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Caribbean Review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095576/00007
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean Review
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Latin American and Caribbean Center, Florida International University
Publisher: Latin American and Caribbean Center, Florida International University
Place of Publication: Miami, FL
Publication Date: 1990
Copyright Date: 1980
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Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: FIU: Special Collections
Holding Location: FIU: Special Collections
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 1553369
System ID: UF00095576:00007

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Front Matter
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    Main
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

FA


CARIBBEAN
* R m E V I E W"
SUMMER 1990 VOLUME XVI, NUMBERS 3 & 4 $12.00


HERITAGE TOURISM m SOVEREIGNTY & THE LIBERATION OF PANAMA
BURNHAM-BASHING STEDMAN'S SURINAME COSTA RICAN ART







Caribbean Festival Arts

Each and Every Bit of Difference

by John Wallace Nunley and Judith Bettelheim

*, S.A .w art history, a new visual tradition, based on beads and feathers and masks
v ",ad p,1rcussion-dominated street-marchers, permeates certain neighborhoods of our
Smal.t. cities. To repeat: a whole lot of shaking, drumming, chanting, feathering,
b.idiPig, multi-lappeting, and sequimnning is going on. How did it happen? Immi-
T he pan-Caribbean aesthetic, with its mixture of media and themes, defines
the flavor of the Caribbean character: a blend of ethnicities, religions, and
SpoIitical orientations intrinsic to the color, themes, music, and spirit of
te-.tn. al arts. This lavishly illustrated volume is the first to examine the
,rigi ns and performance of this exciting art form, which is as colorful and
S|. d\ namic as its creators and participants.
224 pp., 166 illus., $39.95
Published in cooperation with the St. Louis Art Museum
To order, call toll-free 1-800-441-4115
Write for our complete list of art books and exhibition catalogues

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PRESS
P.O. Box 50096, Seattle, WA 98145






'Mornings .....

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your ear as softly as the warm breezes caress your
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like one of our tropical flowers.
Come take time to explore the genteel beauty
and British heritage of Barbados. Its sugar-white
beaches and duty-free shops. Its open-air night-
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Use it for everything from airline tickets to scuba
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For information, call the Barbados Board of
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BARBAD OS




The American Express'Card. '-
The Official Card of Barbados. I v
Registered Trademark of American Express Company.
1988 American Express Travel Related Services Company. Inc.
All rights reserved.










ON THE COVER: CARIBBEAN
/I. caribefio
; ... Caribbean),---------- -
by Costa Rican artist R E V I E .... W
Leonel Gonzalez
(Acrylic on canvas, 1988).
See Costa Rican Art,
on page 84, in this issue.

SUMMER 1990 VOLUME XVI NUMBERS 3 & 4


6 Crosssing Swords-I
; Dj Reggae: Slackness Becomes Standard
By Laura Frost
7 Crossing Swords-II
The American Appropriation of Reggae
By Humphrey A. Regis
8 Heritage Tourism
And the Myth of Paradise
By Rex Nettleford
10 Popular Sovereignty and the Liberation of Panama
Using International Factors for National Purpose
By Ricardo Arias Calderdn, Vice President of Panama
12 Sandinista Self-Criticism
Revolutionary Humor from Nicaragua
Cartoons by ,-'. Sdnchez Flores
14 Poll Watching in Nicaragua
A Report from El Rama
By Jan Knippers Black
16 Burnham-Bashing
Hoyte Fiddles While Guyana Burns
By Festus Brotherson Jr.
18 Stedman's Surinam
The Original Narrative
By Richard and Sally Price
24 16 Tomes and What Do You Get...
The Caribbean Review Index, 1969-1989
By Barry B. Levine
84 Costa Rican Art
And the Latin American Visual Imagination
By Ricardo Pau-Llosa
88 First Impressions
Critics Look at the Literature
Compiled by Forrest D. Colburn
93 Recent Books
On the Region and Its Peoples
Compiled by Normia Miriam Turcoiii


I I










Throughout the Caribbean,
No0ninate individuals, businesses, pri-
vate organizations and gov-
Y r11 ernments are working to
protect and preserve for fu-
v i ture generations, the re-
F avorie gion's diverse cultural and
architectural heritage. Amer-
S 0lo'll ican Express is pleased to
rIL join these efforts.
R The American Express
.1- eCt Preservation Awards Pro-
gram for the Caribbean,
1990-1992, is intended to highlight the hidden gems of the
Caribbean's rich history.
Up to six annual awards will be presented yearly for
completed projects. In addition, an annual
a1%ard of US$10,000 will be given for
projects under development.
AN For the program, restoration
means "recreating" an historical
AA B site or monument so that it can
i proudly display purpose and
significance once again.
....- ......., Newly made available to the
.'s public, these sites provide visi-
.;. tors (local and international) a
I' fresh opportunity to relive the
I ..\ iN excitement of the past to visu-
..v .' ^ a [ize what a site looked like before it
k, ,topped being actively used.
S Places that have fallen into disuse can
also be gi en new uses. They can be brought
back and provide a backdrop for contemporary activities:
theaters, art galleries, chic boutiques.
Two of the criteria to select winners articulate what we
mean. One will test the
impact that a project has
on its own community.
Another will test the de-
gree to which an entry
can serve as an example
and influence others.
To nominate projects,
contact: American Ex-
press Preservation Awards Program for the Caribbean,
c/o US/ICOMOS, 1600 H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20006. Tel: (202) 842-1866. Fax: (202) 842-1861.


;07 TR4'. EL
17 ?FEL- TED
in.,a-i StP'. ICES
An Amencan Express company


CARIBBEAN_
* R E V I E W

Founded in Puerto Rico in 1969
Summer 1990 Vol. XVI, Nos. 3 & 4 Twelve Dollars


EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Barry B. Levine
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Richard A. Dwyer
Dennis J. Gayle
William T. Vickers
MANAGING EDITOR
June S. Belkin
ART DIRECTOR
Peter M. Ekstein
BOOK REVIEW EDITOR
Forrest D. Colburn
BOARD OF EDITORS
Reinaldo Arenas
Ricardo Arias Calderdn
Festus Brotherson Jr.
T. Avril Bryan
German Carrera Damas
Henry S. Gill
Edouard Glissant
Wolf C, '.l;, -,. t
Harmannus Hoetink
Gerard R. Latortue
Gordon K. Lewis
Vaughan A. Lewis
Modesto Maidique
Leslie Manigat
Carmelo Mesa-Lago


ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/BUSINESS
Jill E. Rapperport
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITORIAL
Rosario A. Levine
BIBLIOGRAPHER
Norma Miriam Turconi
CARTOGRAPHER
Linda M. Marston
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
Diedra Phillips



Carlos Moore
Carlos Alberto Montaner
Rex Nettleford
Daniel Oduber
Robert A. Pastor
Richard Price
Eneid Routte Gdmez
Selvyn Ryan
Aaron L. Segal
Andrds Serbin
Carl Stone
Edelberto Torres Rivas
Jose Villamil
Olga J. Wagenheim
Gregory B. Wolfe


Caribbean Review, a quarterly journal dedicated to the Caribbean, Latin America, and their
emigrant groups, is published by Caribbean Review, Inc., a corporation not for profit organized
under the laws of the State of Florida (Barry B. Levine, President; Andrew R. Banks, Vice
President; Kenneth M. Bloom, Secretary).
Editorial policy: to promote international education with an emphasis on creating greater
mutual understanding among the Americas, by articulating the culture and ideals of the
Caribbean and Latin America, and emigrating groups originating therefrom. Caribbean
Review does not accept responsibility for views expressed in its pages, but rather for giving
such views the opportunity to be expressed. Our articles do not represent a consensus of
opinion, some are in open disagreement with others. No reader should be able to agree with
all of them.
Copyright: Contents Copyright 1990 by Caribbean Review, Inc. The reproduction of any
artwork, editorial or other material is expressly prohibited without written permission from the
publisher.
Editorial office: Caribbean Review, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199.
Phone: (305) 284-8466. Fax: (305) 284-1019. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompa-
nied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Concurrent submission on 5 1/4" DOS
compatible disks (preferably in ASCII) is helpful.
Subscription office: Caribbean Review, Box 1370, Miami, FL 33265. Rates In the US,
PR, USVI, Canada, for individuals: 1 year, $24; 2 years, $43; 3 years, $60; for institutions: 1
year, $30; 2 years, $55; 3 years, $78. In the Caribbean, Central America, Colombia, Mexico
and Venezuela: 1 year, $28; 2 years, $51; 3 years, $72. In South America and Europe (except
Colombia and Venezuela): 1 year, $30; 2 years, $55; 3 years, $78. Elsewhere: 1 year, $35; 2
years, $65; 3 years, $93. Overseas subscriptions are shipped by air. Invoicing Charge:
$10.00. Subscription agencies, please take 15%. Back Issues: $10.00 each. Mircrofilm and
microfiche copies are available from University Microfilms; 300 North Zeeb Road; Ann Arbor,
MI. 48106.
Photocopying: Permission to photocopy is granted by Caribbean Review, Inc. for internal
or personal use of libraries and others registered with the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC),
provided that the stated fee of $1.00 per copy is paid directly to CCC, 21 Congress Street,
Salem, MA 01970.
Syndication: Caribbean Review articles have appeared in other media in English, French,
German, Spanish, and Portuguese. Editors, write for details.
Index: Our articles are annotated and indexed in America: History and Life; Current
Contents of Periodicals on Latin America; Development and Welfare Index; Hispanic
American Periodicals Index; Historical Abstracts; International Bibliography of Book Reviews;
International Bibliography of Periodical Literature; International Development Abstracts;
International Serials Database (Bowker); New Periodicals Index; Political Science Abstracts;
PAIS Bulletin; United States Political Science Documents; and Universal Reference System.
International Standard Serial Number: ISSN 0008-6525; Library of Congress Classifica-
tion Number: AP6 C27; Library of Congress Card Number: 71-16267; Dewey Decimal
Number: 079.7295.
Production: Typography and design using Pagewright by Peter Ekstein, The Bell Mount
Company, Box 560577, Miami, FL 33256. Printed in Chile by Cochrane S.A.






h I Caribbean Re\ ie,. A\.ard i- !'-. t' n ir, .ill) t,-
honor an individual who has contributed to the
advancement of Caribbean intellectual life. The
winner of the 10th annual award (presented at the 14th annual
meeting of the Caribbean Studies Association, Barbados, May
1989) was George W. Roberts. The win- -- -- -
ner of the 11th annual award (presented
at the 15th annual meeting of the C.S.A., 1 THE
Trinidad and Tobago, May 1990) was .
Katherine Dunham. They join previous A J -
recipients Jaime Benitez, Aim6 Cesaire, |
C.L.R. James, Gordon K. Lewis, W. A J.L
Arthur Lewis, Sidney W. Mintz, Arturo R E V
Morales Carri6n, Philip M. Sherlock and
M.G. Smith.
George W. Roberts is recognized inter-
nationally as a world-premier demogra-
pher. He has trained many of the younger demographers
throughout the region and pioneered many of the new data
gathering techniques there.
Attesting to his stature, Kingsley Davis wrote in 1956 that
Roberts' study, The Population of Jamaica, was "one of the few
thorough studies of population dynamics in an underdevel-
oped area... The result of the skills, expertise, and interest which
Mr. Roberts has brought to his task is an unusually competent
and original case study... He is to be congratulated ... above all
by the Jamaicans themselves for his skill in catching their lives in
his demographic net."
Twenty-one years later, Vera Rubin wrote: "Understanding
of the complex social organization of the multicultural stratified
societies of the Caribbean requires a sound demographic base-
line; for over twenty years social science researchers... have
drawn on the demographic works of Professor George W.
Roberts for such a base." George W. Roberts is a welcome
addition to the list of previous winners.
Katherine Dunham has made a 50 year contribution to Carib-
b _. ,r, ..... tu r: r ., ,d :,.iJ... l %cip .1 .f;., :,:r ,_.r .-,r pl,._ r


I


.-,n i hr.opcol..'i i-t .-:t'.1d I ritt r. ShI.: _rtudi:,d ->-''i o .I :: i ti',r,-opolIig- in
the 1930s under Melville Herskowitts and did field work in
Haiti. She used her knowledge of anthropology to pioneer the
field of Afro-Caribbean dance.
The Dunham Dance Company which she founded in the
-- - 1930s and maintained for nearly 40
years was the pioneer of all Caribbean
dance companies and a major catalyst
"77 I for interest in Caribbean cultural life.
-/1 I A \ Whether writing, choreographing or
dancing, her work has drawn inspi-
...J.. N ration from the African diaspora: Haiti,
SI E \\ Cuba, Jamaica, Trinidad, Brazil.
S| In turn, her works brought Carib-
[ A RD Ibean dance and culture to millions of
S .A r people around the globe whether she
.. be on tour around the world, on a
Broadway stage or on the Hollywood screen.
She has written several books, among them A Touch of Inno-
cence and Island Possessed, and many articles, some under the
pen-name, Kay Dunn. She played an instrumental role in found-
ing the Haitian National Dance Company. She was a cultural
advisor to the government of Senegal.
She has won many awards, among them, the Albert Sch-
weitzer Music Award, the McArthur Foundation Award, the
Kennedy Center Artist of the Year Award, honorary doctorates,
government medals, and now, the more humble, but as
appreciative, Caribbean Review Award.
The award committee consists of Lambros Comitas (chair-
man), Columbia University; Angel Calder6n Cruz, Universidad
de Puerto Rico; Lisandro P&rez, Florida International Univer-
sity; Selwyn Ryan, University of the West Indies and Andres
Serbin, Universidad Central de Venezuela.
The Caribbean Review Award recognizes individual effort
irrespective of field, ideology, national origin or place of resi-
dence. Nominations for next year's award should be forwarded
[,- i, I -,e it. ,ri ,f ,l ;'f i ., Ii l P.- ; i,., r,- T.T.I: r, hi 1V 1 0 1I


- ~ *.~. -
-. - -
-~. -~


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white sand beaches. This year, -i I., in, St. Maarten is easier. Because the American Express" Card is now its Official
Card. Explore the luxurious hotels, fine restaurants, and duty-free shopping. Find out why this year is -
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*(IlIces Iol \ mt'ir i l':xpresss 'l'r:]c, l lt e ices ( i,)mpan Inc.. Us halil(it l ()l il]|e an 's ;id Repres'litativvs worldlide' Rtgaisltre( Tra[ldenm rk oif tlli A, 'rican :xprcss Company,
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*






CENTER FOR AFROAMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES


The DeBois-Mandela-
Rodney Postdoc- YO
toral Fellowships 0/ *
at the Center
for Afroamerican [. B
and African .f t
Studies (The Uni- 8 1
versity of Michigan)
have been established to identify
and support scholars of high ability
engaged in post-doctoral work on
the Afro-American, African, and
Caribbean experiences of men and
women of color. The focus of the
program is on the social sciences
and the humanities.


We invite letters of application from
qualified candidates for two one-year
fellowships at a stipend of up to
$30,000 (including benefits) per fellow-
ship. Successful candidates can ex-
pect to maintain affiliations with the
Center as well as with departments
and research institutes that relate to
their projects. Fellows will also be ex-
pected to conduct a work-in-progress
seminar on their research during one
of their semesters in residence.
Eligibility: Candidates must have a
Ph.D. in hand and be no more than
ten years beyond the completion of
their degree.


DUBOIS-MANDELA-RODNEY
FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
1991-1992 Academic Year


1 1 1 1 W i o 1 1 1 1 1 M-


Application: Candidates should sub-
mit or arrange to have forwarded
the following materials, post-
marked by January 15, 1991
a full curriculum vitae
three letters of recommendation,
direct from referees
I research prospectus and schedule
of completion
writing sample
Notification: Candidates will be noti-
fied of the Selection Committee's
decision by March 1, 1991
Respond to: Fellowship Office Center
for Afroamerican & African Studies
200 W. Engineering
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1092
(313) 764-5517







IC


K_


S i Florida International University
The State university of Florida at Miami
Department of Sociology & Anthropology
The Department of Sociology Program in Comparativ
M.A. & Ph.D and Anthropology of Florida baccalaureate degree frc
International University has sub- university, and a 3.2 gra
Programs in mitted a proposal for a Master and senior years or a co
of Arts Program in Compara- Verbal and Quantitative
Comparative tive Sociology to the Board of Record Examination (G]
regents of the State University submit official transcrip,
Sociology System. If the BOR approves this scores, and two letters o
proposal at its July meeting, the instructors or others wh
department will begin the M.A. program in the Fall applicant's potential for
Semester of this year (August 1990). The program will native language is not E
provide students with advanced educational opportu- scores for the Test of En
nities in social scientific research and analysis leading to (TOEFL). Admissions w
professional-level competence and employment the minium requirement
opportunities in higher education, government service, into the program.
and the private sector. The curriculum will draw on We anticipate that we
faculty strengths in Sociology and Sociocultural graduate assistantships
Anthropology, and will provide a strong foundation in students in Comparativ
social theory and research methods. The department information about the p
hopes to implement a Ph.D. Program in Comparative Department of Sociolog.
Sociology in academic year 1992-93. International University
Minimum requirements for admission to the M.A. phone: (305) 348-2247. F


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- -- ---- ------


e Sociology will include a
m an accredited college or
de point average for the junior
mbined score of 1000 on the
sections of the Graduate
RE). Applicants will need to
ts of all prior college work, GRE
f reference from former
o are able to evaluate the
graduate study. Those whose
english will also need to submit
glish as a Foreign Language
ill be competitive. Meeting of
:s will not guarantee acceptance
will have a limited number of
(financial aid) for Masters-level
e Sociology. For additional
program please contact the
y and Anthropology, Florida
,, Miami, Florida 33199. Tele-
ax: (305) 348-3605.







CROSSING
SWORDS


Dj Reggae: Slackness Becomes Standard


By
Laura Frost

















































Laura Frost is an
editorial assistant
at Simon &
Schuster and at
Review: Latin
AmericanLitera-
ture and Arts.


he Jamaican reggae
community seems to
have fallen into a
deep, dreamless stupor in the past
few years. With a modicum of
exceptions, recent commercial reg-
gae coming out of Jamaica lacks
any of the social perception, politi-
cal engagement and transcendent
power that Bob Marley brought to
the world in the 1970s. Rhythms
have fallen into tired grooves,
lyrics have become predictable,
and since dj style has been ruling
the scene, themes never progress
beyond the complexity of a
drugged amoeba.
Meanwhile, the source of
innovative reggae has shifted to
Britain. But it's too easy to trace
the declension of "conscious"
Jamaican reggae to Marley's death
in 1981, because this implies that
reggae began, was exclusively de-
fined by, and ended with Marley.
Portentous events in Jamaica sug-
gest that the Jamaican posse may
be waking up and fortifying its
ranks to reclaim roots reggae once
again.
Dj, born in the dance halls to the
booming sound system of artists
like U Roy, is far and away the
most popular reggae style in Ja-
maica compare the attendance
at Montego Bay Reggae Sunsplash
nights that feature "conscious"
roots groups (that is, groups that
address political or social themes)
to the huge crowd that turns out
to skank on Dance Hall Night.
Unfortunately it is the djs who
carry the tsetse fly-like virus that's
been exhausting reggae: slack-
ness. Slackness refers to the ob-
scene, misogynist, homophobic
and xenophobic lyrics that have
become standard themes for cer-
tain djs.
Much of dj's popularity, like
calypso, lies in its topicality. Only
weeks after Hurricane Gilbert
struck Jamaica a glut of dj singles
appeared: Josie Wales and Grego-
ry Issacs' What a Disaster, Sugar
Minott's After the Storm, General
Trees' Rough Gilbert, Charlie
Chaplin's Gilbert Disaster Over,
among others.


S6


records, attends concerts and
clearly prefers the slack style to
the conscious style. The djs are
merely playing to their audience,
which is, I assume, how Yellow-
man and co. would defend their
pitiful performances.
Apparently, the djs are giving
the people what they want. Maxi
Priest was once driven off stage in
Kingston by a bottle-hurling
crowd eager to get on the upcom-
ing dj acts. These djs, including
Sister Charmaine, Ninja man, and
Flourgon, reach such a nadir of
slackness that their backup bands
walked off stage mid-concert.


Along with cashing in on natu-
ral disasters, the djs have moved
in a pack, collectively adopting
certain themes, terminology and
attitudes. Witness the "punaunie"
wave that began around 1987.
"Punaunie," Jamaican patois
slang for vagina, was seized upon
by the djs as a catchword that
could be employed to conglomer-
ately objectify and humiliate
women.
Compilation albums titled sim-
ply Punaunie: Various Artists en-
capsulate the slackness phenome-
non and its alarming attitudes
toward women, boasting songs
like Punaunie Galore by Pan Bird,
Naa Get Punaunie by Lady Jane
(Oh! I get it! It's a feminist ver-
sion!), Want a Virgin by Super
Barry, Want a Two Year Old, ad
nauseam.
The most egregious example of
a slack Jamaican dj is Yellowman
(Winston Foster), whose persona
is predicated on an ironic sexual
machismo. More significant is his
relationship with his audience.
Observing a Yellowman audience,
Jamaican and American alike, is
nothing short of horrifying. A
characteristic Yellowman slack-
ness medley: "We don't like fag-
gots in Jamaica... they bring in the
AIDS. In Jamaica we shoot fag-
gots" and "The reason a lot of
guys have problems with the girls
is that they make love to them
instead of fucking them. What
you've got to do is take the girl by
the neck, shake her (imitating a
strangle-hold) and say, I'm going
to fuck you, bitch!"
A typical audience's response to
such anachronistic lyrics is laugh-
ter and encouragement, only
pausing occasionally to glance
around, a little embarrassed, to
verify how everyone else is react-
ing. Crowd mentality, obviously,
rules the dance hall. And judging
by Yellowman's record sales this
guise of humor hasn't worn off.
What is alarming about slack-
ness is its overwhelming popular-
ity; the vital issue here is not the
particular lyrics of these slack djs,
but rather the audience that buys


Similar incidents have prompt-
ed efforts by musicians like Josie
Wales to record "reply" songs
with culture lyrics, to combat
slackness by example (e.g. Wales'
single Slackness Done). Addition-
ally, there have been movements
within the Jamaican music indus-
try to ban all Jamaican dj awards
until the lyrics are toned down.
Even the government became in-
volved, as Olivia "Babsy" Grange,
Minister of State for Information,
issued a public statement con-
demning dj slackness, according
to I. Jabulani Tafari at Reggae
Report.
A government may speak out
against obscenity but of course it
will not be able to prevent its
people from clamoring for the
See Dj Reggae on page 74

CARIBBEAN


Reggae star, Bunny Wailer.







CROSSING
SWORDS


The American Appropriation of Reggae


Remark appearing in
the book Rock and Roll
Confidential doubly
floored me: "a reggae song called
Capitalism Gone Mad was number
one in Grenada at the time of the
invasion [in 1983 by US and Carib-
bean forces]." First, the writer was
dead wrong in a most elementary
respect: Capitalism Gone Mad was
not a reggae song.
Further, the remark reminded
me of three developments about
which I had become increasingly
aware: the exportation of reggae
to North America, the redefinition
of reggae by North American
"progressives," and the apparent
internalization of this redefinition
in the Caribbean. The net result of
these phenomena was the domi-
nation of the Caribbean definition
of reggae by that of the "progres-
sives."
I was floored also by the
possibility that reggae, although
being promoted as the music of
liberation, appeared to be just
another victim of cultural
imperialism.
Capitalism Gone Mad is a no-
holds-barred indictment of rabid
exploitation, which makes its
point by laying the blame for
economic hardship faced by Joan
and John Public in the island of
Trinidad on gouging that the
writer of the song sees as sanc-
tioned by capitalism.
The song was written, per-
formed and produced by The
Mighty Sparrow, who for more
than three decades has been ac-
claimed as calypso king of the
world by the people of the Carib-
beaf.
Calypso, one of the major music
forms in the English-speaking
Caribbean, has its roots in the
work, leisure and protest songs
composed by African people in
Trinidad while they were en-
slaved there by the Europeans.
Capitalism Gone Mad is a calypso
song.
Why did the article's writer,
who is not from the Caribbean,
call it a reggae song? The answer
is an explanation of how reggae


has been redefined by American
and Western European liberals.
Throughout the history of reg-
gae and calypso, Caribbean musi-
cians have written and performed
musical social commentaries that
offer explanations of and solu-
tions to problems of humanity.
The musicians have identified
components of humanity or
human proclivities believed to
cause the problems. They have
offered insights and resolutions
based on the assumption of the
culpability of the components or
the demerits of the proclivities.
As a result, among music writ-
ers, performers and aficionados in
the Caribbean in the 1960s and
early 1970s, there was the unspo-
ken yet pervasive view that it was
form (rhythm and structure), and
not the presence or preponder-
ance of social commentary, that
distinguished reggae from other
Caribbean music.
Two changes in the conception
of reggae occurred in the mid-
1970s. One was the expropriation
of social commentary from the
conception of Caribbean music in
general and its reassignment to
the conception of reggae. The
other was an emphasis on a
dichotomization of humanity as
the essential feature of the critical
ideas of reggae. Both changes
seem to have been engendered in
the North and to have been due in
part to the success there of the
1970s Jamaican film, The Harder
They Come. And both changes
seem to have been fueled, ex-
ploited and adopted in the Carib-
bean.
The film was well received
among university students and
anti-establishment groups in the
U.S. Helping its reception was its
endorsement of the use of
marijuana, its depiction of Rasta-
fari life as outside the establish-
ment, its portrait of the protago-
nist as dehumanized by the estab-
lishment and his challenge to its
authority. The themes of the film
paralleled many opinions circulat-
ing in American society at that
time.


The producers of The Harder
They Come used Caribbean music
to augment the depictions in the
film. They did not use calypso
songs, although such calypso art-
ists as Chalkdust and Duke were
winning the title of calypso mon-
arch in Trinidad and Tobago par-
ticularly because of the social com-
mentary in their songs. The pro-
ducers used reggae songs instead,
which is not surprising, for the
writers, actors and producers
were Jamaicans, and reggae origi-
nated in Jamaica.
The North Americans held onto
a notion that reggae was effective
because it was the traditional,
indeed natural, way for Caribbean
music to communicate social com-
mentary. Consequently, the exclu-
sion of calypso from the film, the
inclusion of reggae, and the igno-
rance of American "progressive"
writers helped the reassignment
of social commentary from Carib-
bean music in general to reggae by
these writers.
Since the mid-1970s, when these
writers have discussed Caribbean
music with social commentary,
they have tended to focus on
reggae to the exclusion of other
types of Caribbean music, much of
which also offers social commen-
tary. To unknowledgable readers,
they present the picture of any
Caribbean music that communi-
cates social commentary as reg-
gae. No doubt because of this
misconception, the writer of the
article in Rock and Roll Confidential
claimed that Capitalism Gone Mad
was a reggae song.
The Harder They Come did not,
nor did it seek to, address the
variety of social issues in Jamaica
and the Caribbean. Instead it ad-
dressed the specific issues men-
tioned above. The underlying
theme was the notion of the di-
chotomization of the world a
notion that the world could be
divided into opposing camps. Not
so incidentally, this righteous di-
chotomization implied that those
who espoused it were virtuous
"progressives" and others were
See Appropriation on page 74


REVIEW 7


By
Humphrey
A. Regis

















































Humphrey A.
Regis, a native of
St. Lucia, teaches
mass communica-
tions at the Uni-
versity of South
Florida in Tampa.


REVIEW


7







Heritage Tourism


And the Myth of Paradise


Ever since UNESCO
popularized the term
"cultural tourism"
somewhere in the mid-
1960s, a number of countries out-
side of Europe have been enam-
ored of the prospects of luring
visitors to their monuments, sites
and ruins or to anything else that
is marketable as a distinctive cul-
tural attribute.
The statistics used to authenti-
cate the frequent reports on Carib-
bean tourism, especially in the
effort to demonstrate how many
cruise ship visitors arrived or how
many hotel beds were taken, sel-
dom single out "cultural attrac-
tions" visited or how much tourist
dollar is earned through such vis-
its in the overall computation.
This is admittedly difficult to do
since the primacy of sun, sand and
sea remains the strong drawing
card in the market.
Cultural tourism to many peo-
ple is in any case, a camouflage for
touristicc culture" which any
West Indian who is serious about
his heritage and the integrity of its
authenticity and autonomy would
not wish to adopt. And under-
standibly so! For where cultural
tourism works best is when the
culture belongs genuinely to the
host people, where it is very much
in place, active, alive and available
in the normal cir-
cumstances to
A their


F7 BY EX NE


guests (the visi-
tors) to come
and enjoy.
The changing of the guards in
front of Buckingham Palace, the
Westminster Houses of Parlia-
ment, the Tower of London, the
West End theatre-fare and so on
are all organic elements of British
culture that were not designed
specifically to attract North Amer-
ican or Continental European
tourists. They enjoy visits from
millions of tourists in any given
year with some revenue for their
maintenance without violation of
the sensibilities of British civiliza-
tion. Tourism may stimulate and
intensify the activity. It does not
create it!
Is the Caribbean similarly
blessed? Some feel not. For one
thing, visitors do not normally
come, and are not encouraged to
come to the region to "soak up"
its culture. The marketing strate-
gies have themselves been soaked
in something called "Paradise."
Cultural tourism has been re-
ferred to as "Heritage Tourism."
Much emphasis is, however,
placed on the sites and monu-
ments dimension of culture. This
is in a way inevitable. It is, after
all, the easy route out.
Both St. Thomas and St. Croix,
e.g., are rich enough in military
structures, historic public build-
ings, churches and chapels, plan-
tation houses of differing and con-
trasting styles, betraying the 18th
and 19th century European influ-
ences when they were part of the
Danish West Indies. Such "betray-
als" are repeated over and
over again throughout the
region wherever Euro-
pean Powers battled for
territory, planted ex-
port crops, or governed
to maintain hegemonic
control. Forts, guber-
natorial mansions,
naval forts, military
installments, and home-
steads of the ruling
class remain in defiant
splendor. How market-
able are such things to
the tourists?


Rex Nettleford is
cultural advisor to
the prime minister
of Jamaica, direc-
tor of the Jamacian
National Dance
Company and a
professor at the
University of the
West Indies at
Mona.


The Hispanic Caribbean
seemed to have done it better than
the Anglophone West Indies.
There is in fact English Harbour in
Antigua and Nelson's Quarter
Deck in Port Royal or even the
little Square with Rodney's Me-
morial in Spanish Town and the
White Witch's plantation house in
Rose Hall, Jamaica. But it is old
Santo Domingo and Old San Juan
which come off best in the heri-
tage tourism race.
Felix Vazquez, of Puerto Rico
reminded us that "Old San Juan,
as we have named the historical
zone of our city, is not just the
remnant of the Spanish Colonial
era with its architecture, fortifica-
tions and monuments. It is a living
museum. People live there. Mer-
chants trade and work there. Busi-
nessmen and bankers hold court
there, and governmental affairs
are conducted there among and
within the centuries' old buildings
and walls."
Such was the dream that the
young Jamaican Minister of Cul-
ture, Edward Seaga in the 1960s
had for Port Royal, the greatest
underwater archeological site in
the world. And no doubt the
dream persists for New Seville
where Columbus is supposed to
have first landed when he visited
Jamaica.
Always a problem with such
ventures, is the question: How
does one get the general populace
to-identify with such dreams and
give the goodwill and fullest pos-
sible enthusiastic support toward
fulfillment? The answer lies, per-
haps, in a people ensuring that
they never dig out their heritage
for someone else, least of all for
tourists. Dig it out for themselves
first and then invite guests to
come in and enjoy it with them!
Whether by accident or by de-
sign, Jamaica has been lucky in its
own efforts. Cultural tourism
came only after notions of a cul-
tural policy for the building of
Jamaican nationhood and identity
were well established. "Heritage"
was also seen as going well be-
yond sites and monuments, many
of which are as much celebrations
CARIBBEAN














of the brutal exploitation of the
past majority as they are manifes-
tations of the grandeur and sense
of power of former masters.
Great Houses standing firm on
hillocks overlooking lands where
slave villages with houses made of
the most perishable materials,
may be part of the heritage. But
such edifices stand to be used as
evidence of the "lack of history"
among the vast majority who
some would say created nothing.
Yet in the absence of such stone-
and-mortar structures are other
structures carved in the imagina-
tion and intellect of the mass of the
population. So songs, stories,
music, dance, religious expres-
sions and rituals of the people
handed down from generation to
generation become central to the
heritage.
Cultural (heritage) tourism poli-
cies need to give this its due
weight in planning if it seeks the
support a hospitality industry re-
lies on so much for success.
People support comes most
readily when the heritage being
marketed concerns them in funda-
mental organic ways. Only the
distance of the North Coast from
the cultural capital of Jamaica,
Kingston, prevents greater partici-
pation by visitors in the rich and
vibrant performing and other ar-
tistic heritage that is so accessible
to Jamaicans in the capital. But
whatever is moveable (paintings,
dance and music) gets acceptance
on the North Coast as long as
hoteliers have been willing to ex-
pose the guests to these things and
artists are prepared to take some
trouble to aspire after excellence
rather than dish out second-rate
touristicc art."
Perhaps, the best example of
people identification with the tour-
ism product by way of heritage
promotion is the development of
Sunsplash, the reggae festival
which attracts certain visitors to
Jamaica for that reason and none
other, to share in the heritage of
popular music which is the crea-
tion of the people of Jamaica and
now deemed as natural to it as are
the sun, the sand and the sea.


Whether Jamaica will be able to
attract visitors to New Seville or to
Port Royal (were that restoration
to ever get off the ground) de-
pends on whether we have gar-
nered the enthusiasm of our own
people first. There is room still,
despite the reservations, for Ja-
maica and the rest of the Carib-
bean to attract visitors to heritage
attractions once they visit.
Many in the travel business feel
that of the 300 million tourists
who travel worldwide, a five per-
cent count visiting cultural sites
(willingly or otherwise) repre-
sents an important slice of the
market. The problem, according
to one commentator, is that no
reliable statistics are available to
inform public policy on the matter
or to convince decision-makers
that investing in heritage tourism
means profits.
Conservation of historical sites
has a price in any case. Too fre-
quently it costs more to secure the
monuments from the vandalism
and garbage pollution brought on
by visitors, than to conserve them.
In the absence of a local critical
mass to encourage domestic tour-
ism to these sites, a heritage at-
traction could become a bother
rather than an asset.
Trinidad, without oil money, is
now turning to tourism and
knows that its biggest bet is the
fantastic Trinidad Carnival. Nei-
ther Goombay nor Carnival, nor
Sunsplash for that matter, is an
exclusively touristic device: they
all come from the organic roots of
the respective peoples who have
created them. They are likely to be
more important for tourism than
some of the "historic monu-
ments." Few areas can outrun the
living artistic expressions of Car-
ibbean music, dance and theatre.
All the more reason, then, why
the development of these will
have to be on their own terms and
for the Caribbean people them-
selves if they are to be marketable
as part of the tourism product.
Jamaican entrepreneurs who have
been staunch supporters of the
performing and plastic arts in
Jamaica these past thirty years


have in fact made some of the best
investments they have ever made.
They have invested in the human
capital and it is now for the tourist
industry to capitalize on it if it so
desires. Some hoteliers so desire;
others still continue to settle for
touristic culture, rather than for
heritage tourism, or for no "cul-
ture" at all.
How to genuinely sell the Carib-
bean without loss to its dignity,
authenticity and existential reality
is not the least of the problems of
the powerbrokers of Paradise. The
appeal to heritage seems a genu-
ine effort to meet the problem. But
an underlying ambivalence re-
mains throughout the region
among many of those who plan
policies, implement programs,
and manage the hotels. How the
region pierces through a cynicism
that may result and produces gen-
uine hospitality so central to a
tourist industry is part of the
problem of the legacy of a heritage
that the region is yet to confidently
call its own. Until then we are
doomed to continue to sell the
myth of Paradise rather than the
reality of genuine enthusiasm. m


Photos from
Caribbean
Festival Arts by
John W. Nunley
and Judith
Bettelheim
(University of
Washington
Press in associ-
ation with the
St. Louis Art
Museum).
On page 7,
Bahamian
Junkanoo cos-
tume, photo by
Bob Kolbrener
On page 8,
Trinidadian
ithyphallic
mask, photo by
Alex Castro.
On page 1,
Trinidadian
carnival per-
former, photo
by Alex Castro.


REVIEW 9I


REVIEW


9







Popular Sovereignty & the Liberation of Panama


Using International Factors for National Purpose


n the first half of De-
cember 1989, Panama
was still suffering se-
verely under a harsh,
crime-ridden dictatorship culmi-
nating twenty-one years of mili-
tary rule over the country. The
nearly three to one electoral vic-
tory of the democratic opposi-
tion at the polls in May of 1989
had been unconstitutionally de-
clared null and void. As of De-
cember 14 of last year General
Noriega had overtly assumed ab-
solute power and declared Pan-
ama in a "state of war," impos-
ing a series of drastic measures
which he labeled "war laws."
At the same
time, he contin-
ued to organize
irregular bands
of paramilitary
to counterbal-
ance a military
organization
which he no
longer trusted
because of two
attempted in-
surrections
within it's
ranks. He also
continued to re-
ceive vast quan-
tities of high
caliber arms
from the Castro r
government,
which he both distributed to the
paramilitary and hid away for the
announced purpose of sustaining
guerrilla warfare.
Most human rights, especially
freedom of expression and due
process of law, were grossly vio-
lated. Corruption went un-
checked, beginning with the dicta-
tor himself.
As a result, economic and finan-
cial crisis had turned into disaster.
Panama lost nearly one quarter of
it's per capital GNP- from $2,100
in 1987 to $1,700 in 1989. A sub-
stantial paralysis of the banking
system set in. The country accu-
mulated one of the highest per


capital public
debts in the
world (six bil-
lion dollars for a population of
two million) and unemployment
rose above the 25% level. Panama
had come, moreover, to be iso-
lated from the international
community, save from radical re-
gimes such as those of Cuba and
Lybia.
As the year was ending, the
Panamanian people, after years of
frustration and repression and
long months of intense, unremit-
ting struggle for freedom and
justice, saw no democratic solu-
tion forthcoming. They were
downcast, eyes turned towards
the ground in fear and the begin-
nings of hopelessness. By and


large, the people of Panama ex-
pected no less than a worsening of
conditions, namely the passage
from disaster to undefined catas-
trophe.
On the 20th of December, the
U.S. undertook military action in
response to General Noreiga's cri-
minal provocations. By then, it
had become clear that all the
many attempts to negotiate inter-
nally a democratic solution had
met and would continue to meet
with the repressive intransigence
and devious double-dealing of a
Mafia-like regime. It had also
become quite clear that collective
Latin American or inter-Ameri-


can actions of a diplomatic and
political nature would, for lack of
consensus and decisiveness, not
be effective enough in rescuing
the Panamanian people from it's
condition as a collective hostage
of a narco-military dictatorship.
However, traumatic in it's di-
rect impact nearly 600 Panama-
nians dead and 18,000 left home-
less the overwhelming major-
ity of the Panamanians have lived
the U.S. action as a contribution to
Panama's liberation, and such it
has been called by the Catholic
Church of Panama.

Panamanian to the Core
Viewed from outside Panama,
some, particularly among those
who did the least to offer a viable
alternative, have
v considered such
d action a form of
^r- unacceptable for-
eign interven-
tion. Viewed,
however, from
within Panama,
and in the con-
text of Panama's
own history, the
perspective is
quite different.
Just as in 1903
our Panamanian
founding fathers
acted in such a
way as to have
international fac-
ec- tors, specifically
the U.S., serve
our national purpose of Inde-
pendence from Colombia, so in
1989 the Panamanian people had
to act in such a way as to have
international factors, again specifi-
cally the U.S., serve our national
purpose of liberation from
dictatorship.
The basic thrust of the move-
ment towards national independ-
ence, as well as the basic thrust
of the movement towards demo-
cratic liberation was ours, Pana-
manian to the core, developed in
both cases over long years of
struggle and endurance, even if
at the culminating point the U.S.
played an indispensable role.


On page 10, an
anti-Noriega
denionstartion
held in March
1988. On pages
11, 76 and 77,
photos of the
American
Invasion in
December 1989.
On page 1,
Ricardo Arias
Calder6n.





















Ricardo Arias
Calder6n is
Panama's first
Vice-President
and Minister
of Government
and Justice.
1


.0 CARIBBEAN


10


CARIBBEAN














We can honestly and proudly
say we have been faithful to
ourselves in independence as in
liberation. And we, therefore, de-
mand now from the interna-
tional community more respect
than the solidarity we so often
failed to receive in the past.
Panama's situation profoundly
changed for the better. For the
first time in a generation, the
Panamanian people are living
under constitutional democracy.
The executive and the legislative
branches of government corre-
spond to the clear majority vote
of the electorate. The judiciary is
beginning to function independ-
ently from the other two. For the
first time in a generation, Pan-
ama enjoys full freedom of the
press as well
as due process
of law, and has
formally recog-
nized the juris-
diction of the
Inter-American
Court of
Human Rights.
Moreover, the -
government
has under-
taken a most
substantial
process of de-
militarization
of public secu-
rity, disman-
tling the for-
mer unified
military organi-
zation in order to forge diversi-
fied police services.
Corruption has been stopped
in its tracks. Measures are being
adopted to free our banking sys-
tem from the scourge of launder-
ing drug-related money. Finan-
cial order has been reestablished
with the presentation by the cabi-
net of the first national budget in
three years and the first really
balanced budget in Panama's
contemporary history.
The economy is still awaiting
the indispensable transfusion of
U.S. aid, coupled with the aid of
Japan and the European Eco-
nomic Community. But despite
REVIEW


this limitation, it is showing the
first signs of regained confidence
and uplift on the basis of Pan-
ama's own efforts at reconstruc-
tion.
Best of all, the Panamanian
people have regained trust in
themselves, eyes now turned to-
wards a horizon of security and
hope. They exercise their right to
work for a better future, greater,
opportunities and well-being, ex-
ercised in an environment of lib-
erty and justice.
The government has accepted
the awesome, but marvelous
tasks of assuring the transition
from dictatorship to constitu-
tional democracy, of rebuilding a
shattered economy out of chaos,
'towards a new free market


model with sensitivity for social
justice, and of undertaking the
preparation of the Panamanian
state to assume full responsibil-
ity for the Canal by the end of
the present decade.

An Unprecedented Action
The democratic government of
Panama has undertaken a course
of action unprecedented in Latin
America during the past quarter
of a century. While other Latin
American countries have under-
gone democratization processes,
they have left their armed forces
intact, attempting to convert
them from supporters of dictator-


ship into supporters of democ-
racy, but without substantial
structural transformation.
We, on the contrary, have
begun a very radical transforma-
tion: to transform the so-called
Defense Forces of Noriega -an
army, air force and navy under
one unified military command -
into four different security serv-
ices of police nature with separate
commands, under the civilian su-
pervision of two ministries and
the overall direction of the presi-
dent as commander-in-chief of all
four.
Moreover, we have reduced the
total number of persons from
16,000 formerly dependent on the
defunct Defense Forces to 13,000
persons now dependent on the
four services
of the new
Public Force.
The largest of
the four serv-
ices, the Na-
tional Police,
will have
nearly 12,000
members, who
are no longer
quartered in
barracks in
military fash-
ion, but now
serve in eight-
ao hour shifts in
police fashion.
l At any time of
7 the day no
more than
3,500 to 4,000 of them are in
service throughout the country.
Upon calling back former mem-
bers of the military to serve as
police professionals, we have of-
fered neither immunity nor am-
nesty to anyone, but have in fact
subjected them to a screening
process as a result of which the
following percentage of officers
have been retired or dismissed:
100% of generals and colonels,
83% of lieutenant colonels, 38% of
majors, 31% of captains, 19% of
lieutenants and 10% of sub-
lieutenants. Approximately 50 of
those officers no longer in service
See Panama on page 76


11







Sandinista Self-Criticism


Revolutionary Humor from Nicaragua


On February 25, 1990,
Nicaraguans voted
in their country's
first broadly con-
tested elections since 1921. For-
mer U.S. President Jimmy Carter,
serving as an observer, described
the mood at the polls: "It's very
solemn, like a Mass."
To their disbelief, the Sandanis-
tas lost. Violeta Barrios de
Chamorro, publisher of the oppo-
sition paper, La Prensa, defeated
Comandante de la Revoluci6n,
Daniel Ortega. She garnered 55
percent of the vote; Ortega re-


'nhi'ny ceived 41 per-
cent; the candi-
dates of small
parties received the remainder of
the ballots.
The surprise of the Sandanistas
at the outcome was shared by
nearly everyone else, inside and
outside the beleaguered country.
A sobering interpretation of how
the revolution was derailed is
provided by Nicaragua's cele-
brated cartoonist, R6ger SAnchez
Flores. He is the cartoonist for
the Sandanista paper, Barricada,
as well as the publisher of a
weekly humor magazine de-
voted to "Marxist humor, sex
and violence."


R6ger, as he signs his work,
began mimicking a predictable
pantheon of characters the
bourgeoisie, the contra, the CIA,
and Ronald Reagan. In the last
few years, though, cartoons have
appeared in Barricada suggesting
Sandinista ideals have been hum-
bled by the fallibility of human
nature. One kind of cartoon belit-
tles the government, personified
as a lethargic bureaucrat seated
at a desk. A second kind of
cartoon satirizes Nicaraguan soci-
ety for its lack of revolutionary
vison and commitment. In both
state and society, the "New
Man" is elusive.
Forrest D. Colburn


"I am the State."
"I am the State."
"I am not the State."


Ai, 'V G'kW


L9 LAWtO,
"W1,14AO Mi-
[P Q4


"No, I'm not in charge of your case."
"Sorry, I'm not in charge of your case."
"Well, I'm not in charge of your case."
"No, I'm not in charge of your case."
"I guess I'm in charge of my case."


12 CARIBBEAN


S12


CARIBBEAN


















































"Excuse me, may I have
fifteen minutes of your time?"


"You should always be first.


