis, Isle a Quatre and Mustique. 11,340 sq/ft. US$125,000 Tel: (613) 931-1868 E-mail: maccomm@sympatico.ca CARRIACOU Anchor in front of your door. Beach house on 7,216 sq/ft lot. Three-level fully furnished home, 2 bdrm, 1-1/2 baths, 2 kitchens, beach shwr on lower level. Gated and fenced, garage for boat/car. Located on Paradise Beach, LEsterre Bay, across from Sandy Island. For sale or lease. Peter Belmar Tel: (305) 386-2997CARRIACOU LAND, Lots and multi-acre tracts. Great views overlooking Southern Grenadines and Tyrrel Bay. www.caribtrace.comGRENADA Approx. area 150,000 sq/ ft (3 acres, 1 rood, 19 poles). US$1 per sq/ft. Located at The Villa in Soubise, St. Andrews, 1 1/2 miles from Grenville by road and 1/2 mile from Soubise beach. Eastern section cultivated with various fruit trees; western section wooded. Telfor Bedeau Tel: (473) 442-6200BEQUIA MT. PLEASANT Great views, large lots from US$5/sq.ft. www.bequialandforsale.com GRENADA East side Clarkes Court Bay. Excellent views, water access, plots available. 0.9 acres to 9,000 sq.ft. Prices from US$5 to $10 sq/ft depending on size and location. E-mail streetiolaire@hotmail.com MISC. FOR SALE 2 X 3 126 CATERPILLAR 420HP Diesels with lots of spare parts as a package. Mosden, Tel: (473) 407-1147 E-mail: starwindsailing@ spiceisle.com SAILS AND CANVAS EXCEPTIONALLY SPECIAL DEALS at http://doylecaribbean. com/specials.htm SAILBOAT PROPS 3 blade 19" to 22", Winches, Barlow, Barient from US250 Raymarine Instruments ST60 Aries Wind Vane E-mail: ulrich@dsl-yachting.com Tel: (758) 452 8531WESTERBEKE 46 4,500 hours. Great candidate for rebuild. Runs well, but needs repair at the end of the crankshaft. Comes with a V-drive Hurth transmission in excellent shape. Starter motor only 2 years old. Asking US$2,000 E-mail: jackrgreer@gmail.com or qrms44@gmail.com. SERVICES BEQUIA CLIFFS FINE WOODWORKING for yacht or home www.bequiawoodwork.com Tel: (784) 431-9500 E-mail cliffduncan234@gmail.comCHARTER SKIPPER FOR SAILMale 27 yrs. Yacht Master 200 tons, PADI Rescue Diver. Med+Pacific+Carib experienced. Fluent in English, Dutch, Spanish, Papiamento Available early August 2013 E-mail: tylerantho@gmail.com Tel: (5999) 747-2386 RENTALS LA POMPE, BEQUIALarge 2 bedroom house and/ or 1 bed studio apartment. Big verandah and patio, stunning view, cool breeze. Internet, cable TV. 2 weeks minimum, excellent longterm rates. Tel: (784) 495 1177 email: louisjan@vincysurf.comST.VINCENT ARNOSVALE Luxury 3 bdrm house w/ Jacuzzi, WiFi, A/C. Sleeps 6. US$110/nightly. Tel: Frank (784) 430-1010 or Chester (784) 455-0700 www.ecobayguesthouse.com YOUR CLASSIFIED IS ON-LINE! Aero Tech Lab C/W 38 Art & Design Antigua MP Art Fabrik Grenada MP Assurances Maritime Antilles St. Maarten MP B & C Fuel Dock Grenada 32 Barefoot Yacht Charters SVG 23 Bequia Marina SVG 32 Bequia Venture SVG MP Boat Paint & Stuff St. Maarten MP Budget Marine Sint Maarten 2 Camper & Nicholson Grenada 47 Captain Gourmet SVG MP Caraibe Marine Martinique 13/MP Caribbean Marine Electrical Trinidad MP Caribbean Propellers Ltd. Trinidad MP Caribbean Yacht Brokerge St. Maarten 40 Carriacou Regatta Grenada 7 Clippers Ship Martinique MP Curaao Marine Curaao 15 Dominica Marine Center Dominica MP Doolittle's Restaurant St. Lucia 36 Down Island Real Estate Grenada MP Doyle Offshore Sails Tortola 4 Doyle's Guides USA 34 Echo Marine Jotun Special