-~-~

--p LA
~
vu- VA ,C-






9$7\















j


REVIEW 13 -


I L


13 --


REVIEW






Poll Watching in Nicaragua


A Report from El Rama


The final Sandinista
campaign rally in El
Rama might well have
been a county Demo-
cratic convention: it started late;
everybody was trying to talk at
once; the loud-speaker system
didn't work; and there was an
anonymous drunk on the stage
with the candidates, rum bottle
tucked under his belt, resisting all
attempts to remove him. Other
aspects of the campaigns of both
parties the mud-slinging and
flag-waving, T-shirt wearing and
sloganeering might well have
passed for electoral politics in the
United States.
There were occasional remind-
ers, though, of where we were
and what was at stake in this most
closely observed election of all
time: spiders big enough to walk
off with your backpack; horses
and cows and chickens and goats
sharing with us the muddy ruts
that served as city streets; the long
lines that formed at dawn at the
few spigots dispensing the town's
limited supply of clean water; the
blarring reggae music and the
world's best shrimp, served up at
Amy's, overlooking the docks;
the phone lines that were always
down when we wanted to call and
an intensity that made party lead-
ers and candidates oblivious to
the enormous pig that kept stroll-
ing through the meeting room.
Albuquerque's sister city
organization had made a commit-
ment to El Rama after the town
was devastated by a hurricane in
1988. As an offshoot of that rela-
tionship we agreed to go to El
Rama to observe the elections.
The more than 400 Sister City
observers formed the largest com-
ponent of a body of more than
3000 official election observers.
For us, getting there was half
the fun. An antique chartreuse
bus that made the trip out seemed
less than luxurious until we
made the return trip in the back of
a flat-bed truck. The municipality
of El Rama (population 60,000,


I BYJAN NIP


with about
10,000 in the
central settle-
ment), in Region V, is about 180
miles from Managua, a five to six
hour drive toward the Atlantic
Coast, the last two or three hours
on intermittently paved roads.
Just beyond Juigalpa, at the little
town of Gateata, the road was
closed at dusk because of the
dangers posed by Contra activity.
Arriving late, we managed to
talk our way through that barrier,
but the troops guarding the
bridge at Muelle de los Bueyes
(Dock of the Oxen) were more
resolute. The women were able to
find respectable, if basic, accom-
modation at the village inn, but
the men, including a minister and
a politician, had to settle for
rooms that rented by the hour.
We were able, nevertheless, to
spend five days, including elec-
tion day, in El Rama.
While there we interviewed
members of the municipal elec-
toral council leaders and candi-
dates of both major parties, relig-
ious leaders and others, and in
general tried to acquaint our-
selves with the community and its
concerns. We also observed
preparations for the elections and
the casting and counting of bal-
lots. In an area so poor and
underdeveloped and beseiged,
the logistics of carrying out an
election proved a major challenge.
Every gallon of gasoline needed
to transport election materials
and poll workers had to be antici-
pated and every tire accounted
for. The helicopters and pangas,
or motorboats, that would take
precinct officers and ballot boxes
to outlying polling sites were
thought subject to attack by the
Contras. At the end of election
day, after the ballots had been
counted, the sealed boxes were to
be transported overnight by
armed caravan, over the normally
closed roads, to the headquarters
of the regional electoral council in
Juigalpa.
In El Rama, all races were
essentially between the Sandin-
ista National Liberation Front


14CARIBBEAN


Jan Knippers
Black is Research
Professor of Public
Administration at
the University of
New Mexico in
Albuquerque.
She was an official
observer in El
Rama during the
February 1990
presidential
elections in Nica-
ragua.


(FSLN) and the National Opposi-
tion Union (UNO). A third party,
the Central American Unionists
(PUCA), appeared on the ballot,
but to the people of El Rama it
was a phantom; no one we con-
sulted knew anything about it. As
there was only one person from El
Rama, an FSLN candidate, on the
list for the National Assembly,
attention there focused on the
races for the Municipal Council
and for the presidency. Although
there were separate ballots for
presidential, National Assembly,
and Municipal Council races,
ticket-splitting was very rare.
The substantial victory of the
opposition coalition testifies to the
good faith of the Sandinista gov-
ernment in the conduct of these
elections. The electoral code was
carefully crafted to facilitate vot-
ing, especially where a large pro-
portion of the electorate may be
illiterate, to guarantee the secrecy
of the ballot, and to prevent multi-
ple voting, ballot box stuffing,
and other forms of fraud. There
was careful attention to logistical
arrangements, to compliance with
the details of electoral law, to fair
and consensual resolution of is-
sues that arose at the polls, and to
general helpfulness to the voter.
The voters, for their part, were
patient and good-natured. De-
spite long lines, as most wanted to
vote early, we saw no instances of
pushing and shoving or even of
verbal harassment.
The municipality of El Rama is
literally at the end of the road;
from there one proceeds to Blue-
fields only by river transport, the
most common means being a six-
hour ferry ride. It is the jumping
off place into undeveloped jungle
stretching north to Honduras and
south to Costa Rica. It was Contra
country. While downtown Rama
had been spared, the municipal-
ity, over the past decade had seen
313 persons killed and a great
many more wounded in Contra
attacks attacks that continued
throughout the period of the cam-
paign. (In fact, an OAS observer
told us that there had been an
attack in Chontales, just 60 miles


S14


CARIBBEANV














from El Rama, on the eve of
election day.) In response to such
attacks, the army had established
bases in the area. Thus, UNO
leaders claimed that peasants in
outlying areas were intimidated
by the army, and the FSLN coun-
tered that the peasants were in-
timidated by the Contras. No
doubt there was some truth to
both claims.
It was evident,
however, that in El
Rama itself there was
no significant intimi-
dation, as houses
decked in the UNO's
blue and white alter-
nated with those in
the Frente's red and
black. El Rama had
been peripheral to '.. r
the great battles of ,' -
the revolution, and
according to UNO
leaders as well as less p
biased observers,
Sandinista prospects .
were damaged by the
fact that many admin-
istrators of govern-
ment programs in the
area came from else-
where. UNO lead-
ership appeared to
represent a more
traditional power 7.
structure while ,
Sandinista leaders
represented service Peasant w
agencies, unions,
farming cooperatives, and popu-
lar organizations.
The incumbent mayor, a
Sandinista running for another
term, was a former schoolteacher
and Catholic missionary. All of
the UNO Council candidates we
met, along with most other party
leaders, were middle-aged men.
Sandinista candidates were more
varied; they included two women
and an age spread from young to
old.
Sandinista candidates believed
the voters would favor them be-
cause they represented the com-
mon people, because they knew
what it was to work hard and to
struggle to survive. They also saw


the new social programs that had
been introduced and their han-
dling of reconstruction after the
hurricane as a plus. The Sandin-
ista platform called for peace,
greater access to health care and
education, and further land re-
form. At the national level, the
UNO promised an end to the
military draft and economic recov-


omen listening to Violeta Chamorro at a UN(

ery based on privatization and on
foreign aid and investment. UNO
candidates at the local level, how-
ever, had little to say about plat-
forms or programs.
Interestingly, in El Rama, at
least, the Sandinistas seemed con-
fident of victory, while the UNO
seemed scarcely to have credited
the idea of winning. In the City
Council race, for example, the
UNO listed only five candidates,
even though the winning party
was entitled to six Council mem-
bers.
Local sources of tension were
very real. UNO leaders, having
told our group that apart from
some renegades, the Contras no


longer existed, appeared to
change their story later in the
same meeting. One of them ex-
claimed, "Thank God for the Con-
tras: without them there would be
no elections. The Sandinistas
would have had us by the throat!"
On another occasion a UNO
leader told a member of our dele-
gation. "We are the Contras." The
Sandinistas, on the
other hand, accus-
tomed to the "We will
never surrender" rheto-
ric and spirit of revolu-
tion, seemed at times to
have trouble with the
conciliatory require-
ments of electoral poli-
tics. In particular, they
found it hard to deal
with the idea that the
army that had won and
defended the revolu-
tion would simply be
turned over to the
enemy they had been
fighting.
But there were also
mitigating influences.
Exhaustion with the
struggle and a yearning
for peace were almost
universal. And small
town living imposes a
measure of together-
ness. After being told
that the local UNO
leader, Alejandro, had
0 rally. spent eight months in
prison in 1986 for Con-
tra activity, we asked the mayor,
Samuel, if it would not be difficult
for leaders of the two parties to
serve together on the Municipal
Council, as the law required.
Samuel laughed. "Not at all," he
said. Pointing to an FSLN Council
candidate in the office with us, he
said, "Alejandro is his father-in-
law. Besides, Alejandro and I are
friends. We are both officers in the
Lions' Club; I'm the Vice-Presi-
dent and he is the Tail-Twister."
Alejandro confirmed that he and
Samuel were friends, and both
party leaders expressed full confi-
dence in the president of the Mu-
nicipal Electoral Commission,
See Nicaragua on page 78


REVIE 15


15


REVIEW







Burnham-Bashing


Hoyte Fiddles While Guyana Burns


To witness the shenani-
gans and temper tan-
trums that typify
Guyanese politics is to
experience Third World political
theater at its farcical fatuous
worst. Fact is confused with fic-
tion. Principal players excel at
exploiting adversity for vainglory
and other self-gain. Economic
hardship, racial animosities, and
the excesses of retrogression are
believed overcome and banished
by mere bombastic boast and de-
clared political will. All the while,
there is suffering, more and more
of it, as the disunited country
marks time and marches back-
wards to the drumbeat of dema-
goguery.
When the late president Forbes
Burnham passed away in August
1985, it was thought that a new era
had dawned in Guyana. After all,
the severest ills that plagued the
country were attributable to the
corruption, ideological rigidity,
abuse of power, system dysfunc-
tioning, and ill-conceived policies
that had marked Burnham's last
ten years in office. It fell to his
successor, Desmond Hoyte, to re-
move the veils of apathy, cyni-
cism, and despair from the coun-
try's countenance and fire up the
national will in search of progress.
But the new president has yet to
accomplish anything of substance.
His major energies have been
spent not on rebuilding Guyana
but on mounting an iconoclastic
attack on his mentor and prede-
cessor, so much so that
"Burnham-Bashing" has not only
become a staple in Mr. Hoyte's
diet of policies, it also poses a
serious Catch-22 dilemma for the
president; he courts disaster if he
does not continue this line and
equally certain political catastro-
phe if he does.
One irony is that Hoyte had to
be restrained by the late president,
who found his attitudes and ideas
too radical even for a country
hell-bent on radicalism. This fact
exposes "Burnham-Bashing" for


lR what it is: the
politics of sanc-
timony. It is de-
signed to mask Hoyte's deep ties
to the Burnham era and so remove
from him any culpability for
Guyana's serious problems.
This kind of politics has Guyana
mired in a quagmire of suspicion
and acrimony. By offering self-
righteous denial of easily proven
intimate ties to Burnham, Hoyte is
compromising his ability to lead
effectively in the very challenging
task of healing the badly bruised
nation. Given the stagnation in
Guyana's development and the
crises this has spawned, the presi-
dent must strive for a higher
purpose.
The political leadership should
seek to instill a sense of principled
purposeful direction for the na-
tion; a sense of both intrinsic and
material rewards to be reaped by
the entire society through pursuit
of goals that capture and reflect
the collective will. Such atone-
ment would give a fillip to the
healing process by allowing citi-
zens to meet and unite on the
common ground of mobilized in-
spired collective endeavor.
On the other hand, leadership
that promotes the politics of sanc-
timony suggests an incapacity to
grow, to rise to the demands and
opportunities of the occasion to
candidly admit wrongdoing, bury
the past, motivate and lead the
country out of its morass. The
failure of Mr. Hoyte to do this is
Guyana's failure because the un-
leashing of "Burnham-Bashing"
amongst a captive populace in an
authoritarian system makes all
Guyana moribund.

Political Tragi-Comedy
There are grounds for some types
of "Burnham-Bashing," but the
potential good to be derived from
it has been stymied in the more
senseless manifestations of this
line. An examination of some in-
stances of the policy yields a polit-
ical tragi-comedy. The tactics in
service of the goal are so frivolous
that they indicate a peculiar sys-
temic pathology in Guyanese poli-


tics the capacity of the maxi-
mum political leader to ordain the
petty as newsworthy, seriously
propagandize it as such, and yet
escape being laughed out of office.
A few examples are useful.
When President Hoyte was
about to embark on one of his first
important overseas trips, to lead
Guyana's delegation to the 1986
non-aligned summit in Zimbabwe
and on state visits to black South-
ern Africa, the state-controlled
media was instructed to highlight
not the purpose, implications and
expected results and benefits for
Guyana, but the fact that whereas
the late Forbes Burnham used to
travel by private jet and with a
large entourage, the new presi-
dent was traveling on commercial
flights with a small team.
The news release was issued by
the Office of the President. It
revealed that "... because of the
relative smallness of the delega-
tion, a commercial airline was
considered appropriate." To en-
sure the point was not lost, a
presidential spokesman, un-
prompted, amplified "... no deci-
sion was ever made by the presi-
dent or the cabinet to charter a
special plane for the (small)
party."
Burnham's foreign trips used to
yield inconsequential gains. This
one by Hoyte also produced noth-
ing substantial. Indeed, one of the
"highlights" publicized in banner
headlines in the state press was
that a "staff of wisdom and
authority" (a wooden stick) had
been presented to Hoyte in Tanza-
nia by officers and ranks of the
Tanzanian National Service.
Apparently starved for hard news
of positive results from the long
overseas sojourn, the same report
was again prominently publicized
in the official media 12 days later
- this time with photographs.
By August 1985 when President
Burnham died, frequent power
outages had reached such a high
level that the Guyana Electricity
Corporation (GEC) proposed a
special electricity linkup for the
new chief executive's residence so
that he could properly perform


r CARIBBEAN


Festus Brotherson
teaches political
science at Bald-
win- Wallace Col-
lege in Ohio. He
held a number of
senior positions
,ii -i,,, .n "'srul-
ing People's Na-
tiona, C.' .
from ~"---, in-
clding member of
the Central Ex-
ecutive Committee
and editor of New
Nation.


S16













his duties without hardship or
risk of harm. A similar arrange-
ment had been made for
Burnham. President Hoyte
pounced upon the opportunity
provided by this offer to an-
nounce sternly that he had re-
jected it because the head of state
should not be spared the hard-
ships that ordinary Guyanese un-
dergo a reference to the
arrangement for Burnham. Re-
peated urgings by his security
staff for a reversal of this position
were ignored. Their direct instruc-
tions to the GEC to
arrange the spe-
cial hook-up were
met with infor-
mally well-publi-
cized presidential
rebukes. But
months later, with
the hardships just
as severe, some
form of compro-
mise was quietly
arranged by
which the presi-
dent's residence is
now never in com-
plete darkness during the fre-
quent power outages.
The comedy here was maxi-
mized by common knowledge
that during the Burnham years
-Arab oil embargo notwithstand-
ing it had been largely Hoyte's
economic policies that had led to
dramatic economic reversals and,
hence, the government's inability
to import fuel and ensure regular
power supply. There is more.
As soon as he had taken office,
President Hoyte took the state-
run Guyana Chronicle and his
party organ Newr Nation under his
wing to supervise personally the
contents of these newspapers. In
this carefully orchestrated ar-
rangement, which was not made
public, "Burnham-Bashing" as-
sumed new highs and lows of
sanctimony. Tales are told of the
president writing and editing
news stories, and even protesting
and severely scolding state and
party controlled media executives
for the omission of commas and
periods in articles in which he was
REVIEW


featured. His special interest was
apparently to ensure that refer-
ences were not made or simi-
larities drawn between himself
and the late Burnham, a tedious
process that infuriated profes-
sional media staffers because
press, production, and distribu-
tion deadlines were often compro-
mised by resulting delays.
On one occasion (August 1986),
an article that contained many of
the president's choice adjectives
and phrases appeared promi-
nently but without byline on the


W .. ,


President Desmond Hoyte.
front page, of the Guyana Chronicle
under the caption "A Daub of
British Nastiness: Aftermath of
Commonwealth Games Boycott."
The story fiercely rebutted foreign
critics who had dared to question
Hoyte's decision to withdraw
Guyana from participating in the
games. Boycotting of such events
had been a frequent foreign policy
tactic of Forbes Burnham as a
protest against the racial policies
of South Africa.
But in this article, the principal
emphasis was not reaffirming for-
eign policy. Rather, the author
complained: "And wonder of
wonders, on the list of 'Black
Bullies' and 'tyrants' appeared
President Desmond Hoyte of
Guyana, photograph and all... Ac-
cording to the article, President
Hoyte controls Guyana through a
most powerful, weird sect... all
armed, nasty and powerful."
On another occasion, officials of
the Office of the President
swooped down on the Guyana
Chronicle offices to instruct that an


item be placed on the front page of
the newspaper disavowing the
president's endorsement of a foot-
ball match being played in honor
of his birthday. According to sen-
ior spokespersons in the chief
executive's circle, the publicizing
of the sports event had particu-
larly peeved the president be-
cause it was the kind of activity
routinely associated with the late
Burnham and his then most likely
successor, current Prime Minister
Hamilton Green. In numerous
other instances, the media were
instructed, at times
directly by the Office
of the President, and
sometimes by the
Minister of Informa-
tion, not to have any
photograph of
Hoyte appear in the
press next to either
that of Burnham or
4t Green.
j The spectacle of
Guyana's new chief
executive, when
faced with so many
onerous duties of
state that demanded immediate
attention, spending valuable time
poring over trivial stories for the
media, conjures the ultimate polit-
ical tragi-comedy. It is Guyana's
equivalent of Nero fiddling while
Rome burns.

Sanctimony
The sanctimony here is two-fold.
It lies firstly in the president's
publicly posturing in favor of
press freedom when he has al-
ways been government's inde-
fatigable critic of it. Indeed, he has
even allowed the establishment of
an independent newspaper, the
Stabroek News, which has quickly
since been indirectly muzzled
through various tactics having to
do with liberal interpretations of
libel by the Guyana courts in
lawsuits won by Hoyte.
Secondly, media professionals
can readily recount many in-
stances during the Burnham era of
Desmond Hoyte being driven to
ferocious outbursts of anger be-
See Burnham-Bashing on page 79


17







Stedman's Surinam


The Original Narrative


I Yiginl IN*AR S IE


Frontispiece for
Stedman's Narra-
tive, engraved by
Francesco Bar-
tolozzi. "'From
different Parents,
different Climes
we came, At dif-
ferent periods':
Fate still rules the
same. Unhappy
Youth while bleed-
ing on the ground;
'Twas Yours to
fail-but Mine to
feel the wound."












Richard and Sally
Price teach anthro-
pology at Stanford
University. Rich-
ard Price's new
work, Alabi's
World and Sally
Price's new book,
Primitive Arts in
Civilized Places
will be published
by Johns Hopkins
University Press.
They are,", 11h,
,,ilii.,, ii on
another book, Two
Evenings in Sar-
amaka, about tale
telling at funerals.


ohn Gabriel Stedman's
Narrative, of a five
years' expedition,
against the Revolted Ne-
groes of Surinam ... illus-
trated with 80 elegant Engrav-
ings, from drawings made by the
Author is generally considered
one of the richest accounts ever
written of a plantation society in
the Americas. The Johns Hopkins
University Press has now pub-
lished a new edition of
Stedman's work, the
first one based on the
author's recently discov-
ered handwritten manu-
script (1790) rather than
on the 1796 first edition,
which had been brutally
"edited" by the original
publisher. Portions of /
the Introduction to that /
new edition are re- /
printed here with the
kind permission of the I
Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity Press. The original
manuscript of the "Nar-
rative," as well as Sted-
man's handwritten dia-
ries, are now in the col-
lection of the James Ford
Bell Library, University
of Minnesota.

The "Blood Spilling
Colony" of Suriname
In 1759, when Voltaire
needed a setting for his
satirical discussion of
New World slavery, he
turned to the.Dutch col-
ony of Suriname: "As
they drew near the town they came
upon a Negro lying on the ground
wearing only half his clothes, that
is to say, a pair of blue cotton draw-
ers; this poor man had no left leg
and no right hand. 'Good heav-
ens!' said Candide to him in Dutch,
'what are you doing there, my
friend, in that horrible state?
'I am waiting for my master, the
famous merchant Monsieur
Vanderdendur.
'Was it Monsieur Vanderden-


dur,' said Can-
dide, 'who
treated you in


this way?
'Yes, sir,' said the Negro, "it is
the custom. We are given a pair of
cotton drawers twice a year as
clothing. When we work in the
sugar mills and the grindstone
catches a finger, they cut off the
hand; when we try to run away,
they cut off a leg. Both these
things happened to me. This is the
price paid for the sugar you eat in
Europe."


By this time, Suriname had
developed into a "flourishing"
plantation colony and earned a
solid reputation, even among
such rivals as Jamaica and Saint-
Domingue, for its heights of
planter opulence and depths of
slave misery. Stedman's Narrative
makes clear on almost every page
that Voltaire's choice of mid-
eighteenth-century Suriname was
chillingly on target.
The colony was founded in 1651


by the English but was ceded
sixteen years later to the Dutch,
who built it into "the envy of all
the others in the Americas." By
the mid-eighteenth century, it was
said to be producing more reve-
nue and consuming more im-
ported manufactured goods, per
capital, than any other Caribbean
colony. The local plantocracy was,
to borrow Gordon K. Lewis's
phrase about the Caribbean more
generally, "crassly materialist and
spiritually empty ... the most
crudely philistine of all dominant
classes in the history of
Western slavery." As Sted-
man describes, planters
were routinely served at
table by nearly nude
house slaves, who also
fanned them during their
naps (and sometimes all
night long), dressed them
each morning, undressed
them each evening, and
bathed their children in
imported wine; wealthy
planters in the capital
often had forty or fifty
such hand-picked domes-
tic slaves.
Marronage plagued the
colony from its earliest
years, as slaves escaped
into the rain forest that
grew up almost to the
doorsteps of the planta-
tions. By the mid-eight-
eenth century, "the colony
had become the theater of
a perpetual war," and or-
ganized bands of maroons
kept planters living in con-
stant fear for their lives
and in constant risk of
losing their investments.
When Stedman arrived in what he
called "this Blood Spilling Col-
ony" in 1773 to help quell the most
recent maroon depredations,
heavy speculation, planter absen-
teeism, and rapid changes in plan-
tation ownership were posing a se-
rious threat to the colony's via-
bility. This was a maximally polar-
ized society -some three thou-
sand European whites, who must
have sensed that their world was
coming unglued, living in gro-


1 8 C AI B B E A


18


CARIBBEAN














tesque luxury off the forced labor
of some fifty thousand brutally ex-
ploited African slaves. Stedman's
ongoing and intimate dealings
with members of all social classes,
from the governor and the wealth-
iest planters to the most oppressed
slaves, gave him special opportu-
nities to observe and describe the
full panorama of Suriname life.
His four-year stay in the colony re-
sulted in one of the most detailed
"outsider's" descriptions ever
written of life in an eighteenth-
century slave society.

"My Little Wrytings"
In addition to the manu-
script of his "Narrative,"
completed in Devonshire in
1790, Stedman left diverse
notebooks and papers that
have helped us piece to-
gether the history of the
work from its begin-
nings in the form of a log
kept in Suriname in the
1770s through the various
stages of writing, editing,
and painful editorial nego-
tiating with his London
publisher that led to the
first edition of 1796 (and,
according to some, to Sted-
man's premature death the
following year).
Stedman's log of daily
events during his years in
Suriname recorded details of
his personal life (from din-
ners with planters to nights
spent wenching), military ac-
tivities, and anecdotes about
the natural and social worlds
around him. Throughout his stay
in the colony, Stedman divided
his time between two settings that
could not have stood in sharper
contrast to one another. The
homes of planters, where he was a
frequent guest, were notable even
in the context of New World
plantation societies for both the
extravagance and the decadence
of their daily life; the military
campaigns in the rain forest were
extended ordeals of frustration,
danger, malnutrition, sickness,
and death. Stedman coped with
these two worlds through both his


consciously-chosen role as scien-
tific observer (which encouraged
him to distance himself from
much of what he witnessed) and
his incurable romanticism (which
encouraged intimate personal in-
volvements and a responsiveness
to the natural beauty of the col-
ony, even during the most trying
moments of his stay). His easy
movement between different so-
cial settings also owed much to his
linguistic facility; he spoke Eng-
lish, Dutch, French, and, most
important, Sranan (the English-


based creole that was the every-
day language of slaves and many
whites).
Faithfully, he kept on-the-spot
notes sometimes jotted down
on cartridges or even on "a
Bleached bone" when writing paper
was not available which he
then entered into notebooks.
From the outset, Stedman in-
tended to expand these notes into
a book. On the final page of a
"small green almanack," he
wrote, "This Small Journall is
written with the greatest atten-
tion, founded on facts alone By


Captt. John G. S n, who Shall
explain it more at large one day, if
Providance Spares him in life."
In addition to his practice of
faithfully keeping a diary, Sted-
man systematically studied and
drew all that caught his curious
eye. He described, for example,
how on a military campaign in
the forest "while we were
Unsuccessful in taking the Re-
bels I Availed myself of Taking
a Draft of Every Animal, reptile,
or shrub, that I thought Could
Illustrate my Little Collection of
Natural Curiosity, which I
now began to form some
Idea of Exhibiting one
Day to the Publick if I
was Spared to return to
Europe."
Soon after his return from
Suriname Stedman began
writing his "Narrative," but
it was not until thirteen
years later, when he was
living in retirement in the
English countryside, that he
was finally ready to send a
copy of his manuscript as
well as his "drawings" to
Joseph Johnson, the promi-
nent radical publisher, in
London.

"The Book Good
for Nothing"
Although Johnson began
hiring engravers for Sted-
man's plates almost as soon
as he received the manu-
script in 1791, editorial
work on the text began only
in 1794, when he quietly
engaged William Thomson to
serve as "literary dry-nurse" to
the "Narrative." At Johnson's be-
hest, Thomson rewrote Stedman's
manuscript sentence-by-sentence.
Though Stedman came to regard
Johnson as "the demon of Hell"
because of the many changes
wrought on his manuscript, Sted-
man apparently remained una-
ware right up to his death soon
after publication -that it was
actually Thomson, a professional
editor and ghost-writer, who was
directly responsible for causing
his book to be "mard entirely."


REVIEW 19


"Manner of Sleep-
ing &c. in the For-
est." Origional
watercolor by
John Gabriel Sted-
man, later en-
graved as Plate 73
of Stedman's Nar-
rative. Of all the
"drawings" that
were used for the
Narrative's 81
plates, this is the
only one that has
survived. Courtesy
of the James Ford
Bell Library,
University of
Minnesota.


REVIEW


19
















Joanna [Stednian's
Pl. 8, engraved by ,'
Holloway]. Stedman"
wrote: "Johanna
aged then but 15
Years was a very
remarkable favorite
-Rather than mid-
dle Size -She was
perfectly straight
with the most el-
egant Shapes that -I
can be view'din "
nature moving her
well-form'd Limbs
as when a Goddess
walked ... her hair
was a dark brown -next to black, forming a beauteous Globe of small
ringlets, ornate with flowers and Gold Spangles -round her neck her
Arms and her ancles she wore Gold Chains rings and Medals -while a
shaul of finest indian Muslin the end of which was negligently thrown
over her polished Shoulder gracefully covered part of her lovely bosom -a
petticoat of richest Chints alone made out the rest bare headed and bare
footed she shone with double lustre carrying in her delicate hand a ever
hat the crown trim'd rown with Silver."





A Female Negro Slave, with a Weight chained to her Ancle [Stedman's Pl. 4,
engraved by Francesco Bartolozzil. Stedman wrote: "When stepping on
Land [upon arrival in Suriname] the first object I met was a most
miserable Young Woman in Chains simply covered with a Rag around
her Loins, which was like her Skin cut and carved by the lash of the Whip
in a most Shocking Manner. Her Crime was in not having fulfilled her
Task to which she was by appearance unable. Her punishment to receive
200 Lashes and for months to drag a Chain of several Yards in length the
one end of which was Lock'd to her ancle and to the other End of which
was a weight of 3
Score pounds or up-
wards. She was a
beautiful Negroe
Maid and while I :
was Meditating on
the shocking Load
of her Irons I myself ^.,..
nearly escaped
being rivitted by
Fascination I now
took a draft of the
wretched Creature
upon paper which I .
here present to the -' '
Sympathizing
Reader and which ", .
inspired me with a i.
very unfavourable '
Opinion of the Hu-
manity of the Plant-
ers residing in this -
Colony towards -"
theyr negro Slaves."


On 25 May 1795, Stedman
got his first glimpse of the
manuscript he had given
Johnson in 1791, and noted
laconically in his diary: "12
chapters printed & mard."
From that time until his death
two years later, Stedman's life
was a tormented struggle to
repair the damage inflicted
upon his work. Stedman's
irritation with Johnson knew
few limits, and he was often
consumed by anger and
frustration at the publisher's
stubborn and "uncivil" refusal
to respect his wishes. By June
1795, he was referring in his
diary to "My Spoilt M. Script";
"on Midsummer day" he com-
plained of receiving "the Is.
vol. of my book quite mard,
oaths and sermons inserted
&c"'; and shortly after, he re-
marked, "My book mard in-
tirely. am put to the most
extreme trouble and expence
.... bawdy oaths lies & preach-
ings in my unhappy book." He
also mentioned "a hot quarl
with Johnson." In August, he
concluded that "the book was
good for nothing"; and in Janu-
ary 1796, shortly before his
death, he wrote to his brother's
wife: "My book was printed
full of lies and nonsense, with-
out my knowledge. I burnt two
thousand vols.... You have no
idea of the villainy and folly I
have to deal with."
A close reading of Stedman's
diary makes clear that Thom-
son must have produced an
entirely new manuscript from
Stedman's 1790 text, and that it
was from this new manuscript
(after some acrimonious
negotiations with Stedman)
that Johnson, in 1796, printed
the first edition that has until
now served as the only basis for
all subsequent editions and
translations.

The 1790 Text vs. 1796
How does the 1790 manu-
script, now published for the
first time, compare with the
well-known and much-pub-


lished version first brought out
by Johnson in 1796? What sorts
of changes did Johnson and his
"ghost-writer" Thomson ef-
fect? Their editing ranged from
minor rephrasing (often de-
signed to "improve" Sted-
man's direct, sometimes coarse
soldier's language) to quite
substantial alterations of Sted-
man's views on race, slavery,
and social justice, which oblit-
erated or warped significant
aspects of his Suriname experi-
ence and the social commen-
tary he had intended to share
with his readers.
Some of the rephrasing
caused alterations mainly in
tone or color, lending a certain
flatness to Stedman's lively de-
scriptions. His reference to a
"Smouse" was changed to
read "Jew," his "Quacks" were
transformed into "surgeons,"
"a Couple of hungry whores"
became "a brace of the frail
sisterhood," and in his de-
scription of a dalliance with a
slave woman, his report that
"she gave me such a hearty
kiss -as had made my Nose
nearly as flat as her own" was
changed to the more delicate
comment that "she imprinted
on my lips a most ardent kiss."
For related reasons, a num-
ber of sexual allusions were
deleted by the editor. Stedman
described how the sadistic mis-
tress of a plantation "from a
Motive of Groundless Jealousy
... put an end to the Life of a
young and beautiful Quadroon
Girl, by the infernal means of
plunging a red hot Poker in her
Body, by those parts which
decency forbids to mention,"
but in the 1796 publication the
final phrase was omitted. Like-
wise, when Stedman related
how "the pious Mother of the
Charity-House in Paramaribo
Nephariously Kept Flogging
the Poor Slaves dayly because
they were She said Unbeliev-
ers," the editor deleted his
accompanying observation:
"the Men she Always Strip'd
Perfectly Naked, that not a Sin-


- 20 CARIBBEAN


20


CARIBBEAN













gle Part of theyr Body might
Escape her Attention to
what is Religion Come at
Last?" Similarly, Stedman's as-
sertion that not only are Ne-
groes' "Necks ... Thicker than
Ours ... but their Genitels Con-
spicuously Larger" was also
excised; his observation that a
"Cowskin" with which "dur-
ing Breakfast 7 Negroes were
Again tied up and Flogg'd"
was in fact "the Dried Penous
of a Bull" was omitted; and
even his personal, deeply felt
statement about the "pleasure
of rambling naked when the
occasion will permit it" appar-
ently overstepped bounds of
conventional propriety and
was deleted. Stedman's editor
also made a consistent effort to
mute evidence of his "wilder"
side, and much of the wench-
ing, hard drinking, brawling,
and dramatic temper tantrums
reported in the 1790 manu-
script was altered or simply
deleted.
This type of editing, though
apparently minor, sometimes
caused the loss of significant
descriptive information. Sted-
man reported graphically how,
on board the ship bound for
Suriname, "dinners were
sometimes served up in the
very Tubs employed by the
Surgeons to void the filth of the
Seek," but in the 1796 publica-
tion the tubs were more po-
litely characterized as being
"of not the most cleanly ap-
pearance." Likewise, Sted-
man's reference to the "over-
grown Widows, Stale Beauties,
and overaged Maids" of Suri-
name who mistreated their
young female slaves out of
jealousy was discreetly de-
leted. And even his telling
observation that "All the mu-
latta-, negroe- and Indian
Slaves in the Colony go bare
footed and naked above the
waist" was excised.
Stedman's descriptions of
sexual relations between Euro-
pean men and African women
were subtly but systematically
REVIEW


changed by his editor, who
minimized the frequency and
importance of such relations
and stressed the social distance
between the partners. Em-
blematic of these changes is the
description of Stedman's
encounter with a female slave
on his first night in the New
World. In his diary, he noted
laconically, "sleep at Mr. Lolk-
ens ... I f__k one of his negro
maids." The 1790 manuscript
reports the incident in more
detail: "having knocked once
or twice at the door it was
opened by a Masculine young
Negro-woman, as black as Coal
... I was fatigued and longed
for some rest -thus made a
signal that I wanted to sleep
-but here I was truly brought
into great Distress for she
again misunderstanding me
had the unaccountable assur-
ance to give me such a hearty
kiss as had made my Nose
nearly as flat as her own I
knew not what to do or how to
keep my Temper and disentan-
gling myself with some resent-
ment flung into my sleeping
apartment but here wousky a
"comic" character in the popu-
lar Incle and Yarico pursued me
again -and in Spite of what I
could say pulld off my Shoes
and my Stockings in a Mo-
ment. Heavens, I lost all pa-
tience. This Young Woman to
be sure was as black as the
Devil, to be short as the rest of
this adventure can afford but
little instruction or entertain-
ment to the reader. I shall beg
leave to draw a Sable Curtain
over it." Rewritten for the 1796
publication, the description re-
mains intact until the removal
of Stedman's shoes and stock-
ings, but it carefully avoids any
direct or indirect reference to
the sexual encounter itself, and
adds a comment (not present
in the 1790 "Narrative") about
the characteristic servility of
"female negro slaves ... in all
the West India settlements."
Stedman's relationship with
the mulatto slave Joanna, one


A Surinam Planter in his Morning Dress [Stedman's Pl. 49, engraved by
William Blake]. Stedman wrote: "To Give a better idea of this fine
Gentleman [whom Stedman had just described with considerable
sarcasm], I here Represent him to the Reader, With a pipe in his Cheek ...
And receiving a Glass of Madeira and Watter, from a female Quaderoon
Slave.... (Quaderoons ... are in general very much respected on account of
their affinty to Europeans, a Quaderoon being between a White and a
Mulatto, and which are very frequent in this Colony.)"




Family of Negro Slaves from Loango [Stedman's Pl. 68, engraved by William
Blake]. Stedman's text for this deliberately idealized portrait of slave life
reads: "I Will introduce a Negro Family in that State of Tranquil
Happiness to Which they [slaves] are all entitled When they are Well
treated by their Owners; they are Supposed to be of the Loango Nation by
the marks on the man's Body, while on his Breast may also be seen the
letters J.G.S. being the enitials of my name, And Supposed to be the
Cypher by which each master knows his Property."


S21
6^Iiss&
' 1.........























ANegrohungalive
by the Ribs to a Gal-
lows" [Stedman's .,7 .
PL 11, engraved by
William Blake]. St-
edman wrote: 'Not .
long ago (contin-
ued he) I saw a black man hang'd alive by the ribs, between which with a
knife was first made an insision, and then clinch'd an Iron hook with a
Chain -in this manner he kept living three days hanging with his head
and feet downwards and catching with his tongue the drops of water (it
being in the rainy season) that were flowing down his bloated breast
while the vultures were picking in the putred wound, notwithstanding all
this he never complained and even upbraided a negro for crying while he
was flog'd below the Gallows by calling out to him -'you man? da boy
fasi' 'are you a Man you behave like a boy.' "





The Execution of Breaking on the Rack [Stedman's PI. 71, engraved by William
Blake]. Stedman wrote: "Neptune was no Slave, but his own Master, & a
Carpenter by Trade, he was Young and handsome ... [but] having Stole a
Sheep to Entertain some Favourite Women, the Overseer had Determined
to See him Hang'd, Which to Prevent he Shot him dead Amongst the
Sugar Canes this man being Sentenced to be brook Alive upon the Rack,
without the benefit of the Coup de Grace, or mercy Stroke, laid himself
down Deliberately on his Back upon a Strong Cross.... The Executioner
(also a Black) hav-
ing now with a
Hatchet Chop'd off
his Left hand, next
took up a heavy
Iron Crow or Bar
with Which Blow
After Blow he
Broke to Shivers
every Bone in his
Body till the Splin-
ters Blood and Mar-
row Flew About
the Field, but the
Prisoner never
Uttered a Groan,
or a Sigh."











22


of the leitmotifs of the book,
was changed in a similar direc-
tion, by means of numerous
subtle alterations. Descriptions
of the deep emotional bonds
between them were in general
either deleted or elevated to a
purely literary plane; and the
text was extensively rewritten
to stress the inequality of their
respective positions in society.
The edited version emphasizes
Joanna's pitiable condition,
and makes Stedman her pro-
tector and patron, rather than a
lover who aspired to be her
husband. These changes seem
to have been just what the
reading public wanted: the
British Critic in 1796 noted with
approval that "The tale in par-
ticular of Joanna, and of the
author's attachment to her, is
highly honourable to both par-
ties."
Stedman's views on slavery,
the slave trade, social justice,
and organized religion were
also substantially and system-
atically altered. During the
1780s, when he was writing the
"Narrative," his positions
were well within the main-
stream of contemporary edu-
cated British opinion -ambiv-
alence and equivocation about
slavery and the trade as institu-
tions, combined with genuine
compassion for oppressed hu-
manity. While Stedman was
far from being (like Johnson,
Blake, and others of that circle)
a republican or abolitionist
sympathizer, he was equally
far from being a political
conservative, within the con-
temporary spectrum of public
opinion. With his feet firmly
planted in the middle of the
political road, Stedman saw
himself as arguing equally
against men such as Clarkson
who exhibited the "enthusi-
asm of ill placed Humanity
Humanitarianism" and against
those who would "persevere
in the most unjust and diaboli-
cal barbarity ... for the sake of
drinking rum, and eating
Sugar."


In his 1790 "Narrative,"
Stedman rehearsed the whole
panoply of already well-worn
arguments in favor of the
continuation of slavery and the
trade. Motivated, he claimed,
by a dual concern for "the
African" (whom he explicitly
said he "loved") and for "this
glorious Island," Stedman
urged Parliament to focus on
amelioration -the passage
and rigid enforcement of laws
that would protect the rights of
enslaved Africans as human
beings -and thus "make the
Slaves in our West India Settle-
ments perfectly happy, with
even an Accumulation to the
Wealth of their Masters."
But Stedman's editor made
a consistent attempt to slant
these "moderate" opinions in
the direction of a rigid
proslavery ideology for the
1796 edition, at the same time
deleting many of his com-
ments on the common hu-
manity of Africans and Euro-
peans. And he often altered
Stedman's middle-of-the-road
humanitarianism and strong
penchant for cultural relativ-
ism to read almost like the
Jamaican planter Edward
Long's acidulous proslavery
apologetics. In the 1790
"Narrative," Stedman fre-
quently depicted the African
as Natural Man: "the Africans
in a State of nature, Are not
that Wretched People Which
they are by too Many igno-
rant European Wretches
Represented"; "the Africans
are not so entirely destitute of
morality and even Religion as
a number of ignorant Euro-
peans imagine"; and yet more
forcefully, "the African Ne-
groes though by Some Stupid
Europeans treated as Brutes
Are made of no Inferior Clay
but in every one Particular
are our Equals." By 1796, all
of these passages (and others
like them) had been ex-
punged and, in their place,
the "national character of [the
African] people" was now de-


CARIBBEAN














scribed as being "perfectly
savage."
Realizing that "the anti-
slavery writer accents every
tract that identifies the Negro
with the white man," Sted-
man's editor tried to weed
out his frequent and seem-
ingly minor comments to this
effect. Such comments as "the
word negroish is very ill ap-
plied when meant to describe
greediness or Self interest"
was deleted by the editor;
Stedman's comparison of
"Black Women with theyr
Sparkling Eyes. -Ivory
Teeth, and remarkable Clean-
liness All over" with "the too
many Languid Looks, Sallow
Complexions, deform'd Bod-
ies, And Broken Constitu-
tions, of European Con-
triwomen," was (like others
on the physical beauty of
Africans) deleted wholesale.
Similarly, many of Sted-
man's blunt general remarks
about the pervasiveness of
misconduct and debauchery
among European planters
were muted or removed. So,
too, was his opinion that
"those planters who dare so
inhumanely to persecute
theyr Slaves without a Cause
deserve in my opinion no bet-
ter treatment [than to have
their slaves revolt]."
Stedman's Voltairian skepti-
cism about organized religion
apparently offended his editor
as well. As with slavery and
the trade, Stedman took pains
to make clear that he was not
opposed to the institution it-
self, but rather to its wide-
spread corruption by "hypo-
crites," among whom he seems
to have numbered most British
clergymen as well as the
Moravian missionaries sent
out to convert the Indians and
Africans in Suriname. Here is a
characteristic passage, excised
by the editor of the Narrative
(who had once been a minister
in Scotland): "As for the mo-
ravian missionary's that are
Settled Amongst them to Pro-
REVIEW


mote theyr faith &c. I have no
Objections, Providing their
morals go hand in hand with
theyr Precepts, but without
Which they ought /like a Pack
of Canting Hypocritical Ras-
cals deserve/to be Strip'd
naked, then tar'd & Feathered
by the negroes, & flog'd out of
the Colony."
Stedman's publisher be-
lieved that, even in its edited
form, the Narrative would
stand as one of the strongest
indictments ever to appear
against plantation slavery.
And public reaction bore him
out: upon publication, the
Analytical Review claimed that:
"It will be impossible to pe-
ruse the numerous relations of
shocking cruelties and bar-
barities contained in these vol-
umes without a degree of
painful sympathy, which will
often rise into horror. Many
of the facts are indeed so
dreadful, that nothing could
justify the writer in narrating
them, but the hope of inciting
in the breasts of his readers a
degree of indignation, which
will stimulate vigorous and
effectual exertions for the
speedy termination of the
execrable traffic in human
flesh, which, to the disgrace of
civilized society, is still suf-
fered to exist and is, even in
christian countries, sanctioned
by law." And the influential
Critical Review observed that
"We have never opened any
work which is so admirably
calculated to excite the most
heart-felt abhorrence and
detestation of that grossest in-
sult on human nature, -
domestic slavery."
Stedman's original "Narra-
tive," now published for the
first time, affords yet fuller
insights into the nature of
Caribbean slavery -viewed
from the multiple perspectives
of wealthy masters, oppressed
slaves, and the proud ma-
roons whose descendants con-
tinue to struggle for freedom
in Suriname today. m


.i L '*.'A Rebel Negro
|'.... .1 U Iarmed & on his
. .guard [Stedman's
P1. 53, engraved by
Francesco Bar-
tolozzi]. Stedman
,.. t wrote: "[He] is
Armed With a fire-
S- '' lock, and a
-Hatchet, his hair
... ,.j (though Woolly)
may be Observ'd
to be Plaited Close
to his head, by way of Distinction from the Rangers or any other Stragling
Negroes, who are not Accepted yet Amongst them, And his beard is
Grown to a Point.... The Whole dress of this Man Consists in a Cotton
Sheet Negligently tied Across his Shoulders, Which Protects him against
the Rayn, And Serves him as a Bed to lay Down, and Sleep, in the most
Obscure Places he Can find; the Rest are his Camisa, his Pouch which is
made of Some Animals Skin A few Cotton Strings for Orament Around
his Ancles and Wrists, and a Superstitious Obia or Amulet tied About his
Neck, in Which case he Places all his hope and Confidence."


Europe supported by Africa & America [Stedman's finis page, engraved by
William Blake]. Stedman wrote: "Going now to take my last Leave of
Surinam after all the Horrors & Cruelties with which I must have hurt
both the Eye & the heart of the Feeling reader, I will Close the Scene with
an Emblematical Picture of Europe Supported by Africa & America
Accompanied by
an Ardent Wish
that in the friendly
manner as they are
Represented they
may henceforth &
to all Eternity be
Sthe Prop of each
other.... We All
only differ in the
Colour but we are
.Certainly Created
by the same hand
& After the Same
Mould."


23


I






THE CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX
1969-1989


16 Tomes and What Do You Get...


By
Barry B. Levine












































Barry B. Levine is
cofounder and edi-
tor of Caribbean
Review and
professor of
sociology and
,,h1,11 .[-i .-,,h at
Florida Interna-
tional University
in Miami. His last
book, The Carib-
bean Exodus is
available from
Praeger Press.


ANOTHER DAY OLDER
AND DEEPER IN DEBT.
But enough of under-
statement.
The Caribbean Review Index,
1969-1989, which follows on the
next 47 pages, covers nearly
everything published in the
magazine from Volume 1, Num-
ber 1, through Volume 16,
Number 2 (the issue previous to
this one).
The act of constructing the
index has underlined for us the
persistence of certain themes,
some mutable, some immutable,
that have dominated Caribbean
life during the past 20 years: the
rise and obsolescence of Castro;
the coming and going of Gre-
nada's flirtation with socialism;
the passing of the region's first
generation of leaders; the
indefatigable persistence and ex-
tension of democracy through-
out the region (an aspect of so-
cial life in which the Caribbean
has lead the Third World by
example); the challenge to de-
velop the region's economies;
the repeated attempts to deal
with corruption and now narco-
gangsterism; the often fractious
interaction between status
groups sharing the same na-
tional space; the interaction be-
tween metropolitan cultures and
those of the region, both at
home and abroad; the flourish-
ing of Caribbean literary, visual,
and performing arts.
These themes take on more
import in the context of the pre-
sent changes that are unsettling
the world, external changes that
are perhaps more significant for
the Caribbean than any others
during the last two decades. Still,
if the 20 years of information
stored in the Caribbean Review
warehouse proves anything, it
demonstrates at least to this
sociologist the amazing vitality
and resiliency of Caribbean every-
day life and culture.
The availability of the index
does two other things. It now
makes easily available for future
use the many wonderful pieces


that we have published in the
past, works that can help those
seeking deeper understanding of
the evolution of our region. Ac-
cess to these writings has now
been rendered simpler than ever.
The index also represents a cele-
bration of our genre. Caribbean
Review was deliberately charted
to plow seas somewhere between
a journal for the academy and a
magazine for the real world. And
like Homer, we hoped to sneak
between the pedantry of Scylla
and the frivolity of Charybdis. It
took a struggle, but academia em-
braced us, and even emulated us
in producing like-style journals.
And the real world got into the
habit of turning to us when the
Caribbean, normally not front
page news, would jump to the
forefront of a day's events.
Having said that, let me explain
how the index works, or better
yet, how to work the index. Your
patience will be required.

How to Use the Index
The index has over 1,000 entries,
organized in six different for-
mats. The first listing (Articles
and Reviews, By Author, Anno-
tated, p. 25) contains all the
information but, since it is or-
ganized by the last name of the
author, it may not be the easiest
way to locate what you are
searching for. The other listings
contain less information but may
be better places to start.
Articles, By Title (p. 41) lists
entries by title. Start here if you
know the name of the article you
are looking for.
Books Reviewed, By Author
(p. 48) lists entries by the authors
of the books under review. Begin
here if you remember the name of
the author of the book being re-
viewed.
Books Reviewed, By Title (p.
53) lists entries by the titles of the
books under review. Begin here if
you remember the name of the
title of the book being reviewed.
Subject, By Discipline (p. 58)
divides entries into 15 sometimes
surprising categories or disci-


24 CARIBBEAN


plines and then further divides
the entries into subjects. Start here
if you are looking for material
about a certain subject matter. You
may need to search more than one
category to find your topic.
Subject, By Country (p. 65)
divides entries into 50 countries or
other geographical areas that en-
compass more than one country
and then further divides the en-
tries into subjects. Start here if you
are looking for material rooted in
a specific geographical area.
When an article encompasses
more than one area it may be
listed in a geographical category
larger than a single nation cate-
gory (e.g., Hispaniola or Carib-
bean, Hispanic, etc.).
Once having located an entry in
one of these latter listings, it is
necessary to return to the first
listing (Articles and Reviews, By
Author, Annotated, p. 25) for the
complete information.
The abbreviations used to de-
scribe ARTICLE TYPE are as fol-
lows: ARC Art Critique; ART
-Article; BRV Book Review;
CRV Cinema Review; ED -
Editorial; EXC -Excerpt; FIC -
Fiction; INT -Interview; LED -
Letter to the Editor; POE -Poetry;
REP -Reprint; RES -Review
Essay; SS Short Story.
The abbreviations used for the
disciplines correspond to the
headings in the Subject, By Disci-
pline (p. 58) listing and are as
follows: [CC] Contemporary
Culture; [EC] Economics; [ED]
- Economic Development; [GP]
- Geopolitics; [HI] History;
[LA] Literary Arts; [LC] -
Literary Commentary; [MI] -
Migration; [PA] -Performing
Arts/Commentary; [PSI Politi-
cal Processes/Structures; [RL] -
Religion; [SC] Social Char-
acteristics/Groups; [SI] Social
Institutions; [TS] Traditional
Societies; [VA] Visual Arts/
Commentary.
We hope the Caribbean Review
Index will be of use to you. The
next one of this size will out in the
Summer 2010 issue of Caribbean
Review. That's Vol. ... No .....


. 24


CARIBBEAN








ARTICLES & REVIEWS,
BY AUTHOR, ANNOTATED


MODEL
Last Name, First Name. Article Title. ARTICLE
TYPE. Title Book Reviewed. Author Book Re-
viewed. Vol:Number page (Season 'Year). Geo-
graphical Area. [DISCIPLINE] Subject.
Annotation.
A
Acosta-Belen, Edna. Rican Richness. BRV. From
Colonia to Community: The History of Puerto
Ricans in New York City, 1917-1948. Virginia
Sanchez Korrol. 14:1 p. 51 (Winter '85). Puerto
Rico. [MI] Puerto Ricans in New York. Documents
efforts by early migrants to build a community
support system for later arrivals.
Adams, Richard N. The Sandinistas & the
Indians. The "Problem" of the Indian in
Nicaragua. ART. 10:1 p. 22 (Winter '81). Nicara-
gua. [TS] Miskito Indians. A revolution inherits a
problem of resistance to assimilation by an
indigenous minority.
Albizu, Charlie & Norman Matlin. The Death of
Poetry. The '68 Puerto Rico Election. ART. 1:1
p. 2 (Spring '69). Puerto Rico. [PS] Elections,
1968. Personalities & platforms of the '68
gubernatorial race.
Albizu-Miranda, C. & Norman Matlin. Mascaras y
Vejigantes: The Folklore of Puerto Rican
Politics. ART. 1:2 p. 5 (Summer '69). Puerto Rico.
[PS] Culture of politics. The folk logic of who
Puerto Ricans will vote for, regardless of which
candidate they may actually support.
de Albuquerque, Klaus. The Future of the
Rastafarian Movement. ART. 8:4 p. 22 (Fall '79).
Jamaica. [RL] Rastafarians. Religion & politics
meld into a dynamic force in Jamaica.
Alegria, Alonso. El Super. CRV. 8:2 p. 54 (Spring
'79). Cuba. [PA] Exile (El Super). Film review
about Cubans in exile.
Alegria, Fernando. Literature & Revolution in
Chile. ART. 5:2 p. 13 (April '73). Chile. [LC]
Revolution & art. Analysis of the significance of
political events for Chile's writers.
Alisky, Marvin. Central American Sancocho.
Recent Scholarship on an Area in Crisis. RES.
Political Change in Central America: Internal &
External Dimensions. Wolf Grabendorff, H.W.
Krumwiede & Jorg Todt, eds. Politics of Interven-
tion: The United States in Central America. Roger
Burbach & Patricia Flynn, eds. Central America:
Crisis & Adaptation. Steve C. Ropp & James A.
Morris, eds. 14:1 p. 26 (Winter '85). Central
America. [GP] Conflict, political. Scholarly
shortcomings.
Allen, Charles H. Let Us Construct a Wa-
tercloset. First Annual Report of Charles H.
Allen, Governor of Porto Rico. EXC. 3:1 p. 8
'Spring '71). Puerto Rico. [HI] Acculturation.
Selected excerpts from the first American civil
Governor of Puerto Rico demonstrate how the
island was viewed from non-native eyes in 1901.
Alonso Garcia, Jos6 M. Conversations with
Guillermo. Young resident from a San Juan
slum tells it like it is. ART. 5:3 p. 6 (July '73).
Puerto Rico. [CC] Testimonial. An interview by an
anthropologist.
de Alonso, Irma T. Economic Erosion. BRV. What
Price Equity? A Macroeconomic Evaluation of
Government Policies in Costa Rica. Fuat M.
Andic. 15:1 p. 44 (Winter '86). Costa Rica. [EC]
Government policies. Based on an AID report,
Costa Rica's record jeopardized by government
policies.
Alvarez, Julia. Homecoming. A Dominican Rev-
erie. POE. 12:1 p. 30 (Winter '83). Dominican
Republic. [LA] Reminiscences. Free verse about
life in the DR.
Ameringer, Charles D. The Thirty Years War
Between Figueres & the Somozas. ART. 8:4 p. 4
(Fall '79). Central America. [GP] Conflict, political.
Confrontation between Costa Rica & Nicaragua.


Ameringer, Charles D. The Tradition of De-
mocracy in the Caribbean. Betancourt,
Figures, Mufoz & the Democratic Left. ART.
11:2 p. 28 (Spring '82). Caribbean Basin. [PS]
Democratic left. Some examples of democracy at
work in the region.
Anderson, Patricia. The Hassle & the Hustle. A
Minibus Ride Through Kingston. ART. 16:1 p.
18 (Spring '88). Jamaica. [SI] Transportation.
Adventures encountered while riding public trans-
port; the competition between public & private
transit systems.
Anderson, Robert W. Cuba: Creole Stalinism?
BRV. Guerrillas in Power: The Course of the
Cuban Revolution. K.S. Karol. 4:1 p. 31 (April '72).
Cuba. [PS] Totalitarianism. Reviews a devastating
critique of the Castro revolution by a Polish writer.
Anderson, Robert W. A Hint of Something Bad.
BRV. Problems de desigualdad social en Puerto
Rico. Barry B. Levine, Rafael Ramirez & Carlos
Buitrago (eds.). 5:3 p. 35 (July '73). Puerto Rico.
[SC] Social inequality. A review of a strange little
book that was a best seller in Puerto Rico.
Anderson, Thomas P. What Debate? BRV. Hon-
duras Confronts Its Future: Contending Perspec-
tives on Critical Issues. Mark B. Rosenberg &
Philip L. Shepherd, eds. Honduras: Portrait of a
Captive Nation. Nancy Peckenham & Annie
Street, eds. 16:1 p. 42 (Spring '88). Honduras.
[PS] Social change. Two collections of essays: the
first, a superficial lot by Hondurans; the other, a
chronology of events.
Andic, Fuat M. Efficiency Versus Equity. Eco-
nomic Policy Options in the Caribbean. ART.
13:1 p. 16 (Winter '84). Caribbean Basin. [EC]
Policy options. Real vs. ideal aims of
development.
Andic, Suphan. The Decision to Trade. Puerto
Rico's Export Strategies. ART. 14:2 p. 22
(Spring '85). Puerto Rico. [EC] Export trade.
Puerto Rico's move towards diversification of
manufactured exports & open trade.
de Andrade, Mario. Landscape 2. POE. 1:4 p. 5
(Winter '69). Brazil. [LA] de Andrade, Mario.
A poem.
Antrim, Harry T. Paradise Is In The Mind. BRV.
The Prime Minister. Austin C. Clarke. 8:4 p. 38
(Fall '79). Barbados. [LC] Clarke, Austin C. Author
of an allegorical novel of disillusionment & recap-
tured innocence seen as a disciple of Milton.
Arias Calder6n, Ricardo. The Christian Demo-
crats in Latin America. The Fight for Democ-
racy. ART. 11:2 p. 34 (Spring '82). Latin America.
[PS] Christian Democratic Party. The Democrats
take on repressive military regimes in 19 Latin
American countries, promoting democracy & par-
ticipatory, pluralistic economies.
Arias Calder6n, Ricardo. Political Systems as
Export Commodities. Democracy & the Role of
the US in Central America. ART. 15:1 p. 20
(Winter '86). Central America. [GP] International
relations. Democracy vs. military alliance: the
conflict in US commitment to its neighbors.
Arias Calderon, Ricardo. The Third World of the
West. ED. 13:4 p. 3 (Fall '84). Latin America. [GP]
Crisis, sociopolitical. Promoting democracy on the
last frontier.
Arnold, Jr., St. George Tucker. A Celebration of
Caribbean Color. BRV. Ignoring Hurts... poems.
John J. Figueroa. 7:3 p. 54 (July '78). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [LC] Figueroa, John. Excerpts
from the Jamaican poet's collection.
Austin, James E. Calories Count in Cuba. BRV.
No Free Lunch: Food & Revolution in Cuba Today.
Medea Benjamin, Joseph Collins & Michael Scott.
15:2 p. 45 S,.pring '86). Cuba. [SC] Food policy.
Documents government managed redistribution of
Cuba's food supply.
Avebury (Lord) & the British Parliamentary
Human Rights Group, Lord. Guyana's 1980
Elections. The Politics of Fraud. ART. 10:2 p. 8
(Spring '81). Guyana. [PS] Elections, 1980. Work-
ing towards fair elections in a volatile, pluralistic
polity.
Aybar, Jose M. On Goure's Non-Review. LED. 5:1
p. 2 (January '73). Latin America. [GP] Soviet
policy. Complaint about reviewer's opinions (3:4).


Azicri, Max. Cuba & the US. On the Possibilities
of Rapprochement. ART. 9:1 p. 26 (Winter '80).
Cuba. [GP] International relations. Socialism not
the issue, competition for intervention rights is.
B
Bach, Robert L. The New Cuban Exodus. Politi-
cal & Economic Motivations. ART. 11:1 p. 22
(Fall '82). Cuba. [Ml] Migration, motivations for. An
analysis of the characteristics of the Mariel boatlift
emigrants & their impact on South Florida.
Bajeux, Jean-Claude. The Little Game of January
17th. ART. 16:2 p. 7 (Winter '88). Haiti. [PS]
Conflict, political. Sleight-of-hand & intrigue lead-
ing up to the '88 elections.
Baker, Jeffrey J. W. Galileo, Onan & the Pope.
ART. 1:3 p. 6 (Fall '69). Third World. [SC]
Population policy. A criticism of the Catholic
Church's position on birth control.
Baloyra, Enrique A. Between A Rock & A Hard
Place. BRV. Cuba Between Empires, 1872-1902.
Louis A. P6rez, Jr. 13:4 p. 48 (Fall '84). Cuba. [HI]
History, political. A tortuous trail from Spanish to
US colony.
Baptist de Caluwe, Johannes. Drama Writing in
Papiamentu. ART. 8:4 p. 33 (Fall '79). Nether-
lands Antilles. [PA] Theatre. Use of creole in
national theatre legitimates the language & its
speakers.
Barnet, Miguel. A Man & his Potential. BRV.
Benjy Lopez. Barry B. Levine. 9:3 p. 40 (Summer
'80). Puerto Rico. [MI] Diaspora, Puerto Rican.
Enthusiastic review of testimonial-style biography
of a feisty Rican.
Barradas, Efrain. Formerly. BRV. Our House in
the Last World. Oscar Hijuelos. 13:2 p. 54 ,prnrg
'84). Cuba. [LC] Acculturation. Novel placed in
context of literature about Hispanic migrants:
language barrier, acculturation, & ethnic identity.
Barrow, Errol. The Danger of Rescue Op-
erations. ED. 12:4 p. 3 (Fall '83). Grenada. [GP]
Invasion, 1983. Criticism by the former prime
minister of Barbados of rescue-by-invasion
tactics.
Bejel, Emilio. 1605 Dominican Pages. BRV.
Antologia literaria dominicana. Margarita Vallejo
de Paredes. 13:4 p. 49 (Fall '84). Dominican
Republic. [LC] Anthology, literary. Extensive col-
lection of Dominican poetry, short stories, theatre,
speeches, biographical sketches, essays &
folklore.
Belcher, Emily M. Poetic Permutation. BRV. The
Penguin Book of Caribbean Verse in English.
Paula Burnett, ed. 15:4 p. 42 (Spring '87).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [LC] Anthology, po-
etry. West Indian poetry from 18th century to
present. Oral & literary traditions translated into
standard English.
Belkin, June S. CARICOM: Caribbean Com-
munity & Common Market. ART. 13:4 p. 11 (Fall
'84). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [ED] CARICOM.
Description & chronology of history of CARICOM.
Belknap, Ellen L. Coffee Table Aztecs. BRV. Art
of the Aztecs. Henri Stierlin. 13:2 p. 54 (Spring
'84). Mexico. [VA] Art, Aztec. Pre-Aztec & Aztec
architecture, planning & traditional art forms.
Belknap, Ellen L. Mere Description. BRV. Histoire
de I'architecture dans la Caraibe. David Buissert.
14:3 p. 49 (Summer '85). Caribbean Archipelago.
[VA] Architecture. Survey of architecture on 12+
islands, highlighting indigenous & colonial
influences.
Bell, lan. Bruised Apples. BRV. The Dominican
Republic. Howard J. Wiarda & Michael J. Kry-
zanek. 13:3 p. 52 (Summer '84). Dominican
Republic. [PS] History, political. Good discussions
on economy, agricultural development, land re-
form policy, & technical planning.
Bell, Wendell. Remembrances of a Jamaica Past.
And Reflections on Its Future. ART. 14:1 p. 5
(Winter '85). Jamaica. [HI] Political change. Were
Jamaica's good ole' days really better? Positive
changes have occurred.
Bender, Bea. The Charmed World of Manuel
Lepe. Primitive Art by a Mexican Master. ARC.
13:1 p. 41 (Winter '84). Mexico. [VA] Lepe,
Manuel. The unique style & technique of a
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /25








Mexican painter.
Bender, Lynn-Darrell. Hemispheric Debate. How
to Handle Latin America. RES. From Gunboats
to Diplomacy: New US Policies for Latin America.
Richard Newfarmer. Governance in the Western
Hemisphere. Viron P. Vaky. Crisis & Opportunity:
US Policy in Central America & the Caribbean.
Mark Falcoff & Robert Royal, eds. US Influence in
Latin America in the 1980s. Robert Wesson.
Confrontation in the Caribbean Basin. Alan Adel-
man & Reid Reading, eds. 14:4 p. 34 (Fall '85).
Hemisphere. [GP] US policy. Review formulates a
strategy to modify US/LA relations.
Bendix, Reinhard. Weber & Latin America. BRV.
Political History of Latin America. Ronald Glass-
man. 2:4 p. 3 (Winter '70). Latin America. [HI]
Social structure. Reviews attempt to interpret the
political history of Latin America using Weber.
Bengochea, Armando. Sacrificial Equality. BRV.
Cuba: Dilemmas of A Revolution. Juan M. del
Aguila. 14:4 p. 49 (Fall '85). Cuba. [PS] Political
economy. Reviewer finds interpretation of sacri-
fices for achievement of basic needs biased;
dilemmas more in mind of author than in the
revolution.
Benoist, Jean. West Indian Paysans. BRV. De-
sengagement paysan et sous production alimen-
taire. Remain Paquette. 13:3 p. 53 (Summer '84).
Caribbean Archipelago. [ED] Development, agri-
cultural. Study of peasants' notion of land use &
exclusion in development planning.
Bensman, Joseph & Arthur Vidich. Struggle for
the Underdeveloped World: I. ART. 2:3 p. 3 (Fall
'70). Third World. [GP] International relations.
Competition between superpowers for the Third
World, not for gain but for the exclusion of
the other.
Bensman, Joseph & Arthur Vidich. Struggle for
the Underdeveloped World: II. ART. 2:4 p. 4
(Winter '70). Third World. [GP] International
relations. Foreign aid as a bribe for alliance
against the opposition.
Benftez, Jaime. A Response to Berrios. ART. 8:2
p. 21 (Spring '79). Puerto Rico. [PS] Status,
political. Reply to independence argument (in
same issue) from a Commonwealth perspective.
Berger, Peter L. Can the Caribbean Learn from
East Asia? The Case of Jamaica. ART. 13:2 p. 6
(Spring '84). Jamaica. [ED] Development models.
Evaluates the feasibility of development plan
based on Taiwanese industrial model & whether
cultural factors impede Jamaica's growth.
Berrios Martinez, Ruben. Independence For
Puerto Rico: The Only Solution. ART. 8:2 p. 15
(Spring '79). Puerto Rico. [PS] Status, political.
Argues independence is only way to resolve
island's malaise.
Best, Lloyd. Black Power & Doctor Politics. ART.
2:2 p. 5 (Summer '70). Trinidad. [SC] Black power.
Excerpts from a 1970 speech during a period of
conflict in T&T.
Betancur, Belisario. The Cartagena Proposal.
The Far-Off Thunder of Violent Drums. ART.
13:3 p. 10 (Summer '84). Latin America. [ED]
Debt. Refinancing Latin America's debt to stave
off bankruptcy.
Bilby, Kenneth. Jamaica's Maroons at the Cross-
roads. Losing Touch with Tradition. ART. 9:4 p.
18 (Fall '80). Jamaica. [TS] Culture change.
Maroon culture & threat of assimilation of
the young.
Bilder, J. Raban. Borges: Into the Mainstream
via the Back Door. ART. 4:4 p. 18 (October '72).
Argentina. [LC] Borges, Jorge Luis. Review essay
on Borges' cultivation of a particular literary style.
Bilder, J. Raban. Interviewing Cabrera Infante.
INT. 6:4 p. 17 (October '74). Cuba. [LC] Cabrera
Infante, Guillermo. Interview of the renowned
Cuban novelist in his London flat.
Bilder, J. Raban. London Knows, Do You? BRV.
Caribbean Voices: An Anthology of Caribbean
Poetry Selected by John Figueroa (2 vols.). John
Figueroa. 4:1 p. 24 (April '72). Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. [LC] Figueroa, John. Contribution of
W.I. poetry to English language poetry in general.
Bilder, J. Raban. Three Trapped Tigers. BRV.
Three Trapped Tigers. Guillermo Cabrera Infante.
26 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


4:3 p. 28 (July '72). Cuba. [LC] Cabrera Infante,
Guillermo. Review of a tongue twisting master-
piece in either English or Spanish.
Biondi, Joann. Sweet Temptation. BRV. My Little
Island. Frane Lessac. 15:3 p. 43 (Winter '87).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [LC] Children's fic-
tion. Young boy's visit to his native island evokes
vivid images.
Blake, Eric W. Stranger in Paradise. ART. 6:2 p. 8
(April '74). USVI. [MI] Racial consciousness.
Examination of USVI development on ethnic &
racial consciousness.
Blum, Leonor. The Literacy Campaign. Nica-
ragua Style. ART. 10:1 p. 18 (Winter '81).
Nicaragua. [SI] Literacy. Literacy as a tool for
indoctrination & development.
Boersner, Demetrio. Venezuela & the Caribbean.
ART. 8:4 p. 8 (Fall '79). Caribbean Basin. [GP]
Diplomatic relations. Venezuela vies for a leader-
ship role in the region.
Bohning, Don. Haitian Errors. BRV. Haiti, Political
Failures, Cultural Successes. Brian Weinstein &
Aaron Segal. 14:1 p. 48 (Winter '85). Haiti. [CC]
Culture & politics. Introduction to Haitian history.
Bohning, Don, Juan 0. Tamayo & Bernard
Diederich. The Springtime of Elections. The
Status of Democracy in the Caribbean. ART.
11:3 p. 4 (Summer '82). Caribbean Basin. [PS]
Elections, 1982. The quiet, steady progress of
democracy reflected in Caribbean elections.
Bonnet, Jr., Juan A. & Angel Calderon-Cruz.
Caribbean Energy Dependence. A 15-Year
Prognosis. ART. 14:3 p. 16 (Summer '85).
Caribbean Archipelago. [SI] Energy. Plans for
alternative energy sources & projects to reduce
dependence.
Boodhoo, Ken. The Case of the Missing Majority.
ART. 6:2 p. 3 (April '74). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [PS] Race relations. Analysis of the use of
political power in Trinidad & Guyana.
Boodhoo, Ken. A Little Black Book. BRV. Race &
Revolutionary Consciousness: A Documentary
Interpretation. Ivar Oxaal. 5:1 p. 42 (January '73).
Trinidad. [PS] Conflict, political. The 1970 Black
Power uprising.
Boodhoo, Ken. Sugar & East Indian Inden-
tureship in Trinidad. ART. 5:2 p. 17 (April '73).
Trinidad. [HI] Sugar. Benefits derived by plantation
owners capitalizing on imported East Indian labor.
Booth, John A. Rare Bird. BRV. Nicaragua Under
Siege. Marlene Dixon & Susanne Jonas, eds. 15:2
p. 47 (Spring '86). Nicaragua. [GP] US policy.
Nicaraguan revolution & US opposition; not for
conservatives.
Borges, Jorge Luis. Game of Chess. POE. 1:3 p.
5 (Fall '69). Argentina. [LA] Borges, Jorge Luis.
A poem.
Bossen, Laurel Herbenar. Huipiles, Tzutes &
Molas. Context & Coincidence in Central
American Textiles. RES. A Century of Change in
Guatemalan Textiles. Ann Pollard Rowe. Cuna
Molas & Cocle Art Forms: Reflections on Panama-
nian Design Styles & Symbols. Mary Helms. 13:4
p. 31 (Fall '84). Central America. [VA] Textile
designs. Review of 2 works analyzing color,
pattern & technique in textile arts.
Boswell, Thomas D. Caribbean Crystal Ball.
BRV. The Caribbean Basin to the Year 2000.
Norman A. Graham & Keith L. Edwards. 14:3 p. 51
(Summer '85). Caribbean Basin. [SC] Growth
projections. Good reference for demographic,
economic & resource characteristics for 17
countries.
Boswell, Thomas D. The New Haitian Diaspora.
Florida's Most Recent Residents. ART. 11:1 p.
18 (Fall '82). Haiti. [MI] Diaspora, Haitian. Demo-
graphic characteristics of Haitians in Florida, their
origins, lifestyles & opportunities.
Bouchey, L. Francis. Reagan Policy: Global
Chess or Local Crap Shooting. A Critique
From the Right. ART. 11:2 p. 20 (Spring '82).
Latin America. [GP] US policy. Appeal to escalate
US geopolitical gamesmanship with the Soviet
Union.
Bourne, Compton. The Retreat from Integration.
ED. 14:3 p. 3 (Summer '85). Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. [ED] Integration, economic. Cyclical


progression of the movement down due to the
economic recession.
Bovenkerk, Frank. Caribbean Migration to the
Netherlands. From the Elite to the Working
Class. ART. 11:1 p. 34 (Fall '82). Caribbean,
Dutch. [MI] Caribbean exodus. Surinamese immi-
grants add a diverse range of ethnic backgrounds
& social classes to the Netherlands.
Brana-Shute, Gary. An Eastern Caribbean Cen-
trist. Interviewing Prime Minister James F
"Son" Mitchell. INT. 14:4 p. 27 (Fall '85).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [PS] Mitchell, James
F. The leader of St. Vincent speaks out on
Grenada, regional economics, & US interests.
Brana-Shute, Gary. Interviewing James F "Son"
Mitchell. In the Center Looking for Change.
INT. 12:3 p. 10 (Summer '83). St. Vincent. [PSI
Opposition, role of. Conversations with the leader
of St. Vincent.
Brana-Shute, Gary. Politicians in Uniform. Suri-
name's Bedeviled Revolution. ART. 10:2 p. 24
,Spring '81). Suriname. [PS] Authoritarianism. The
military bit off more than they could chew.
Brana-Shute, Gary. Suriname Surprises. Small
Country, Smaller Revolution. ART. 15:4 p. 4
(Spring '87). Suriname. [PS] Conflict, political.
Author predicts thriller-style surprises & political
conflict.
Brana-Shute, Gary. Who's Who?BRV. The Carib
Reserve: Identity & Security in the West Indies
Anthony Layng. 13:2 p. 54 (Spring '84). Dominica.
[TS] Caribs. Ethnicity claimed as a strategy to
control resources.
Brathwaite, Edward Kamau. Gods of the Middle
Passage. A Tennament. EXC. 11:4 p. 18 (Fall
'82). Barbados. [LA] Braithwaite, Edward Kamau.
Poetic essay by a well-known Barbadian writer.
Bray, David. Learning About Politics. BRV. I...
Rigoberta Menchb: An Indian Woman in Guate-
mala. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, ed. 15:3 p. 41
(Winter '87). Guatemala. [PS] Socialization, politi-
cal. Autobiography of a Mayan woman ju.trriiii
Bray, David. Sandinista Socialization. BRV. La
montafna es algo mas que una inmensa estepa
verde. Omar Cabezas. 14:3 p. 48 (Summer '85).
Nicaragua. [CC] Sandinistas. An oral history of a
young guerrilla's growing up Sandinista.
Brown, Jerry B. Oil on the Periphery. The History
of the Mexican Oil Expropriation. ART. 10:3 p.
12 (Summer '81). Mexico. [HI] Oil. A concise
history of the nationalization of oil in Mexico.
Brown, Jonathan C. Not Greasy Kid Stuff. BRV.
Oil & Politics in Latin America: Nationalist Move-
ments & State Companies. George Philip. 13:4 p.
48 (Fall '84). Latin America. [EC] Oil. The
nationalization of oil, undertaken for popular
support, proved disastrous for all countries but
Colombia.
Bruce, Christina. For the American Dream. A
Journey to El Norte. CRV. 13:3 p. 36 (Summer
'84). Guatemala. [PA] Migration (El Norte). Well-
done saga of Guatemalan refugees' igir, ti
California.
Bryan, Anthony T. Mexico & the Caribbean. New
Ventures into the Region. ART. 10:3 p. 4
(Summer '81). Caribbean Basin. [GP] Foreign
policy. Mexico moves to influence region.
Bryant, John. Health & the Developing World.
EXC. 2:3 p. 7 (Fall '70). Third World. [SC] Health.
Vignettes & statistics on an uphill battle for
adequate health care in Colombia.
Bryce-Laporte, Roy Simon. The Rastas. BRV.
The Rastafarians: A Study of Messianic Cultism in
Jamaica. Leonard E. Barrett. 2:2 p. 3 (Summer
'70). Jamaica. [RL] Rastafarians. Compares
Rastafarians to Black Muslims.
Buckley, Roger N. Culture Against Chains. BRV.
Slavery, War& Revolution: The British Occupation
of Saint Domingue, 1793-1798. David Geggus.
Testing the Chains: Resistance to Slavery in the
British West Indies. Michael Craton. 13:4 p. 50
(Fall '84). Caribbean Archipelago. [HI] Slave
resistance. The myth of the docile slave shattered
in two accounts of slave resistance in Haiti &
British West Indies.
Buitrago-Ortiz, Carlos. Social Strata in Esper-
anza. ART. 2:3 p. 11 (Fall '70). Puerto Rico. [SC]








Social stratification. Social class differentiation in a
Puerto Rican community.
Burton, Julianne. The Harder They Come. CRV.
7:2 p. 33 (April '78). Jamaica. [PA] Picaresque tale
(The Harder They Come). An "up-from-poverty
through so-so means" story set in Jamaica.
Bush, Roland E. Requiem for the Artist. BRV.
Heroes Are Grazing in My Garden. Herberto
Padilla. 15:1 p. 41 (Winter'86). Cuba. [LC] Padilla,
Herberto. A lengthy, psycho-philosophical novel
about the effect of political repression on writers.
Butler, Janet. The Existentialism of George
Lamming. The Early Development of a Writer.
ART. 11:4 p. 15 (Fall '82). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [LC] Lamming, George. Biographical
essay on the works of a Caribbean novelist.

C
Calder, Bruce J. The Dominican Turn Toward
Sugar. ART. 10:3 p. 18 (Summer '73). Dominican
Republic. [HI] Sugar. Reconstruction of the devel-
opment of sugar as the dominant crop in the D.R.
Calderon Ramirez, Salvador. The Last Days of
Sandino. Texts selected & translated by Ri-
cardo Arias Calderon. EXC. 7:4 p. 4 (October
'78). Nicaragua. [HI] Sandino, Gen. Augusto C. A
moral document revealing the pathos of the
Nicaraguan tragedy.
Calmus, Ellen. Beefprints. BRV. Hoofprints on the
Forest. Douglas R. Shane. 16:1 p. 39 (Spring '88).
Latin America. [ED] Ecological concerns. Review
of an environmental impact assessment & ex-
planation of the ecological function of tropical
forests.
Campbell, Ena. Creole Jamaica. BRV. The Devel-
opment of Creole Society in Jamaica: 1770-1820.
Edward Braithwaite. 5:2 p. 42 (April '73). Jamaica.
[HI] Creole culture. A review of Braithwaite's
historical analysis of creole society.
Carlyle, Thomas. Occasional Discourse on the
Negro Question. REP. 4:1 p. 18 (April '72).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [HI] Slavery. Car-
lyle's elitist vilification of the Negro as well as his
critique of laissez-faire economics & utilitarian
philosophy. Reprinted as the first part of the
famous 19th century debate between Carlyle &
John Stuart Mill.
Carnegie, Charles V. Strategic Flexibility in the
West Indies. A Social Psychology of Caribbean
Migrations. ART. 11:1 p. 10 (Fall '82). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [MI] Migration, social psychology
of. Considers migration a strategy of flexibility.
Carrero, Jaime. The Leper. POE. 3:1 p. 10 (Spring
'71). Puerto Rico. [LA] Carrero, Jaime. Puerto
Rican poet Jaime Carrero dedicates a poem to
"los revolucionarios de Santo Domingo."
Carrero, Jaime. The Neorican Dream, A Poem.
POE. 9:3 p. 34 (Summer '80). Puerto Rico. [LA]
Carrero, Jaime. Chronicles the life of a Puerto
Rican immigrant to NY.
Carrillo, Justo. Could Cuba Have Been Dif-
ferent? The Winds of December. BRV. The Winds
of December. John Dorschner & Roberto Fabricio.
10:4 p. 38 (Fall '81). Cuba. [PS] Conflict, political.
A dramatic history of the Castro revolution.
Author's belief that a third force could have altered
history is refuted by a reviewer.
Castaneda, Carlos. The Teaching of Don Juan.
EXC. 1:2 p. 7 (Summer '69). Mexico. [RL] Yaqui
knowledge. Excerpts from a novel of traditional
wisdom.
Castillo, Siro del. A Plea to Destigmatize Mariel.
ART. 13:4 p. 7 (Fall '84). Cuba. [Ml] Marielitos.
Crimes of the few taint the many due to media
hype & insensitive studies.
de Challes, Mac6. Cockfighting in the 19th
Century Caribbean. ART. 4:4 p. 12 (October '72).
Caribbean Archipelago. [Sl] Cockfighting. Ex-
cerpted from an 1861 journal, describes cockfight-
ing in Guadeloupe.
Charnovitz, Steve. Varieties of Labor Or-
ganization. The Caribbean & Central America
Compared. ART. 14:2 p. 14 (Spring '85). Carib-
bean Basin. [PS] Labor organization. Differences
in trade unions in style, ideology, politics, attitudes
between Central America & English-speaking
Caribbean.


Cintr6n, Celia F. de. Street Reform. BRV. En la
calle estabas: La vida dentro de una institucidn
para menores. Awilda Palau de L6pez & Ernesto
Ruiz. 1:4 p. 13 (Winter '69). Puerto Rico. [SI]
Reform school. Reviews a study of a
reform school.
Clarke, Colin G. Who Cares About the Carib-
bean? BRV. The Caribbean Community: Chang-
ing Societies & U.S. Policy Robert D. Crassweller.
West Indian Societies. David Lowenthal. Peoples
& Cultures of The Caribbean: An Anthropological
Reader. Michael M. Horowitz. 5:1 p. 31 (January
'73). Caribbean Archipelago. [CC] Caribbean
Archipelago. Review concludes that gap between
US & the Caribbean parallels gap between the
Caribbean elites & their populations & that US
policy towards the Caribbean is as unchanging as
most of the Caribbean itself.
Coard, Bernard. Central America's Economic
Family. ART. 7:1 p. 24 (January '75). Central
America. [ED] Central American Common Market.
An analysis of integration & dependence resulting
from the Central American Common Market.
Colburn, Forrest D. Bird Bath. BRV. Miskitu Bila
Aisanka: Gramatica Miskita. Centro de Investi-
gaciones y Documentati6n de la Costa Atl.ntica.
Miskitu Kisi Nani: Cuentos Miskitos. Centro de
Investigaciones y Documentati6n de la Costa
Atlantica. 14:4 p. 49 (Fall '85). Nicaragua. [TS]
Miskito Indians. Reviewer discovers a grammar
exercise book for an essentially nonwritten lan-
guage & a volume of charming fables.
Colburn, Forrest D. Enterprising Enclaves. BRV.
Getting Ahead Collectively: Grassroots Ex-
periences in Latin America. Albert 0. Hirschman.
14:2 p. 48 (Spring '85). Latin America. [ED] Local
organizations. On the nature & utility of collective
action for betterment of the poor.
Colburn, Forrest D. Pilgrimages to Managua.
ART. 14:1 p. 21 (Winter '85). IJi.: r gu [SI]
Political tourism. A Goffman-esque view of every-
day life in Nicaragua.
Colburn, Forrest D. Theory & Practice in Nicara-
gua. The Economics of Class Dynamics. ART.
12:3 p. 6 (Summer '83). Nicaragua. [PS] Contra-
dictions, inherent. A change in political regime
does not necessarily engender economic r.:....nir
Colburn, Forrest D. What About my Tip? BRV. El
"Entre" Policiaco. Arturo Rios. 13:2 p. 55 (Spring
'84). Mexico. [Sl] Police, Mexican. An expos of
Mexican police as extortionists & racketeers,
where corruption pervades the entire system.
Cole, Sam. Paradise Lost? Rediscovering Tra-
dition in Aruba. ART. 14:3 p. 22 (Summer '85).
Aruba. [CC] Tradition, loss of. Forced to find a new
economic base, Arubans may reassert traditions
to forge a culturally compatible development.
Coleridge, H. N. Six Months in the West Indies in
1825. EXC. 5:4 p. 30 (October '73). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [HI] Slavery. How the West
Indies looked in the early 19th century to a
British gentleman.
Conliffe, Grafton & Thomas W. Walker. The
Literary Works of Pedro Joaquin Chamorro.
ART. 7:4 p. 46 (October '78). Nicaragua. [LC]
Chamorro, Pedro Joaquin. A survey of the fiction
of the assassinated Nicaraguan martyr.
Conway, Dennis. Big Theories, Small Island.
BRV. Politics on Bonaire. Ank Klomp. 16:2 p. 50
(Winter '88). Netherlands Antilles. [PS] Bonaire.
Book describes island politics; reviewer feels
comparisons are drawn to the wrong parallels.
Cooke, John. Requiem for a Pen Name. BRV.
Requiem for a Village/Aparteid Love. Sharlowe
(pseud.). 13:2 p. 53 (Spring '84). Trinidad. [LC]
Morality tales. Pornography thinly disguised in
borrowed plots: a Romeo & Juliet tale of interracial
marriage. Author was wise to use a pen name.
Correa, Miguel. A Decent Woman. Abstracts
From a New Novel. EXC. 12:3 p. 30 (Summer
'83). Cuba. [LA] Mariel exodus. Excerpt from Al
Norte del Infierno, an ingenious tale of escape
from Cuba under the cloak of "undesirable."
Coutinho, Edilberto. Two Brazilian Short Sto-
ries: The Fight Goes On & Tourism, Oh, Tour-
ism... SS. 8:2 p. 42 (Spring '79). Brazil. [LA]
Cr6nicas. Short stories illustrate new genre.


Cromer, Peggo. National Dances of the Car-
ibbean & Latin America. ART. 6:3 p. 26 (July
'74). Latin America & the Caribbean. [PA] Dance.
A photo-essay surveys national dances of
the area.
Crowley, Daniel J. An Aristocratic Briton Views
the Twilight of Empire. Thoughts on a Travel
Classic. BRV. The Traveller's Tree: A Journey
Through the Caribbean Islands. Patrick Leigh-
Fermor. 12:3 p. 36 (Summer '83). Caribbean
Archipelago. [LA] Travelogue. A trip through the
travel classics of Leigh-Fermor, with which a
reviewer paints a portrait of a chronicler.
de la Cuesta, Leonel A. Devil's Geography. BRV.
Al norte del infierno. Miguel Correa. 14:1 p. 49
(Winter '85). Cuba. [LC] Revolution & myth.
Disturbing testimonial mosaic of disembodied
characters attempts to voice the angst of Mari-
elitos (excerpted in 12:3).
de la Cuesta, Leonel A. Gallego. BRV. Gallego.
Miguel Barnet. 13:2 p. 53 (Spring '84). Cuba. [LC]
Barnet, Miguel. A tribute to Spanish-immigrant
contributions to Cuba, done in an Oscar Lewis-
style ethnography.
Cvejanovich, George. Future Aruba. Can It Make
It Alone? ART. 14:3 p. 18 (Summer'85). Aruba.
[GP) Independence. An analysis of the feasibility
of independence.

D
Daner, Francine J. Living the Revolution. BRV.
Four Men: Living the Revolution, An Oral History
of Contemporary Cuba. Oscar Lewis, Ruth M.
Lewis & Susan Rigdon. Four Women: Living the
Revolution, An Oral History of Contemporary
Cuba. Oscar Lewis, Ruth M. Lewis & Susan
Rigdon. Neighbors: Living the Revolution, An Oral
History of Contemporary Cuba. Oscar Lewis, Ruth
M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon. 7:2 p. 44 (April '78).
Cuba. [CC] Testimonial. Review essay of posthu-
mous salvaging of field data by the famous
anthropologist's wife.
Dario, Ruben. I Seek a Form. POE. 1:4 p. 12
(Winter '69). Nicaragua. [LA] Dario, Ruben.
A poem.
Dathorne, 0. R. Poem 1. POE. 6:3 p. 38 (July '74).
Guyana. [LA] Reminiscences. A poem by a
Guyanese writer.
Dathorne, 0. R. Reflections on Grandfather from
Guyana. Excerpts. EXC. 7:3 p. 32 (July '78).
Guyana. [LA] Reminiscences. Excerpts from his
novel, Grandman, a quest for roots.
Dathorne, 0. R. The Future of Tomorrow. EXC.
7:1 p. 28 (January '75). Guyana. [LA] Remi-
niscences. A silken, sad, uncertain excerpt from
Grandman.
Davis, E. Wade. The Ethnobiology of the Haitian
Zombie. On the Pharmacology of Black Magic.
ART. 12:3 p. 18 (Summer '83). Haiti. [RL] Voudou.
Recipes for traditional folk magic.
Davis, Stephen. Jamaican Politics, Economics &
Culture. An Interview With Edward Seaga. INT.
10:4 p. 14 (Fall '81). Jamaica. [PS] Seaga,
Edward. The Jamaican leader speaks out on
Manley's socialism, Jamaica's influence on Car-
ibbean culture & ganja economics.
Demas, William G. How To Be Independent. ART.
6:4 p. 9 (October '74). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [ED] Independence, economic. Describes
how economic independence is manifested &
outlines ways to promote it.
Deosaran, Ramesh. The Role of the Press in the
Caribbean. Private Ownership & Public Re-
sponsibility. ART. 13:4 p. 16 (Fall '84). Carib-
bean, Commonwealth. [CC] Media. The struggles
between privately owned news media & socialist
regimes.
Desquiron, Jean. Try to Write... & You Will See
What Happens. Vignettes from Haiti's
Journalistic Past. ART. 16:2 p. 13 (Winter '88).
Haiti. [HI] Media. Modernization & liberation of the
fourth estate in Haiti.
Dew, Edward. Did Suriname Switch? Dialectics a
la Dante. ART. 12:4 p. 29 (Fall '83). Suriname.
[GP] Shrlling alliances. Changing alliances in
mid-invasion.
Dew, Edward. The Draining of Surinam. ART. 5:4
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /27


I








p. 8 (October '73). Suriname. [MI] Brain drain. An
analysis of Surinamese emigration to the Nether-
lands.
Dew, Edward. Elections Surinam Style. ART. 6:2
p. 20 (April '74). Suriname. [PS] Elections, 1973.
The opportunities & problems of democracy in a
multi-ethnic society.
Dew, Edward. Guyana Glimpses. BRV. Nacion-
alismo, Etnicidad y Politica en la Republica
Cooperativa de Guyana. Andr6s Serbin. Guyana
Hoy. Rita Giacalone de Romero. Estudio Hist6rico
de la Guayana Britanica. Rita Giacalone de
Romero. 14:2 p. 49 (Spring '85). Guyana. [CC]
Three different views give a sampling of literature
on Guyana.
Dew, Edward. Suriname Tar Baby. The Signature
of Terror. ART. 12:1 p. 4 (Winter '83). Suriname.
[PS] Conflict, political. Power without ideological
direction in the military regime of Suriname.
Dew, Edward. That Was the Way It Wasn't. BRV.
The Wild Coast: An Account of Politics in Guyana.
Reynold Burrowes. Guyana: Fraudulent Revolu-
tion. The Latin American Bureau. 16:1 p. 43
(Spring '88). Guyana. [PS] Fraud. Two selections
on modern Guyana, neither offering anything
original.
Dew, Edward. The Year of the Sergeants. What
Happened in Suriname. ART. 9:2 p. 4 (Spring
'80). Suriname. [PS] Coup d'etat, 1979. 1980
remembered as a year of crisis & coup.
Diaz-Briquets, Sergio. How To Figure Out Cuba.
Development, Ideology & Mortality. ART. 15:2
p. 8 (Spring '86). Cuba. [SC] Health, development
and. Given vagaries of data, how to assess a
revolution's progress in health & education.
Diederich, Bernard. Baseball In Their Blood: The
San Pedro Syndrome. ART. 14:4 p. 15 (Fall '85).
Dominican Republic. [SI] Baseball. Aday in the life
of a town in the DR renowned for producing
baseball players.
Diederich, Bernard. Betancur's Battles. The
Man of Peace Takes Up the Sword. ART. 15:1
p. 10 (Winter '86). Colombia. [PS] Betancur,
Belisario. Coping with the aftermath of the M-19
incident.
Diederich, Bernard. Clouds Over Aruba. ART.
14:3 p. 21 (Summer '85). Aruba. [EC] Oil, Lago
Refinery. Closing of the Lago refinery marks an
end of an era & the beginning of economic
hard times.
Diederich, Bernard. Did Human Rights Kill
Anastasio Somoza? An Excerpt From A Re-
cent Biography. EXC. 10:4 p. 4 (Fall '81).
Nicaragua. [PS] Somoza. This piece sees US
human rights dictum as the demise of Somoza's
regime.
Diederich, Bernard. The End of West Indian
Innocence. Arming the Police. ART. 13:2 p. 10
(Spring '84). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [PS]
Police, modernization of. Controversy over the
build-up of armed security forces in the
West Indies.
Diederich, Bernard. Interviewing George Lou-
ison. A PRG Minister Talks about the Killings.
INT. 12:4 p. 17 (Fall '83). Grenada. [PS] Counter-
revolution. Louison's first-hand version of the coup
in Grenada.
Diederich, Bernard. Nature Strikes at Colombia.
ART. 15:1 p. 15 (Winter '86). Colombia. [SI]
Natural disaster, reaction to. Volcanic eruption
decimates Armero.
Diederich, Bernard. On the Nature of Zombie
Existence. The Reality of a Voudou Ritual.
ART. 12:3 p. 14 (Summer '83). Haiti. [RL] Voudou.
An account of the experiences of a self-professed
zombie.
Diederich, Bernard. A Poor King Without a
Crown. A Review of the Haitian Press During
the Manigat Months. ART. 16:2 p. 10 (Winter
'88). Haiti. [Sl] Media. A change in regime
precipitates & facilitates the accelerated matura-
tion of the Haitian press.
Diederich, Bernard. Swine Fever Ironies. The
Slaughter of the Haitian Black Pig. ART. 14:1 p.
16 (Winter '85). Haiti. [TS] Peasants. The social
impact of a program to eradicate swine fever in
Haitian pigs.
28 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Diederich, Bernard. The Troubled Island of
Hispaniola. Riots in Haiti & the Dominican
Republic. ART. 13:3 p. 18 (Summer'84). Hispan-
iola. [PS] Unrest, political. Austerity measures
induced by IMF-demands provoke violent protest.
Dietz, James. Beauty & the Beast. BRV. Problems
of Development in Beautiful Countries: Perspec-
tives on the Caribbean. Ransford W. Palmer. 13:3
p. 52 (Summer '84). Caribbean Basin. [ED]
Alternatives. Reviewer finds orthodox approach to
regional integration does not address structural
constraints on economic development.
Dietz, James L. Stuck on Status. New Ideas
about an Old Problem. RES. Puerto Rico:
Freedom & Equality at Issue. Juan M. Garcia-
Passalacqua. Puerto Rico: A Colonial Experiment.
Raymond Carr. Puerto Rico: The Search for a
National Policy. Richard J. Bloomfield, ed. The
Puerto Rican Question. Jorge Heine & Juan M.
Garcia-Passalacqua. Time for Decision: The
United States & Puerto Rico. Jorge Heine. 14:3 p.
34 (Summer '85). Puerto Rico. [PS] Status,
political. Yet another reexamination of Puerto
Rico's status problem.
Dobbin, Jay D. A Jombee Dance. Friendship &
Ritual in Montserrat. ART. 10:4 p. 28 (Fall '81).
Montserrat. [PA] Dance. Ethnographic description
of folk religion rituals with social overtones.
Dodd, David J. A Day in Babylon. Street Life in
Guyana. ART. 10:4 p. 24 (Fall '81). Guyana. [CC]
Street life. Excerpt from an author's ethnographic
study of lower class black social structure &
subculture.
Dominguez, Jorge I. Cuba's Inhumanity To-
wards Cubans. BRV. Against All Hope: The
Prison Memoirs of Armando Valladares Armando
Valladares. 16:1 p. 24 (Spring '88). Cuba. [PS]
Political prisoners. Sympathetic review of an
account of brutality in Cuba.
Dominguez, Jorge I. Grenadian Party Paper.
Revealing an Imaginary Document. FIC. 15:2 p.
16 (Spring '86). Grenada. [GP] Invasion, 1983. A
piece of "social science fiction" constructed out of
actual documents confiscated during the Grenada
invasion.
Dominguez, Jorge I. Sugar High. BRV. Caribbean
Sugar Industries: Constraints & Opportunities. G.
B. Hagelberg. 7:2 p. 52 (April '78). Caribbean
Archipelago. [EC] Sugar. An analysis of the
sugar industry.
Drekonja-Kornat, Gerhard. On the Edge of Civili-
zation. Paris in the Jungle. ART. 13:2 p. 26
(Spring '84). French Guiana. [SI] Europe's space
center. A guided tour through France's spaceport
city in French Guiana.
Drimmer, Melvin. Slaves as People. ART. 3:2 p. 5
(Summer '71). Hemisphere. [HI] Slavery. The
vision of the slave as sambo is attacked as
incorrect. Appeal to see the creative role of slaves
in their own destiny.
Dwyer, Augusta. Future Fiction. BRV. D'.airi Up
The Mountains. Neil Bissoondath. 14:4 p I:.' F Fall
'85). Trinidad. [LC] Bissoondath, Neil. V. S.
Naipaul's nephew produces a collection of short
stories about West Indian emigrants.
Dwyer, Richard A. Caribbean Eve. Yielding to the
Pacing Shapes of Jaguars. BRV. Beka Lamb.
Zee Edgell. Heremakhonon, a Novel. Maryse
Conde. The Bridge of Beyond. Simone Schwarz-
Bart. 13:3 p. 34 (Summer '84). Caribbean Basin.
[LC] Gender roles, women. Discusses emerging
roles of Caribbean women in literature.
Dwyer, Richard A. Caribbean Textuality. ART.
11:4 p. 12 (Fall '82). Caribbean, Commonwealth.
[LC] Literature survey. An introduction to the
diversity of Caribbean literature.
Dwyer, Richard A. Jamaica Well-Told. Tales
From the Land of Look Behind. BRV. Jamaican
Folk Tales & Oral Histories. Laura Tanna. 16:1 p.
22 (Spring '88). Jamaica. [TS] Folklore. Enthusias-
tic review & extracts from a collection of
over 50 tales. Audio & video tapes accompany
the book.
Dwyer, Richard. One Walcott. And He Would Be
Master. ART. 11:4 p. 14 (Fall '82). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [LC] Walcott, Derek. Literary
essay on the masterful works of Derek Walcott.