Trinidad 9 Edward William Insurance International 39 Electropics Trinidad MP Food Fair Grenada 37 Free Cruising Guides C/W 35 Golden Hind Chandlery Tortola MP Golden Taste St. Lucia MP Gourmet Foods SVG 36 Grenada Marine Grenada 10 Grenadine Air Alliance SVG 33 Grenadines Sails SVG MP IGY/RBM Fish Tourney St. Lucia 8 Intouchable Marine Services St. Maarten 9 Iolaire Enterprises UK 34/39 Island Water World Sint Maarten 48 Jaden Sun for sale C/W 41 Johnson Hardware St. Lucia 19 LIAT C/W 35 Marc One Marine Trinidad MP Marigot Gourmet Pizza St. Lucia 36 Marina Pescaderia Puerto Rico MP Marina Santa Marta Colombia 20 Marina Zar-Par Dominican Rep. 27 Marine Solar Tec Panama 41 McIntyre Bros. Ltd Grenada 38 Mid Atlantic Yacht Services Azores MP Multihull Company C/W 40 Neil Pryde Sails Grenada MP Northern Lights Generators Tortola 6 Off Shore Risk Management Tortola 11 Porthole Restaurant SVG MP Power Boats Trinidad MP Renaissance Marina Aruba 14 SantEquip Trinidad MP Sea Hawk Paints C/W 5 Slipway Restaurant Grenada MP South African Wines Grenada 37 Spice Island Marine Grenada 29 SpotlessStainless USA MP St. Thomas Yacht Sales St. Thomas 40 Sunbay Marina Puerto Rico 21 Sunsail Marine Center SVG 22 Superyacht Shipping C/W 39 Technick Grenada MP Tikal Arts & Crafts Grenada MP TMM SVG 12 Tortugal Marina Hotel Guatemala MP Turbulence Sails Grenada 10/ MP Velocity Water Services SVG MP Venezuelean Marine Supply Venezuela MP West Palm Hotel Trinidad MP WIND Martinique MP X marine Grenada 38 Xanadu Marine Venezuela 27 Yacht Steering Committee Trinidad 18 YES Martinique MP ADVERTISERS INDEX MP = Market Place pages 42 to 45 C/W = Caribbean-wide CLASSIFIEDS US 50¢ PER WORDInclude name, address and numbers in count. Line drawings/photos accompanying classifieds are US$10 Pre-paid by the 10th of the monthE-mail: shellese @caribbeancompass.com www.caribbeancompass.com FREE on-line version!

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JULY 2013 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 47 WWW.CNMARINAS.COM/PLM ABU DHABI | CYPRUS | ITALY | MALTA | TURKEY | WEST INDIES Get down to Grenada this summerSummer berths from just $400 a month Lying just above 12 degrees North, Grenada is south of the main hurricane belt and is growing in popularity among yacht owners during the summer months … not least for its spectacular carnival which takes place from 9 to 13 August. Port Louis Marina provides a safe, secure berth with all the amenities youd expect from a full-service marina run by Camper & Nicholsons. And the Spice Island of Grenada guarantees a genuine, warm welcome. From 1 June to 30 November a 32 foot yacht can berth for just $390 USD per month. Its $595 for a 40 footer and $1,095 for a 60 footer Call Danny Donelan on +1 (473) 435 7431 or email danny.donelan@cnportlouismarina.com Low Season Rates: 1 June to 30 November 2013 LOA in feetMonthly: $/ft/dayup to 32$0.39 up to 40$0.48 up to 50$0.53 up to 60$0.59 up to 65$0.66 up to 75$0.67 up to 80$0.83 up to 100$0.85For yachts above 100 feet LOA, and for bookings of longer periods, please contact us for a personalised quote. Multihulls are charged at 1.5 times the standard rate.

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Published by Compass Publishing Limited, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, and printed by Guardian Media Limited, Trinidad & Tobago