E
Eberstadt, Nicholas. Did Fidel Fudge the Fig-
ures? Literacy & Health: The Cuban Model.
ART. 15:2 p. 4 (Spring '86). Cuba. [SC] Health &
literacy. Inconsistent statistics do not support
Cuba's claim to gains in health & education.
Edelberg, Guillermo S. Bergman On The Beach.
BRV. Estatuas sepultadas y otros relates. Benitez
Rojo. 15:3 p. 43 (Winter '87). Cuba. [LC] Short
stories. Collection of complex short stories provide
artist's view of Cuban society at different points
in time.
Edinburgh Review. Puerto Rico in 1834. BRV. An
Account of the Present State of the Island of
Puerto Rico. Colonel Flinter. 2:4 p. 8 (Winter '70).
Puerto Rico. [HI] Social structure. Reprint of a
dignitary's report on the colonies.
Edmunds, John C. & William Renforth. The
Costa Rican Solution. An Innovative Approach
to Export Promotion. ART. 14:2 p. 27 (Spring
'85). Costa Rica. [EC] Export trade. New laws give
tax break to exporters in an attempt to revitalize
economy.
Emerson, Jr., Edwin. Alone in Porto Rico. A War
Correspondent's Report. REP. 5:3 p. 18 (July
'73). Puerto Rico. [HI] Spanish-American War.
Reprint of an 1898 article about the adventures of
an American war correspondent in Spanish-
occupied PR.
Emmanuel, Patrick. Elections & Parties in the
Eastern Caribbean. A Historical Survey. ART.
10:2 p. 14 (Spring '81). Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. [PS] Political parties. A survey of the
English-speaking Caribbean, the stronghold of
democratic process, which engenders competition
between parties & the evolution of political
party platforms.
Enders, Amb. Thomas 0. A Comprehensive
Strategy for the Caribbean Basin. The US & her
Neighbors. ART. 11:2 p. 10 (Spring '82). Carib-
bean Basin. [GP] US policy. A blueprint for peace,
security & prosperity in the Caribbean Basin.
Erisman, H. Michael. Caribbean Whirlpool. BRV.
The International Crisis in the Caribbean. Anthony
Payne. 15:3 p. 42 (Winter '87). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [GP] Conflict, ideological. Tranquil on the
surface, economic tensions breed political
instability.
Erisman, H. Michael. Cuba & the Third World.
The Sixth Nonaligned Nations Conference.
ART. 9:1 p. 21 (Winter '80). Cuba. [GP] Non-
aligned Nations Movement. In the neutral zone,
imperialism by any other name is still intervention.
Erisman, H. Michael. Cuba's Struggle for Third
World Leadership. ART. 8:3 p. 8 (Summer '79).
Cuba. [GP] Nonaligned Nations Movement. Cuba
competes for influence in a growing Neutral Zone.
Erisman, H. Michael. Unconventional Geo-
politics. BRV. Geopolitics of the Caribbean:
Ministates in a Wider World. Thomas D. Ander-
son. 14:3 p. 51 (Summer '85). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [GP] Geography & politics. Anal-
ysis of problems inherent in marine boundaries,
regional economics, tourism & traditional West
Indian agriculture.
Escalante Arce, Luis. In Defense of Restoring
Constitutional Order. ART. 10:1 p. 35 (Winter
'81). El Salvador. [PS] Conflict, political. Conser-
vative call for the replacement of the Salvadoran
junta to restore equilibrium.
Espin, Oliva M. Lucia. CRV. 6:4 p. 36 (October
'74). Cuba. [PA] Gender roles, women (Lucia). A
review of a Cuban movie about 3 women, each
representing a different stage in Cuba's history.
Eyre, L. Alan. Quasi-Urban Melange Settle-
ments. ART. 8:2 p. 32 (Spring '79). Jamaica. [SC]
Urban settlement. The Drojlter.ail,:.rn of squatter
settlements in St. James & St. Catherines,
Jamaica.
F
Faerron, Judith C. Chronology of Events. ART.
12:4 p. 10 (Fall '83). Grenada. [GP] Timeline.
Grenadian sequence of occurrences: from Co-
lumbus to post-invasion.
Faerron, Judith C. Dramatis Personae. ART. 12:4








p. 12 (Fall '83). Grenada. [GP] Grenadian crisis,
major actors. A cast of major characters with a role
in the incidents precipitating the invasion
of Grenada.
Fagen, Richard R. The Real Clear & Present
Danger. A Critique from the Left. ART. 11:2 p.
18 (Spring '82). Latin America. [GP] US policy.
Resisting knee-jerk reactionary responses to
communist infiltration (real or imagined) in the
region.
Falk, Pamela S. Whatever Happened to CancLun?
The 600 Billion Dollar Question. ART. 11:3 p. 14
(Summer '82). Latin America. [ED] Debt. Interna-
tional conference among benefactors & recipients
discuss the international debt, the future of
development & the role of the private sector.
Fazlollah, Mark. Behind the Lines. Life in the
Guerrilla Camps in El Salvador. ART. 12:2 p. 6
(Spring '83). El Salvador. [PS] Guerrilla lifestyle. A
close-up view of how the other half lives in a
war zone.
Feinberg, Richard E., Richard Newfarmer and
Bernadette Orr. The Battle Over The CBI. The
Debate in Washington. ART. 12:2 p. 15 (Spring
'83). Caribbean Basin. [ED] CBI. Congress belea-
guers the good intentions of the CBI with intensive
debate over its rationale, impact & feasibility.
Feuer, Carl Henry. Jargon Liberation. BRV. The
Other Side of Paradise. Tom Barry, Beth Wood &
Deb Preusch. 15:4 p. 43 (Spring '87). Caribbean
Archipelago. [EC] Foreign investment. Self-
professed handbook on foreign control of eco-
nomic interests & underdevelopment in the
Caribbean.
Feuer, Carl H. The Political Use of Rasta. BRV.
Race, Class & Political Symbols. Anita M. Waters.
14:4 p. 48 (Fall '85). Jamaica. [RL] Rastafarians.
Analysis of the use of Rasta music & symbols in 5
election campaigns.
Feuer, Carl Henry. Was Bishop A Social Demo-
crat? The Speeches of Maurice Bishop. BRV.
Forward Ever: Three Years of the Grenadian
Revolution. Maurice Bishop. 12:4 p. 37 (Fall '83).
Grenada. [PS] Bishop, Maurice. Posthumous
typecasting of Bishop through a review of his
speeches.
Figueroa, John J. Another Life. BRV. Another
Life. Derek Walcott. 7:1 p. 30 (January '75). St.
Lucia. [LC] Walcott, Derek. A review of Walcott's
epic poem.
Fink, Marcy. A Dominican Harvest of Shame.
ART. 8:1 p. 34 (January '79). Dominican Republic.
[MI] Labor migration. The love-hate, bittersweet
relationship between Haitians & Dominicans crys-
tallized by the sugar industry.
Flanagan, Brenda. Shango. SS. 8:4 p. 26 (Fall
'79). Trinidad. [LA] Superstitions. A Frankie &
Johnnie short story from Trinidad.
Flax, Herman J. Saving Slaves. BRV. Doctors &
Slaves. Richard B. Sheridan. 14:4 p. 48 (Fall '85).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [HI] Slavery, health.
Medical & demographic history of slavery in the
British West Indies (diet, housing, sanitation, work
loads, hazards & punishments).
Fletcher, L.P. Benign Neglect. BRV. Frangipani
House. Beryl Gilroy. 16:1 p. 40 (Spring '88).
Guyana. [LC] Old age. Review of a novel about
the institutionalization of the elderly, cuts across
national & ethnic boundaries.
Francis, Anselm. Small States. BRV. Foreign
Policy Behavior of Caribbean States: Guyana,
Haiti & Jamaica. Georges A. Fauriol. 15:3 p. 42
(Winter '87). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [GP]
Foreign policy. Quantitatively based forecasts of
foreign policy behavior for 3 countries.
Francis, Anselm. Trade Tactics. BRV. Anglo-
Argentine Connection, 1900-1939. Roger Gravil.
14:4 p. 48 (Fall '85). Argentina. [EC] Trade
relations. Did British exploitation during Argentine
economic crises affect development? Author
claims no, reviewer not convinced.
Freeman, Gary P. Caribbean Migration to Britain
& France. From Assimilation to Selection. ART.
11:1 p. 30 (Fall '82). Caribbean Basin. [MI]
Caribbean exodus. The reverse colonization of
European mother countries by Caribbean stepchil-
dren & resultant problems of assimilation.


Friedman, Robert. Che. Hmm. CRV. 1:4 p. 11
(Winter '69). Cuba. [PA] Guevara, Ernesto (Che).
Caustic review of a movie about the legendary
revolutionary figure.

G
Galeano, Eduardo. Guatemala: Occupied Coun-
try. Guatemala's Rebels. EXC. 1:3 p. 8 (Fall '69).
Guatemala. [PS] Conflict, political. The exploita-
tion of the Indian populations in Guatemala & their
recruitment by rebel forces.
Gannon, Francis X. Will the OAS Live To Be 100?
Does It Deserve to? ART. 13:4 p. 12 (Fall '84).
Hemisphere. [PS] OAS. Critical assessment of
OAS & recommendations for change.
Garcia, Jose R. Tomorrow's Child. BRV. Tomor-
row's Child: Imagination, Creativity & the Rebirth
Of Culture. Rubem Alves. 7:1 p. 36 (January '75).
Brazil. [RL] Theology. Theology & development in
the writing of Brazilian Rubem Alves.
Garcia-Passalacqua, Juan M. Puerto Rico:
Equality or Freedom? The Rebirth of the
Status Issue. ART. 13:1 p. 8 (Winter '84). Puerto
Rico. [PS] Status, political. The debate over
statehood, independence, or status quo & who
should decide.
Garcia-Zamor, Jean-Claude. Papadocracy. BRV.
Papa Doc: The Truth About Haiti Today. Bernard
Diederich & Al Burt. Haiti: Radiograffa de una
dictadura. Gbrard Pierre-Charles. 2:1 p. 8 (Spring
'70). Haiti. [PS] Duvalier regime. Compares 2
works which try to understand Haiti under
Duvalier.
Garrard, Virginia C. Popular Progressives. BRV.
Garrison Guatemala. George Black, with Milton
Jamail & Norman Stultz Chinchilla. 15:4 p. 43
(Spring '87). Guatemala. [PS] State, military
control of. Describes entrenchment of military & its
suppression of opposition.
Garzaro, Rafael. Guatemala: Occupied Country.
BRV. Guatemala, Occupied Country. Eduardo
Galeano. 1:3 p. 7 (Fall '69). Guatemala. [PS]
Conflict, political. A country under siege by its own
military forces.
Garzaro, Raphael. Camilo: Rebel Priest. BRV.
Camilo, Presencia y Destino. GermAn C. Guzmbn.
1:1 p. 11 (Spring '69). Colombia. [RL] Torres,
Camilo. A biography of Colombia's gurrnII 3 pnr- i.
Gastmann, Albert. Holland's Narrowing Horizon.
BRV. De Krimpende Horizon van de Hollandse
Kooplieden, Een Studie Over Hoallands Welvaren
in Het Caribisch Zeegebied (1780-1830). Theo P.
M. De Jong. 1:1 p. 13 (Spring '69). Netherlands
Antilles. [HI] Mercantilism. Chronicles the decline
of Dutch commerce in the Caribbean.
Gayle, Dennis J. Caribbean Concepts. BRV.
Venezuela y las Relaciones Internacionales en la
Cuenca del Caribe. Andr6s Serbin. 16:1 p. 40
(Spring '88). Caribbean Basin. [GP] International
relations. Relationships between Anglo & His-
panic Caribbean, reflected in the regional policy of
contenders for leadership (Venezuela, Mexico).
Gilbert, Arthur N. Tales of the High Seas. Gay
Pirates in the 17th Century Caribbean. BRV.
Sodomy & the Perception of Evil: English Sea
Rovers in the Seventeenth Century Caribbean. B.
R. Burg. 12:3 p. 34 (Summer '83). Caribbean
Basin. [HI] Pirates. Titillating review of a provoc-
ative piece, insufficiently documented.
Gilbert, Dennis. A Plague of Distrust. BRV. The
Long War: Dictatorship & Revolution in El Salva-
dor. James Dunkerley. 13:3 p. 55 (Summer '84).
El Salvador. [GP] Conflict, political. Tedious
chronology of political events of over 50 years with
a no-end, no-win projection.
Gindine, Yvette. The Magic of Black History:
Images of Haiti. ART. 6:4 p. 25 (October '74).
Haiti. [LC] Literature survey. Contemporary in-
terpretations of Haitian history (Carpentier,
Cesaire, Glissant) attest to the magnetism of the
first Black nation to achieve Independence.
Girault, Christian A. The Haitian Diaspora. A
Prescription for Decency. ART. 16:2 p. 14
(Winter '88). Haiti. [MI] Diaspora, Haitian. Chroni-
cles Haiti's waves of emigration.
Girault, Christian A. Second-Hand Haiti. BRV.


The Haitian Economy: Man, Land & Markets. Mats
Lundahl. 14:2 p. 51 (Spring '85). Haiti. [EC]
Demographic factors. Critique of Lundahl's collec-
tion of articles in which he analyzes works of
others (one of whom is Girault).
Glazier, Stephen D. Might It Be A Fad? BRV.
Crisis & Change: The Church in Latin America
Today. Edward L. Cleary. 15:4 p. 42 (Spring '87).
Latin America. [RL] Liberation theology. Liberation
theology as uniquely Latin American & its antece-
dents from Pope Leo XII through the '60s.
Goddard, David. Levi-Strauss in Latin America.
BRV. Tristes Tropiques. Claude Levi-Strauss. 1:2
p. 10 (Summer '69). Latin America. [TS] Primitive
culture. A philosophically sensitive review of an
extraordinary metaphysical ethnography.
Gonzales, Anthony P. The Future of CARICOM.
Collective Self-Reliance in Decline? ART. 13:4
p. 8 (Fall '84). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [ED]
CARICOM. The case for expanding CARICOM
into a political & cultural as well as economic
community.
Gonzalez, Edward. Virology of Revolution. As-
sessing Castro's International Activities. RES.
The New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean. Barry
B. Levine. The Cuban Threat. Carla Anne Rob-
bins. 13:2 p. 32 '.prirg '84). Cuba. [GP] Interna-
tional relations. Review of 2 books which appraise
Cuba's international relations in the Caribbean &
elsewhere.
Goodman, Louis Wolf. Chile's Past Malaise?
RES. The Political System of Chile. Federico G.
Gil. Politics & Social Forces in Chilean Develop-
ment. James Petras. 3:2 p. 14 (Summer '71).
Chile. [PS] Development, impediments to. An-
alyzes 2 books, asks whether Allende would be
capable of avoiding Chile's country's traditional
malaise.
Goodman, Louis Wolf. Inequality in Latin Amer-
ica. The Division of Income in Latin America.
ART. 4:1 p. 15 (April '72). Latin America. [SC]
Income distribution. Discussion of inequality be-
tween upper, middle & lower classes, & within the
working class itself.
Gorman, Stephen. Sandinista Chess. How the
Left Took Control. ART. 10:1 p. 14 (Winter '81).
Nicaragua. [PS] Sandinistas. Explanation of the
success of the Sandinista bid for power.
Goslinga, Cornelis Ch. Benign Neglect. BRV.
Avonturen aan de Wilde Kust. Albert Helman. 14:1
p. 50 (Winter '85). Suriname. [HI] Social change. A
compact, readable history of Suriname from
colonization to independence.
Goslinga, Cornelis C. Dutch Details. BRV. Dutch
Authors on West Indian History. M.A.P. Meilink
Roelofsz, ed. 14:2 p. 49 (Spring '85). Caribbean
Archipelago. [HI] Dutch historical writings. Anthol-
ogy of Dutch histories written in English.
Goslinga, Marian. U.S. Press Coverage of Gre-
nada. Articles in the New York Times, October
1983. ART. 12:4 p. 66 (Fall '83). Grenada. [GP]
Invasion, 1983; press coverage, US. A chronologi-
cal bibliography of invasion coverage in the
NY Times.
Goure, Leon. Fear of the Bear. BRV. The Giant's
Rival: The USSR & Latin America. Cole Blasier.
3:4 p. 51 (Fall '84). Latin America. [GP] Soviet
policy. Summary of Soviet foreign policy & the
constraints limiting further participation (see also
5:1, 5:2).
Goure, Leon. Goure's Response: Aybar Ex-
pected Too Much. LED. 5:2 p. 2 (April '73). Latin
America. [GP] Soviet policy. Reply to a response
to a review (5:1, 3:4).
Goure, Leon. Russia & Latin America. BRV.
Soviet Image of Contemporary Latin America, A
Documentary History. 1960-1968. Robert G.
Carlton. The Soviet Union & Latin America. J.
Gregory Oswald & Anthony Strover, eds. 4:4 p. 39
(October '72). Latin America. [GP] Soviet policy. A
'72 review judges these books good for back-
ground but dated.
Graham, Bob. Florida & the Caribbean. ED. 14:2
p. 3 (Spring '85). Caribbean Basin. [GP] US policy.
As a member of the Caribbean economic commu-
nity & major recipient of immigrants, Florida takes
a leadership role in direct aid to the Caribbean.
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /29


I








Grayson, George W. The Joint Oil Facility.
Mexican-Venezuelan Cooperation. ART. 12:2 p.
19 .:pring '83). Caribbean Basin. [EC] Oil. A new
regional cartel developed as a result of rising
oil prices.
Grayson, George W. An Overdose of Corruption.
The Domestic Politics of Mexican Oil. ART.
13:3 p. 22 (Summer '84). Mexico. [EC] Oil. Various
forms of corruption, greed, & violence besiege the
oil industry.
Grayson, George W. Sadists & Sycophants.
BRV. The Road to OPEC: United States Relations
with Venezuela. Stephen G. Rabe. 14:1 p. 49
(Winter '85). Venezuela. [EC] Oil. Analysis of how
oil has shaped relations between the 2 countries.
Grayson, George W. Tecnicos vs. Politicos. The
Aftermath of the Mexican Earthquakes. ART.
15:4 p. 20 i prng '87). Mexico. [PS] Natural
disaster, response to. Sluggish response to
natural disaster further weakens support for
the regime.
Green, James W. Rape of the Virgins. BRV. Rape
of the American Virgins. Edward A. O'Neill. 5:2 p.
37 (April '73). USVI. [CC] Transculturation. Re-
views journalistic account of problems that plague
the USVI.
Greenberg, Alan. Reggae International. Spiritual
Balm for a Trembling World. BRV. Reggae
International. Stephen Davis & Peter Simon. 12:2
p. 32 (Spring '83). Jamaica. [PA] Reggae. Review
of a chronicle of Jamaica & the culture of reggae in
films, literature & music.
Greene, J. E. The Party's Over. Bring in the
Jugglers. ART. 15:4 p. 13 (Spring '87). Trinidad.
[PS] PNM. The 1986 Trinidad elections usher in a
new party & era.
Greiff, Peter R. Caribbean Swan Song. Joaquin
Balaguer. ART. 15:3 p. 17 (Winter '87). Domini-
can Republic. [PS] Balaguer, Joaquin. The DR
prefers the personal style of political veteran
Balaguer.
Grose, Howard B. The Protestant Cartel in
Puerto Rico. REP. 5:1 p. 11 (January'73). Puerto
Rico. [RL] Protestant cartel. Excerpt from a 1910
publication about Protestant missions in Puerto
Rico. Tactics used were a curious combination of
corporate economics & governmental welfare.
Grosse, Robert. A Guide to the Andean Pact.
ART. 10:3 p. 16 (Summer'81). South America.
[ED] ANCOM. An explanation of ANCOM & its role
in development.
Gudmundson, Lowell. Puerto Rican Coun-
terpoint. Fernando Pico & the Culture of
Coffee. RES. Amargo cafe. Fernando Pic6.
Libertad y servidumbre en el Puerto Rico del siglo
XIX. Fernando Pico. "Deshumanizaci6n del tra-
bajo... Los comienzos del cafe en el Utuado del
siglo XIX. "Fernando Pic6. 13:1 p. 34 (Winter'84).
Puerto Rico. [TS] Culture, coffee. Review essay
based on Pico's works, contrasting the plantation
systems of sugar & coffee.
Gudmundson, Lowell. Resilient Self-Delusion.
BRV. Pan American Visions: Woodrow Wilson in
the Western Hemisphere, 1913-1921. Mark T.
Gilderhus. 16:1 p. 40 (Spring '88). Hemisphere.
[HI] US policy. Examines Wilson's Pan American
policy arising out of US delusion with its custodial
role.
Gudmundson, Lowell. Solid Survey. BRV. Mex-
ico: A History. Robert Ryal Miller. 15:1 p. 43
(Winter '86). Mexico. [HI] Survey. Excellent text for
undergraduates. Enticingly written, politically
traditional.
Guess, George M. On Capitalist Weather. BRV.
Hacia una historic del ambiente en America
Latina. Luis Vitale. 13:3 p. 54 (Summer '84). Latin
America. [ED] Resource exploitation. Depend-
ency explanation/environmental protectionist com-
plaint against capitalist development does not
account for same ailments in non-capitalist
nations.
Gugliotta, Guy. The Central American Exodus.
Grist for the Migrant Mill. ART. 11:1 p. 26 (Fall
'82). Central America. [MI] Civil war, -igrhi itr.:
Economic migrants, political exiles & war-
beleaguered refugees flow Northward as condi-
tions in Central America worsen.
30 / CIRiTEBt' REWVEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Guillen, Nicolas. El Caribe, Mujer nueva,
Cancion puertorriqueha. POE. 5:3 p. 28 (July
'73). Cuba. [LA] Guill6n, Nicolas. Three poems by
the Cuban poet.
Guinness, Gerald. The Black Power Killings in
Trinidad. Naipaul's New Book of Essays. BRV.
The Return of Eva Perdn. V. S. Naipaul. 10:2 p. 36
(Spring '81). Trinidad. [LC] Naipaul, V.S. Back-to-
earth review of Naipaul's journalistic essays of
racial unrest, in which a reviewer declares the
author, although good, is no Conrad.
Guinness, Gerald. A Manual for Manuel. BRV. A
Manual for Manuel. Julio Cortazar. 8:3 p. 40
(Summer '79). Argentina. [LC] Cortazar, Julio.
Father-to-son instruction manual for life.
Guinness, Gerald. What Did He Say? What Did
He Mean? An Ethnography of Discourse in
Puerto Rico. BRV. Saying & Meaning in Puerto
Rico: Some Problems in the Ethnography of
Discourse. Marshall Morris. 10:4 p. 32 (Fall '81).
Puerto Rico. [CC] Sociolinguistics. A sociolinguis-
tic treatise based on the flaws unearthed in a book
whose merits lie in promoting new thoughts and
ideas if not scientific rigor.
H
Hall, Lawrence H. In-Depth Military. BRV. The
Latin American Military Institution. Robert Wes-
son. 15:4 p. 43 (Spring '87). Latin America. [SI]
Armed forces. Examination of armed forces in 9
Latin nations.
Hamner, Robert D. Ambiguity Without Crisis.
PRV. The Arkansas Testament. Derek Walcott.
16:2 p. 51 (Winter '88). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [LC] Walcott, Derek. The themes, leit
motifs & style of the West Indian poet as
compared to his earlier works.
Hamner, Robert D. A New Naipaul? BRV. The
Enigma of Arrival. V.S. Naipaul. 16:1 p. 38 (Spring
'88). Trinidad. [LC] Naipaul, V.S. Quasi-
autobiographical novel contains expected social
commentary & criticism but without usual conde-
scension.
Hanchard, Michael. Jamaica's Jews. BRV. Minor-
ities & Power in a Black Society: The Jewish
Community of Jamaica. Carol S. Holzberg. 16:1 p.
13 Spring '88). Jamaica. [SC] Jews. Dissects a
complex explanation of the impact of Jews in
Jamaica.
Handelman, Howard. Manley's Jamaica. BRV.
Democratic Socialism in Jamaica. Evelyne Huber
Stephens & John D. Stephens. 16:2 p. 41 (Winter
'88). Jamaica. [PS] PNP. Review of Manley's
contribution to democratic socialism in Jamaica.
Hanvik, Jan Michael. The Biography of an Artist.
Mexico's Frida Kahlo. BRV. Friday: A Biography
ofFrida Kahlo. Hayden Herrera. 15:3 p. 22 (Winter
'87). Mexico. [VA] Kahlo, Frida. Review of Her-
rera's biography of the unusual & iconoclastic
painter.
Harber, Richard P. Little Backyards. BRV. Manu-
facturing in the Backyard: Case Studies on,
Accumulation & Employment in Small-Scale Bra-
zilian Industry. Hubert Schmitz. 14:2 p. 49 (Spring
'85). Brazil. [EC] Industry, small scale. Based on
case studies, the author finds small industries are
run by drop-outs from larger concerns.
Harrison, John P. The Tidy Tico Way. BRV.
Democracy in Costa Rica. Charles D. Ameringer.
13:2 p. 53 (Spring '84). Costa Rica. [PS] Political
economy. Praises Costa Rica's democracy but
fears economy threatened by the style of admin-
istrative bureaucracy.
Harrison, Lawrence E. Underdevelopment Is A
State Of Mind. The Latin American Case. ART.
15:4 p. 16 (Spring '87). Latin America. [ED]
Culture, role of. Author asserts cultural factors
influence the tenacity of underdevelopment in
Latin countries.
Hartlyn, Jonathan. A Democratic Shoot-Out in
the D.R. An Analysis of the 1986 Elections.
ART. 15:3 p. 14 (Winter'87). Dominican Republic.
[PS] Elections, 1986. Conditions & events leading
up to the return to power of Balaguer.
Hawes, John. The Islander. EXC. 2:1 p. 2 Spring
'70). Puerto Rico. [LA] Reminiscences. Anecdote
about an old barrio Don.


Hawes, John. Remembrances of Things Puerto
Rican. Vignettes from The Islander. EXC. 9:3 p.
22 (Summer '80). Puerto Rico. [LA] Everyday life.
Nostalgic reprints from The Islander, vivid portrai-
tures of traditional life in Puerto Rico.
Hawes, John. Toussaint Breda. EXC. 3:2 p. 6
(Summer '71). Haiti. [LA] Touissaint L'Ouverture.
A chapter from a biography of Toussaint, the
Haitian revolutionary, set on the Breda plantation.
Headley, Bernard D. A Contest that Became A
Referendum. ART. 15:3 p. 13 (Winter '87).
Jamaica. [PS] Elections, 1986. The PNP regains
lost ground in Jamaica's 1986 local elections.
Headley, Bernard D. Cultural Confusion. BRV. A
Review of Urban Life in Kingston, Jamaica. Diane
J. Austin. 15:1 p. 42 (Winter '86). Jamaica. [Sl]
Urban life. Theoretically interesting work that
avoids culture-of-poverty approach.
Heine, Jorge. Transition to Nowhere. How Haiti's
Democratic Transition Might Have Worked.
ART. 16:2 p. 4 (Winter '88). Haiti. [PS] Conflict,
political. An analysis of where Haiti's transfer of
power went wrong.
Heisler, Michele. Marxian Worship. BRV. Guer-
rillas of Peace: Liberation Theology & the Central
American Revolution. Blase Bonpane. 16:2 p. 48
(Winter '88). Central America. [RL] Liberation
theology. Reviewer blasts an infuriating work as
simplistic.
Henry, Frances. A Note on Caribbean Migration
to Canada. ART. 11:1 p. 38 (Fall '82). Caribbean
Basin. [MI] Caribbean exodus. Not all Caribbean
migrants to North America end up in the US.
Henry, Frances. Strangers in Paradise. The
Jewish Enclave at Sosua. ART. 14:4 p. 16 (Fall
'85). Dominican Republic. [SC] Jews. The con-
tributions made by the resettlement project & the
reasons it is dying out.
Hernandez, Cruz. Oh, You Sexy Kid You. BRV. La
Habana para un infante difunto. Guillermo
Cabrera Infante. 9:4 p. 40 (Fall '80). Cuba. [LC]
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Ambivalent coverage
of the work by the renowned Cuban writer, in the
genre of a trashy best-seller.
Hernandez, David D. Puerto Rico's Blackboard
Jungle. INT. 4:1 p. 3 (April '72). Puerto Rico. [SI]
Public schools. Interview reveals that our ideas
about school don't correspond to what the stu-
dents themselves think about it.
Hernandez Col6n, Rafael. Puerto Rico, 936 & the
Caribbean. ED. 14:4 p. 3 (Fall '85). Puerto Rico.
[ED] 936. An appeal to preserve the Section 936
tax incentive as a development fund for all of the
Caribbean.
Hersh, Kathy Barber. Sanctuary for Central
Americans. A Threat to INS Policy? ART. 12:1
p. 16 (Winter '83). El Salvador. [MI] Refugees.
Churches in the US create an underground
railroad to rescue Central American refugees in
defiance of US immigration policy.
Heyman, Timothy. Chronicle of A Financial
Crisis. Mexico, 1976-1982. ART. 12:1 p. 8
(Winter '83). Mexico. [ED] Debt. Increasing de-
pendence on oil-based economy made Mexico
vulnerable to economic ills.
Hiller, Herbert L. Sun Lust Tourism in the
Caribbean. ART. 7:4 p. 12 (October '78). Carib-
bean Archipelago. [EC] Tourism. On the possibility
of visiting a real Caribbean.
Hillman, Richard S. Jamaica's Political Leaders.
Edward Seaga & Michael Manley. INT. 8:3 p. 28
(Summer '79). Jamaica. [PS] Seaga, Edward &
Michael Manley. Manley & Seaga present views of
Jamaica's needs.
Hippolyte-Manigat, Mirlande. What Happened in
Ocho Rios. Last Chance for CARICOM? ART.
12:2 p. 10 (Spring '83). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [ED] CARICOM. A summary of the Nov.
'82 meeting of CARICOM heads of state.
Hirsch, Dena. The Cockfight. SS. 4:4 p. 15
(October '72). Caribbean Archipelago. [LA]
Cockfighting. Short story about a visit to
a cockfight.
Hoch-Smith, Judith & Ernesto Pichardo. Having
Thrown a Stone Today, Eshu Kills a Bird of
Yesterday. ART. 7:4 p. 16 (October '78). Cuba.
[RL] Santeria. The native wisdom of Santeria,








proverbs from the Yoruba religion.
Hoetink, Harmannus. 19th Century Santo Dom-
ingo. ART. 2:4 p. 6 (Winter '70). Dominican
Republic. [HI] Social classes. The sociology of the
aristocracy (Part I).
Hoetink, Harmannus. Dominican Patrimony.
ART. 3:1 p. 6 ,Sprirg '71). Dominican Republic.
[HI] Culture & society. Continues discussion of
19th century Santo Domingo with an analysis of its
power structure.
Hoetink, Harmannus. West Indian Dialogue.
BRV. The Growth of the Modern West Indies.
Gordon K. Lewis. 1:4 p. 6 (Winter '69). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [HI] Societies, post-colonial.
Glowing review of Lewis' analysis of the period
from 1920s to 1960s.
de Hoetink, Ligia Espinal. Remembrances of
Things Dominican. EXC. 5:1 p. 18 (January '73).
Dominican Republic. [TS] Reminiscences. Bio-
graphical sketches of the DR at the turn of the
century. A Durellian perspective emerges as the
reader is shown how the consequences of acts,
especially political ones, affect different families in
different ways.
Hoffman, Ldon-Frangois. The Originality of the
Haitian Novel. ART. 8:1 p. 44 (January '79). Haiti.
[LC] Haitian novels. Literary essay examines
audience themes & political expression of Haitian
novelists.
Hoffman, Leon-Frangois. Slavery & Race in
Haitian Letters. Literature & the Peculiar
Institution. RES. 9:2 p. 28 (Spring '80). Haiti. [LC]
Literature survey. Themes of slavery & race,
permeating social classes & politics, as found in
Haitian writing.
Hoffmann, Leon-Frangois. The Incomplete
Haitiana. A New Research Bibliography on
Haiti. BRV. Complete Haitiana: A Bibliographic
Guide to the Scholarly Literature 1900-1980.
Michel S. Laguerre. 12:2 p. 30 ,Sprig '83). Haiti.
[LC] Reference. A thumbs-down review of a
disappointing reference work on things Haitian.
Hoffmann, Leon-Frangois. Bye Bye Baby. BRV.
Haiti in Caribbean Context: Ethnicity, Economy &
Revolt. David Nicholls. 15:3 p. 42 (Winter '87).
Haiti. [PS] Duvalier regime. Explanation of why the
shift in power from Papa Doc to Baby Doc went so
smoothly & an indictment against aid programs to
oppressive regimes.
Hoffmann, Leon-Frangois. More Than Language.
BRV. An Introduction to the French Caribbean
Novel. Beverley Ormerod. 15:4 p. 41 (Spring '87).
Caribbean, French-speaking. [LC] Novels, French
Caribbean. Compares differing viewpoint of writ-
ers in French-speaking Caribbean.
Hogg, Donald W. Elegy fora Christian Pagan.
ART. 2:2 p. 1 (Summer '70). Jamaica. [RL]
Walker, Francis. Tribute to deceased Jamaican
religious figure Francis Walker.
Hollander, Paul. Big Stuff. BRV. Small Countries,
Large Issues-Studies in US-Latin American
Asymmetries. Mark Falcoff. 15:3 p. 40 (Winter
'87). Latin America. [GP] International relations.
Non-dependency view of 5 Latin American coun-
tries & relations with US, balanced by indigenous
forces.
Horowitz, Irving Louis. Cuban Morality: Ethics &
Economics in Cuba. BRV. The Theory of Moral
Incentives in Cuba. Robert M. Bernardo. 4:4 p. 33
(October '72). Cuba. [ED] Moral incentives. Re-
viewer evaluates the problems of implementation
of Marxist economy in Cuba.
Horowitz, Irving Louis. Passion & Compassion.
The Conflict in Central America. ART. 14:1 p. 23
(Winter '85). Central America. [PS] Conflict,
political. Regional metaphysics & East-West
geopolitics in CA.
Horowitz, Irving Louis. Romancing the Dictator.
BRV. The Closest of Enemies: A Personal &
Diplomatic Account of US-Cuban Relations Since
1957. Wayne S. Smith. 16:1 p. 25 (Spring '88).
Cuba. [GP] US-Cuban relations. Skeptical review
of the author & his work.
Hoskin, Gary. Colombia Under Stress. A Pres-
idency Lamed by Instability. ART. 15:1 p. 6
(Winter '86). Colombia. [PS] Betancur, Belisario.
Government response to guerrilla warfare &


natural disaster provokes criticism.
Hospital, Carolina. Betwixt & Between. PRV.
Triple Crown. Roberto Duran, Judith Ortiz Cofer &
Gustavo Pbrez. 16:2 p. 49 (Winter '88). Carib-
bean, Hispanic. [LC] Bicultural poetry. Anthology
of poetry from 3 writers, each grappling with
dualities of language, culture & identity.
Howes, Barbara. Mercedes. POE. 2:4 p. 5 (Winter
'70). Caribbean Archipelago. [LA] Howes, Bar-
bara. A poem.
Hoyt, Garry. Puerto Rico: A Chronicle of Ameri-
can Carelessness. ART. 8:2 p. 9 (Spring '79).
Puerto Rico. [PS] Status, political. Economic
addiction & psychological dependence: Is Puerto
Rico a mistress colony?
Hubbard, Gardiner Greene. The Ruin of Jamaica.
RES. The Present Crisis, And How To Meet It.
Rev. Mr. Panton. The West Indies. Rev. Dr.
Underhill. Reflections on the Gordon Rebellion. S.
R. Ward. Report of the Jamaica Royal Com-
mission. Jamaica Royal Commission. Report of
W. Morgan, Esq. on His Mission to Jamaica. W.
Morgan, Esq. Jamaica Papers. Jamaica Commit-
tee. The Light & Shadows of Jamaica History.
Hon. Richard Hill. The Ordeal of Free Labor in the
British West Indies. W. G. Sewell. 3:2 p. 8
(Summer '71). Jamaica. [HI] Slavery. Discusses
19th century attempts by the Jamaica planter
class to keep former slaves under subjection.
Hudicourt, Pierre L. Prejudice & Paranoia. BRV.
La isla al revds: Haiti y el destino dominicano.
Joaquin Balaguer. 14:4 p. 21 (Fall '85). Hispan-
iola. [PS] Confederation. Scathing review of a
proposal for confederation of Haiti & the Domini-
can Republic which is fraught with racial
superiority.
Hudson, Brian J. The End of Paradise. What
Kind of Development for Negril? ART. 8:3 p. 32
(Summer '79). Jamaica. [EC] Tourism. The spec-
tre of tourist development threatens parklike
beauty of Negril.
Hibener, Karl-Ludolf. The Socialist International
& Latin America. Progress & Problems. ART.
11:2 p. 38 (Spring '82). Latin America. [GP]
Socialist International. Socialism vs. communism
vs. imperialism vs. poverty.
I
Ickis, John Cows & Credit. BRV. Development
Strategies in Rural Colombia: The Case of
Caqueta. Robin Ruth Marsh 13:4 p. 51 (Fall '84).
Colombia. [ED] Development, rural. Guerrilla
activity further threatens rural development
projects.
liams, Thomas M. Los Gamines of Bogota. South
America's Youngest Untouchables. ART. 9:2 p.
22 (Spring '80). Colombia. [SI] Street urchins. The
plight of dispossessed urban street children.
Illich, Ivan. Holy Mother School. ART. 1:3 p. 1
(Fall '69). Puerto Rico. [SI] Education, philosophy
of. School as a new religion in Puerto Rico.
Ince, Basil. Black Power in Trinidad. BRV. Black
Intellectuals Come to Power: The Rise of Creole
Nationalism in Trinidad & Tobago. Ivar Oxaal. 1:3
p. 10 (Fall '69). Trinidad. [SC] Black power.
Lukewarm review of Oxaal's expose on middle
class snobbery.
Ince, Basil A. The Caribbean Commissions. BRV.
Patterns of International Cooperation in the Carib-
bean. Herbert Corkran, Jr. 4:3 p. 36 (July '72).
Caribbean Archipelago. [PS] Cooperation, in-
ternational. Reviewer notes persistent theme of
colonialism in this book about 4 attempts at
international cooperation in the Caribbean.
Ince, Basil A. Transfer of Power: British-Style.
ART. 1:1 p. 7 (Spring '69). Guyana, Venezuela.
[GP] Conflict, border. Analysis of the withdrawal of
Britain & the Venezuela-Guyana border dispute.

J
Jagan, Cheddi. The Role of the Opposition in
Guyana. ART. 7:4 p. 37 (October '78). Guyana.
[PS] Opposition, role of. The Opposition repre-
sents socialism & revolution & moves toward a
socialist constitution.
Jhabvala, Farrokh. Storm Over Cape Horn. ART.
8:4 p. 12 (Fall '79). Chile, Argentina. [GP] Conflict,


border. Boundary dispute between Chile & Argen-
tina heats up the chilly waters of the Cape.
Jhabvala, Farrokh. Two Hundred Islands of
Soledad. International Law & the South Atlan-
tic. ART. 11:3 p. 8 (Summer '82). South America.
[GP] Conflict, border. Analysis of the dispute over
the Falkland Islands.
Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga. The Drama of
Lares. The New Intellectual Debate. ART. 12:1
p. 22 (Winter '83). Puerto Rico. [HI] Grito de Lares.
Historical event enjoys renaissance of intellectual
inquiry.
Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga. The Dual Colo-
nization of an Island. A Political & Cultural
History of Puerto Rico. BRV. Puerto Rico: A
Political & Cultural History. Arturo Morales
Carri6n, et. al. 13:1 p. 31 (Winter'84). Puerto Rico.
[HI] Culture & politics. Detailed description by
section of Morales' comprehensive
historiography.
Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga. Prelude to Lares.
The events leading to Puerto Rico's Grito de
Lares. ART. 8:1 p. 39 (January '79). Puerto Rico.
[HI] Grito de Lares. Excerpt from an analysis of the
1868 uprising.
Johnson, Janis & Robert A. Rankin. Interviewing
Michael Manley. The Role of the Opposition in
Jamaica. INT. 11:3 p. 26 (Summer '82). Jamaica.
[PS] Opposition, role of. The Jamaican leader
speaks out on CBI, US policy, the economic future
of Jamaica.
Johnson, John J. Yankee Boo-Boos. BRV. Anti-
Yankee Feelings in Latin America. F. Toscano &
James Hiester. 13:2 p. 52 (Spring '84). Latin
America. [HI] Anti-Americanism. Scathing criti-
cism lists numerous flaws in this attack on US.
According to the reviewer, the ones who boo-
booed were the publishers who printed this book.
Johnson, Peter. Revolting Conditions. BRV.
Latin American Insurgencies. Georges Fauriol,
ed. 15:4 p. 41 (Spring '87). Latin America. [GP]
Conflict, political. Views revolts as strategic battles
in the East/West Cold War but does not account
for socioeconomic conditions that attract support
for such movements.
Jones-Hendrickson, S. B. Virgin Island Vi-
gnettes. BRV. America's Virgin Islands: A History
of Human Rights & Wrongs. William W. Boyer.
13:3 p. 54 (Summer '84). USVI. [PS] Status,
political. Reviewer finds this work falls short,
reveal author's bias against Eastern Caribbean
migrants to USVI.

K
Kandel, Randy Frances. Journey to Ixtlan. RES.
The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of
Knowledge. Carlos Castaneda. A Separate Real-
ity: Further Conversations With Don Juan. Carlos
Castaneda. Journey to Ixtlan: The Lessons of Don
Juan. Carlos Castaneda. 6:4 p. 32 (October '74).
Mexico. [RL] Yaqui knowledge. Review of a trilogy
about how a youth became an adult through a
mind-blowing dialogue of paradoxes.
Kanter, Deborah. Plantation Society. Martin-
ique's Sugar Cane Alley. CRV. 14:1 p. 32
(Winter '85). Martinique. [PA] Plantation life
(Sugar Cane Alley). Film review of a tale about a
young boy outward bound from the insular cane
society of 1930s Martinique.
Kaufman, Jay S. Music & Politics in Jamaica.
ART. 15:3 p. 9 (Winter '87). Jamaica. [PA] Music &
politics. The political message of Rastafarianism
in reggae spreads to other musical forms.
Kearney, Richard C. Dominican Update. Can
Politics Contain the Economic Crisis? ART.
14:4 p. 12 (Fall '85). Dominican Republic. [PS]
Political economy. Economic disruption strains a
political structure which lacks adequate ad-
ministrative support.
Kennedy, Paul P. Mexican Artists. EXC. 4:3 p. 12
(July '72). Mexico. [VA] Painters. Excerpt from The
Middle Beata NY Times correspondent relates his
experiences with Mexico's great artists.
Kingsley, Charles. Coolie Labor in Trinidad.
EXC. 5:2 p. 21 (April '73). Trinidad. [HI] Sugar.
Excerpt from Kingsley's 1862 work, a readable
account flavored by the insensitivity of metro-
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /31


I








politan scholarship concerning the colonies.
Knight, Franklin W. Toward a New American
Presence in the Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p. 36
(Winter '80). Caribbean Basin. [GP] International
relations. Suggestions for a revised US policy.
Knight, Franklin W. Who Needs a Guest Worker
Program? They Do; We Do. ART. 11:1 p. 46 (Fall
'82). Caribbean Basin. [MI] Labor migration. A
proposal to alleviate illegal migrant worker
problems.
Koehler, Wallace C. & Aaron Segal. Caribbean
Science & Technology. Do They Exist? ART.
14:3 p. 11 (Summer '85). Caribbean Archipelago.
[SI] Science & technology. The state of the
sciences in the region.
Kohr, Leopold. La Puntilla Reborn. EXC. 7:3 p. 16
(July '78). Puerto Rico. [SC] Urban planning.
Excerpt from The City of Man describes an idyllic,
though rejected, urban renewal project for Old
San Juan.
Kohr, Leopold. Two Views of Ecuador. BRV. The
Making of an Unamerican. Paul Cowan. Living
Poor. Moritz Thomsen. 2:4 p. 1 (Winter '70).
Ecuador. [CC] Peace Corps. Reviews 2 personal
accounts by peace corps volunteers relating
totally opposite experiences in the same country.
Komrad, Eugene L. Lewis's Novela. CRV. 8:1 p.
54 (January '79). Mexico. [PA] Culture & poverty
(Children of Sanchez). Review of the movie
version of Oscar Lewis' classic tale of a poor
Mexican family.
Koss, Joan. Curanderismo: Folk psychiatry.
BRV. Curanderismo: Mexican-American Folk Psy-
chiatry. Ari Kiev, M.D. 1:2 p. 6 (Summer '69).
Mexico. [TS] Folk psychiatry. Mexican-American
traditional treatment of mental conditions.
Kyle, David. Race & Revolution. BRV. Slave
Emancipation in Cuba. The Transition to Free
Labor, 1866-1899. Rebecca J. Scott. 15:2 p. 47
(Spring '86). Cuba. [HI] Slave emancipation. An
explanation of a gradualist strategy for
emancipation.

L
Lacombe, Charles. The Book of the Quiche.
BRV. Popul Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Ancient
Quiche Maya. Delia Goetz & Sylvanus G. Morley,
trans. 9:2 p. 42 (Spring '80). Guatemala. [RL]
Maya, ancient. Descriptive review of a translation
from old Spanish texts on ancient Mayan legends.
LaFlamme, A. G. Black & White On Green Turtle
Cay. ART. 7:1 p. 13 (January'75). Bahamas. [SC]
Racial politics. Analysis of changing race relations
in a Bahamaian out-island community.
Lake, David A. A Pessimistic Picture. BRV.
Dependency under Challenge: The Political Econ-
omy of the Commonwealth Caribbean. Anthony
Payne & Paul Sutton, eds. 14:3 p. 48 (Summer
'85). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [EC] Political
economy. Presents 10 studies of economic strate-
gies tried in the Commonwealth Caribbean.
Latortue, Gerard R. Chairman Duvalier. BRV.
Memoires dun Leader Du Tiers Monde. Frangois
Duvalier. Breviare d'une Revolution. Frangois
Duvalier. 2:1 p. 9 (Spring '70). Haiti. [PS] Duvalier
regime. Reviews a comparison of Mao & Duvalier
& Duvalier's personal memoirs.
Latortue, Gerard R. French West Indian Au-
tonomy. ART. 2:2 p. 8 (Summer '70). Caribbean,
French-speaking. [PS] Status, political. Discus-
sion of independence for Guadeloupe &
Martinique.
Latortue, Gerard R. Latortue on Maingot's
Bosch. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (April '72). Caribbean
Archipelago. [HI] Race vs. class. Review of
reviewer (3:2, also 4:3).
Latortue, Paul R. Haitian Neo-Slavery in Santo
Domingo. Bitter Sugar. BRV. Sucre Amer:
Esclaves Aujourd'hui dans les Caraibes. Maurice
Lemoine. 11:3 p. 36 (Summer '82). Hispaniola.
[MI] Labor repressive mechanisms. Reviewer
sees no resolution of the indignity of Haitian
migration to the DR.
Latortue, Paul R. Neoslavery in the Cane Fields.
Haitians in the Dominican Republic. ART. 14:4
p. 18 (Fall '85). Dominican Republic. [MI] Labor
migration. Haitian migrants to sugar cane fields in
32 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


the Dominican Republic face conditions akin to
slavery.
Layng, Anthony. Religion Among The Caribs.
ART. 8:2 p. 36 (Spring '79). Dominica. [RL] Caribs.
Religious tenacity of Dominica's Caribs.
LeFranc, Elsie. Higglering in Kingston. En-
trepreneurs or Traditional Small-Scale Oper-
ators?ART. 16:1 p. 15 (Spring '88). Jamaica. [SI]
Higglers. Traditional trading practices continue.
Leguizam6n, Francisco A. Costa Rica & the
Beast. BRV. Estado empresario y lucha political
en Costa Rica. Ana Sojo. 15:2 p. 45 (Spring '86).
Costa Rica. [ED] State, role of. Review postulates
that increasing state participation in & control of
the economy generated political conflict.
Leland, Andrea E. Collages, Carvings & Quilts.
The Visual Arts of St. Vincent. ARC. 14:1 p. 28
(Winter '85). St. Vincent. [VA] Folk art. A tour of
the handicrafts & their creators in St. Vincent.
LeoGrande, William M. Cuba & Nicaragua. From
the Somozas to the Sandinistas. ART. 9:1 p. 11
(Winter '80). Caribbean Basin. [GP] International
relations. Lack of US support of Sandinistas
enhances Cuba's bid for solidarity.
Levin, Daniel. Susu. ART. 7:1 p. 19 (January '75).
Trinidad. [EC] Informal credit association. Exami-
nation of Trinidad's rotating credit system, susu.
Levine, Barry B. After the Fall. Manigat: "I took a
calculated risk." Latortue: "There's no instant
democracy, like instant coffee!". INT. 16:2 p. 8
(Winter '88). Haiti. [PS] Manigat & Latortue.
Interviews with Manigat & Latortue after their 1988
ouster from the Haitian government.
Levine, Barry B. Alienation of Leninist Group
Therapy. Extraordinary General Meeting of
Full Members of the NJM. EXC. 12:4 p. 14 (Fall
'83). Grenada. [PS] NJM minutes. A revealing
peek at the proceedings of Grenadian Marxists
in power.
Levine, Barry B. Bootstrap Babies. BRV. The
Sober Generation: Children of Operation Boot-
strap. R. FernAndez Marina, U. von Eckardt, E.
Maldonado Sierra. 1:1 p. 6 .:prrng '69). Puerto
Rico. [SC] Socialization. Studies the coping
mechanisms of Puerto Rican adolescents.
Levine, Barry B. Bread vs. Soul. BRV. The Politics
of Puerto Rican University Students. Arthur
Liebman. 2:4 p. 11 (Winter '70). Puerto Rico. [SI]
Student politics. Reviews a sociological mono-
graph on students & their political opinions.
Levine, Barry B. Colombia: Cowboy Country.
BRV. Colombia: Social Structure & the Process of
Development. T. Lynn Smith. 1:2 p. 11 (Summer
'69). Colombia. [ED] Development, sociology of.
Comparison of 2 types of agricultural systems &
their relationship to development.
Levine, Barry B. Cultural Tag. BRV. The Mod-
ernization of Puerto Rico: A Political Study of
Changing Values & Institutions. Henry Wells. 1:4
p. 2 (Winter '69). Puerto Rico. [ED] Development,
sociology of. Review finds Wells strong on
description & weak on interpretation.
Levine, Barry B. The End of the Search. Norberto
Fuentes on Ernest Hemingway. INT. Hem-
ingway in Cuba. Norberto Fuentes. 10:3 p. 22
(Summer '81). Cuba. [LC] Hemingway, Ernest.
Interview with a Cuban writer on his biography of
Hemingway's years in Cuba.
Levine, Barry B. The French Connection. Two
Views of Their Latin American Policy. INT. 11:2
p. 46 (Spring '82). Latin America. [GP] French
policy. Interviews with A. Rouqui6 & F. Bourricaud
present 2 separate views of French policy.
Levine, Barry B. Grenada Explodes. ED. 12:4 p. 2
(Fall '83). Grenada. [GP] Revolution & invasion.
Rescue mission a fortuitous excuse for
invasion?
Levine, Barry B. Miguel Barnet on the Testi-
monial. INT. 9:4 p. 32 (Fall '80). Cuba. [LC]
Testimonial ii-r iure A Cuban :iritr,:.p.:.i:.git
discusses the development of his particular style
of literature.
Levine, Barry B. The New Cuban Presence in the
Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p. 4 (Winter '80). Cuba. [GP]
International relations. The economic influence of
exile Cuba & the ideological & military press of
revolutionary Cuba pervade the entire region.


Levine, Barry B. Puerto Rican Culture at the
Turning Point. ED. 9:3 p. 4 _umTr-mr .Oi) Puerto
Rico. [CC] Puerto Rico. The death of Murioz & the
looming issue of statehood vs. independence
places PR at a cultural & political crossroads.
Levine, Barry B. Rethinking Cuba. ED. 15:2 p. 3
(Spring '86). Cuba. [SI] Totalitarianism. Evaluates
the utility of a populist-statist form of government
by measuring Cuba's purported progress in
fulfilling basic needs.
Levine, Barry B. Rumupmanship. BRV. Rum-
Yesterday & Today. Hugh Barty-King & Anton
Massel. 16:1 p. 42 (Spring '88). Caribbean Basin.
[SI] Rum. A review dissertation on rum: con-
sumption, types of, processes for making, com-
peting brands.
Levine, Barry B. The Shifting Sands of Haitian
Legitimacy. ED. 16:2 p. 3 (Winter '88). Haiti. [PS]
State, legitimation of. Discusses legitimate means
of changes in government & transfer of power.
Levine, Barry B. Sources of Ethnic Identity for
Latin Florida. ART. 8:1 p. 30 (January '79). Cuba.
[SC] Ethnic identity. Resistance to acculturation in
South Florida transforms melting pot into multi-
ethnic plurality.
Levine, Barry B. The Status of Democracy in the
Caribbean. ED. 10:2 p. 4 (Spring '81). Caribbean
Archipelago. [PS] Elections, 1979-80. A measure
of the fitness of democracy in the region through a
survey of then-recent elections.
Levine, Barry B. Surplus Populations. Economic
Migrants & Political Refugees. ED. 11:1 p. 4
(Fall '82). Caribbean Basin. [MI] Caribbean exo-
dus. Whether fleeing for economic or political
reasons, Caribbean migrants resettling in the US
become legally dispossessed.
Levine, Barry B. The System is Upstairs. Selec-
tions from Benjy Lopez. EXC. 9:3 p. 36 (Summer
'80). Puerto Rico. [MI] Diaspora, Puerto Rican. A
view of the life of an emigrant through his
own eyes.
Levine, Daniel H. If Only They Could Be More
Like Us! RES. Impulse to Revolution in Latin
America. Jeffrey W. Barrett. Underdevelopment Is
a State of Mind: The Latin American Case.
Lawrence E. Harrison. 15:4 p. 19 (Spring '87).
Latin America. [ED] Culture, role of. Review of a
fashionable trend in development rhetoric.
Lewis, Gordon K. An Anatomy of Caribbean
Vanity. BRV. A Destiny to Mold. Forbes Burnham.
The West on Trial-My Fight for Guyana's
Freedom. Cheddi Jagan. Inward Hunger, The
Education of a Prime Minister. Eric Williams. 3:1 p.
2 (Spring '71). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [PS]
Burnham, Forbes & Eric Williams. Wide-ranging
analysis & critical examination of 3 autobi-
ographies by Caribbean leaders (Jagan, Burnham
& Williams) compares them to Mufioz & Castro &
concludes magnanimity is still possible.
Lewis, Gordon K. The Anguilla Imbroglio: As
Seen From London. ART. 1:2 p. 2 (Summer '69).
Anguilla. [GP] Independence movement. Indict-
ment of the Aauii.~in affair as racial politics.
Lewis, Gordon K. The Caribbean in the 1980s.
What We Should Study. ART. 10:4 p. 18 (Fall
'81). Caribbean Archipelago. [GP] Research
agenda. Suggestions by a noted Caribbeanist on
pertinent issues to pursue in the decade of
the '80s.
Lewis, Gordon K. In Re: The West Indies. BRV.
Freedom In The Caribbean: A Study In Consti-
tutional Change Sir Fred Phillips. 7:2 p. 49 (April
'78). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [PS] A discus-
sion of revising jurisprudence & body of law within
the boundaries of that law.
Lewis, Gordon K. Jamaica's Manley. BRV.
Manley & the New Jamaica: Selected Speeches &
Writings Rex Nettleford. 5:2 p. 44 (April '73).
Jamaica. [HI] Manley, Norman. A review of a
testimonial to Manley, who, according to the
author, "helped engineer the masses into the
national life."
Lewis, Gordon K. Lewis on Lopez's Diaspora.
LED. 5:3 p. 2 (July '73). Puerto Rico. [CC] Puerto
Rico. A critical letter (see 5:2).
Lewis, Gordon K. On the Limits of the New
Cuban Presence in the Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p.








33 (Winter '80). Caribbean Basin. [GP] Interna-
tional relations. Towards a more democratic
socialism.
Lewis, Gordon K. A Puritan in Babylon. BRV.
Poet in the Fortress: The Story of Luis Muhoz
Marin. Thomas Aitken. 1:4 p. 3 (Winter '69).
Puerto Rico. [PS] Munoz Marin, Luis. Reviews a
book about the career of Puerto Rico's late
governor.
Lewis, Gordon K. Requiem for a Lost Leader.
Luis Munloz Marin, 1989-1980. ART. 9:3 p. 5
(Summer '80). Puerto Rico. [PS] Munoz Marin,
Luis. Eulogy for the eminent Puerto Rican states-
man & founder of the PDP.
Lewis, Gordon K. Romans, Natives & Helots.
ART. 2:1 p. 3 ':.pring '70). USVI. [MI] Labor
migration. Microcosm of Roman social structure
recreated in the USVI.
Lewis, Gordon. Wagenheim's Profile. BRV.
Puerto Rico: A Profile. Kal Wagenheim. 3:2 p. 11
(Summer '71). Puerto Rico. [CC] Puerto Rico.
British expatriate Lewis asks how close an
American (Wagenheim) can come to under-
standing Puerto Rico.
Lewis, Gordon K. Which Way the U.S. Virgin
Islands? ART. 5:4 p. 16 (October '73). USVI. [PS]
Status, political. The political predicament of an
American colony is explored.
Lewis, Kamla. Sociobiography. BRV. Bob Marley.
Stephen Davis. 15:4 p. 40 (Spring '87). Jamaica.
[PA] Marley, Bob. Biography of the Jamaican star
set in wider historical, social & political contexts.
Lewis, Linden. The Mighty Shadow. On the
Pointlessness of Human Existence. ART. 10:4
p. 20 (Fall '81). Trinidad. [PA] Calypso. Reflections
on the philosophy of a popular West Indian
calypso performer, as revealed through his lyrics.
Lewis, Oscar. Culture & Poverty. BRV. Culture &
Poverty. Charles A. Valentine. 1:1 p. 5 (Spring
'69). Caribbean, Hispanic. [SC] Culture & poverty.
Devastating critique elucidates differences in
their views.
Lewis, Oscar. Reminiscences of an Aging
Puerto Rican. EXC. 2:3 p. 1 (Fall '70). Puerto
Rico. [CC] Reminiscences. Excerpts from a
collection of vignettes about Puerto Rican men
that the author never published.
Lewis, Vaughan A. The US & the Caribbean.
Issues of Economics & Security. ART. 11:2 p. 6
(Spring '82). Caribbean Basin. [GP] Political
economy. Negotiating for Caribbean regional
economic development instead of US security
interests.
Leyva, Adolfo. Brief Triumph. BRV. Cuba 1933:
Estudiantes, Yanquis y Soldados. Justo Carrillo.
16:2 p. 48 (Winter '88). Cuba. [HI] Revolution,
1933. An account of the 1933 revolt of middle-
class university students against the repressive
tactics of Machado.
Leyva, Adolfo. In-betweenism? BRV. El Ter-
cermundismo. Carlos Rangel. 14:1 p. 50 (Winter
'85). Third World. [ED] Underdevelopment. Ar-
gues that the Third World can't blame back-
wardness on the West.
Leyva, Roberto (pseud.). Cuba's Other Revo-
lution. BRV. Cuba 1933: Prologue to Revolution.
Luis E. Aguilar. 5:2 p. 33 (April '73). Cuba. [HI]
Revolution, 1933. Analysis of events that led to
overthrow of Cuba's brutal Machado dictatorship.
Lidin, Harold. Puerto Rico's 1980 Elections. The
Voters Seek the Center. ART. 10:2 p. 28 (Spring
'81). Puerto Rico. [PS] Elections, 1980. Deciding
not to decide, sitting on a fence, in the middle
of a road.
Liff, Robert A. What Happened in Cartagena. The
Gloved Hand of the Debtor. ART. 13:3 p. 14
(Summer '84). Latin America. [ED] Debt. The
debtors join forces to renegotiate the terms.
Livingston, Ivor L. Uptight West Indians. BRV.
Hypertension & Culture Change: Acculturation &
Disease in the West Indies. William W. Dressier.
13:4 p. 51 (Fall '84). Caribbean, Commonwealth.
[SC] Health. Study of hypertension correlated with
stress in the Wl.
Lopez, Adalberto. Literature for the Puerto Rican
Diaspora. ART. 5:2 p. 5 (April '73). Puerto Rico.
[CC] Puerto Rico. Analysis of the Puerto Rican


emigration & the literature to understand it.
L6pez, Adalberto. Literature For The Puerto
Rican Diaspora: Part II. RES. The Puerto Ricans:
An Annotated Bibliography. Paquita Vivo, ed.
Savior, Savior, Hold My Hand. Piri Thomas. Spiks.
Pedro Juan Soto. The Puerto Rican Papers: Notes
On The Re-Emergence Of A Nation. Alfredo
Lopez. Puerto Rico: Commonwealth, State, or
Nation? Byron Williams. Puerto Ricans On The
United States: A Bibliography. Francesco Cor-
dasco & Eugene Bucchioni eds. Hot Land, Cold
Season. Pedro Juan Soto. The Puerto Ricans: A
Documentary History Kal & Olga Jimenez de
Wagenheim, eds. The Puerto Rican Experience.
Francesco Cordasco & Eugene Bucchioni eds. 6:4
p. 41 (October '74). Puerto Rico. [CC] Puerto Rico.
Nine books reviewed to find out how they help
Puerto Ricans on the mainland understand
themselves.
Lopez, Adalberto. L6pez on Lewis. LED. 5:4 p. 2
(October '73). Puerto Rico. [CC] Puerto Rico.
Reviewer responds to Lewis's response to his
review (5:3, 5:2)
Lopez, Adalberto. Vito Marcantonio. An Italian-
American's Defense of Puerto Rico & Puerto
Ricans. ART. 8:1 p. 16 (January '79). Puerto Rico.
[HI] Marcantonio, Vito. Mini-biography of a cham-
pion for Puerto Rican immigrant status & rights.
Lott, Eric. The Chronic Caribbean. BRV. Love &
Death in a Hot Country. Shiva Naipaul. 14:4 p. 51
(Fall '85). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [LC]
Naipaul, Shiva. Reviews a novel about post-
colonial floundering, with alienated characters that
are the unsuccessful embodiment of ideas.
Luchting, Wolfgang A. Tired Latin Liberals. ART.
2:1 p. 6 Sprirg '70). Latin America. [ED] Develop-
ment, philosophies of. Assesses political temper
of former liberals in the lower latitudes of LA.

M
Macaulay, Neill. Guardians of the Dynasty. BRV.
Guardians of the Dynasty: A History of the U.S.
Created Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua. Richard
Millett. 7:3 p. 30 (July '78). Nicaragua. [PS]
Guardia Nacional. Succinct summary doc-
umenting the Somoza family's personal police
force.
MacDonald, Scott B. Endangering Friendships.
ART. 14:3 p. 21 (Summer '85). Netherlands
Antilles. [GP] US policy. Change in US tax law
disrupts Antilles economy & jeopardizes
relationships.
MacDonald, Scott B. & Albert L. Gastmann.
Mitterrand's Headache. The French Antilles in
the 1980s. ART. 13:2 p. 18 (Spring '84). Carib-
bean, French-speaking. [PS] Status, political.
Socialists strike out in the French Antilles.
Macguire, Robert. The US & A New Haiti. ED.
15:3 p. 3 (Winter '87). Haiti. [GP] US policy. The
steps necessary to dismantle & replace the
parasitic infrastructure left behind by the
Duvaliers.
Magruder, Joel. So it Wasn't a Picnic. BRV. The
Cuban & Porto Rican Campaigns. Richard Har-
ding Davis. 1:2 p. 12 (Summer '69). Caribbean,
Hispanic. [HI] Spanish-American War. Reviews a
work on the great campaigns of the Spanish-
American War.
Maingot, Anthony P. Cuba & the Commonwealth
Caribbean. Playing the Cuban Card. ART. 9:1 p.
7 (Winter '80). Cuba. [GP] International relations.
About the role of Cuban aid in West Indies.
Maingot, Anthony P. Future of the University of
The West Indies. BRV. White Paper on National
Institute of Higher Education. Republic of Trinidad
& Tobago. 7:3 p. 48 (July '78). Trinidad. [SI]
Sciences, role of. Issues that confront a university
with campuses in 3 independent countries.
Maingot, Anthony P. Maingot's Response: The
Old Bosch Was Better. LED. 4:3 p. 2 (July '72).
Caribbean Archipelago. [HI] Race vs. class.
Reviewer responds to responses to his
review (4:1).
Maingot, Anthony P. The New Caribbean His-
tory. BRV. De Cristbbal Coldn a Fidel Castro. El
Caribe, Frontera Imperial. Juan Bosch. From
Colombus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean


1492-1969. Eric Williams. 3:2 p. 2 (Summer '71).
Caribbean Archipelago. [HI] Race vs. class.
Examines how effectively 2 works reconcile
ethnic-racial perspectives with a class view
of society.
Maingot, Anthony P. Options for Grenada. The
Need To Be Cautious. ART. 12:4 p. 24 (Fall '83).
Grenada. [GP] Future possibilities. In geopolitical
chess, everyone smaller than a superpower may
be a pawn.
Maingot, Anthony P. Politics Caribbean Style.
Lessons from Grenada. ART. 14:2 p. 4 (Spring
'85). Grenada. [PS] Elections, 1984. Economic
strategies dominate the political arena in Grenada.
Maingot, Anthony P. Role of the Opposition in
the Caribbean. ART. 7:4 p. 22 (October '78).
Caribbean, Commonwealth. [PS] Opposition, role
of. Parliamentary politics of Britain transplanted to
the WI.
Maingot, Anthony P. Structure & Culture in
Santo Domingo. BRV. El Pueblo Dominicano:
1850-1900. Apuntes para su sociologia historic.
Harmannus Hoetink. 5:3 p. 43 (July '73). Domini-
can Republic. [HI] Culture & society. Reviewer
asks under what conditions aristocratic culture can
survive in the midst of structural change.
Maingot, Anthony P. Three Rebellious Lieu-
tenants. BRV. Lengthening Shadows: Birth and
Revolt of the Trinidad Army S. Hylton Edwards.
13:4 p. 49 (Fall '84). Trinidad. [PS] Mutiny, 1970.
Questions re the 1970 mutiny & attendant legal
proceedings.
Maingot, Anthony R A Time for Straight Talk.
ED. 12:1 p. 3 (Winter '83). Caribbean Basin. [GP]
Revolutionary language. Decries practice that
political stance depends on who's listening.
Malefijt, Annemarie de Waal. The Passing of
Wajang. ART. 7:3 p. 43 (July '78). Suriname. [SC]
Javanese. Acculturation of the Javanese immi-
grant community.
Malloy, James M. Nicaragua's Uncertain Po-
litical Future. A View of the Elections. ART.
14:1 p. 18 (Winter '85). Nicaragua. [PS] Elections,
1984. Analysis of content & process of the 1984
elections.
Manley, Michael. Grenada in the Context of
History. Between Neocolonialism & Inde-
pendence. ART. 12:4 p. 6 (Fall '83). Grenada.
[GP] Invasion, 1983. Historical antecedents for
crisis as seen by Manley.
Manley, Robert H. Surinam Politics. BRV. The
Politics of Surinam & the Netherlands Antilles.
Albert L. Gastmann. 1:1 p. 12 (Spring '69).
Suriname. [PS] Status, political. Documents
transition of Dutch territories to independent
nations.
Manning, Frank E. Anatomy of a Riot. Bermuda's
Politics of Race. ART. 7:2 p. 4 (April '78).
Bermuda. [SC] Racial politics. Analysis of '77 race
riots & underlying system of racial politics pro-
vokes & contains racial tensions & conflicts.
Manning, Frank E. International Eleuthera. BRV.
Tryin' to Make It: Adapting to the Bahamas. John
Bregenzer. 13:4 p. 49 (Fall '84). Bahamas. [ED]
'.1r.i,, 'rih.i,, economic. Review of contradictory
work that misses role of the Bahamas as interces-
sionary between US & West Indies.
Manning, Frank E. Plantations & Crime. BRV.
Crime in Trinidad: Conflict & Control in a Planta-
tion Society, 1838-1900. David Vincent Trotman.
16:1 p. 41 (Spring '88). Trinidad. [HI] Plantation
life. An attempt to broaden the definition of crime
to include negative stereotyping.
Manning, Frank E. Race & Democracy in Ber-
muda. The Fight for the Right. ART. 10:2 p. 20
(Spring '81). Bermuda. [SC] Ethnic politics. With
both parties conservative, race becomes a de-
ciding factor.
Manning, Frank E. Religion & Politics in Ber-
muda. Revivalist politics & the language of
power. ART. 8:4 p. 18 (Fall '79). Bermuda. [RL]
Revivalist politics. Born-again politics.
Manning, Frank E. Risk Taking in the Stock
Market. Gambling & Politics in Bermuda. ART.
11:4 p. 20 (Fall '82). Bermuda. [SI] Gambling. The
subculture of gambling based on racial & political
undertones in Bermuda.
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /33


I _ I


--








Markham, E. A. Sugarcake Day. SS. 9:4 p. 36 (Fall
'80). Montserrat. [LA] Reminiscences. Reminis-
cences of an elderly failing woman about her
youth in the Caribbean.
Marqu6s, Rend. The Informer. SS. 7:2 p. 24 (April
'78). Puerto Rico. [LA] Marques, Rene. A psy-
chological tale of the internal terror of an informer.
Marques, Rend. Three Men by the River. SS. 1:4
p. 7 (Winter '69). Puerto Rico. [LA] Marqubs,
Rene. Story about a native's interpretation of white
man's faith.
Marshall, Dawn I. The History of Caribbean
Migrations. The Case of the West Indies. ART.
11:1 p. 6 (Fall '82). Caribbean, Commonwealth.
[MI] Migration, history of. Traces West Indian
outmigration patterns from 1835-1980.
Martinez, Juan A. Mythical Landscapes of a
Cuban Painter. Wifredo's Lam's La Jungla.
ARC. 15:2 p. 32 (Spring '86). Cuba. [VA] Lam,
Wifredo. Traces development of an important
Latin American artist; evaluates his unique style.
Mathews, Thomas. Caribbean Economic His-
tory. ART. 3:1 p. 4 .Sprrng '71). Caribbean
Archipelago. [HI] Literature survey. A survey of
economic histories of the West Indies covering
1585-1910.
Mathews, Thomas. Historical Writing in the
Caribbean. ART. 2:3 p. 4 (Fall '70). Caribbean
Archipelago. [HI] Literature survey. A comparison
of major contributions to historical literature on the
Caribbean.
Mathews, Thomas. Mathews on Maingot's
Bosch. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (April '72). Caribbean
Archipelago. [HI] Race vs. class. Mathews on
Maingot on Bosch (see 3:2).
Mathews, Thomas. PDP + NPP = A*pa*thy. The
End of the Popular Party. ART. 9:3 p. 9 (Summer
'80). Puerto Rico. [PS] Popular Democratic Party.
A eulogy for meaningful platforms in either party in
the absence of dynamic leaders such as the late
Muhoz.
Mathews, Thomas. Poor DR!BRV. The Dominican
Republic, A Nation in Transition. Howard Wiarda.
1:3 p. 12 (Fall '69). Dominican Republic. [HI]
Social change. Merciless critique of book's lack of
factual evidence.
Mathews, Thomas. Puerto Rico & The Carib-
bean. ART. 5:3 p. 14 (July '73). Caribbean Basin.
[GP] International relations. Author suggests new
relations between PR & rest of the Caribbean.
Mathews, Thomas. R.I.P. BRV. A Strategy for
Caribbean Economic Integration. Roland I. Pe-
russe. 4:3 p. 41 (July '72). Caribbean Archipelago.
[ED] Integration, economic. R.I.P.
Mathews, Thomas. The U.S. & Latin America.
BRV. Revolution Next Door. Gary MacEoin. Aid
As Imperialism. Teresa Hayter. 4:4 p. 42 (October
'72). Latin America. [GP] US policy. Review of 2
dispassionate books that are devastating in
analysis of US interaction in LA.
Mathews, Thomas. What Ever Happened to
Polarization in the Caribbean. ART. 5:1 p. 26
(January '73). Caribbean Archipelago. [PS]
Status, political. Analyzes political changes in the
Netherland Antilles, French Antilles, &
Puerto Rico.
Matlin, Norman. Left, Center, Right. BRV. Puerto
Rico: Una Interpretacidn Histdrico-Social. Manuel
Maldonado Denis. 1:4 p. 3 (Winter '69). Puerto
Rico. [PS] Status, political. Reviews Denis's
oversimplified taxonomy of political dimensions.
Matlin, Norman. The Myth of Mastery. A Decision
Analytic Critique of The New Cuban Presence
in the Caribbean [with responses by Maingot,
LeoGrande, Ropp, Erisman, Azicri & Knight].
ART. 9:4 p. 22 (Fall '80). Caribbean Basin. [GP]
Political theory. A critique of positions presented in
Vol 9, No.1 of CR, from a decision model
perspective.
Matlin, Norman & Charlie Albizu. The Death of
Poetry. The '68 Puerto Rico Election. ART. 1:1
p. 2 (Spring '69). Puerto Rico. [PS] Elections,
1968. Analysis of personalities & platforms of the
1968 gubernatorial race.
Matlin, Norman & C. Albizu-Miranda. Mascaras y
Vejigantes: The Folklore of Puerto Rican
Politics. ART. 1:2 p. 5 (Summer '69). Puerto Rico.
34 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


[PS] Culture of politics. The folk logic of who
Puerto Ricans will vote for, regardless of which
candidate they may actually support.
McCartney, John. The Garvey Papers. BRV. The
Marcus Garvey & the Universal Negro Improve-
ment Association Papers. Robert A. Hill, ed. 14:2
p. 50 (Spring '85). Jamaica. [HI] Black activism.
The first 2 volumes of an anticipated 10, covering
Garveyism & the international black power
movement.
McCoy, Terry. Postpartum Perils. BRV. Patterns
of Caribbean Development: An Interpretive Essay
on Economic Change. Jay R. Mandle. 13:3 p. 53
(Summer '84). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [ED]
Alternatives. Analysis promoting agricultural
development as the key to economic growth in
Jamaica, Guyana & Trinidad.
McCoy, Terry L. A Primer for US Policy on
Caribbean Emigration. ART. 8:1 p. 10 (January
'79). Caribbean Basin. [MI] US immigration policy.
Examines past policies & analyzes potential of
Carter's proposal.
McDonald, Roderick A. Raising Cane. BRV.
Sugar & Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation
Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850. Francisco A.
Scarano. 15:3 p. 41 (Winter '87). Puerto Rico. [HI]
Plantation life. Analysis of late-starting sugar cane
industry in Puerto Rico.
Mclntire, Jr., Alexander H. Once Too Many. BRV.
Endless War: How We Got Involved in Central
America & What Can Be Done About It. James
Chace. 15:1 p. 44 (Winter '86). Central America.
[GP] US policy. Reviewer finds this work an
unoriginal rehash of materials gleaned from other
sources.
Mehu, Hervd. Haiti's Art. ART. 3:1 p. 14 (Spring
'71). Haiti. [VA] Art, Haitian. A note on the
unpolished art of Haiti.
Mendoza, Ramon. A Caribbean Carnival of
Abundance. BRV. The Autumn of the Patriarch.
Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 7:2 p. 38 (April '78).
Caribbean Basin. [LC] Garcia Marquez, Gabriel.
Marquez's style is characterized as the "most
remarkable literary feat in contemporary Spanish
literature."
Mendoza, Ram6n. A Sling Shot at the Soap
Giant. BRV. La Tia Julia y El Escribidor. Mario
Vargas Llosa. 8:2 p. 45 (Spring '79). Peru. [LC]
Vargas Llosa, Mario. Vargas Llosa's black-listed
best seller satirizes the military among other
venerable institutions.
Mercier Vega, Luis. Guerrillas in Latin America.
EXC. 2:3 p. 9 (Fall '70). Latin America. [PS]
Guerrillas. Guerrilla movements as a regular
feature of Latin culture.
Michaels, Robert A. Changing the Guard in
Dominica. Elections & A Hostage Crisis. ART.
10:2 p. 18 (Spring '81). Dominica. [PS] Elections,
1980. The first Caribbean woman prime minister
inherits a number of crises.
Mill, John Stuart. The Negro Question. REP. 4:3
p. 24 (July '72). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [HI]
Slavery. Reprint of Mill's reply to Thomas Carlyle
in their famous 19th Century debate over the
rights of freed slaves.
Miller, Linda. A Development Agency with a
Difference. BRV. Grassroots Development In
Latin America & The Caribbean: Oral Histories of
Social Change. Robert Wasserstrom. 15:1 p. 41
(Winter '86). Latin America & the Caribbean. [ED]
Grassroots efforts. Strong case for development
by local organizations.
Miller, Mark J. & William W. Boyer. Foreign
Workers in the USVI. History of a Dilemma.
ART. 11:1 p. 48 (Fall '82). USVI. [MI] Labor
migration. The issue of illegal migrant labor in US
territories within the Caribbean & a non-solution
for the USVI.
Millet, Richard L. Can We Live with Revolution in
Central America? ART. 10:1 p. 6 (Winter '81).
Central America. [GP] Conflict, political. Examines
US response to & inadvertent role in revolutionary
change.
Millett, Richard L. Could Nicaragua Have Been
Different? BRV. Condemned to Repetition: The
United States & Nicaragua. Robert A. Pastor. 16:2
p. 24 (Winter '88). Nicaragua. [GP] US policy.


Review of Pastor's work on policy formation &
implementation & the pitfalls in real geopolitics
(also see excerpt in same issue, p. 20).
Mintz, Sidney W. Thoughts on Caribbean Soci-
ety. An Anthropological Critique. BRV. Main
Currents in Caribbean Thought: The Historical
Evolution of Caribbean Society in Its Ideological
Aspects, 1492-1900. Gordon K. Lewis. 13:1 p. 28
(Winter'84). Caribbean Archipelago. [CC] Cultural
diversity. -,,ti-ring opinions on the concepts of
"culture" & "society" arise between reviewer and
author.
Mohr, Eugene V. The Pleasures of West Indian
Writing. An Introduction to the Literature. ART.
11:4 p. 13 (Fall '82). Caribbean, Commonwealth.
[LC] Literature survey. A view of Caribbean culture
through the works of its literary artists.
Mohr, Eugene V. Remembrances of New York.
The Puerto Rican Community From the Ameri-
can Civil War to 1947. BRV. Memorias de
Bernardo Vega. Bernardo Vega. 10:4 p. 34 (Fall
'81). Puerto Rico. [MI] Immigration to New York.
Warm review of Vega's recollections on life in NY
during early years of the community.
Mohr, Eugene V. West Indian Fiction is Alive &
Well. RES. 5:4 p. 23 (October '73). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [LC] Literature survey. Major
works of West Indian fiction are examined & found
vibrant.
Monroe, Gary. Guatemalan Wanderers. BRV. Los
Ambulantes: The Itinerant Photographers of Gua-
temala. Ann Parker. 14:2 p. 48 Spririg '85).
Guatemala. [VA] Photography. A collection of
photos from an endangered species, traveling
commercial photographers.
Montaner, Carlos Alberto. The Mediation of the
Socialist International. Inconsistency, Preju-
dice & Ignorance. ART. 11:2 p. 42 (Spring '82).
Latin America. [GP] Socialist International. The
Third World as a change of venue for grievances
arising in Europe over US/Soviet posturing.
Montaner, Carlos Alberto. On the Antillian Iden-
tity. ART. 7:3 p. 11 (July '78). Caribbean,
Hispanic. [CC] Caribbean identity. Problems of
national identity afflicting the Spanish Caribbean,
resulting from its role as crossroads to the New
World, though neither a part of the New World nor
a destination in itself (see response, 7:3).
Montaner, Carlos Alberto. The Roots of Anti-
Americanism in Cuba. Sovereignty in an Age
of World Cultural Homogeneity. ART. 13:2 p. 13
(Spring '84). Cuba. [GP] Sovereignty, national.
Historical antecedents for the love-hate relation-
ship between the two Cubas & Yanquis.
Montaner, Carlos Alberto. Tropical Hamlet. BRV.
El Francotirador. Pedro Juan Soto. 2:2 p. 12
(Summer '70). Cuba. [LC] Soto, Pedro Juan.
Negative notes on Soto's novel (excerpted as The
Sniper, 1:3, p. 3).
Montaner, Carlos Alberto. Twenty Years After
the Cuban Revolution. ART. 8:1 p. 4 (January
'79). Cuba. [PS] Castro, Fidel. The changes in
Cuba as reflected by the changes in Castro.
Montiel, Pedro J. On the Politics of the Cuban
Revolution. Dominguez's Cuba: Order & Revo-
lution. BRV. Cuba: Order & Revolution. Jorge
Dominguez. 9:1 p. 40 (Winter '80). Cuba. [GP]
Revolution, Castro. Dominguez' meticulous
description is recommended as an invaluable
contribution & standard reference.
Montiel, Pedro J. The US & Cuba, 1880-1934.
BRV. The United States & Cuba: Hegemony &
Dependent Development, 1880-1934. Jules
Robert Benjamin. 8:1 p. 51 (January '79). Cuba.
[HI] Hegemony. What accounts for both economic
backwardness & political instability in Cuba's
development? Answer: US intervention.
Moore, Carlos. Congo or Carabali? Race Rela-
tions in Socialist Cuba. ART. 15:2 p. 12 (Spring
'86). Cuba. [SC] Race policy. Expose of discrim-
ination & intolerance in the Marxist stronghold.
Morgado, Marcia. Perro de Alambre. CRV. 9:4 p.
42 (Fall '80). Cuba. [PA] Human rights (Perro de
Alambre). Review of a disturbing but well-done
film about violation of human rights in Cuba.
Morisseau-Leroy, Felix. Slaying the Dragon.
BRV. Monsieur Toussaint. Edouard Glissant. 14:1


-- II


I








p. 49 (Winter '85). Martinique. [LC] Toussaint
L'Ouverture. Compares a poetic play with previ-
ous works; notes current conditions in Haiti are
much the same as in Toussaint's time.
Morisseau-Leroy, Felix. A Source of Human
Experience. BRV. Le Roman Haitien: Iddologie et
Structure. Leon Frangois Hoffmann. 14:3 p. 49
(Summer '85). Haiti. [LC] Literature survey. An
evaluation of Haitian literature that reveals the
quest for national identity as a dominant theme.
Morris, James A. Honduras. An Oasis of Peace?
ART. 10:1 p. 38 (Winter '81). Honduras. [PS]
Political stability. Central America's poorest coun-
try holds its own due to relative homogeneity &
lack of polarized extremes.,
Moss, Jr., Amb. Ambler H. Insider's View. BRV.
Panama Odyssey. William J. Jorden. 15:1 p. 43
(Winter '86). Panama. [GP] Panama Canal treaty.
Overview of Jordan's career.
Mullen, Edward J. Paz & Fuentes: How Close?
ART. 6:2 p. 27 (April '74). Mexico. [LC] Literature
& politics. How Mexico's 2 most acclaimed writers
interpret contemporary social problems.
Murad, Anatol. Kohr's Size Theory. REP. El
Superdesarrollo. Leopold Kohr. 2:4 p. 12 (Winter
'70). Third World. [ED] Overdevelopment. A novel
view of the problems of overdeveloped nations.
Mufioz, Nelida Agosto. Haitian Voodoo: Social
Control of the Unconscious. ART. 4:3 p. 6 (July
'72). Haiti. [RL] Voudou. Voudou controls even the
unconscious thoughts of individuals via spirit
possession.
N
Nash, James W. What Hath Intervention
Wrought. Reflections on the Dominican
Republic. ART. 14:4 p. 7 (Fall '85). Dominican
Republic. [GP] Invasion, 1965. Retrospective
analysis of effects of US intervention in the
Dominican civil war.
Needler, Martin C. Hegemonic Tolerance. In-
ternational Competition in the Area. ART. 11:2
p. 32 (Spring '82). Latin America & the Caribbean.
[GP] Influence, competition for. A compendium of
competing influences in the context of the domi-
nant player.
Neruda, Pablo. Residence on Earth. POE. 6:2 p.
32 (April '74). Chile. [LA] Neruda, Pablo. A
selection of poems by Chile's Pablo Neruda.
Neruda, Pablo. Caballero Solo. (Gentlemen With-
out Company). POE. 1:2 p. 3 (Summer '69).
Chile. [LA] Neruda, Pablo. A poem by the Chilean
political poet.
Nettleford, Rex. Cultivating A Caribbean Sen-
sibility. Media, Education & Culture. ART. 15:3
p. 4 (Winter '87). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [CC]
Cultural identity. Development of a Caribbean
cultural identity through education, arts & media.
Nettleford, Rex. Definition & Development. The
Need for Caribbean Creativity. ART. 14:3 p. 6
(Summer '85). Caribbean Archipelago. [ED] Alter-
natives. A recommendation to the Caribbean to
focus on cultural autonomy to promote
development.
Nietschmann, Bernard. When the Turtle Col-
lapses, the World Ends. Modernization & the
Miskito Indians of Nicaragua. ART. 9:2 p. 14
(Spring '80). Nicaragua. [TS] Miskito Indians.
Over-harvesting turtles has caused ecological &
economic imbalance for the Miskitos.
Nieves Falcon, Luis. Demythology of the Show-
case. BR.' 2-?. p 12 (Fall '10 Puerto Rico [SC]
C uliure .A p:., 'r, A .:ri'.:al nil.naior vi .: causes
,:.I po.enr, 1- PR
Nodal, Roberto. The Sacred Drums ol the
Lucumi. ART p .0 Iapr,I -81 Cuta3 IFA]
t.luj ".: irc'. ub' an i ale, .:r.- pi, -.:r i .:ere-
mTn.Ial Arln.:n drum. drum I, lre I e b',
de L rienaanl_. i. ul:,a
Novak. Michael. Why Latin America Is Poor.
Cultural Factors in Latin Poverty. ART 11:3 p.
1. iSijTuimeir f. 1i L tiir, eriri.: a [EDI) C llure &
p '. e: rl, A .Ie ,' ,i pc. -ri a' re'i :. cl uliural
13,:Or, r hlli- lhi.rn alir-dL I.I onoi',IriIciT
rIYCPD. Rasta Crime. A Conlidential Report.
ART 14 1 p i VWirlr T .T.aT i.: RLI


Rastafarians. A police report on Rasta crime
including a dictionary of Rasta terms.

0
Ocasio, Rafael. Raptures & Recuperaciones.
BRV. La ruta de Sarduy. Roberto GonzAlez
Echevarria. 16:1 p. 40 (Spring '88). Cuba. [LC]
Sarduy, Severo. Sociohistorical analysis of Sar-
duy's novels.
Oduber, Daniel. The Dead Are All Ours. ED. 13:2
p. 3 (Spring '84). Central America. [GP] US policy.
A former president of Costa Rica declares that no
aid at all is better than military aid.
Oduber, Daniel. Towards a New Central Ameri-
can Dialogue. ART. 10:1 p. 10 (Winter '81).
Central America. [GP] International relations.
Positive change requires regional cooperation
which starts with dialogue.
Olander, Joseph D. The Caribbean Watchers.
RES. Politics & Economics in the Caribbean. T.G.
Mathews & F.M. Andic. The United States & the
Caribbean. Tad Szulc, ed. 5:1 p. 35 (January '73).
Caribbean Archipelago. [GP] Political economy.
Analyzes 2 books in terms of wise-man, winnie-
the-pooh & iceberg syndromes.
Olander, Joseph D. China & Latin America. BRV.
Communist China & Latin America. Cecil
Johnson. 4:4 p. 35 (October '72). Latin America.
[GP] Chinese policy. Reviewer finds author's
explanation of China's strategy in foreign policy
impressive.
Olson, Nancy. Not for the Birds. BRV. Pelican
Guide to the Bahamas. James E. Moore. 13:3 p.
55 (Summer '84). Bahamas. [CC] Travel guide.
Traveler's guide to things to do & see in the
Bahamas.
Orci, Hector. Mexico Budgeted. BRV. The Mexi-
can Revolution: Federal Expenditure & Social
Change Since 1910. James W. Wilkie. 4:1 p. 28
(April '72). Mexico. [EC] Federal budget. Ques-
tions second-cousin syndrome that often sprouts
up when non-Mexicans analyze that country.
Ortiz-Buonafina, Marta. The CBI Is Not Enough.
The Case of Honduras. ART. 14:2 p. 20 (Spring
'85). Honduras. (Economics) CBI. The CBI as-
sumes an infrastructure in marketing not
necessarily in existence in countries like
Honduras.
P
Pab6n, Milton. The Hero & the Crowd. BRV. The
Hero & the Crowd in a Colonial Polity. A. W.
Singham. 1:2 p. 13 (Summer '69). Grenada. [PS]
Gairy, Eric. Reviews a sociological analysis of
shortcomings of colonial politics in Grenada.
Padula, Alfred. Cuba's Pending Energy Crisis.
ART. 8:2 p. 4 (Spring '79). Cuba. [EC] Energy.
New emphasis on technology intensifies Cuba's
dependence on Soviet oil.
Padula, Alfred L. Pan Am in the Caribbean. The
Rise & Fall of an Empire. ART. 12:1 p. 24 (Winter
'83). Caribbean Basin. [HI] Transportation.
Informative account of the role of the airline in
growth & development of the region.
Padula, Alfred. Ritual, Paradox & Death in
Managua. Internacionalistas in Nicaragua.
ART. 15:1 p. 18 (Winter '86). Nicaragua. [PS]
Political tourism. Coverage of the commemoration
of the military coup reveals some of the character-
istics of its supporters.
Paley, William (pseud.). Haiti's Dynastic Des-
potism. From Father to Son to... ART. 13:1 p. 13
(Winter '84). Haiti. [PS] Duvalier regime. An
analysis of the endurance of the Duvalier dynasty.
Palmer, Ransford W. Absorbing the Caribbean
Labor Surplus. The Need for an Indigenous
Engine of Growth. ART. 11:3 p. 22 (Summer
'82). Caribbean Archipelago. [EC] Labor surplus.
Argues for greater industrialization to absorb local
labor & participate in international economy.
Panday, Basdeo. The Role of the Opposition in
Trinidad& Tobago. ART. 7:4 p. 31 (October '78).
Trinidad. [PS] Opposition, role of. The Opposition
moves for a more indigenously relevant form of
constitution.
Parga de Bay6n, Beatriz. Freedom of the Press
in Nicaragua. Sergio Ramirez & Pedro Joaqufn


Chamorro. INT. 12:1 p. 20 (Winter '83). Nicara-
gua. [PS] Freedom of the press. Interview with
fourth estate representatives from Junta de
Reconstrucci6n Nacional & La Prensa, comparing
freedom of the press under the Sandinista and
Somoza regimes.
Parga de Bay6n, Beatriz. An Interview with Hugo
Spadafora. Four Months Before His Death. INT.
15:1 p. 24 (Winter '86). Panama. [PS] Spadafora,
Hugo. The doomed revolutionary doctor's views
on social democracy, Cuba, Nicaragua & his
personal quest in Panama.
Parga de Bay6n, Beatriz. Interviewing Eden
Pastora. "Comandante Cero." INT. 11:3 p. 30
(Summer '82). Nicaragua. [PS] Pastora, Ed6n.
Conversations with then revolutionary-in-exile
Pastora on true sandinismo & his rift with Ortega's
regime.
Parker, Richard. Intelligent History. BRV. Ven-
ezuela, A Century of Change. Judith Ewell. 14:3 p.
51 (Summer '85). Venezuela. [HI] Social change.
A weaving of geography, resources, economy,
politics, foreign relations & cultural history.
Parris, Ronald G. Poverty in Trinidad. BRV.
Lower Class Families: The Culture of Poverty in
Negro Trinidad. Hyman Rodman. 4:3 p. 44 (July
'72). Trinidad. [SC] Culture & poverty. Analyzes a
book on poverty in Trinidad that unfortunately
attempts to account for poverty in non-historical
terms.
Pastor, Robert A. The Canal Treaties. The Other
Debate on Central America. RES. Panama
Canal in American Politics: Domestic Advocacy &
the Evolution of Policy. J. Michael Hogan. The
Limits of Victory: The Ratification of the Panama
Canal Treaties. George D. Moffett III. 15:4 p. 22
(Spring '87). Central America. [GP] Canal treaties.
Review essay on 2 new books & their utility for
understanding the politics behind the Canal
Treaties.
Pastor, Robert A. Getting Your Hands Dirty.
Negotiating with Dictators: The Case of Nicara-
gua. ART. 16:2 p. 20 (Winter '88). Nicaragua. [GP]
US policy. Excerpt on the problems of implem-
entation of US policy against dictatorships.
Pastor, Robert A. Psychological Divide in the
Caribbean Basin. ED. 15:1 p. 3 (Winter '86).
Caribbean Basin. [GP] Attitudes towards US.
Division by concept of free will or notion of
dependency: those that fear US intervention from
those who follow US prescription.
Pateman, Roy. Old White Jumby. BRV. Jean
Rhys: The West Indian Novels. Teresa F. O'Con-
nor. 16:2 p. 49 (Winter '88). Dominica. [LC] Rhys,
Jean. A criticism of Rhys' novel plus an account of
her life.
Pateman, Roy. Weary Traveler. BRV. The Old
Gringo. Carlos Fuentes. 15:3 p. 40 (Winter '87).
Mexico. [LC] Fuentes, Carlos. Fictionalized ac-
count of the death of US journalist Ambrose Bierce
in Mexico.
Patman, Roy. Small & Vulnerable. BRV. Vul-
nerability: Small States in the Global Society.
Commonwealth Secretariat. 16:1 p. 42 (Spring
'88). British Commonwealth. [GP] Vulnerability.
Internal security for small states through use of
civilian volunteers, neutral status & strong indig-
enous private sector economy.
Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. Abstraction & Repre-
sentation. Rosado del Valle's Visual Inno-
cence. ARC. 14:4 p. 36 (Fall '85). Puerto Rico.
[VA] Rosado del Valle, Julio. Essay on the Puerto
Rican artist's synthesis of surrealism &
expressionism.
Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. Calzada's Architecture of
Memory. Reconstruction of an Envisioned
Past. ARC. 13:2 p. 38 (Spring '84). Cuba. [VA]
Calzada, Humberto. Art critique of the Cuban
painter's focus on colonial Caribbean architecture.
Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. Carlos Alfonzo. The Tex-
tuality of Painted Surfaces. ARC. 16:1 p. 28
(Spring '88). Cuba. [VA] Alfonzo, Carlos. Art
critique of the style & works of Alfonzo.
Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. In Light's Dominion. ARC.
11:3 p. 38 (Summer '82). Cuba. [VA] Soriano,
Rafael. Rapturous essay on Soriano's techniques
of oneiric luminism.
-- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /35








Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. Man & Nature in Central
American Painting. ART. 10:1 p. 50 (Winter '81).
Central America. [VA] Central American painters.
A survey of the theme through its appearance in
the works of noted artists with diverse styles.
Pau-Llosa, Ricardo. Wifredo Lam. BRV. Wifredo
Lam. Max-Pol Fouchet. 7:4 p. 54 (October '78).
Cuba. [VA] Lam, Wifredo. Reviewer judges the
biography of the famed Cuban as valuable but
questions the author's near-canonization of his
subject.
Payne, Anthony John. Creative Politics. Ja-
maica's Approach to Independence. ART. 16:1
p. 4 (Spring '88). Jamaica. [GP] Independence.
Jamaica works at becoming a viable internation-
ally participating entity.
Pearson, Neale. The Good Doctor. BRV. Witness
to War: An American Doctor in El Salvador.
Charles Clements, M.D. 15:2 p. 47 (Spring '86). El
Salvador. [GP] War, ravages of. Personal account
of a US doctor who worked in a guerrilla zone.
Pearson, Neale. What Graham Greene Didn't Tell
Us. Five Accounts of the Torrijos Legacy. RES.
Getting to Know the General, The Story of an
Involvement. Graham Greene. Panama Odyssey.
William J. Jorden. Red, White & Blue Paradise,
The American Canal Zone in Panama. Herbert
and Mary Knapp. Panamb, Desastre... o De-
mocracia. Ricardo Arias Calder6n. The Limits of
Victory, The Ratification of the Panama Canal
Treaties. George D. Moffets III. 15:1 p. 26 (Winter
'86). Panama. [HI] Social change. Review essay
builds a profile of the National Guard under
Torrijos in Panama & its atrocities.
Pescatello, Ann. Ladies & Whores in Colonial
Brazil. ART. 5:2 p. 26 (April '73). Brazil. [HI]
Gender roles, women. Analysis of sex roles of
Brazilian women during colonial times.
Phelps de Cordova et als., Loretta. La Fortaleza
Replies. An Answer to Puerto Rican Culture at
the Turning Point. ART. 10:2 p. 32 (Spring '81).
Puerto Rico. [CC] Puerto Rico. Impassioned
refutations of 9:3 on the future of PR.
Philp, Geoffry. Florida Bound. A Jamaican
Complaint. POE. 12:1 p. 28 (Winter '83). Ja-
maica. [LA] Displacement. A lament in free verse
of life in exile.
Phipps IV, Lawrence C. Puerto Rico Without
Politics. BRV. Factories & Food Stamps: The
Puerto Rican Model of Development. Richard
Weisskoff. 16:2 p. 49 (Winter '88). Puerto Rico.
[EC] Political economy. A comprehensive picture
of Puerto Rico's economy without reference to
status.
Pietri, Pedro Juan. Puerto Rican Obituary. POE.
2:3 p. 14 (Fall '70). Puerto Rico. [LA] Pietri, Pedro.
A poem.
Pindling, Lyden 0. Hydrospace & the Law of the
Sea. ART. 6:3 p. 6 (July '74). Bahamas. [GP] Law
of the Sea. Examination of various proposals with
a hope that an acceptable regime of the sea will
emerge allowing cooperation.
Pino, Octavio. Revolutionary Cuban. ART. 6:4 p.
20 (October '74). Cuba. [CC] Language changes.
Soviet influences on Spanish spoken in Cuba
Plaza, Galo. Latin American Development. ART.
1:4 p. 5 (Winter '69). Latin America. [EC] Foreign
investment. Policy changes & options to facilitate
rapid development in LA.
Pollack-Eltz, Angelina. Black Carib Households.
BRV. Black Carib Household Structure: A Study in
Migration & Modernization. Nancy L. Solien
Gonzalez. 2:3 p. 6 (Fall '70). Central America. [TS]
Black Caribs. Reviews ethnography of the
remnants of Indian culture in coastal Cen. Am.
Pollack-Eltz, Angelina. The View from the Barrio.
BRV. The View from the Barrio. Lisa Redfield
Peattie. 2:1 p. 13 (Spring '70). Venezuela. [SC]
Culture & poverty. Reviews ethnography of barrio
life in Venezuela.
Pons, Frank Moya. The Tainos of Hispaniola.
The Island's First Inhabitants. ART. 13:4 p. 21
(Fall '84). Hispaniola. [TS] Tainos. The earliest
waves of migration & conquest in the Caribbean.
Pons de Alegria, Mela. Bread & Roses. BRV. The
Art of Revolution. Castro's Cuba. Dugald Stermer.
3:2 p. 13 (Summer '71). Cuba. [VA] Poster art.
36 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Examines the state of Cuban graphic arts in a
review of a collection of 96 Cuban posters.
Portes, Alejandro. Bringing Misery Along? BRV.
The Plight of Haitian Refugees. Jake C. Miller.
15:3 p. 41 (Winter '87). Haiti. [MI] Refugees,
Haitian. Overview of Haitian conditions & migra-
tion but no explanation of a adii tiiil,' of boats,
travel funds, or informal underground banking
system.
Portes, Alejandro. Notes on the Reconquest.
The Latin Americanization of the United
States? ART. 12:3 p. 22 (Summer '83). Latin
America. [MI] Immigration to US. Migrants as the
new colonists in an iterative process of conquest,
colonization & migration on the road to cultural
assimilation.
Portes, Alejandro. The Reality of Immigration
Reform. ED. 15:4 p. 3 (Spring '87). Third World.
[MI] US immigration policy. The law of supply &
demand confounds changes in legislation. It's still
a buyer's market.
Price, Richard. An Absence of Ruins? Seeking
Caribbean Historical Consciousness. ART.
14:3 p. 24 (Summer '85). Caribbean Archipelago.
[HI] Historical consciousness. Discovering the
hidden history extant in the region, contrary to
scholarly opinion.
Price, Richard. First-Time. Anthropology and
History Among the Saramaka. ART. 13:1 p. 20
(Winter '84). Suriname. [TS] Saramaka. Folk
history of their forebears provides ideological
cohesion & identity among the Surinamese de-
scendants of former slaves.
Price, Sally & Richard. Exotica & Commodity.
The Arts of the Suriname Maroons. ART. 9:4 p.
12 (Fall '80). Suriname. [TS] Culture as commod-
ity. Debunking the symbolic myths of Maroon art
perpetuated by ethnographers & commercially-
minded Maroons.
Price, Sally. Wives, Husbands & More Wives.
Sexual Opportunities Among the Saramaka.
ART. 12:2 p. 26 (Spring '83). Suriname. [TS]
Behavior, sexual. Sexual habits, attitudes &
behavior of Saramaka.
Prince, Althea V. Anansi Folk Culture. An
Expression of Caribbean Life. ART. 13:1 p. 24
(Winter '84). Antigua. [TS] Folklore. Colorful folk
tales from Antigua express underlying ideology.
Punnett, Betty Jane. Lady Law. BRV. Women &
Politics in Barbados, 1948-1981. Neville Duncan &
Kenneth O'Brien. 13:4 p. 50 (Fall '84). Barbados.
[CC] Women in politics. Increasing participation of
women in political arena.
Perez, Lisandro. Cuban Hippocrisy. BRV. The
Health Revolution in Cuba. Sergio Diaz-Briquets.
14:1 p. 48 (Winter '85). Cuba. [SC] Health care.
Study of mortality in Cuba from 1899-1953 casts a
new light on revolutionary claims of better
health care.
Perez Firmat, Gustavo. Bilingual Blues and
Turning the Times Tables. POE. 15:3 p. 37
(Winter '87). Cuba. [LA] P6rez Firmat, Gustavo.
Two poems on bilingualism.
Perez Firmat, Gustavo. Spic Chic. Spanglish As
Equipment for Living. ART. 15:3 p. 20 (Winter
'87). Puerto Rico. [CC] Spanglish. Cultural integra-
tion & linguistic assimilation.
Perez-Lopez, Jorge F. Cuba As An Oil Trader.
Petroleum Deals in A Falling Market. ART. 15:2
p. 26 (Spring '86). Cuba. [EC] Oil. Can the Soviets
afford to continue subsidizing Cuba's oil broker-
age business?
Perez-Venero, Mirna. A Novelist's Erotic Racial
Revenge. ART. 4:4 p. 24 (October '72). Panama.
[LC] Race relations. Review essay on Panama-
nian novelist Belaho & his provocative themes
which underscore racial prejudice in the Canal
Zone.

Q
Quant, Roger. Pithy Politics. BRV. La political de
Mexico hacia Centroamerica. Renb Herrera &
Mario Ojeda. 14:3 p. 49 (Summer '85). Mexico.
[GP] Foreign policy. Changes in Mexico's foreign
policy.
Quesada, Luis M. Panama Wounded. A Poet's
Reaction. BRV. Reconstrucci6n de los hechos.


Manuel Orestes Nieto. Darla cara. Manuel
Orestes Nieto. 13:1 p. 39 (Winter '84). Panama.
[LC] Panama Canal zone. A melodramatic military
allegory interspersed with Nieto's verse.

R
Rama, Carlos M. Peasants Considered. ART. 3:1
p. 13 (Spring '71). Latin America. [TS] Peasants. A
Uruguayan sociologist discusses the problem of
peasant movements, particularly those of Latin
America.
Ramchand, Kenneth. The Fate of Writing in the
West Indies. Reflections on Oral & Written
Literature. ART. 11:4 p. 16 (Fall '82). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [LC] Oral vs. written traditions.
Literary essay on differences between oral &
written literature & on the nature of WI writing.
Ramos, Aar6n G. Spanish Maimed. BRV. Tran-
sculturaci6n e interferencia linguistica en el Puerto
Rico contemporaneo. German de Granda. 1:1 p.
11 (Spring '69). Puerto Rico. [CC] Transcultura-
tion. Structural transformations of Spanish lan-
guage in Puerto Rico are seen as indicative of a
process of acculturation.
Ramsaran, Ramash. The "M" Factor of Tourism.
BRV. Tourism & Development, A Case Study of
the Commonwealth Caribbean. John M. Bryden.
7:1 p. 41 (January '75). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [EC] Tourism. An analysis of the multiplier
effect of tourism.
Ramsaran, Ramesh. Central American Eco-
nomic Integration. BRV. The Central American
Common Market, Economic Policies, Economic
Growth & Choices for the Future. Donald H.
McClelland. 6:2 p. 47 (April '74). Central America.
[ED] Integration, economic. The structure &
prospects of the Central American Common
Market.
Ramsaran, Ramesh. Latin American Economic
Integration. BRV. Latin American Economic Inte-
gration & U.S. Policy. Joseph Grunwald, Miguel S.
Wicnezek & Martin Carney. 5:4 p. 41 (October
'73). Latin America. [ED] Integration, economic.
The success & failure of attempts at economic
integration in Latin America.
Ramsaroop, Bishwaishwar. The Opposition in
Guyana A Response. ART. 8:2 p. 28 (Spring
'79). Guyana. [PS] Opposition, role of. The
government in power challenges the purported
position of the PPP (see 7:4).
Ramirez, Sergio. What the Sandinistas Want. Not
a new Cuba, but a new Nicaragua. ART. 8:3 p.
24 (Summer '79). Nicaragua. [PS] Sandinistas.
The struggle to become uniquely Nicaraguan.
Ramirez Novoa, Ezequiel. Relations with Cuba.
ART. 4:3 p. 22 (July '72). Cuba. [GP] International
relations. Appeal to the Latin American states to
reestablish diplomatic relations with Cuba.
Rangel, Carlos. Mexico & Other Dominoes. Form
& Substance in Mexican Foreign Policy. ART.
10:3 p. 8 (Summer '81). Mexico. [GP] foreign
policy. Mexico plays "good-cop" to US's "bad-
cop" in regional foreign policy scenarios.
Record, Barry. Does Fidel Eat More than Your
Father? Conversations in Cuba: A "Third
World" view of Cuba by a young Jamaican
writer. EXC. 4:4 p. 4 (October '72). Cuba. [CC]
Testimonial. A journey to Cuba to discover
whether revolutionary lifestyle was consistent with
its rhetoric.
Reich, Otto J. Commentary on Grenada. Diplo-
matic Magic. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (Summer '84).
Grenada. [GP] Invasion, 1983. Response from the
Department of State to various articles on Gre-
nada in 12:4.
Remy, Anselme. The Unholy Trinity. ART. 6:2 p.
14 (April '74). Martinique. [SC] Race vs. class.
Class, race & ethnicity in Caribbean are assessed
by focusing on Island of Martinique.
Revel, Jean-Frangois. The Trouble with Latin
America. ART. 8:3 p. 13 (Summer '79). Latin
America. [ED] Underdevelopment, indigenous.
Underdevelopment due to corruption, military
avarice & political immaturity.
Ribeiro, Darcy. Pieces of Mule. Excerpts from 0
Mulo. EXC. 14:4 p. 23 (Fall '85). Brazil. [LA]
Ribiero, Darcy. A taste of the Brazilian novelist's








fictional biography of an aging wealthy rancher.
Rice, Prudence M. The Rise & Fall of the Maya.
Mysteries of an Ancient Civilization. RES.
Origins of Maya Civilization, The. R. E. W. Adams,
ed. The Classic Maya Collapse. T. P. Culbert.
Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns. W. Ashmore,
ed. 13:4 p. 28 (Fall '84). Central America. [TS]
Maya. In-depth review of 3 excellent reference
volumes which address key questions about
Mayan civilization.
Richardson, Bonham C. Anniversary Pub-
lication. BRV. Slave Populations of the British
Caribbean 1807-1834. B. W. Higman. 15:2 p. 46
(Spring '86). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [HI]
Slavery. Impressive demographic survey illus-
trates the lives of slaves.
Richardson, Bonham C. Go West Young Man.
Black Barbadians & the Panama Canal. ART.
14:2 p. 10 (Spring '85). Barbados. [MI] Barbadians
in Panama. Historical causes behind Barbadian
labor migration to the Canal Zone.
Richardson, Bonham C. Invitation to a Party.
BRV. Bondsmen & Rebels: A Study of Master-
Slave Relations in Antigua. David Barry Gaspar.
15:3 p. 40 (Winter '87). Antigua. [HI] Slavery. A
contribution to explain why aborted 1736 slave
revolt was highly organized & island-wide.
Richardson, Bonham C. Slave Health. BRV. The
Caribbean Slave: A Biological History. Kenneth F.
Kiple. 15:4 p. 42 (Spring '87). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [HI] Slavery, health. Comparison of West
African & Caribbean disease, nutrition mortality,
& health conditions among slave populations.
Rivera, Mario A. Refugee Chess. Policy by
Default. ART. 13:4 p. 5 (Fall '84). Cuba. [Ml] US
immigration policy. When a migrant is a refugee,
red tape & politics precipitate reactive policy.
Rivera, Tomas. A Clash of Cultures. The Ballad
of Gregorio Cortez. CRV. 12:3 p. 32 (Summer
'83). Mexico. [PA] Legendary figure. Review of film
based on the book With His Pistol in His Hand by
Am6rico Paredes.
Robinson, Nancy. Mexico's Southern Neigh-
bors. BRV. Relaciones Centroamdrica-M6xico.
Panama: Crisis, soberania y el cardcter de sus
relaciones con M6xico, 1978-1986. Anayansi
Turner Yau. 16:2 p. 50 (Winter '88). Mexico. [GP]
Relations with Central America. Asserts that
Mexico stands in relation to its Southern neighbors
much as US does to Mexico.
Robinson, Nancy. Why Migrate. BRV. The Carib-
bean In Europe. Aspects of the West Indian
Experience in Britain, France & The Netherlands.
Colin Brock, ed. 16:1 p. 41 (Spring '88). Caribbean
Archipelago. [MI] Emigration to Europe. Essays on
the migration of West Indians to Europe.
Roca, Sergio. Flawed Analysis. BRV. Revo-
lutionary Cuba: The Challenge of Economic
Growth with Equity. Claes Brundenius. 15:4 p. 40
Spring '87). Cuba. [SC] Socioeconomic indica-
tors. Weak analysis attempts to support Cuba's
claim to equitable growth & economic self-
sufficiency but overlooks dependency on Moscow.
Rodriguez, Miguelangelo. Chagito, The
Dreamer. A Puerto Rican Short Story. SS. 11:3
p. 12 (Summer '82). Puerto Rico. [LA] Childhood
fantasies. A young boy's fantasies of pirates
sustain him through his chores.
Rodriguez Beruff, Jorge. 100 Years of Military.
BRV. 10O Ahos de ejercitoperuano: Frustraciones
y cambios. Victor Villanueva. 5:1 p. 44 (January
'73). Peru. [PS] Military. An analysis of literature
on the Peruvian military.
Rodriguez Beruff, Jorge. The Dominican Inva-
sion. RES. The Dominican Republic: Rebellion &
Repression. Carlos Maria Guti6rrez. The Domini-
can Intervention. Abraham F. Lowenthal. 5:4 p. 45
(October'73). Dominican Republic. [GP] Invasion,
1965. Evaluation of 2 books that analyze the 1965
"invasion" of the Dominican Republic.
Rodriguez Cruz, Juan. A Puerto Rican History of
Puerto Rico. BRV. Breve Historia de Puerto Rico.
Loyda Figueroa. 3:1 p. 14 (Spring '71). Puerto
Rico. [HI] Social change. Neither too pro Spain nor
too pro US.
Rod6n, Francisco. Painting Jorge Luis Borges.
Reflections by the Artist. ARC. 10:3 p. 53


(Summer '81). Argentina. [VA] Rod6n, Francisco.
A moving account of an artist's experience while
painting the venerable writer (see cover photo).
Rogers, Claudia. What's A Rasta? ART. 7:1 p. 9
(January '75). Jamaica. [RL] Rastafarians. An
introduction to the millennial Rastafarian move-
ment of Jamaica whose members worship Haile
Selassie & smoke the wisdom weed ganja.
Rogers, William D. & Jeffrey A. Meyers. The
Reagan Administration & Latin America. An
Uneasy Beginning. ART. 11:2 p. 14 (Spring '82).
Latin America. [GP] US policy. Big Stick policy
without speaking softly.
Ropp, Steve C. Cuba & Panama. Signaling Left &
Going Right? ART. 9:1 p. 15 (Winter '80).
Caribbean Basin. [GP] International relations.
Panama's multiplicity of foreign policies allows for
partial support of Cuba without total alignment.
Ropp, Steve C. Nice Show! BRV. Anatomy of a
Fraud: the 1984 Presidential Election in Panama.
Raul Arias de Para. 14:4 p. 51 (Fall '85). Panama.
[PS] Elections, 1984. Documents fraud ensuring
election of PRD candidate.
Rosario, Charles. The Phenomenology of Eve-
ryday Life. Puerto Rico Becomes A Mass
Society. ART. 9:3 p. 28 (Summer '80). Puerto
Rico. [CC] Everyday life. Lamentations on the loss
of communitas & the sense of shared experience
in everyday life.
Rosenberg, Mark B. Central America Dev-
astated. ED. 12:2 p. 3 (Spring '83). Central
America. [GP] Conflict, political. Even changes in
government & cessation of hostilities cannot
assuage the destruction wrought over the years to
Central America.
Rosenberg, Mark B. Honduran Scorecard. Mili-
tary & Democrats in Central America. ART.
12:1 p. 12 (Winter '83). Honduras. [PS] Conflict,
political. Last holdout in a declining neighborhood
falters.
Rosenberg, Mark B. Interviewing Pefa Gomez.
Leader of the Dominican Revolutionary Party.
INT. 9:4 p. 10 (Fall '80). Dominican Republic. [PS]
Peha G6mez, Jos6 Francisco. Dynamic Domini-
can leader discusses position, role & future of his
party & his view of US/Caribbean relations.
Rosenberg, Mark B. Nicaragua & her Neighbors.
ED. 10:1 p. 4 (Winter '81). Nicaragua. [GP]
International relations. Central American political
interaction considered from the nexus of
Nicaragua.
Rosenberg, Mark B. The Panamanian Con-
nection. BRV. The Path Between the Seas: The
Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914. David
McCullough. 7:3 p. 61 (July '78). Panama. [HI]
Panama Canal. Favorably compares this history
of the Panama Canal to other books.
Routte Gomez, Eneid. The Politics of Intuition.
ED. 13:3 p. 3 (Summer '84). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [SI] Gender roles, women. Toward the
liberation of Caribbean women & the rein-
statement of intuition.
Routt6 G6mez, Eneid. 100 Years of Solitude.
BRV. Cien Ahos de Solitude. Gabriel Garcia
Marquez. 100 Years of Solitude. Gabriel Garcia
Marquez. 2:1 p. 5 (Spring '70). Colombia. [LC]
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Reviews the classic
allegorical novel of life in a near-mythical society.
Routtb Gomez, Eneid. The Agony of Puerto
Rican Art. ART. 9:3 p. 16 (Summer '80). Puerto
Rico. [CC] Culture & politics. The nationalization of
art & art as the national conscience.
Roy, Joaquin. The Divided Kingdom. BRV. Spain
& the Loss of America. Timothy E. Anna. 15:2 p.
48 (Spring '86). Latin America. [HI] Spanish
Empire, decline of. Collapse of a 300 year empire.
Ryan, Selwyn. The Church That Williams Built.
Electoral Possibilities in Trinidad & Tobago.
ART. 10:2 p. 12 (Spring '81). Trinidad. [PS]
Electoral democracy. The death of Williams alters
the political probabilities.
Ryan, Selwyn. The Grenada Questions. A Revo-
lutionary Balance Sheet. ART. 13:3 p. 6 (Sum-
mer '84). Grenada. [GP] Revolution, 1979. The '79
revolution as an indictment of the Westminster
model & the economic issues it raised.
Ryan, Selwyn. A Shortcut to Development? ED.


12:3 p. 3 (Summer '83). Trinidad. [ED] Ad-
ministrative deficiencies. Public & civil service
infrastructure is seen as a necessary part of
development.
Ryan, Selwyn. Tobago's Quest for Autonomy.
From Colony to Ward to... ART. 14:2 p. 7 (Spring
'85). Trinidad. [PS] Status, political. Sibling rivalry
in the two-island republic, based on different
cultures, ties & economic needs.

S
Sabines, Jaime. In the House of the Day. POE.
2:4 p. 4 (Winter '70). Mexico. [LA] Sabines, Jaime.
More on aid as a bribe for alliance against the
opposition.
Safa, Helen I. A Tale of Wit & Woe. BRV. Benjy
Lopez. Barry B. Levine. 9:3 p. 41 (Summer '80).
Puerto Rico. [MI] Diaspora, Puerto Rican. A pithy
review that praises the work while condemning the
author.
Salas, Luis P. The Traumas of Exile. Contra
Viento y Marea. BRV. Contra Viento Y Marea.
Grupo Arieto. 9:1 p. 42 (Winter '80). Cuba. [MI]
Cuban exiles. Relates the traumatizing of the first
wave of youthful migrants to Miami.
Salazar-Carillo, Jorge. Is the Cuban Economy
Knowable? A National Accounting Parable.
ART. 15:2 p. 24 (Spring '86). Cuba. [EC] Federal
budget. Questions the reliability of accounting
system used to evaluate Cuba's economy.
Salazar-Carrillo, Jorge. An Old Refrain. BRV. La
economic desigual: Empleo y distribuci6n en
M6xico. Manuel Gollas. 15:4 p. 43 (Spring '87).
Mexico. [ED] Economic inequality. Examination of
Mexican economics, looks at linkages between
unemployment in income distribution & the
stimulators of disposable income in urban areas.
Salazar-Carrillo, Jorge. Thoughts From a Policy-
Maker. BRV. En defense de Mexico: pensamiento
econ6mico politico. Jesus Silva Herzog. 15:2 p. 46
(Spring '86). Mexico. [EC] Political economy. Two
volume collection of the best articles of the
influential political economist & his contribution to
shaping economic policy from the 1920s on.
Sanchez, Luis Rafael. La Guagua Area/The
Airbus. A Short Story. SS. 13:3 p. 26 (Summer
'84). Puerto Rico. [LA] Sanchez, Luis Rafael. An
airplane is transformed into a caricature of a
typical Latin American bus through hilarious
happenings.
Sanchez, Nestor D. What Was Uncovered in
Grenada. The Weapons & Documents. ART.
12:4 p. 20 (Fall '83). Grenada. [GP] Cuban
influence. The scandal of the militarization of the
Caribbean erupts.
Sanchez Flores, Roger. Revolutionary Comics.
Political Humor from Nicaragua. ART. 15:1 p.
16 (Winter '86). Nicaragua. [VA] Political cartoons.
A collection of cartoons by R6ger Sanchez.
Sanchez Korrol, Virginia E. Between Two
Worlds. Educated Puerto Rican Migrant
Women. ART. 12:3 p. 26 (Summer '83). Puerto
Rico. [MI] Migrant women. The role of professional
immigrant women in the early New York Puerto
Rican colony.
Sanchez Korrol, Virginia. On the Other Side of
the Ocean. The work experiences of early
Puerto Rican migrant women. ART. 8:1 p. 22
(January '79). Puerto Rico. [MI] Migrant women.
Vignettes of hardship, adjustment & survival
strategies of early immigrants.
Sanchez Vilella, Roberto. Puerto Rico & the U.S.
The Political Economy of Later-day Bootstrap.
ART. 13:1 p. 4 (Winter '84). Puerto Rico. [PS]
Status, political. The long-term consequences of
Operation Bootstrap & economic malaise.
Sanderson, Steven E. So Near... BRV. Distant
Neighbors: A Portrait of the Mexicans. Alan
Riding. 14:3 p. 49 (Summer '85). Mexico. [CC]
Mexico. In spite of opening psychobabble, re-
viewer found good chapters on weak opposition &
economic models. Not the definitive work on
Mexico.
Santamaria Salamanca, Ricardo & Gabriel Silva
Lujan. Colombia in the Eighties. A Political
Regime in Transition. ART. 15:1 p. 12 (Winter
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /37


I -








'86). Colombia. [PS] Conflict, political. The truce-
breaking M-19 confrontation forces popular sup-
port to the right.
Sathyamurthy, T.V. Will Allende Make It? ART.
4:1 p. 7 (April '72). Chile. [PS] Social change.
Analyzes the events that changed Chile's political
& economic alignments.
Schneider, Ben. Story's Story. BRV. Industry, the
State & Public Policy. Dale Story. 16:1 p. 39
(Spring '88). Mexico. [EC] Industrial policy. Docu-
ments a more active role of the private industrial
sector in Mexico's economy than is commonly
known.
Schneider, Ben. Unflattering Analysis. BRV.
Latin American Political Economy: Financial Crisis
& Political Change. Jonathan Hartlyn & Samuel A.
Morley, eds. 16:1 p. 41 (Spring '88). Latin America
& the Caribbean. [EC] Political economy. Policy
blunders that culminate in economic & interna-
tional debt crises.
Schoenhals, Kai. A Caribbean Lilliput. Scru-
tinizing the Grenada Skirmish. RES. The Gre-
nada Papers. Paul Seabury & Walter A. McDou-
gall, eds. Documents Pertaining to Relations
Between Grenada, the USSR & Cuba. United
States Information Agency. Grenada Documents:
An Overview & Selection. Michael Ledeen &
Herbert Romerstein, eds. Grenada: Revolution &
Invasion. Anthony Payne, Paul Sutton, & Tony
Thorndike. 14:2 p. 34 (Spring '85). Grenada. [GP]
Invasion, 1983. Reviewing some of the invasion of
post-invasion books; picks & pans.
Schoenhals, Kai. An Extraordinary Migration.
Jews in the Dominican Republic. ART. 14:4 p.
17 (Fall '85). Dominican Republic. [SC] Jews.
History of an unusual resettlement experiment.
Schwartz, Francis. The Bureaucracy of Music in
Puerto Rico. ART. 9:3 p. 19 (Summer '80). Puerto
Rico. [PA] Music & politics. Politicization of
performing arts to enhance the cause of state-
hood.
Schwarzbeck, Frank. Recycling a Forgotten
Colony. From Green Hell to Outer Space in
French Guiana. ART. 13:2 p. 22 (Spring '84).
French Guiana. [ED] Modernization. Underde-
velopment takes on a different meaning in the last
French colony.
Seaga, Edward. The Role of the Opposition in
Jamaica. ART. 7:4 p. 27 (October '78). Jamaica.
[PSi Opposition, role of. Opposition is part of the
constitutional system & has an ordained role.
Seaga, Rt. Hon. Edward. Toward Resolving the
Debt Crisis. ED. 16:1 p. 3 (Spring '88). Hemi-
sphere. [ED] Debt. Towards alleviating the rising
international debt.
Segal, Aaron. Background to Grenada. When the
Social Scientists Invaded. RES. Stratification in
Grenada. M. G. Smith. The Hero & the Crowd in a
Colonial Polity. Archie Singham. 12:4 p. 40 (Fall
'83). Grenada. [SC] Social research. Review
essay of an earlier scientific invasion of Grenada &
their utility as predictive tools.
Segal, Aaron. Bahama Watching. RES. Bahamas
Handbook. Etienne Dupuch, Jr. The Quiet Revolu-
tion in the Bahamas. Doris Johnson. Bahamas
Independence Issue. Third World Group. The
Innocent Island: Abaco in the Bahamas. Zoe C.
Durrell. A History of the Bahamas. Michael Craton.
Grand Bahama. P.J.H. Barratt. Neuroses in the
Sun. Timothy 0. McCartney. The Best of Pot Luck.
Nassau Guardian. 6:3 p. 40 (July '74). Bahamas.
[CC] Bahamas. Reviews 8 works that help us
understand how Bahamas became independent.
Segal, Aaron. Caribbean Architecture. The Great
& Small Houses of the West Indies. RES.
Caribbean Georgian, The Great & Small Houses
of The West Indies. Pamela Gosner. Historic
Architecture of the Caribbean. David Buisseret.
12:1 p. 32 (Winter '83). Caribbean Archipelago.
[VA] Architecture. Review essay on books provid-
ing an attractive introduction to WI architecture.
Segal, Aaron. The Caribbean in the Year 2000.
ART. 8:3 p. 4 (Summer '79). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [ED] Economic forecast. Forecasting
future trends in region's growth.
Segal, Aaron. Collecting the Caribbean. The
Not-So-Hidden Politics of Explanation. RES.
38 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Latin America & Caribbean Contemporary Re-
cord, Vol. 1: 1981-82. Jack Hopkins, ed. The
Newer Caribbean: Decolonization, Democracy &
Development. Paget Henry & Carl Stone, eds.
Contemporary Caribbean: A Sociological Reader.
Susan Craig. The Restless Caribbean: Changing
Patterns of International Relations. Richard Millet
& W. Marvin Wills, eds. Crisis in the Caribbean.
Fitzroy Ambursley & Robin Cohen, eds. Readings
in Caribbean History & Economics: An Introduc-
tion to the Region. Roberta Marx Delson, ed. 13:2
p. 29 (Spring '84). Caribbean Basin. [GP] Carib-
bean Basin. A review essay of anthologies &
edited works on the Basin, all found wanting.
Segal, Aaron. Cross-Cultural Gold. Cannabis in
the Caribbean. RES. Working Men & Ganja.
Melanie Creagan Dreher. Cannabis in Costa Rica.
William E. Carter. Ganja in Jamaica. Vera Rubin &
Lambros Comitas. 11:4 p. 26 (Fall '82). Caribbean
Basin. [SI] Drugs, cannabis. Biting, almost tongue-
in-cheek survey of the literature on a major
agricultural export of the Third World plus pithy
comments about funding agencies & savvy re-
searchers.
Segal, Aaron. Cuba & the Caribbean. RES. Les
Etats-Unis et la Revolution Cubaine. Manuela
Semidei. Cantate d'Octobre. Rene Depestre. Half
A Loaf: Canada's Semi-Role Among Developing
Countries Clyde Sanger. Havana Journal. Andrew
Salkey. 4:1 p. 40 (April '72). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [GP] International relations. Reviews 4
books to understand relation between Cuba & rest
of the Caribbean.
Segal, Aaron. Cubanology. RES. Kennedy Et La
Revolution Cubaine. Manuela Semidei. Cuba,
Castro & Revolution. Jaime Suchliki. Cuba, Castro
& the United States. Philip W. Bonsai. Revolu-
tionary Change in Cuba. Carmelo Mesa-Lago.
Slave Society in Cuba. Franklin W. Knight. Cuba:
The Pursuit of Freedom. Hugh Thomas. 5:1 p. 40
(January '73). Cuba. [CC] Cuba. A review of 6 sad
commentaries on why books about Cuba are
published & on the state of Cuban intellectual life.
Segal, Aaron. Cubans in Africa. ART. 7:3 p. 4
(July '78). Cuba. [GP] Military presence. In-depth
survey of the role & influence of Cuba's military
presence in Africa.
Segal, Aaron. Dance & Diplomacy. The Cuban
National Ballet. ART. 9:1 p. 30 (Winter '80).
Cuba. [PA] Alonzo, Alicia. The national ballet
disseminates Cuban culture & joo:j .'.. iil on tour.
Segal, Aaron. Growing Pains: Latin America's
Auto Industry. RES. Transnational Corporation
versus the State: The Political Economy of the
Mexican Auto Industry. Douglas E. Bennett &
Kenneth E. Sharpe. Public Policy & Industrial
Development: The Case of the Mexican Auto
Parts Industry. Mark Bennett. Transnational Cor-
poration & the Latin American Automobile Indus-
try. Rhys Jenkins. Political Economy of the Latin
American Motor Vehicle Industry. Rich Kronish &
Kenneth S. Mericle. 15:4 p. 24 (Spring '87). Latin
America. [EC] Auto industry. Assesses the
contribution of 4 books to understanding ability of
the LA's auto industry to compete internationally.
Segal, Aaron. The Land of Look Behind. A Film
About Reggae & Rastafarianism. CRV. 12:2 p.
36 (Spring '83). Jamaica. [PA] Rastafarians (The
Land of Look Behind). Uneven film better as a
study of reggae in Jamaica than Rastafarianism.
Segal, Aaron. A New World Or Old Bargain
Town? BRV. Readings in the Political Economy of
the Caribbean. Norman Girvan & Owen Jefferson,
eds. 4:3 p. 32 (July '72). Caribbean, Common-
wealth. [EC] Political economy. Reviewer ques-
tions whether the radical New World Group has
the cures for the diseases it diagnoses.
Segal, Aaron. Poetry & Politics in Nicaragua.
RES. Nueva Antologia Poetica. Ernesto Cardenal.
Zero Hour & Other Documentary Poems. Ernesto
Cardenal. 10:1 p. 26 (Winter '81). Nicaragua. [LC]
Cardenal, Ernesto. An essay on the 5 dominant
themes found in the poetry of Cardenal.
Segal, Aaron. Rockers. A Different Image of
Jamaica. CRV. 10:2 p. 38 -.pr-ng '81). Jamaica.
[PA] Reggae (Rockers). Thumbs-up review of
upbeat tuneful film about Rastafarian musicians.


Segal, Aaron. "Si Abuela..." Garcia Marquez's
Erotic Fairy Tale. CRV. 13:4 p. 34 (Fall '84).
Colombia. [PA] Garcia Marquez, Gabriel
(Erendira). Review of Erendira, a French-style soft
porn film.
Segal, Aaron. Too Much of a Good Thing. RES.
Ideology, Faith & Family Planning in Latin Amer-
ica. J. Mayone Stycos. Political Science in
Population Studies. Richard L. Clinton, William S.
Flash, R. Kenneth Godwin, eds. El Control de la
Natalidad Como Arma del Imperialismo. Jos6
Consuegra. Population Policies & Growth in Latin
America. David Chaplin, ed. Essays on Population
Policy. Edwin D. Driver. 5:4 p. 37 (October '73).
Third World. [SC] Population policy. The problem
of overpopulation.
Segal, Aaron. Which Way the French West
Indies? BRV. Fecondite et Famille en Martinique.
Henri Leridon, Elisabeth Zucker, Maite Cazenave.
Pour La Guadeloupe Independante. Monique
Vernhes & Jean Bloch. Le Fait National Guade-
loupeen. Laurent Farugia. 5:3 p. 39 (July '73).
Caribbean, French-speaking. [PS] Status, politi-
cal. In Guadeloupe & Martinique, ties to France
are strained to breaking point.
Segal, Bernard E. Who Got the Oil? BRV.
US-Mexico Relations: Economic & Social As-
pects. Clark W. Reynolds & Carlos Tello, ed. 13:2
p. 54 (Spring '84). Mexico. [EC] Oil. A comparison
of Mexican & American contributors to this volume
shows Mexican analysts focus more on structural
conditions as economic constraints.
Semaj, Leahcim T. Inside Rasta. The Future of a
Religious Movement. ART. 14:1 p. 8 (Winter
'85). Jamaica. [RL] Rastafarians. Discusses the
probable future of the movement based on past
transformations.
Serbin, Andres. The Nonexistent Caribbean. ED.
14:1 p. 3 (Winter'85). Caribbean, Commonwealth.
[GP] Cultural perceptions. Real & imagined
boundaries between Latin America & the
Caribbean.
Serbin, Andres. The Venezuelan Reception.
Human Resources & Development. ART. 11:1
p. 42 (Fall '82). Caribbean Basin. [MI] Venezuela,
migration to. Presents a model for immigration
policy.
Serrano, Sandra. Exhibition for National Peace.
ART. 15:1 p. 33 (Winter '86). Panama. [VA] Art &
politics. Predictive powers of Panama's political
artist Pretto draws crowds for his exhibition
promoting peace.
Serrano, Sandra. Searching for Pretto. Politics &
Art in Panama. EXC. 15:1 p. 28 (Winter '86).
Panama. [VA] Pretto, Rogelio. Excerpt from book
on the political artist, detailing author's journey to
interview Pretto at his mountain retreat.
Sheinman, Susan. Caribbean Inferno. BRV. The
Day the World Ended. Gordon Thomas & Max
Morgan Witts. 1:4 p. 12 (Winter '69). Martinique.
[HI] Natural disaster, volcanic eruption. Reviews a
gripping account of the volcanic destruction of St.
Pierre, Martinique in 1902.
Shelton, Marie-Denise. Africa Revisited. Two
French West Indian Novels. RES. Batouala.
Rene Maran. Heremakhonon. Maryse Conde. 9:2
p. 33 (Spring '80). Caribbean, French-speaking.
[LC] African origins. Review of 2 novels by
Caribbean writers on their experiences in Africa;
one an expose of French colonialism & the other a
personal quest in search of racial identity.
Shepherd, Philip. Colombia's Tobacco Road.
Feudalism Versus Capitalism in the Tobacco
Fields. BRV. Aparceros en Boyacd: Los conde-
nados del tabaco. Maria Cristina Salazar. 13:1 p.
36 (Winter '84). Colombia. [EC] Culture, tobacco.
What causes exploitation & who benefits.
Sigmund, Paul E. Fidel & the Friars. Castro
Confesses to Friar Betto. BRV. Fidel y la
Religion: Conversaciones con Frei Betto. Oficina
de Publicaciones del consejo de Estado. 15:2 p.
30 (Spring '86). Cuba. [RL] Castro & Catholics.
Review of a best-seller in Cuba based on a
Brazilian clergyman's interview of Castro.
Silva Gotay, Samuel. Followers of the New Faith.
BRV. Followers of the New Faith. Emilio Willems.
2:1 p. 11 (Spring '70). Latin America. [RL]








Protestantism. Review about Protestant move-
ments in LA.
Sims, Harold. Civilistas. BRV. La Migracidn
Espanola de 1939 y los Inicios del Marxismo-
Leninismo en la Republic Dominicana. Bernardo
Vega. 14:4 p. 50 (Fall '85). Dominican Republic.
[HI] Spanish immigrants. The role of Communist
Spanish exiles emigrating to the DR after the
Spanish Civil War & their lack of success under
Trujillo.
Sims, Harold. The Samurai & the Machete. BRV.
Siete migraciones japoneses en Mexico, 1890-
1978. Maria Elena Ota Mishima. 13:3 p. 54
(Summer '84). Mexico. [SC] Japanese immigra-
tion. In-depth, chronological treatment of 7 waves
of Japanese immigration to Mexico.
Small, Augustus C. Studying in the States. A
Rap Session. ART. 11:4 p. 22 (Fall '82). Carib-
bean, Commonwealth. [CC] Foreign students.
Foreign students learn Tom Wolf was right.
Small, Augustus C. This Train. A St. Lucian
Short Story. SS. 9:2 p. 24 (Spring '80). St. Lucia.
[LA] Displacement. Tale about an emigrant return-
ing from the US.
Smart, lan I. Big Rage & Big Romance. RES.
Pensamientos del Negro Cubena. Carlos Guill-
ermo Wilson. Cuentos del Negro Cubena. Carlos
Guillermo Wilson. 8:3 p. 34 (Summer '79).
Panama. [LC] Race identity. Review examines the
element of "tremendismo" in the short stories &
poetry of the Panamanian writer known
as Cubena.
Smart, lan I. Discovering the Caribbean. RES.
The Complete Caribbeana 1900-1975. Lambros
Comitas. Caribbean Writers: A Bio-Bibliographi-
cal-Critical Encyclopedia. Donald E. Herdeck et al.
10:3 p. 32 (Summer '81). Caribbean Archipelago.
[LC] Reference. Accolades to 2 excellent additions
to the Caribbean reference collection.
Smart, lan I. Dual Identity. BRV. Afro-Hispanic
Poetry 1940-1980: From Slavery to "Negritude" in
South American Verse. Marvin A. Lewis. 14:1 p.
48 (Winter '85). Latin America. [LC] Literature
survey. A theoretical work from a sociological
perspective that views racism in South America as
a source of motivation for 9 black poets.
Smith, Larry J. Smith on Smiths' Smith. BRV. To
Shoot Hard Labor: The Life & Times of Samuel
Smith, an Antiguan Workingman, 1877-1982.
Keithlyn B. Smith & Fernando C. Smith. 16:1 p. 42
(Spring '88). Antigua. [HI] Testimonial. A captivat-
ing oral autobiography of the authors' grandfather
serves as an example of creative history.
Smith, Nigel J. H. Caribbean Edge. BRV. Carib-
bean Edge. Bernard Nietschmann. 9:2 p. 20
(Spring '80). Nicaragua. [TS] Miskito Indians.
Colorful & engaging recounting of a research
project on turtles among the Miskitos.
Smith, Wayne S. Commentary on Grenada.
Wayne S. Smith Replies. LED. 13:3 p. 4
(Summer '84). Grenada. [GP] Invasion, 1983.
Author replies to Reich's response (13:3) to his
article on Grenada.
Smith, Wayne S. The Grenada Complex in
Central America. Action & Negotiation in US
Foreign Policy. ART. 12:4 p. 34 (Fall '83).
Caribbean Basin. [GP] US policy. The invasion as
a symptom of US security paranoia.
Snyder, Gilbert B. Political Ornithology. BRV.
Bird of Life, Bird of Death. Jonathan Evan Maslow.
16:1 p. 38 (Spring '88). Guatemala. [LC] Endan-
gered species. Ostensibly a naturalist's search for
an endangered species, poetic parallels between
nature & politics are drawn.
Solaun, Mauricio, Eduardo Velez, & Cynthia
Smith. Claro, Trigueno, Moreno. Testing for
Race in Cartagena. ART. 15:3 p. 18 (Winter '87).
Colombia. [SC] Stratification, racial. Proliferation
of terms in class-conscious Colombia connote &
denote shades of racial characteristics.
Soto, Pedro Juan. Fiction or Reality. Testimony
of an Author in Crisis. ART. 9:3 p. 15 (Summer
'80). Puerto Rico. [PS] Conflict, political. An author
agonizes over his ability to express himself when
the plot is the real death of his son.
Soto, Pedro Juan. The Sniper. EXC. 1:3 p. 3 (Fall
'69). Puerto Rico. [LA] Soto, Pedro Juan. Excerpt


from Soto's novel about a writer caught up in a
revolution.
Spinner, Jr., Thomas J. The Emperor Burnham
Has Lost His Clothes. Guyana's Political Life in
Disarray. ART. 9:4 p. 4 (Fall '80). Guyana. [PS]
Burnham, Forbes. Conditions contributing to the
disintegration of Burnham's empire.
Spinner, Jr., Thomas J. Guyana Update. Politi-
cal, Economic, Moral Bankruptcy. ART. 11:4 p.
8 (Fall '82). Guyana. [PSi Burnham, Forbes.
Economic crisis is added to an already fractured
nation.
Spinner, Jr., Thomas J. When They Worked in
Guyana. BRV. The History of the Guyanese
Working People, 1881-1905. Walter Rodney. 13:2
p. 52 (Spring '84). Guyana. [HI] Working class.
Early history of labor relations in Guyana should
have promoted class solidarity; subsequent ethnic
conflict not historically inevitable.
St. Vincent, Paul. Summit. POE. 7:3 p. 60 (July
'78). Antigua. [LA] St. Vincent, Paul. A political
verse of development.
Stanton, Howard. Model City: Dawn or Disaster?
BRV. Model Cities Program: Municipality of San
Juan. City Demonstration Agency. 1:1 p. 9
'..prg '69). Puerto Rico. [SC] Urban planning.
Critique of San Juan's bid for Model City money,
with a 5-point strategy for revision.
Stella, Tomas. Cerro Maravilla. Injustice in
Puerto Rico. ART. 9:3 p. 12 (Summer'80). Puerto
Rico. [PS] Conflict, political. The ambush of young
revolutionaries by police mushroom into a Water-
gate-style cover-up & enflames the political scene.
Stephens, John D. & Evelyne Huber Stephens.
Manley Prepares to Return. PNP Options in
Today's Jamaica. ART. 16:2 p. 16 (Winter '88).
Jamaica. [PS] PNP. The PNP gears up to return
to power.
Stepick, Alex. Haitian Coffee. BRV. Le Commerce
du Cafe en Haiti: Habitants, Speculateurs et
Exportateurs. Christian A. Girault. 14:2 p. 51
(Spring '85). Haiti. [EC] Coffee trade. Extensive
fieldwork of the coffee trade: small-scale pro-
ducers bear brunt of taxes; exporters & brokers
enjoy the lion's share of profits.
Stepick, Alex. Ideology of Migration. BRV. Carib-
bean Migrants: Environment & Human Survival on
St. Kitts & Nevis. Bonham Richardson. 16:1 p. 39
(Spring '88). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [MI] St.
Kitts & Nevis. Migration as a tradition, grounded in
structural conditions & necessary for survival.
Changes in political economy redirect the flow
over time.
Stepick, Alex. The New Haitian Exodus. The
Flight From Terror & Poverty. ART. 11:1 p. 14
(Fall '82). Haiti. [MI] Kleptocracy, flight from.
Historical factors of underdevelopment contribute
to a long tradition of Haitian migration.
Stevens-Arroyo, Antonio M. A Taino Tale. A
Mythological Statement of Social Order. ART.
13:4 p. 24 (Fall '84). Hispaniola. [LA] Myth.
Eirn-o--gr aph., .. riiin by a priest who accompanied
Columbus.
Stevens-Arroyo, Antonio M. Theological Opium.
BRV. El pensamiento Cristiano revolucionario en
America Latina y el Caribe. Samuel Silva Gotay.
14:1 p. 50 (Winter '85). Latin America & the
Caribbean. [RL] Liberation theology. Argues that
the revolutionary force of the liberation church is a
reaction against socialism, capitalism, develop-
mentalism & Latin American leftism.
Stoetzer, 0. Carlos. Dreams of Integration. ART.
7:2 p. 28 (April '78). Caribbean Archipelago. [HI]
Integration movements. History of movements
promoting economics & political integration in the
region.
Stone, Carl. Jamaica's 1980 Elections. What
Manley Did Do; What Seaga Need Do. ART.
10:2 p. 5 (Spring '81). Jamaica. [PS] Elections,
1980. A change of parties & shift in direction for
Jamaica.
Stone, Carl. The Jamaican Reaction. Grenada &
the Political Stalemate. ART. 12:4 p. 31 (Fall
'83). Jamaica. [GP] Invasion, 1983; reaction to.
The Grenadian incident from the perspective of
Jamaican public opinion.
Stone, Carl. Mirror, Mirror. BRV. Mirror, Mirror:


Identity Race & Protest in Jamaica. Rex Nettle-
ford. 4:4 p. 28 (October '72). Jamaica. [SC] Racial
pluralism. Cause & consequence of racial unrest
as viewed by Nettleford's multi-racial ideology.
Stone, Carl. Race & Economic Power in Jamaica.
Toward the Creation of a Black Bourgeoisie.
ART. 16:1 p. 10 (Spring '88). Jamaica. [SC] Race
& economics. A shift in the composition of the
Jamaican middle class.
Stone, Carl. Running Out Of Options in Jamaica.
Seaga & Manley Compared. ART. 15:3 p. 10
(Winter '87). Jamaica. [PS] Manley, Michael &
Edward Seaga. Measuring an administration's
achievements & shortcomings against its prede-
cessor's.
Stone, Carl. Seaga Is In Trouble. Polling the
Jamaican Polity in Mid-Term. ART. 11:4 p. 4
(Fall '82). Jamaica. [PS] Opinion poll, 1982.
Decline in the popularity of the JLP & perceived
grievances of the people.
Stone, Samuel. Costa Rica's Political Turmoil.
Can Production Support the Welfare State?
ART. 10:1 p. 42 (Winter '81). Costa Rica. [PS]
Political economy. Sympathy for her neighbor's
resistance groups creates tension with Costa
Rica's ruling groups.
Story, Dale. Poor Bodies, Poor Spirits. BRV.
Religion & Political Conflict in Latin America.
Daniel H. Levine. 16:1 p. 38 (Spring '88). Latin
America. [RL] Religion & politics. Religious belief
& organizations as a nexus for political reform
in LA.
Sutherland, Elizabeth. Young Cuba. EXC. 1:4 p. 9
(Winter '69). Cuba. [SI] Enculturation, political.
Personal account of a visit to the youth camps of
revolutionary Cuba.
Suarez, Andres. John Wayne on Cuba. BRV. The
Losers. Paul D. Bethel. 1:4 p. 11 (Winter '69).
Cuba. [GP] Soviet penetration. Pronounces this
rabid work a loser.
Suarez-Murias, Marguerite C. An Important Li-
brary on the Caribbean. The American Geo-
graphical Society Library at The University of
Wisconsin. ART. 9:2 p. 52 t spring '80). Carib-
bean Basin. [CC] Library collections. One of
largest & most extensive collections of research
materials for Caribbeanists.
Szuchman, Mark D. The Case for Indigenous
Development. The Poverty of Progress. BRV.
Poverty of Progress: Latin America in the Nine-
teenth Century. E. Bradford Burns. 10:3 p. 28
(Summer '81). Latin America. [HI] Development,
consequences of. Reviewer finds support in this
book for his case that underdevelopment is a
result of the clash between cultures.
Szuchman, Mark D. On the Balkanization of
America. A Response to Montaner's "On the
Antillian Identity". ART. 7:4 p. 42 (October '78).
Caribbean, Hispanic. [CC] Caribbean identity. A
rejoinder to 7:3, disclaims separateness of island-
ers from the rest of Spanish America.

T
Taylor, Frank Fonda. Does Trinidad Have A Drug
Problem? ART. 15:4 p. 15 (Spring '87). Trinidad.
[SI] Drugs. The Scott drug report reveals drug
trafficking in T&T.
Thieme, John. Catching Mullet & Chasing Shad-
ows. The early novels of Edgar Mittelholzer.
RES. A Morning at the Office. Edgar Mittelholzer.
Shadows Move Among Them. Edgar Mittelholzer.
Corentyne Thunder. Edgar Mittelholzer. 8:4 p. 36
(Fall '79). Guyana. [LC] Mittelholzer, Edgar.
Review essay on the evolution of Mittelholzer's
style as revealed in his early works.
Thieme, John. Gnarled Sour Grapes. BRV. Sea
Grapes. Derek Walcott. 7:4 p. 51 (October'78). St.
Lucia. [LC] Walcott, Derek. A review of the St.
Lucian poet's '76 collection.
Thieme, John. Naipauliana. BRV. V.S. Naipaul:An
Introduction To His Work. Paul Theroux. The
Overcrowded Barracoon & Other Articles. V. S.
Naipaul. 7:1 p. 32 (January '75). Trinidad. [LC]
Naipaul, V.S. An analysis of the work of the
famous Trinidadian writer.
Thiesenhusen, William C. Campesinos Versus
Landlords. Central American Agricultural Eco-
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /39








nomics. ART. 14:4 p. 30 (Fall '85). Central
America. [EC] Agriculture. The state of agricultural
development, the plight of workers, limitations of
land reform.
Thompson, Donald. Poor Man's Bass Fiddle.
ART. 3:1 p. 11 (Spring '71). Caribbean Archi-
pelago. [PA] Musical instruments. A music profes-
sor discusses inventive creation of the Caribbean
marimbula, an instrument related to the African
sanza.
Thompson, L. O'Brien. How Cricket Is West
Indian Cricket? Class, Racial & Color Conflict.
ART. 12:2 p. 22 Spring '83). Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. [SI] Cricket. Art imitates life & politics
in the West Indies version of this sport.
Thomsen, Moritz. Living Poor. EXC. 1:4 p. 8
(Winter '69). Ecuador. [SC] Culture & poverty.
Excerpt from a peace corps volunteer's wonderful
memoirs.
Thorndike, A. E. Belize Among Her Neighbors.
An Analysis of the Guatemala-Belize Dispute.
ART. 7:2 p. 13 (April '78). Belize. [GP] Conflict,
border. Traces historical antecedents & treaty
violations leading to a border dispute.
Torres, Jose Arsenio. Military Cuba? BRV. Cuba:
Est-ll Socialiste? Rene Dumont. 4:1 p. 36 (April
'72). Cuba. [PS] Militarization of. Review of
critique of the Castro revolution by a French social
scientist.
Torres Ortiz, Benjamin. Don Pedro. BRV. La
Conciencia Nacional Puertorrequeina: Pedro Al-
bizu Campos Manuel Maldonado Denis. 6:2 p. 43
(April '74). Puerto Rico. [HI] Albizu Campos,
Pedro. A review of a political anthology about
Puerto Rican nationalist, Pedro Albizu Campos.
Truett, Dale. Creeping Mexicanization. ART. 6:3
p. 19 (July '74). Mexico. [EC] National policy. An
analysis of the 1973 Mexican laws that regulate
foreign investment & the transfer of technology.
U
Ungo, Guillermo Manuel. In Defense of the
Frente Democratico. ART. 10:1 p. 34 (Winter
'81). El Salvador. [PS] Conflict, political. The
leader of a radical group states his party's position
& hopes for the country.
Ungo, Guillermo. The Role of the Opposition in
El Salvador. ART. 8:2 p. 22 (Spring '79). El
Salvador. [PS] Opposition, role of. The difficulties
of an orderly opposition party role in a multi-party
oligarchy where revolutionaries reject elections &
democratic process is a fagade.
V
Valdelomar, Abraham. Apumarcu, the Potter.
EXC. 2:2 p. 13 (Summer '70). Peru. [LA] Myth.
Excerpted from Our Children of the Sun, a story of
an old potter.
Valdes, Nelson P. Report Redux. Thoughts on
the Imaginary Document. FIC. 15:2 p. 21 Spr.ri
'86). Grenada. [GP] Invasion, 1983. A fictional
addendum to the "Report on the Imperialist
Aggression of the US in Grenada."
Valenta, Jiri & Frederick F. Shaheen. Controlling
Latin America. BRV. Controlling Latin American
Conflicts: Ten Approaches. Michael Morris &
Victor Millan, eds. 14:3 p. 50 (Summer '85). Latin
America. [GP] Conflict, political. Ambitious compi-
lation of work offers 10 approaches to control 30
types of conflict.
Vallejo, Cesar. Violence of the Hours. POE. 1:3 p.
10 (Fall '69). Peru. [LA] Vallejo, Cesar. Bio-
graphical review of Peruvian poet C6sar Vallejo's
posthumously published works, Poemas
Humanos.
Vega, Bernardo. The CBI Faces Adversity. Les-
sons from the Asian Export Strategy. ART. 14:2
p. 18 (Spring '85). Caribbean Basin. [ED] CBI.
Author feels import substitution, agrarian reform,
increase in food production & solid infrastructure
must precede export strategy for CBI to work.
Velazquez, Ismaro. Mufioz & the 1980 Elections
in Puerto Rico. ART. 9:3 p. 7 (Summer '80).
Puerto Rico. [PS] Elections, 1980. Both platform &
future of PDP uncertain without influence of the
revered founder.
Venegas, Haydee. Francisco Oiler. 19th Century
40 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Puerto Rican Artist. ART. 12:2 p. 38 (Spring '83).
Puerto Rico. [VA] Oiler, Francisco. Essay on the
life & "boricuismo" style of Oiler, the only Latin
impressionist.
Ventura, Arnold K. Technologism. BRV. Cap-
italism, Socialism & Technology-A Comparative
Study of Cuba & Jamaica. Charles Edquist. 15:3
p. 43 (Winter '87). Caribbean Archipelago. [EC]
Sugar. Comparison of socialist & capitalist ap-
proaches to technological innovation in the sugar
industry.
Vickers, William T. Development Without Them.
In Brazil's North-East & Amazon. RES. Victims
of the Miracle: Development & the Indians of
Brazil. Shelton H. Davis. Drought & Irrigation in
North-East Brazil. Anthony L. Hall. 8:2 p. 50
(Spring '79). Brazil. [ED] Policy issues. Review
essay on the development fast-shuffle that ex-
cludes Indians but not their land.
Vickers, William T. Farewell to Amazonia? How
to Invest in Its Future. RES. Sicuanga Runa: The
Other Side of Development in Amazonian Ecua-
dor. Norman E. Whitten, Jr. Change in the
Amazon Basin, Vol. I: Man's Impact On Forest &
Rivers. John Hemming, ed. Change in the Ama-
zon Basin, Vol. I1: The Frontier After a Decade of
Colonisation. John Hemming, ed. Dreams of
Amazonia. Roger D. Stone. 15:3 p. 26 (Winter
'87). South America. [ED] Amazon Basin. Review
essay built on 4 assessments of the complexities
& consequences of development in Brazil's inte-
rior frontier.
Vickers, William T. Notfor the Coffee Table. BRV.
Aztec Art. Esther Pasztory. 13:4 p. 50 (Fall '84).
Mexico. [TS] Art, Aztec. Excellent overview of
Aztec cosmology, social & political :.rg r: n:i':'ii
economy, & conquest. Good coverage of multiple
artistic media, folk religion & arts.
Vidich, Paul. Green Hell. BRV. Green Hell:
Massacre of the Brazilian Indians. Lucien Bodard.
5:2 p. 31 (April '73). Brazil. [HI] Genocide. On the
genocide of Brazil's Indians, reviewer wonders if
"Brazil, like America, will pass from barbarism to
decadence without ever having passed through
civilization."
Vilas, Carlos M. The Legacy of Dictatorship:
Nicaragua. The Fall of Somoza. RES. Somoza &
the Legacy of US Involvement in Central America
Bernard Diederich. 11:3 p. 34 (Summer '82).
Nicaragua. [PS] Sandinistas. Review of struggle
between Somoza & middle class opponents for
US backing & the role FSLN played.
Villamil, Jose J. The Status Soap Opera. ED. 13:1
p. 3 (Winter '84). Puerto Rico. [PS] Status,
political. Resolution of the status issue relies on
forces & interests beyond Puerto Rican voters.
Villanueva, Tino. Day-Long Day. POE. 4:4 p. 32
(October '72). Mexico. [LA] Chicanos. A poem
from the Mexican-American poet's collection, Hay
Otra Voz Poems.
Villanueva, Tino. Pachuco Remembered. POE.
3:1 p. 5 (Spring '71). Mexico. [LA] Chicanos. A
poem about a clash of cultures.
Villaurrutia, Xavier. Nocturne of the Statue. POE.
4:1 p. 30 (April '72). Mexico. [LA] Dreams. A poem
by the late Mexican poet.
Von Eckardt, Ursula M. We Wish to be Looked
Upon. BRV. We Wished To Be Looked Upon: A
Study of the Aspirations of Youth in a Developing
Society. Vera Rubin & Marisa Zavalloni. 2:2 p. 10
(Summer '70). Trinidad. [SC] Socialization. A
survey of upwardly mobile youth in T&T.
W
Wagenheim, Kal. An Affair with Puerto Rico.
BRV. Puerto Rico. Marvin Schwartz. 1:2 p. 11
(Summer '69). Puerto Rico. [VA] Photography.
Reviews a passionately done photoessay of
Puerto Rico.
Wagenheim, Kal. Imaginary Beings & Cro-
nopios. BRV. Cronopios & Famas. Julio Cortazar.
The Book of Imaginary Beings. Jorge Luis Borges.
2:2 p. 11 (Summer '70). Argentina. [LC] Borges,
Jorge Luis. Catalogues the fabled & fantastic
creatures of these 2 writers.
Wagenheim, Kal. Juan Bosch's New Stance.
BRV. Pentagonism. Juan Bosch. Dictadura con


respaldo popular. Juan Bosch. 2:1 p. 10 (Spring
'70). Dominican Republic. [GP] Conflict, political.
Review of a work by the Dominican leader.
Wagenheim, Kal. Mario Vargas Llosa. INT. 1:1 p.
3 (Spring '69). Peru. [LC] Vargas Llosa, Mario. An
interview with the Peruvian writer on his views of
Peruvian/US relations, the military, revolutions,
Cuba & writing.
Wagenheim, Kal. Puerto Rican Downpour. BRV.
Apalabramiento: Cuentos puertorriquehos de hoy.
Efrain Barradas. Reunidn de espejos. Josb Luis
Vega, ed. 13:3 p. 53 (Summer '84). Puerto Rico.
[LC] Anthology, short stories. Two excellent
anthologies of varied short fiction.
Wagenheim, Kal. Wagenheim on Lewis' Wagen-
heim. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (April '72). Puerto Rico. [CC]
Puerto Rico. Response by author to reviewer
(see 3:2).
Walcott, Derek. A far cry from Africa. POE. 3:2 p.
4 (Summer '71). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [LA]
Walcott, Derek. A poem about a conflict of
heritages.
Walker, Thomas W. Nicaragua & Human Rights.
ART. 7:3 p. 24 (July '78). Nicaragua. [GP] Human
rights. US human rights policy, the Nicaraguan
case.
Walker, Thomas W. The US & Central America.
ART. 8:3 p. 18 (Summer '79). Central America.
[GP] US policy. Short term security interests
create long term impediments to real political
maturity in LA.
Wallenstein, Barry. Chile: Poetry & Anti-Poetry.
RES. Selected Poems. Gabriela Mistral. Emer-
gency Poems. Nicanor Parra. Poems & Antipo-
ems. Nicanor Parra. 5:1 p. 4 (January '73). Chile.
[LC] Parra, Nicanor. Reviewer explains how a poet
expresses the consciousness of a people as well
as his own needs, passions & desires.
Wallenstein, Barry. Human Poems. BRV. Poemas
Humanos/Human Poems. Cesar Vallejo. 1:3 p. 11
(Fall '69). Peru. [LC] Vallejo, C6sar. Analyzes the
Peruvian poet's collection.
Wallenstein, Barry. Infinity. BRV. Ecuador. Henri
Michaus. 2:4 p. 12 (Winter '70). Ecuador. [LC]
Travelogue. Reviews an esoteric work outside of
time-space.
Wallenstein, Barry. Neruda in English. BRV.
Twenty Poems. Pablo Neruda. Heights of Macchu
Picchu. Pablo Neruda. We Are Many. Pablo
Neruda. Selected Poems of Pablo Neruda. Pablo
Neruda. 1:2 p. 3 (Summer '69). Chile. [LC]
Neruda, Pablo. Reviews the Chilean poet's politi-
cal verse.
Wallenstein, Barry. Pedro Pietri. What Is False Is
Really True. RES. Puerto Rican Obituary. Pedro
Pietri. Traffic Violations. Pedro Pietri. The Masses
Are Asses. Pedro Pietri. Loose Joints. Pedro
Pietri. 14:3 p. 38 (Summer '85). Puerto Rico. [LC]
Pietri, Pedro. A review essay of the Neorican
poet's offbeat style.
Walsh, Monsignor Bryan 0. One Came To
Dinner. Florida's First Cuban Emigrant, 1792.
ART. 5:3 p. 10 (July '73). Cuba. [HI] Persecution,
religious. The story of Florida's first Cuban
emigrant, 1762.
Walsh, Monsignor Bryan 0. Who is the Devil?
BRV. Idols of Death & the God of Life: A Theology.
Pablo Richard. 13:3 p. 53 (Summer '84). Cuba.
[RL] Theology. Book of essays by liberation
theologian confounds identification of the good
guys & disturbs atheists, established churches
and conservative governments alike.
Waterbury, John. Starting to Redistribute. BRV.
Scheming for the Poor: The Politics of Redistribu-
tion in Latin America. William Ascher. 15:1 p. 42
(Winter '86). Latin America. [SC] Culture &
poverty. Not for determinists, a recipe for redistri-
bution, includes a book of "lessons" for leaders.
Waters, Donald J. Jungle Politics. Guyana, The
Peoples Temple & the Affairs of State. ART. 9:2
p. 8 (Spring '80). Guyana. [RL] Jonestown. The
relationship between Jonestown & the Guyanese
government & its culmination in disaster.
Watson, Donald Gwynn. Apolitical Fiction in a
Political World. Picaresque & Parody in
Cabrera Infante. RES. Infante's Inferno. Guill-
ermo Cabrera Infante. 13:3 p. 30 (Summer '84).


_______ IC


- I I --' -I -I-








Cuba. [LC] Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Reviews a
saga of adolescent sexual misadventures in Old
Havana.
Watson, G. Llewellyn. Caribbean Cult Cultures.
BRV. Obeah, Christ & Rastaman: Jamaica & its
Religion. Ivor Morrish. 14:1 p. 51 (Winter '85).
Jamaica. [RL] Pluralism, religious. An overview of
religious pluralism in Jamaica & its origins in
slavery.
Watson, G. Llewellyn. If Crab Walk... BRV. Ole
Time Sayin's: Proverbs of the West Indies. Lito
Valls. 14:2 p. 51 (Spring '85). Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. [LC] Proverbs. A collection of centu-
ries-old but unwritten Creole aphorisms that
comes complete with English equivalencies.
Watson, G. Llewellyn. Why the Black Man is
Black. BRV. Folklore from Contemporary Jamai-
cans. Daryl C. Dance. 14:4 p. 49 (Fall '85).
Jamaica. [TS] Folklore. A delightful collection of
popular tales, riddles, songs, myths, rhymes &
legends, for posterity & scholars, presented in
unedited Creole.
Weinstein, Norman. Tis English? BRV. History of
the Voice: The Development of Nation Language
in Anglophone Caribbean Poetry. Edward Kamau
Brathwaite. 15:4 p. 41 (Spring '87). Caribbean,
Commonwealth. [CC] Language. The evaluation
of a Caribbean literary lariguag, derived from
Ergli.-h & molded by African rhythms & sounds as
expressed in Caribbean poetry, verse & lyrics.
Weiss, Sara C. Oh, Those Amazon Women! ART.
6:3 p. 11 (July '74). Brazil. [TS] Myth. An old
legend about a race of women who lived apart
from men & who engaged in the masculine pursuit
of war is traced back to its origins in 16th century
accounts.
Wessman, James W. The Puerto Rican Circuit.
BRV. Labor Migration Under Capitalism: The
Puerto Rican Experience. The History Task Force.
9:3 p. 42 (Summer '80). Puerto Rico. [MI] Labor
migration. Economic forces fuel migration to
the US.
West, Dennis. Latin Talkies. BRV. New Latin
American Cinema: An Annotated Bibliography of
Sources in English, Spanish & Portuguese: 1960-
1980. Julianne Burton. 13:2 p. 55 (Spring '84).
Latin America. [LC] Reference. Well-organized &
useful guide evaluates articles & books in English,
Portuguese & Spanish.
West, Dennis. One Way or Another. (De Cierta
Manera). CRV. 8:3 p. 42 (Summer '79). Cuba.
[PA] Revolutionary consciousness, obstacles to
(De Cierta Manera). Enthusiastic review of a
Cuban film about everyday life during a social
revolution.
White, Byron. Jamaica's Economy. BRV. The
Jamaican Economy. Ransford W. Palmer. 1:3 p.
12 (Fall '69). Jamaica. [ED] Development rec-
ommendations. Critical review claiming this work
is limited in its utility.
White, Amb. Robert. In Defense of the Junta.
ART. 10:1 p. 30 (Winter '81). El Salvador. [PS]
Conflict, political. An attempt to justify & legitimate
the then-current regime by the then-US
ambassador.
Whitten, Dorothea & Norman. Ethnoaesthetics
in the Rain Forest. BRV. Afro-American Arts of
the Suriname Rain Forest. Sally & Richard Price.


11:4 p. 24 (Fall '82). Suriname. [TS] Culture as
commodity. Authors' study of folk art forms &
symbols reinforces a reviewer's view of ethnoaes-
thetics.
Wilde, Margaret D. The Sandinistas & the
Costeios. Reconciliation & Integration? ART.
10:4 p. 8 (Fall '81). Nicaragua. [SC] Ethnic
Indians. Can the Sandinistas successfully incor-
porate the peoples of the Mosquito Coast into the
revolution?
Williams, Edward J. Mexico's Modern Military.
Implications for the Region. ART. 10:4 p. 12
(Fall '81). Mexico. [PS] Military. Revamping of the
military reflects trends in foreign policy & ambi-
tions for leadership in the Caribbean Basin.
Wilson, Carlos Guillermo. The Flour Boy. A
Panamanian Short Story. SS. 9:2 p. 25 (Spring
'80). Panama. [LA] Race identity. Story of a young
child's precocious solution to an age-old problem.
Wilson-Tagoe, Nana. No Place. V.S. Naipaul's
Vision of Home in the Caribbean. ART. 9:2 p. 37
(Spring '80). Caribbean, Commonwealth. [LC]
Naipaul, V.S. Review essay on an author's sense
of place.
Wirth, John D. Mistreated Goose. BRV. The
Nationalization of the Venezuelan Oil Industry.
Gustavo Coronel. 13:3 p. 55 (Summer '84).
Venezuela. [EC] Oil. The demise of the post-
nationalization Venezuelan oil industry caused by
political pirates.
Wolf, Maurice. Breaking the Puerto Rico Logjam.
Ask the Courts to Clarify Status. ART. 14:3 p.
30 (Summer '85). Puerto Rico. [PS] Status,
political. Can the courts alter status with a vote?
Wolfe, Gregory B. Thoughts On A Democratic
Consortium. The World is Small to Stay. ED.
11:2 p. 4 .Sprirg '82). Latin America. [GP]
International relations. An alternative approach to
the crisis-intervention model of US-Latin American
relations.
Wood, Bryce. The End of the Good Neighbor
Policy. Changing Patterns of US Influence.
ART. 11:2 p. 25 (Spring '82). Latin America. [HI]
Good Neighbor Policy. The myth of the Good
Neighbor exposed & real intent revealed.
Woodward, Jr., Ralph Lee. Ballots Amidst Bul-
lets. BRV. Voter Participation in Central America,
1954-1981: An Exploration. George A. Bowdler &
Patrick Cotter. 13:2 p. 55 (Spring '84). Central
America. [PS] Voter participation. A country-by-
country description of conditions relating to elec-
tions. Prognosis of "good" only for Costa Rica &
Honduras.
Woodward, Jr., Ralph Lee. Dispassionate Con-
flict. BRV. Central America, Anatomy of Conflict.
Robert S. Leiken. 14:3 p. 50 (Summer '85).
Central America. [GP] Conflict, political. Anthology
of 17 moderate critiques & defenses of US foreign
policy in Central America.
Woodward, Jr., Ralph Lee. Mosquito Control.
BRV. Nicaragua's Mosquito Shore: The Years of
British & American Presence. Craig L. Dozier.
15:4 p. 40 (Spring '87). Nicaragua. [HI] Mosquito
Coast. The history of the Miskito Coast, influences
from England & America & subsequent incorpora-
tion in 1979 into Nicaragua by the Sandinistas.
Woodward, Jr., Ralph Lee. Where to Study
Central America. A Geography of Historical


Materials. ART. 10:1 p. 47 (Winter '81). Central
America. [CC] Library collections. The location of
original documents & important translations.
World Press Review. Press Reaction to the
Invasion. ART. 12:4 p. 33 (Fall '83). Grenada.
[GP] Invasion, 1983; press coverage. A sampling
of journalist response to the invasion from around
the world.
Y
Yates, Juan A. Gospel. BRV. Financial Policies &
the World Capital Market: The Problem of Latin
American Countries. Pedro Aspe Armella, Ru-
diger Dornbusch & Maurice Obstfeld. 14:2 p. 50
(Spring '85). Latin America. [EC] Financial prob-
lems. Review of a collection that attempts to
explain reasons for Latin American debt problems.
Yafiez, Augustin. The Lean Lands. EXC. 1:2 p. 8
(Summer '69). Mexico. [LA] Reminiscences. Ex-
cerpt from an autobiographical sketch of an
author's grandfather.
Yelvington, Kevin A. Vote Dem Out. The Demise
of the PNM in Trinidad & Tobago. ART. 15:4 p.
8 (Spring '87). Trinidad. [PS] Elections, 1986.
Widespread corruption & qro;3 mismanagement
end the long reign of the -: f Jr
Yoder, Lauren W. A Caribcentric View of the
World. The Novels of Edouard Glissant. RES.
Le Quatribme Siecle. Edouard Glissant. La
Lezarde. Edouard Glissant. 10:3 p. 24 (Summer
'81). Martinique. [LC] Glissant, Edouard. Disser-
tation by a reviewer on an author's
Weltanschauung.
Young, Alma Harrington. Ethnic Politics in
Belize. ART. 7:3 p. 38 (July '78). Belize. [SC]
Ethnic politics. Party politics in Belize divide the
population along ethnic & linguistic lines.
Yudin, Florence L. Casa de las Americas, Whose
Home? ART. 6:3 p. 33 (July '74). Cuba. [LC]
Literature survey. Literary works awarded Cuba's
Casa de las Am6ricas prizes are explored to
discover whether their content is sufficiently
Iluijrairg to educate the curious.
Yudin, Florence L. Earth Words. BRV. Residence
on Earth. Pablo Neruda. 6:2 p. 38 (April '74).
Chile. [LC] Neruda, Pablo. Analyzes the work of
the Chilean Nobel Prize-winning poet.
Yudin, Florence L. The Great Zoo. On Cuba's
National Poet, Nicolas Guillen. BRV. Patria o
Muerte! The Great Zoo & Other Poems. NicolAs
Guillen. Man-Making Words. Selected Poems of
Nicolas Guill6n. NicolAs Guillen. 5:3 p. 30 (July
'73). Cuba. [LC] Guillen, Nicolas. Reviewer con-
cludes that Guini-, liberated poetry has been
given another tongue to confront other values &
ideologies whose free readings may reach affirm-
ation or rejection."
Z
Zweig, David. Local Yokels. BRV. Local Or-
ganizations: Intermediaries in Rural Development.
Milton J. Esman & Norman T. Uphoff. 14:2 p. 48
(Spring '85). Third World. [ED] Local organiza-
tions. Reviewer finds support for development
from the grassroots up in this first-rate analysis of
150 local organization projects.


ARTICLES, BY TITLE
A
100 Years of Military. Jorge Rodriguez Beruff.
BRV. 5:1 p. 44 (73).
100 Years of Solitude. Eneid Routt6 G6mez. BRV.
2:1 p. 5 (70).
1605 Dominican Pages. Emilio Bejel. BRV. 13:4 p.
49 (84).
19th Century Santo Domingo. Harmannus Hoet-
ink. ART. 2:4 p. 6 (70).
An Absence of Ruins? Seeking Caribbean Histori-
cal Consciousness. Richard Price. ART. 14:3 p.
24 (85).
Absorbing the Caribbean Labor Surplus. The
Need for an Indigenous Engine of Growth.


Ransford W. Palmer. ART. 11:3 p. 22 (82).
Abstraction & Representation. Rosado del'Valle's
Visual Innocence. Ricardo Pau-Llosa. ARC. 14:4
p. 36 (85).
An Affair with Puerto Rico. Kal Wagenheim. BRV.
1:2 p. 11 (69).
Africa Revisited. Two French West Indian Novels.
Marie-Denise Shelton. RES. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
After the Fall. Manigat: "I took a calculated risk."
Latortue: "There's no instant democracy, like
instant coffee!" Barry B. Levine. INT. 16:2 p. 8
(88).
The Agony of Puerto Rican Art. Eneid Routte
Gomez. ART. 9:3 p. 16 (80).
The Alienation of Leninist Group Therapy.
Extraordinary General Meeting of Full Members of


the NJM. Barry B. Levine, ed. EXC. 12:4 p. 14
(83).
Alone in Porto Rico. A War Correspondent's
Report. Edwin Emerson, Jr.. REP. 5:3 p. 18 (73).
Ambiguity Without Crisis. Robert D. Hamner.
PRV. 16:2 p. 51 (88).
Anansi Folk Culture. An Expression of Caribbean
Life. Althea V. Prince. ART. 13:1 p. 24 (84).
An Anatomy of Caribbean Vanity. Gordon K.
Lewis. BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
Anatomy of a Riot. Bermuda's Politics of Race.
Frank E. Manning. ART. 7:2 p. 4 (78).
The Anguilla Imbroglio: As Seen From London.
Gordon K. Lewis. ART. 1:2 p. 2 (69).
Anniversary Publication. Bonham C. Richardson.
BRV. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /41


I I


- 9r; 111 11-


II -







Another Life. John J. Figueroa. BRV. 7:1 p. 30 (75).
Apolitical Fiction in a Political World. Picaresque
and Parody in Cabrera Infante. Donald Gwynn
Watson. RES. 13:3 p. 30 (84).
Apumarcu, the Potter. Abraham Valdelomar. EXC.
2:2 p. 13 (70).
An Aristocratic Briton Views the Twilight of
Empire. Thoughts on a Travel Classic. Daniel J.
Crowley. BRV. 12:3 p. 36 (83).
B
Background to Grenada. When the Social Sci-
entists Invaded. Aaron Segal. RES. 12:4 p. 40
(83).
Bahama Watching. Aaron Segal. RES. 6:3 p. 40
(74).
Ballots Amidst Bullets. Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr..
BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Baseball In Their Blood: The San Pedro Syn-
drome. Bernard Diederich. ART. 14:4 p. 15 (85).
The Battle Over The CBI. The Debate in Wash-
ington. Richard E. Feinberg, Richard Newfarmer
and Bernadette Orr. ART. 12:2 p. 15 (83).
Beauty & the Beast. James Dietz. BRV. 13:3 p. 52
(84).
Beefprints. Ellen Calmus. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Behind the Lines. Life in the Guerrilla Camps in El
Salvador. Mark Fazlollah. ART.'12:2 p. 6 (83).
Belize Among Her Neighbors. An Analysis of the
Guatemala-Belize Dispute. A. E. Thorndike. ART.
7:2 p. 13 (78).
Benign Neglect. L. P. Fletcher. BRV. 16:1 p. 40
(88).
Benign Neglect. Cornelis Ch. Goslinga. BRV. 14:1
p. 50 (85).
Bergman On The Beach. Guillermo S. Edelberg.
BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Betancur's Battles. The Man of Peace Takes Up
the Sword. Bernard Diederich. ART. 15:1 p. 10
(86).
Between a Rock & a Hard Place. Enrique A.
Baloyra. BRV. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
Between Two Worlds. Educated Puerto Rican
Migrant Women. Virginia E. Sanchez Korrol. ART.
12:3 p. 26 (83).
Betwixt & Between. Carolina Hospital. PRV. 16:2
p. 49 (88).
Big Rage & Big Romance. Ian I. Smart. RES. 8:3 p.
34 (79).
Big Stuff. Paul Hollander. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Big Theories, Small Island. Dennis Conway. BRV.
16:2 p. 50 (88).
Bilingual Blues. Gustavo P6rez Firmat. POE. 15:3
p. 37 (87).
The Biography of an Artist. Mexico's Frida Kahlo.
Jan Michael Hanvik. BRV. 15:3 p. 22 (87).
Bird Bath. Forrest D. Colburn. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Black & White On Green Turtle Cay. A. G.
LaFlamme. ART. 7:1 p. 13 (75).
Black Carib Households. Angelina Pollack-Eltz.
BRV. 2:3 p. 6 (70).
Black Power & Doctor Politics. Lloyd Best. ART.
2:2 p. 5 (70).
Black Power in Trinidad. Basil Ince. BRV. 1:3 p. 10
(69).
The Black Power Killings in Trinidad. Naipaul's
New Book of Essays. Gerald Guinness. BRV. 10:2
p. 36 (81).
The Book of the Quich6. Charles Lacombe. BRV.
9:2 p. 42 (80).
Bootstrap Babies. Barry B. Levine. BRV. 1:1 p. 6
(69).
Borges: Into The Mainstream Via The Back Door.
J. Raban Bilder. ART. 4:4 p. 18 (72).
Bread & Roses. Mela Pons de Alegria. BRV. 3:2 p.
13(71).
Bread vs. Soul. Barry B. Levine. BRV. 2:4 p. 11
(70).
Breaking the Puerto Rico Logjam. Ask the Courts
to Clarify Status. Maurice Wolf. ART. 14:3 p. 30
(85).
Brief Triumph. Adolfo Leyva. BRV. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Bringing Misery Along? Alejandro Portes. BRV.
15:3 p. 41 (87).
Bruised Apples. lan Bell. BRV. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
The Bureaucracy of Music in Puerto Rico.
Francis Schwartz. ART. 9:3 p. 19 (80).
42 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Bye Bye Baby. L6on-Frangois Hoffmann. BRV.
15:3 p. 42 (87).
C
Caballero Solo. (Gentlemen Without Company).
Pablo Neruda. POE. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Calories Count in Cuba. James E. Austin. BRV.
15:2 p. 45 (86).
Calzada's Architecture of Memory. Recon-
struction of an Envisioned Past. Ricardo Pau-
Llosa. ARC. 13:2 p. 38 (84).
Camilo: Rebel Priest. Rafael Garzaro. BRV. 1:1 p.
11 (69).
Campesinos Versus Landlords. Central American
Agricultural Economics. William C. Thiesenhusen.
ART. 14:4 p. 30 (85).
Can the Caribbean Learn from East Asia? The
Case of Jamaica. Peter L. Berger. ART. 13:2 p. 6
(84).
Can We Live with Revolution in Central Amer-
ica? Richard Millet. ART. 10:1 p. 6 (81).
The Canal Treaties. The Other Debate on Central
America. Robert A. Pastor. RES. 15:4 p. 22 (87).
Caribbean Architecture. The Great & Small
Houses of the West Indies. Aaron Segal. RES.
12:1 p. 32 (83).
A Caribbean Carnival of Abundance. Ram6n
Mendoza. BRV. 7:2 p. 38 (78).
The Caribbean Commissions. Basil A. Ince. BRV.
4:3 p. 36 (72).
Caribbean Concepts. Dennis J. Gayle. BRV. 16:1
p. 40 (88).
Caribbean Crystal Ball. Thomas D. Boswell. BRV.
14:3 p. 51 (85).
Caribbean Cult Cultures. G. Llewellyn Watson.
BRV. 14:1 p. 51 (85).
Caribbean Economic History. Thomas Mathews.
ART. 3:1 p. 4 (71).
Caribbean Edge. Nigel J. H. Smith. BRV. 9:2 p. 20
(80).
Caribbean Energy Dependence. A 15-Year Prog-
nosis. Juan A. Bonnet, Jr. & Angel Calder6n-Cruz.
ART. 14:3 p. 16 (85).
Caribbean Eve. Yielding to the Pacing Shapes of
Jaguars. Richard Dwyer. BRV. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
The Caribbean in the 1980s. What We Should
Study. Gordon K. Lewis. ART. 10:4 p. 18 (81).
The Caribbean in the Year 2000. Aaron Segal.
ART. 8:3 p. 4 (79).
Caribbean Inferno. Susan Sheinman. BRV. 1:4 p.
12(69).
A Caribbean Lilliput. Scrutinizing the Grenada
Skirmish. Kai Schoenhals. RES. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
Caribbean Migration to Britain & France. From
Assimilation to Selection. Gary P. Freeman. ART.
11:1 p. 30 (82).
Caribbean Migration to the Netherlands. From
the Elite to the Working Class. Frank Bovenkerk.
ART. 11:1 p. 34 (82).
Caribbean Science & Technology. Do They Exist?
Wallace C. Koehler & Aaron Segal. ART. 14:3 p.
11 (85).
Caribbean Swan Song. Joaquin Balaguer. Peter R.
Greiff. ART. 15:3 p. 17 (87).
Caribbean Textuality. Richard Dwyer. ART. 11:4 p.
12(82).
The Caribbean Watchers. Joseph D. Olander.
RES. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
Caribbean Whirlpool. H. Michael Erisman. BRV.
15:3 p. 42 (87).
A Caribcentric View of the World. The Novels of
Edouard Glissant. Lauren W. Yoder. RES. 10:3 p.
24(81).
CARICOM: Caribbean Community & Common
Market. June S. Belkin. ART. 13:4 p. 11 (84).
Carlos Alfonzo. The Textuality of Painted Surfaces.
Ricardo Pau-Llosa. ARC. 16:1 p. 28 (88).
The Cartagena Proposal. The Far-Off Thunder of
Violent Drums. Belisario Betancur. ART. 13:3 p.
10(84).
Casa de las Americas, Whose Home? Florence L.
Yudin. ART. 6:3 p. 33 (74).
The Case for Indigenous Development. The
Poverty of Progress. Mark D. Szuchman. BRV.
10:3 p. 28 (81).
The Case of the Missing Majority. Ken I. Boodhoo.
ART. 6:2 p. 3 (74).


Catching Mullet & Chasing Shadows. The early
novels of Edgar Mittelholzer. John Thieme. RES.
8:4 p. 36 (79).
The CBI Faces Adversity. Lessons from the Asian
Export Strategy. Bernardo Vega. ART. 14:2 p. 18
(85).
The CBI Is Not Enough. The Case of Honduras.
Marta Ortiz-Buonafina. ART. 14:2 p. 20 (85).
A Celebration of Caribbean Color. St. George
Tucker Arnold, Jr.. BRV. 7:3 p. 54 (78).
Central America Devastated. Mark B. Rosenberg.
ED. 12:2 p. 3 (83).
Central America's Economic Family. Bernard
Coard. ART. 7:1 p. 24 (75).
Central American Economic Integration. Ra-
mesh Ramsaran. BRV. 6:2 p. 47 (74).
The Central American Exodus. Grist for the
Migrant Mill. Guy Gugliotta. ART. 11:1 p. 26 (82).
Central American Sancocho. Recent Scholarship
on an Area in Crisis. Marvin Alisky. RES. 14:1 p.
26 (85).
Cerro Maravilla. Injustice in Puerto Rico. Tomas
Stella. ART. 9:3 p. 12 (80).
Chagito, The Dreamer. A Puerto Rican Short Story
Miguelangelo Rodriguez. SS. 11:3 p. 12 (82).
Chairman Duvalier. Gbrard R. Latortue. BRV. 2:1
p. 9 (70).
Changing the Guard in Dominica. Elections & a
Hostage Crisis. Robert A. Michaels. ART. 10:2 p.
18 (81).
The Charmed World of Manuel Lepe. Primitive Art
by a Mexican Master. Bea Bender. ARC. 13:1 p.
41 (84).
Che. Hmm. Robert Friedman. CRV. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Chile's Past Malaise? Louis Wolf Goodman. RES.
3:2 p. 14 (71).
Chile: Poetry & Anti-Poetry. Barry Wallenstein.
RES. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
China & Latin America. Joe Olander. BRV. 4:4 p.
35 (72).
The Christian Democrats in Latin America. The
Fight for Democracy. Ricardo Arias Calder6n.
ART. 11:2 p. 34 (82).
The Chronic Caribbean. Eric Lott. BRV. 14:4 p. 51
(85).
Chronicle of A Financial Crisis. Mexico, 1976-
1982. Timothy Heyman. ART. 12:1 p. 8 (83).
Chronology of Events (Grenada). Judith C. Faer-
ron. ART. 12:4 p. 10 (83).
The Church That Williams Built. Electoral Pos-
sibilities in Trinidad & Tobago. Selwyn Ryan. ART.
10:2 p. 12 (81).
Civilistas. Harold Sims. BRV. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Claro, Trigueio, Moreno. Testing for Race in
Cartagena. Mauricio Solain, Eduardo Velez, and
Cynthia Smith. ART. 15:3 p. 18 (87).
A Clash of Cultures. The Ballad of Gregorio
Cortez. Tombs Rivera. CRV. 12:3 p. 32 (83).
Clouds Over Aruba. Bernard Diederich. ART. 14:3
p. 21 (85).
The Cockfight. Dena Hirsch. SS. 4:4 p. 15 (72).
Cockfighting in the 19th Century Caribbean. M
ce de Challes. ART. 4:4 p. 12 (72).
Coffee Table Aztecs. Ellen L. Belknap. BRV. 13:2
p. 54 (84).
Collages, Carvings & Quilts. The Visual Arts of St.
Vincent. Andrea E. Leland. ARC. 14:1 p. 28 (85).
Collecting the Caribbean. The Not-So-Hidden
Politics of Explanation. Aaron Segal. RES. 13:2 p.
29 (84).
Colombia in the Eighties. A Political Regime in
Transition. Ricardo Santamaria Salamanca and
Gabriel Silva Lujan. ART. 15:1 p. 12 (86).
Colombia Under Stress. A Presidency Lamed by
Instability. Gary Hoskin. ART. 15:1 p. 6 (86).
Colombia's Tobacco Road. Feudalism Versus
Capitalism in the Tobacco Fields. Philip Shepherd.
BRV. 13:1 p. 36 (84).
Colombia: Cowboy Country. Barry B. Levine.
BRV. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Commentary on Grenada. Wayne S. Smith Re-
plies. Wayne S. Smith. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
Commentary on Grenada. Diplomatic Magic. Otto
J. Reich. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
A Comprehensive Strategy for the Caribbean
Basin. The US & her Neighbors. Amb. Thomas 0.
Enders. ART. 11:2 p. 10 (82).








Congo or Carabali? Race Relations in Socialist
Cuba. Carlos Moore. ART. 15:2 p. 12 (86).
A Contest that Became A Referendum. Bernard
D. Headley. ART. 15:3 p. 13 (87).
Controlling Latin America. Jiri Valenta and
Frederick F. Shaheen. BRV. 14:3 p. 50 (85).
Conversations with Guillermo. A young resident
from a San Juan slum tells it like it is. Jos6 M.
Alonso Garcia. ART. 5:3 p. 6 (73).
Coolie Labor in Trinidad. Charles Kingsley. EXC.
5:2 p. 21 (73).
Costa Rica & the Beast. Francisco A. Leguizam6n.
BRV. 15:2 p. 45 (86).
Costa Rica's Political Turmoil. Can Production
Support the Welfare State? Samuel Stone. ART.
10:1 p. 42 (81).
The Costa Rican Solution. An Innovative Ap-
proach to Export Promotion. John C. Edmunds
and William Renforth. ART. 14:2 p. 27 (85).
Could Cuba Have Been Different? "The Winds of
December."Justo Carrillo. BRV. 10:4 p. 38 (81).
Could Nicaragua Have Been Different? Richard L.
Millett. BRV. 16:2 p. 24 (88).
Creative Politics. Jamaica's Approach to Inde-
pendence. Anthony John Payne. ART. 16:1 p. 4
(88).
Creeping Mexicanization. Dale Truett. ART. 6:3 p.
19 (74).
Creole Jamaica. Ena Campbell. BRV. 5:2 p. 42
(73).
Cross-Cultural Gold. Cannabis in the Caribbean.
Aaron Segal. RES. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Cuba & Nicaragua. From the Somozas to the
Sandinistas. William M. LeoGrande. ART. 9:1 p.
11 (80).
Cuba & Panama. Signaling Left & Going Right?
Steve C. Ropp. ART. 9:1 p. 15 (80).
Cuba & the Caribbean. Aaron Segal. BRV. 4:1 p.
40 (72).
Cuba & the Commonwealth Caribbean. Playing
the Cuban Card. Anthony P. Maingot. ART. 9:1 p.
7 (80).
Cuba & the Third World. The Sixth Nonaligned
Nations Conference. H. Michael Erisman. ART.
9:1 p. 26 (80).
Cuba & the US. On the Possibilities of Rap-
proachement. Max Azicri. ART. 9:1 p. 26 (80).
Cuba As An Oil Trader. Petroleum Deals In A
Falling Market. Jorge F. P6rez-L6pez. ART. 15:2
p. 26 (86).
Cuba's Inhumanity Towards Cubans. Jorge
Dominguez. BRV. 16:1 p. 24 (88).
Cuba's Other Revolution. Roberto Leyva (pseud.).
BRV. 5:2 p. 33 (73).
Cuba's Pending Energy Crisis. Alfred Padula.
ART. 8:2 p. 4 (79).
Cuba's Struggle for Third World Leadership. H.
Michael Erisman. ART. 8:3 p. 8 (79).
Cuba: Creole Stalinism? Robert W. Anderson.
BRV. 4:1 p. 31 (72).
Cuban Hippocrisy. Lisandro Perez. BRV. 14:1 p.
48 (85).
Cuban Morality: Ethics & Economics in Cuba.
Irving Louis Horowitz. BRV. 4:4 p. 33 (72).
Cubanology. Aaron Segal. RES. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Cubans in Africa. Aaron Segal. ART. 7:3 p. 4 (78).
Cultivating A Caribbean Sensibility. Media, Edu-
cation & Culture. Rex Nettleford. ART. 15:3 p. 4
(87).
Cultural Confusion. Bernard D. Headley. BRV.
15:1 p. 42 (86).
Cultural Tag. Barry B. Levine. BRV. 1:4 p. 2 (69).
Culture Against Chains. Roger N. Buckley. BRV.
13:4 p. 50 (84).
Culture & Poverty. Oscar Lewis. BRV. 1:1 p. 5 (69).
Curanderismo: Folk psychiatry. Joan Koss. BRV.
1:2 p. 6 (69).

D
Dance & Diplomacy. The Cuban National Ballet.
Aaron Segal. ART. 9:1 p. 30 (80).
The Danger of Rescue Operations. Errol Barrow.
ED. 12:4 p. 3 (83).
A Day in Babylon. Street Life in Guyana. David J.
Dodd. ART. 10:4 p. 24 (81).
Day-Long Day. Tino Villanueva. POE. 4:4 p. 32
(72).


The Dead Are All Ours. Daniel Oduber. ED. 13:2 p.
3(84).
The Death of Poetry. The '68 Puerto Rico Election.
Charlie Albizu & Norman Matlin. ART. 1:1 p. 2
(69).
A Decent Woman. Abstracts From a New Novel.
Miguel Correa. EXC. 12:3 p. 30 (83).
The Decision to Trade. Puerto Rico's Export
Strategies. Suphan Andic. ART. 14:2 p. 22 (85).
Definition & Development. The Need for Carib-
bean Creativity. Rex Nettleford. ART. 14:3 p. 6
(85).
A Democratic Shoot-Out in the D.R. An Analysis
of the 1986 Elections. Jonathan Hartlyn. ART.
15:3 p. 14 (87).
Demythology of the Showcase. Luis Nieves
Falc6n. BRV. 2:3 p. 12 (70).
A Development Agency with a Difference. Linda
Miller. BRV. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Development Without Them. In Brazil's North-
East & Amazon. William T. Vickers. RES. 8:2 p. 50
(79).
Devil's Geography. Leonel de la Cuesta. BRV.
14:1 p. 49 (85).
Did Fidel Fudge the Figures? Literacy & Health:
The Cuban Model. Nicholas Eberstadt. ART. 15:2
p. 4 (86).
Did Human Rights Kill Anastasio Somoza? An
Excerpt From A Recent Biography. Bernard
Diederich. EXC. 10:4 p. 4 (81).
Did Suriname Switch? Dialectics a la Dante.
Edward Dew. ART. 12:4 p. 29 (83).
Discovering the Caribbean. lan I. Smart. RES.
10:3 p. 32 (81).
Dispassionate Conflict. Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr.
BRV. 14:3 p. 50 (85).
The Divided Kingdom. Joaquin Roy. BRV. 15:2 p.
48 (86).
Does Fidel Eat More than Your Father? Conver-
sations in Cuba: A "Third World" view of Cuba by
a young Jamaican writer. Barry Record. EXC. 4:4
p. 4 (72).
Does Trinidad Have A Drug Problem? Frank
Fonda Taylor. ART. 15:4 p. 15 (87).
A Dominican Harvest of Shame. Marcy Fink. ART.
8:1 p. 34 (79).
The Dominican Invasion. Jorge Rodriguez Beruff.
RES. 5:4 p. 45 (73).
Dominican Patrimony. Harmannus Hoetink. ART.
3:1 p. 6 (71).
The Dominican Turn Toward Sugar. Bruce J.
Calder. ART. 10:3 p. 18 (81).
Dominican Update. Can Politics Contain the
Economic Crisis? Richard C. Kearney. ART. 14:4
p. 12 (85).
Don Pedro. Benjamin Torres Ortiz. BRV. 6:2 p. 43
(74).
The Draining of Surinam. Edward Dew. ART. 5:4
p. 8 (73).
The Drama of Lares. The New Intellectual Debate.
Olga Jim6nez de Wagenheim. ART. 12:1 p. 22
(83).
Drama Writing in Papiamentu. Johannes Baptist
de Caluwb. ART. 8:4 p. 33 (79).
Dramatis Personae (Grenada). Judith C. Faerron.
ART. 12:4 p. 12 (83).
Dreams of Integration. 0. Carlos Stoetzer. ART.
7:2 p. 28 (78).
The Dual Colonization of an Island. A Political and
Cultural History of Puerto Rico. Olga Jimenez de
Wagenheim. BRV. 13:1 p. 31 (84).
Dual Identity. lan I. Smart. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Dutch Details. Cornelis C. Goslinga. BRV. 14:2 p.
49 (85).
E
Earth Words. Florence L. Yudin. BRV. 6:2 p. 38
(74).
An Eastern Caribbean Centrist. Interviewing
Prime Minister James F. "Son" Mitchell. Gary
Brana-Shute. INT. 14:4 p. 27 (85).
Economic Erosion. Irma T. de Alonso. BRV. 15:1
p. 44 (86).
Efficiency Versus Equity. Economic Policy Op-
tions in the Caribbean. Fuat M. Andic. ART. 13:1
p. 16 (84).
El Caribe, Mujer nueva, Cancion puertorriquetia.


NicolAs Guill6n. POE. 5:3 p. 28 (73).
El Super. Alonso Alegria. CRV. 8:2 p. 54 (79).
Elections & Parties in the Eastern Caribbean. A
Historical Survey. Patrick Emmanuel. ART. 10:2 p.
14 (81).
Elections Surinam Style. Edward Dew. ART. 6:2 p.
20 (74).
Elegy for a Christian Pagan. Donald W. Hogg.
ART. 2:2 p. 1 (70).
The Emperor Burnham Has Lost His Clothes.
Guyana's Political Life in Disarray Thomas J.
Spinner, Jr. ART. 9:4 p. 4 (80).
The End of Paradise. What Kind of Development
for Negril? Brian J. Hudson. ART. 8:3 p. 32 (79).
The End of the Good Neighbor Policy. Changing
Patterns of US Influence. Bryce Wood. ART. 11:2
p. 25 (82).
The End of the Search. Norberto Fuentes on
Ernest Hemingway. Barry B. Levine. INT. 10:3 p.
22(81).
The End of West Indian Innocence. Arming the
Police. Bernard Diederich. ART. 13:2 p. 10 (84).
Endangering Friendships. Scott B. MacDonald.
ART. 14:3 p. 21 (85).
Enterprising Enclaves. Forrest D. Colburn. BRV.
14:2 p. 48 (85).
Ethnic Politics in Belize. Alma Harrington Young.
ART. 7:3 p. 38 (78).
Ethnoaesthetics in the Rain Forest. Dorothea and
Norman Whitten. BRV. 11:4 p. 24 (82).
The Ethnobiology of the Haitian Zombie. On the
Pharmacology of Black Magic. E. Wade Davis.
ART. 12:3 p. 18 (83).
Exhibition for National Peace. Sandra Serrano.
ART. 15:1 p. 33 (86).
The Existentialism of George Lamming. The
Early Development of a Writer. Janet Butler. ART.
11:4 p. 15 (82).
Exotica & Commodity. The Arts of the Suriname
Maroons. Sally & Richard Price. ART. 9:4 p. 12
(80).
An Extraordinary Migration. Jews in the Do-
minican Republic. Kai Schoenhals. ART. 14:4 p.
17(85).
F
A far cry from Africa. Derek Walcott. POE. 3:2 p. 4
(71).
Farewell to Amazonia? How to Invest in Its Future.
William T. Vickers. RES. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
The Fate of Writing in the West Indies. Reflec-
tions on Oral & Written Literature. Kenneth
Ramchand. ART. 11:4 p. 16 (82).
Fear of the Bear. Leon Goure. BRV. 13:4 p. 51 (84).
Fiction or Reality. Testimony of an Author in Crisis.
Pedro Juan Soto. ART. 9:3 p. 15 (80).
Fidel & the Friars. Castro Confesses to Friar Betto.
Paul E. Sigmund. BRV. 15:2 p. 30 (86).
First-Time. Anthropology & History Among the
Saramaka. Richard Price. ART. 13:1 p. 20 (84).
Flawed Analysis. Sergio Roca. BRV. 15:4 p. 40
(87).
Florida & the Caribbean. Bob Graham. ED. 14:2 p.
3 (85).
Florida Bound. A Jamaican Complaint. Geoffry
Philp. POE. 12:1 p. 28 (83).
The Flour Boy. A Panamanian Short Story. Carlos
Guillermo Wilson. SS. 9:2 p. 25 (80).
Followers of the New Faith. Samuel Silva Gotay.
BRV. 2:1 p. 11 (70).
For the American Dream. A Journey to El Norte.
Christina Bruce. CRV. 13:3 p. 37 (84).
Foreign Workers in the USVI. History of a
Dilemma. Mark J. Miller & William W. Boyer. ART.
11:1 p. 48 (82).
Formerly. Efrain Barradas. BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Francisco Oiler. 19th Century Puerto Rican Artist.
Haydee Venegas. ART. 12:2 p. 38 (83).
Freedom of the Press in Nicaragua. Sergio
Ramirez & Pedro Joaquin Chamorro. Beatriz
Parga de Bay6n. INT. 12:1 p. 20 (83).
The French Connection. Two Views of Their Latin
American Policy. Barry B. Levine. INT. 11:2 p. 46
(82).
French West Indian Autonomy. Gerard R. Lator-
tue. ART. 2:2 p. 8 (70).
Future Aruba. Can It Make It Alone? George
-- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /43








Cvejanovich. ART. 14:3 p. 18 (85).
The Future of Tomorrow. 0. R. Dathorne. SS. 7:1
p. 28 (75).
Future Fiction. Augusta Dwyer. BRV. 14:4 p. 50
(85).
The Future of CARICOM. Collective Self-Reliance
in Decline? Anthony P. Gonzales. ART. 13:4 p. 8
(84).
The Future of the Rastafarian Movement. Klaus
de Albuquerque. ART. 8:4 p. 22 (79).
The Future of the University of The West Indies.
Anthony P. Maingot. BRV. 7:3 p. 48 (78).

G
Galileo, Onan & the Pope. Jeffrey J. W. Baker.
ART. 1:3 p. 6 (69).
Gallego. Leonel A. de la Cuesta. BRV. 13:2 p. 53
(84).
Game of Chess. Jorge Luis Borges. POE. 1:3 p. 5
(69).
The Garvey Papers. John McCartney. BRV. 14:2 p.
50 (85).
Getting Your Hands Dirty. Negotiating with Dicta-
tors: The Case of Nicaragua. Robert A. Pastor.
ART. 16:2 p. 20 (88).
Gnarled Sour Grapes. John Thieme. BRV. 7:4 p.
51 (78).
Go West Young Man. Black Barbadians & the
Panama Canal. Bonham C. Richardson. ART.
14:2 p. 10 (85).
Gods of the Middle Passage. A Tennament.
Edward Kamau Brathwaite. EXC. 11:4 p. 18 (82).
The Good Doctor. Neale J. Pearson. BRV. 15:2 p.
47 (86).
Gospel. Juan A. Yanes. BRV. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
Goure's Response: Aybar Expected Too Much.
Leon Gour6. LED. 5:2 p. 2 (73).
The Great Zoo. On Cuba's National Poet, Nicolas
Guilldn. Florence L. Yudin. BRV. 5:3 p. 31 (73).
Green Hell. Paul Vidich. BRV. 5:2 p. 31 (73).
The Grenada Complex in Central America. Action
and Negotiation in US Foreign Policy. Wayne S.
Smith. ART. 12:4 p. 34 (83).
Grenada Explodes. Barry B. Levine. ED. 12:4 p. 2
(83).
Grenada in the Context of History. Between
Neocolonialism & Independence. Michael Manley.
ART. 12:4 p. 6 (83).
The Grenada Questions. A Revolutionary Balance
Sheet. Selwyn Ryan. ART. 13:3 p. 6 (84).
Grenadian Party Paper. Revealing an Imaginary
Document. Jorge I. -o'rmriun : FIC. 15:2 p. 16
(86).
Growing Pains: Latin America's Auto Industry.
Aaron Segal. RES. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Guardians of the Dynasty. Neill Macaulay. BRV.
7:3 p. 30 (78).
Guatemala: Occupied Country. Rafael Garzaro.
BRV. 1:3 p. 7 (69).
Guatemala: Occupied Country. Guatemala's Re-
bels. Eduardo Galeano. EXC. 1:3 p. 8 (69).
Guatemalan Wanderers. Gary Monroe. BRV. 14:2
p. 48 (85).
Guerrillas in Latin America. Luis Mercier Vega.
EXC. 2:3 p. 9 (70).
A Guide to the Andean Pact. Robert Grosse. ART.
10:3 p. 16 (81).
Guyana Glimpses. Edward Dew. BRV. 14:2 p. 49
(85).
Guyana Update. Political, Economic, Moral Bank-
ruptcy. Thomas J. Spinner, Jr. ART. 11:4 p. 8 (82).
Guyana's 1980 Elections. The Politics of Fraud.
Lord Avebury & the British Parliamentary Human
Rights Group. ART. 10:2 p. 8 (81).

H
Haiti's Art. Herve Mehu. ART. 3:1 p. 14 (71).
Haiti's Dynastic Despotism. From Father to Son
to... William Paley (pseud.). ART. 13:1 p. 13 (84).
Haitian Coffee. Alex Stepick. BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
The Haitian Diaspora. A Prescription for Decency.
Christian A. Girault. ART. 16:2 p. 14 (88).
Haitian Errors. Don Bohning. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Haitian Neo-Slavery in Santo Domingo. Bitter
Sugar. Paul R. Latortue. BRV. 11:3 p. 36 (82).
Haitian Voodoo: Social Control of the Uncon-
scious. Nelida Agosto Munoz. ART. 4:3 p. 6 (72).
44 / C(iWRRE REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


The Harder They Come. Julianne Burton. CRV. 7:2
p. 33 (78).
The Hassle & the Hustle. A Minibus Ride Through
Kingston. Patricia Anderson. ART. 16:1 p. 18 (88).
Having Thrown a Stone Today, Eshu Kills a Bird
of Yesterday. Judith Hoch-Smith & Ernesto
Pichardo. ART. 7:4 p. 16 (78).
Health & the Developing World. John Bryant.
EXC. 2:3 p. 7 (70).
Hegemonic Tolerance. International Competition
in the Area. Martin C. Needler. ART. 11:2 p. 32
(82).
Hemispheric Debate. How to Handle Latin Amer-
ica. Lynn-Darrell Bender. RES. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
The Hero & the Crowd. Milton Pab6n. BRV. 1:2 p.
13 (69).
Higglering in Kingston. Entrepreneurs or Tra-
ditional Small-Scale Operators? Elsie LeFranc.
ART. 16:1 p. 15 (88).
A Hint of Something Bad. A review of a strange
little book that is a best seller in Puerto Rico today.
Robert W. Anderson. BRV. 5:3 p. 35 (73).
Historical Writing in the Caribbean. Thomas G.
Mathews. ART. 2:3 p. 4 (70).
The History of Caribbean Migrations. The Case of
the West Indies. Dawn I. Marshall. ART. 11:1 p. 6
(82).
Holland's Narrowing Horizon. Albert Gastmann.
BRV. 1:1 p. 13 (69).
Holy Mother School. Ivan Illich. ART. 1:3 p. 1 (69).
Homecoming. A Dominican Reverie. Julia Alvarez.
POE. 12:1 p. 30 (83).
Honduran Scorecard. Military & Democrats in
Central America. Mark B. Rosenberg. ART. 12:1
p. 12 (83).
Honduras. An Oasis of Peace? James A. Morris.
ART. 10:1 p. 38 (81).
How Cricket Is West Indian Cricket? Class, Racial
and Color Conflict. L. O'Brien Thompson. ART.
12:2 p. 22 (83).
How To Be Independent. William G. Demas. ART.
6:4 p. 9 (74).
How To Figure Out Cuba. Development, Ideology
and Mortality. Sergio Diaz-Briquets. ART. 15:2 p.
8 (86).
Huipiles, Tzutes & Molas. Context & Coincidence
in Central American Textiles. Laurel Herbenar
Bossen. RES. 13:4 p. 31 (84).
Human Poems. Barry Wallenstein. BRV. 1:3 p. 11
(69).
Hydrospace & the Law of the Sea. Lyden 0.
Pindling. ART. 6:3 p. 6 (74).

1
I Seek a Form. Ruben Dario. POE. 1:4 p. 12 (69).
Ideology of Migration. Alex Stepick. BRV. 16:1 p.
39 (88).
If Crab Walk... G. Llewellyn Watson. BRV. 14:2 p.
51 (85).
If Only They Could Be More Like Us!. Daniel H.
Levine. RES. 15:4 p. 19 (87).
Imaginary Beings & Cronopios. Kal Wagenheim.
BRV. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
An Important Library on the Caribbean. The
American Geographical Society Library at The
University of Wisconsin. Marguerite C. Suarez-
Murias. ART. 9:2 p. 52 (80).
In Defense of Restoring Constitutional Order.
Luis Escalante Arce. ART. 10:1 p. 35 (81).
In Defense of the Frente Democratico. Guillermo
Manuel Ungo. ART. 10:1 p. 34 (81).
In Defense of the Junta. Ambassador Robert
White. ART. 10:1 p. 30 (81).
In Light's Dominion. Ricardo Pau-Llosa. ARC.
11:3 p. 38 (82).
In Re: The West Indies. Gordon K. Lewis. BRV. 7:2
p. 49 (78).
In the House of the Day. Jaime Sabines. POE. 2:4
p. 4 (70).
In-betweenism? Adolfo Leyva. BRV. 14:1 p. 50
(85).
In-Depth Military. Lawrence H. Hall. BRV. 15:4 p.
43 (87).
The Incomplete Haitiana. A New Research Bibliog-
raphy on Haiti. Le6n-Frangois Hoffmann. BRV.
12:2 p. 30 (83).
Independence For Puerto Rico: The Only Solu-


tion. Rub6n Berrios Martinez. ART. 8:2 p. 15 (79).
Inequality in Latin America. The Division of
Income in Latin America. Louis Wolf Goodman.
ART. 4:1 p. 15 (72).
Infinity. Barry Wallenstein. BRV. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
The Informer. Renb Marques. SS. 7:2 p. 24 (78).
Inside Rasta. The Future of a Religious Movement.
Leahcim T. Semaj. ART. 14:1 p. 8 (85).
Insider's View. Ambler H. Moss, Jr. BRV. 15:1 p. 43
(86).
Intelligent History. Richard Parker. BRV. 14:3 p.
51 (85).
International Eleuthera. Frank E. Manning. BRV.
13:4 p. 49 (84).
An Interview with Hugo Spadafora. Four Months
Before His Death. Beatriz Parga de Bay6n. INT.
15:1 p. 24 (86).
Interviewing Cabrera Infante. J. Raban Bilder.
INT. 6:4 p. 17 (74).
Interviewing Eden Pastora. "Comandante Cero."
Beatriz Parga de Bay6n. INT. 11:3 p. 30 (82).
Interviewing George Louison. A PRG Minister
Talks about the Killings. Bernard Diederich. INT.
12:4 p. 17 (83).
Interviewing James F "Son" Mitchell. In the
Center Lookng for Change. Gary Brana-Shute.
INT. 12:3 p. 10 (83).
Interviewing Michael Manley. The Role of the
Opposition in Jamaica. Janis Johnson & Robert A.
Rankin. INT. 11:3 p. 26 (82).
Interviewing Peha Gomez. Leader of the Do-
minican Revolutionary Party. Mark B. Rosenberg.
INT. 9:4 p. 10 (80).
Invitation to a Party. Bonham C. Richardson. BRV.
15:3 p. 40 (87).
Is the Cuban Economy Knowable? A National
Accounting Parable. Jorge Salazar-Carillo. ART.
15:2 p. 24 (86).
The Islander. John Hawes. EXC. 2:1 p. 2 (70).

J
Jamaica Well-Told. Tales From the Land of Look
Behind, Richard A. Dwyer. BRV. 16:1 p. 22 (88).
Jamaica's 1980 Elections. What Manley Did Do;
What Seaga Need Do. Carl Stone. ART. 10:2 p. 5
(81).
Jamaica's Economy. Byron White. BRV. 1:3 p. 12
(69).
Jamaica's Jews. Michael Hanchard. BRV. 16:1 p.
13 (88).
Jamaica's Manley. Gordon K. Lewis. BRV. 5:2 p.
44 (73).
Jamaica's Maroons at the Crossroads. Losing
Touch With Tradition. Kenneth Bilby. ART. 9:4 p.
18 (80).
Jamaica's Political Leaders. Edward Seaga and
Michael Manley. Richard S. Hillman. INT. 8:3 p. 28
(79).
Jamaican Politics, Economics & Culture. An
Interview With Edward Seaga. Stephen Davis.
INT. 10:4 p. 14 (81).
The Jamaican Reaction. Grenada & the Political
Stalemate. Carl Stone. ART. 12:4 p. 31 (83).
Jargon Liberation. Carl Henry Feuer. BRV. 15:4 p.
43 (87).
John Wayne on Cuba. Andrbs Suarez. BRV. 1:4 p.
11 (69).
The Joint Oil Facility. Mexican-Venezuelan Co-
operation. George W. Grayson. ART. 12:2 p. 19
(83).
A Jombee Dance. Friendship & Ritual in Montser-
rat. Jay D. Dobbin. ART. 10:4 p. 28 (81).
Journey to Ixtlan. Randy Frances Kandel. RES.
6:4 p. 32 (74).
Juan Bosch's New Stance. Kal Wagenheim. BRV.
2:1 p. 10 (70).
Jungle Politics. Guyana, The Peoples Temple, and
the Affairs of State. Donald J. Waters. ART. 9:2 p.
8 (80).

K
Kohr's Size Theory. Preface. Anatol Murad. REP.
2:4 p. 12 (70).

L
La Fortaleza Replies. An Answer to "Puerto Rican
Culture at the Turning Point." Loretta Phelps de


I _


I








Cordova et als. ART. 10:2 p. 32 (81).
La Guagua Area/The Airbus. A Short Story. Luis
Rafael Sanchez. SS. 13:3 p. 26 (84).
La Puntilla Reborn. Leopold Kohr. EXC. 7:3 p. 16
(78).
Ladies & Whores in Colonial Brazil. Ann
Pescatello. ART. 5:2 p. 26 (73).
Lady Law. Betty JanePunnett. BRV. 13:4 p. 50
(84).
The Land of Look Behind. A Film About Reggae
and Rastafarianism. Aaron Segal. CRV. 12:2 p. 36
(83).
Landscape 2. Mario de Andrade. POE. 1:4 p. 5
(69).
The Last Days of Sandino. Texts selected and
translated by Ricardo Arias Calderon. Salvador
Calder6n Ramirez. EXC. 7:4 p. 4 (78).
Latin American Development. Galo Plaza. ART.
1:4 p. 5 (69).
Latin American Economic Integration. Ramesh
Ramsaran. BRV. 5:4 p. 41 (73).
Latin Talkies. Dennis West. BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Latortue on Maingot's Bosch. Gerard R. Latortue.
LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
The Lean Lands. Augustin Yahez. EXC. 1:2 p. 8
(69).
Learning About Politics. David Bray. BRV. 15:3 p.
41 (87).
Left, Center, Right. Norman Matlin. BRV. 1:4 p. 3
(69).
The Legacy of Dictatorship: Nicaragua. The Fall
of Somoza. Carlos M. Vilas. RES. 11:3 p. 34 (82).
The Leper. Jaime Carrero. POE. 3:1 p. 10 (71).
Let Us Construct a Watercloset. First Annual
Report of Charles H. Allen, Governor of Porto
Rico. Charles H. Allen. EXC. 3:1 p. 8 (71).
Lewis on L6pez's Diaspora. Gordon K. Lewis.
LED. 5:3 p. 2 (73).
Lewis's Novela. Eugene L. Komrad. CRV. 8:1 p. 54
(79).
The Literacy Campaign. Nicaragua Style. Leonor
Blum. ART. 10:1 p. 18 (81).
The Literary Works of Pedro Joaquin Chamorro.
Grafton Conliffe & Thomas W. Walker. ART. 7:4 p.
46 (78).
Literature & Revolution in Chile. Fernando
Alegria. ART. 5:2 p. 13 (73).
Literature for the Puerto Rican Diaspora. Adal-
berto L6pez. ART. 5:2 p. 5 (73).
Literature For The Puerto Rican Diaspora: Part II.
Adalberto L6pez. RES. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Little Backyards. Richard P. Harber. BRV. 14:2 p.
49 (85).
A Little Black Book. Ken Boodhoo. BRV. 5:1 p. 42
(73).
The Little Game of January 17th. Jean-Claude
Bajeux. ART. 16:2 p. 7 (88).
Living Poor. Moritz Thomsen. EXC. 1:4 p. 8 (69).
Living the Revolution. Francine J. Daner. BRV. 7:2
p. 44 (78).
Local Yokels. David Zewig. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
London Knows, Do You? J. Raban Bilder. BRV.
4:1 p. 24 (72).
Los Gamines of Bogota. South America's Young-
est Untouchables. Thomas M. liams. ART. 9:2 p.
22 (80).
Lucia. Oliva M. Espin. CRV. 6:4 p. 36 (74).
Levi-Strauss in Latin America. David Goddard.
BRV. 1:2 p. 10 (69).
Lopez on Lewis. Adalberto L6pez. LED. 5:4 p. 2
(73).
M
The "M" Factor of Tourism. Ramash Ramsaran.
BRV. 7:1 p. 41 (75).
The Magic of Black History: Images of Haiti.
Yvette Gindine. ART. 6:4 p. 25 (74).
Maingot's Response: The Old Bosch Was Better.
Anthony P. Maingot. LED. 4:3 p. 2 (72).
Man & Nature in Central American Painting.
Ricardo Pau-Llosa. ART. 10:1 p. 50 (81).
Manley Prepares to Return. PNP Options in
Today's Jamaica. Evelyne Huber & John D.
Stephens. ART. 16:2 p. 16 (88).
Manley's Jamaica. Howard Handelman. BRV. 16:2
p. 41 (88).
A Manual for Manuel. Gerald Guinness. BRV. 8:3


p. 40 (79).
Mario Vargas Llosa. Kal Wagenheim. INT. 1:1 p. 3
(69).
Marxian Worship. Michele Heisler. BRV. 16:2 p. 48
(88).
Mascaras y Vejigantes: The Folklore of Puerto
Rican Politics. C. Albizu-Miranda & Norman
Matlin. ART. 1:2 p. 5 (69).
Mathews on Maingot's Bosch. Thomas Mathews.
LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
The Mediation of the Socialist International.
Inconsistency, Prejudice & Ignorance. Carlos
Alberto Montaner. ART. 11:2 p. 42 (82).
Mercedes. Barbara Howes. POE. 2:4 p. 5 (70).
Mere Description. Ellen L. Belknap. BRV. 14:3 p.
49 (85).
Mexican Artists. Paul P. Kennedy. EXC. 4:3 p. 12
(72).
Mexico & Other Dominoes. Form & Substance in
Mexican Foreign Policy. Carlos Rangel. ART. 10:3
p. 8 (81).
Mexico & the Caribbean. New Ventures into the
Region. Anthony T. Bryan. ART. 10:3 p. 4 (81).
Mexico Budgeted. Hector Orci. BRV. 4:1 p. 28 (72).
Mexico's Modern Military. Implications for the
Region. Edward J. Williams. ART. 10:4 p. 12 (81).
Mexico's Southern Neighbors. Nancy Robinson.
BRV. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Might It Be A Fad? Stephen D. Glazier. BRV. 15:4
p. 42 (87).
The Mighty Shadow. On the Pointlessness of
Human Existence. Linden Lewis. ART. 10:4 p. 20
(81).
Miguel Barnet on the Testimonial. Barry B.
Levine. INT. 9:4 p. 32 (80).
Military Cuba?Jose Arsenio Torres. BRV. 4:1 p. 36
(72).
Mirror, Mirror. Carl Stone. BRV. 4:4 p. 28 (72).
Mistreated Goose. John D. Wirth. BRV. 13:3 p. 55
(84).
Mitterrand's Headache. The French Antilles in the
1980s. Scott B. MacDonald & Albert L. Gastmann.
ART. 13:2 p. 18 (84).
Model City: Dawn or Disaster? Howard Stanton.
BRV. 1:1 p. 9 (69).
More Than Language. Lbon-Frangois Hoffmann.
BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Mosquito Control. Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. BRV.
15:4 p. 40 (87).
Music & Politics in Jamaica. Jay S. Kaufman.
ART. 15:3 p. 9 (87).
Munoz & the 1980 Elections in Puerto Rico.
Ismaro Velazquez. ART. 9:3 p. 7 (80).
The Myth of Mastery. A Decision Analytic Critique
of "The New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean"
with responses by Maingot, Leogrande, Ropp,
Erisman, Azicrl & Knight. Norman Matlin. ART. 9:4
p. 22 (80).
Mythical Landscapes of a Cuban Painter.
Wifredo's Lam's La Jungla. Juan A. Martinez.
ARC. 15:2 p. 32 (86).
N
Naipauliana. John Thieme. BRV. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
National Dances of the Caribbean & Latin
America. Peggo Cromer. ART. 6:3 p. 26 (74).
Nature Strikes at Colombia. Bernard Diederich.
ART. 15:1 p. 15 (86).
The Negro Question. John Stuart Mill. REP. 4:3 p.
24 (72).
The Neorican Dream, A Poem. Jaime Carrero.
POE. 9:3 p. 34 (80).
Neoslavery in the Cane Fields. Haitians in the
Dominican Republic. Paul R. Latortue. ART. 14:4
p. 18 (85).
Neruda in English. Barry Wallenstein. BRV. 1:2 p.
3 (69).
The New Caribbean History. Anthony P. Maingot.
BRV. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
The New Cuban Exodus. Political & Economic
Motivations. Robert L. Bach. ART. 11:1 p. 22 (82).
The New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean.
Barry B. Levine. ART. 9:1 p. 4 (80).
The New Haitian Diaspora. Florida's Most Recent
Residents. Thomas D. Boswell. ART. 11:1 p. 18
(82).
The New Haitian Exodus. The Flight From Terror


and Poverty. Alex Stepick. ART. 11:1 p. 14 (82).
A New Naipaul? Robert D. Hamner. BRV. 16:1 p.
38 (88).
A New World Or Old Bargain Town? Aaron Segal.
BRV. 4:3 p. 32 (72).
Nicaragua & Her Neighbors. Mark B. Rosenberg.
ED. 10:1 p. 4 (81).
Nicaragua & Human Rights. Thomas W. Walker.
ART. 7:3 p. 24 (78).
Nicaragua's Uncertain Political Future. A View of
the Elections. James M. Malloy. ART. 14:1 p. 18
(85).
Nice Show!. Steve C. Ropp. BRV. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
No Place. V.S. Naipaul's Vision of Home in the
Caribbean. Nana Wilson-Tagoe. ART. 9:2 p. 37
(80).
Nocturne of the Statue. Xavier Villaurrutia. POE.
4:1 p. 30 (72).
The Nonexistent Caribbean. Andres Serbin. ED.
14:1 p. 3 (85).
Not for the Birds. Nancy Olson. BRV. 13:3 p. 55
(84).
Not for the Coffee Table. William T. Vickers. BRV.
13:4 p. 50 (84).
Not Greasy Kid Stuff. Jonathan C. Brown. BRV.
13:4 p. 48 (84).
A Note on Caribbean Migration to Canada.
Frances Henry. ART. 11:1 p. 38 (82).
Notes on the Reconquest. The Latin Americaniza-
tion of the United States? Alejandro Portes. ART.
12:3 p. 22 (83).
A Novelist's Erotic Racial Revenge. Mirna Perez-
Venero. ART. 4:4 p. 24 (72).

0
Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question.
Thomas Carlyle. REP. 4:1 p. 18 (72).
Oh, Those Amazon Women. Sara C. Weiss. ART.
6:3 p. 11 (74).
Oh, You Sexy Kid You. Cruz Hernandez. BRV. 9:4
p. 40 (80).
Oil on the Periphery. The History of the Mexican
Oil Expropriation. Jerry B. Brown. ART. 10:3 p. 12
(81).
An Old Refrain. Jorge Salazar-Carrillo. BRV. 15:4
p. 43 (87).
Old White Jumby. Roy Pateman. BRV. 16:2 p. 49
(88).
On Capitalist Weather. George M. Guess. BRV.
13:3 p. 54 (84).
On Goure's Non-Review. Josb M. Aybar. LED. 5:1
p. 2 (73).
On the Antillian Identity. Carlos Alberto Montaner.
ART. 7:3 p. 11 (78).
On the Balkanization of America. A Response to
Montaner's "On the Antillian Identity." Mark D.
Szuchman. ART. 7:4 p. 42 (78).
On the Edge of Civilization. Paris in the Jungle.
Gerhard Drekonja-Kornat. ART. 13:2 p. 26 (84).
On the Limits of the New Cuban Presence in the
Caribbean. Gordon K. Lewis. ART. 9:1 p. 33 (80).
On the Nature of Zombie Existence. The Reality
of a Voudou Ritual. Bernard Diederich. ART. 12:3
p. 14 (83).
On The Other Side of the Ocean. The work
experiences of eary Puerto Rican migrant women.
Virginia Sanchez Korrol. ART. 8:1 p. 22 (79).
On the Politics of the Cuban Revolution.
Dominguez's "Cuba: Order & Revolution." Pedro
J. Montiel. BRV. 9:1 p. 40 (80).
Once Too Many. Alexander H. Mclntire, Jr. BRV.
15:1 p. 44 (86).
One Came To Dinner. Florida's First Cuban Emi-
grant, 1792. Bryan 0. Walsh. ART. 5:3 p. 10 (73).
One Walcott. And He Would Be Master. Richard
Dwyer. ART. 11:4 p. 14 (82).
One Way or Another. (De Cierta Manera). Dennis
West. CRV. 8:3 p. 42 (79).
The Opposition in Guyana-A Response. Bish-
waishwar Ramsaroop. ART. 8:2 p. 28 (79).
Options for Grenada. The Need To Be Cautious.
Anthony P. Maingot. ART. 12:4 p. 24 (83).
The Originality of the Haitian Novel. L6on-
Frangois Hoffman. ART. 8:1 p. 44 (79).
An Overdose of Corruption. The Domestic Politics
of Mexican Oil. George W. Grayson. ART. 13:3 p.
22 (84).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /45


I I








p
Pachuco Remembered. Tino Villanueva. POE. 3:1
p. 5 (71).
Painting Jorge Luis Borges. Reflections by the
Artist. Francisco Rodon. ARC. 10:3 p. 53 (81).
Pan Am in the Caribbean. The Rise & Fall of an
Empire. Alfred L. Padula. ART. 12:1 p. 24 (83).
Panama Wounded. A Poet's Reaction. Luis M.
Quesada. BRV. 13:1 p. 39 (84).
The Panamanian Connection. Mark B. Rosen-
berg. BRV. 7:3 p. 61 (78).
Papadocracy. Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor. BRV.
2:1 p. 8 (70).
Paradise Is In The Mind. Harry T. Antrim. BRV. 8:4
p. 38 (79).
Paradise Lost? Rediscovering Tradition in Aruba.
Sam Cole. ART. 14:3 p. 22 (85).
The Party's Over. Bring in the Jugglers. J. E.
Greene. ART. 15:4 p. 13 (87).
The Passing of Wajang. Annemarie de Waal
Malefijt. ART. 7:3 p. 43 (78).
Passion & Compassion. The Conflict in Central
America. Irving Louis Horowitz. ART. 14:1 p. 23
(85).
Paz & Fuentes: How Close? Edward J. Mullen.
ART. 6:2 p. 27 (74).
PDP + NPP = A *pa*thy. The End of the Popular
Party. Thomas Mathews. ART. 9:3 p. 9 (80).
Peasants Considered. Carlos M. Rama. ART. 3:1
p. 13 (71).
Pedro Pietri. What Is False Is Really True. Barry
Wallenstein. RES. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Perro de Alambre. Marcia Morgado. CRV. 9:4 p. 42
(80).
A Pessimistic Picture. David A. Lake. BRV. 14:3 p.
48 (85).
The Phenomenology of Everyday Life. Puerto
Rico Becomes A Mass Society. Charles Rosario.
ART. 9:3 p. 28 (80).
Pieces of Mule. Excerpts from "0 Mulo." Darcy
Ribeiro. EXC. 14:4 p. 23 (85).
Pilgrimages to Managua. Forrest D. Colburn. ART.
14:1 p. 21 (85).
Pithy Politics. Roger Quant. BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
A Plague of Distrust. Dennis Gilbert. BRV. 13:3 p.
55 (84).
Plantation Society. Martinique's Sugar Cane Alley.
Deborah Kanter. CRV. 14:1 p. 32 (85).
Plantations & Crime. Frank E. Manning. BRV. 16:1
p. 41 (88).
A Plea to Destigmatize Mariel. Siro del Castillo.
ART. 13:4 p. 7 (84).
The Pleasures of West Indian Writing. An Intro-
duction to the Literature. Eugene V. Mohr. ART.
11:4 p. 13(82).
Poem 1.0. R. Dathorne. POE. 6:3 p. 38 (74).
Poetic Permutation. Emily M. Belcher. BRV. 15:4
p. 42 (87).
Poetry & Politics in Nicaragua. Aaron Segal. BRV.
10:1 p. 26 (81).
Political Ornithology. Gilbert B. Snyder. BRV. 16:1
p. 38 (88).
Political Systems as Export Commodities. De-
mocracy & the Role of the US in Central America.
Ricardo Arias Calder6n. ART. 15:1 p. 20 (86).
The Political Use of Rasta. Carl H. Feuer. BRV.
14:4 p. 48 (85).
Politicians in Uniform. Suriname's Bedeviled Rev-
olution. Gary Brana-Shute. ART. 10:2 p. 24 (81).
Politics Caribbean Style. Lessons from Grenada.
Anthony P. Maingot. ART. 14:2 p. 4 (85).
The Politics of Intuition. Eneid Routt6 G6mez. ED.
13:3 p. 3 (84).
Poor Bodies, Poor Spirits. Dale Story. BRV. 16:1
p. 38 (88).
Poor DR!. Thomas Mathews. BRV. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
A Poor King Without a Crown. A Review of the
Haitian Press During the Manigat Months. Bernard
Diederich. ART. 16:2 p. 10 (88).
Poor Man's Bass Fiddle. Donald Thompson. ART.
3:1 p. 11 (71).
Popular Progressives. Virginia C. Garrard. BRV.
15:4 p. 43 (87).
Postpartum Perils. Terry McCoy. BRV. 13:3 p. 53
(84).
Poverty in Trinidad. Ronald G. Parris. BRV. 4:3 p.
46 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


44 (72).
Prejudice & Paranoia. Pierre L. Hudicourt. BRV.
14:4 p. 21 (85).
Prelude to Lares. The events leading to Puerto
Rico's Grito de Lares. Olga Jim6nez de Wagen-
heim. ART. 8:1 p. 39 (79).
Press Reaction to the Invasion. World Press
Review. ART. 12:4 p. 33 (83).
A Primer for US Policy on Caribbean Emigration.
Terry L. McCoy. ART. 8:1 p. 10 (79).
The Protestant Cartel in Puerto Rico. Howard B.
Grose. REP. 5:1 p. 11 (73).
Psychological Divide in the Caribbean Basin.
Robert A. Pastor. ED. 15:1 p. 3 (86).
The Puerto Rican Circuit. James W. Wessman.
BRV. 9:3 p. 42 (80).
Puerto Rican Counterpoint. Fernando Pico and
the Culture of Coffee. Lowell Gudmundson. RES.
13:1 p. 34 (84).
Puerto Rican Culture at the Turning Point. Barry
B. Levine. ED. 9:3 p. 4 (80).
Puerto Rican Downpour. Kal Wagenheim. BRV.
13:3 p. 53 (84).
A Puerto Rican History of Puerto Rico. Juan
Rodriguez Cruz. BRV. 3:1 p. 14 (71).
Puerto Rican Obituary. Pedro Juan Pietri. POE.
2:3 p. 14 (70).
Puerto Rico & the U.S. The Political Economy of
Later-day Bootstrap. Roberto Sanchez Vilella.
ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
Puerto Rico & The Caribbean. Thomas Mathews.
ART. 5:3 p. 14 (73).
Puerto Rico in 1834. Edinburgh Review. BRV. 2:4
p. 8 (70).
Puerto Rico Without Politics. Lawrence C. Phipps
IV. BRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Puerto Rico's 1980 Elections. The Voters Seek
the Center. Harold Lidin. ART. 10:2 p. 28 (81).
Puerto Rico's Blackboard Jungle. David D.
Hernandez. INT. 4:1 p. 3 (72).
Puerto Rico, 936 & the Caribbean. Rafael Her-
nandez Col6n. ED. 14:4 p. 3 (85).
Puerto Rico: A Chronicle of American Care-
lessness. Garry Hoyt. ART. 8:2 p. 9 (79).
Puerto Rico: Equality or Freedom? The Rebirth of
the Status Issue. Juan M. Garcia-Passalacqua.
ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
A Puritan in Babylon. Gordon K. Lewis. BRV. 1:4
p. 3 (69).
Q
Quasi-Urban Melange Settlements. L. Alan Eyre.
ART. 8:2 p. 32 (79).
R
R.I.P. Thomas Mathews. BRV. 4:3 p. 41 (72).
Race & Democracy in Bermuda. The Fight for the
Right. Frank E. Manning. ART. 10:2 p. 20 (81).
Race & Economic Power in Jamaica. Toward the
Creation of a Black Bourgeoisie. Carl Stone. ART.
16:1 p. 10 (88).
Race & Revolution. David Kyle. BRV. 15:2 p. 47
(86).
Raising Cane. Roderick A. McDonald. BRV. 15:3 p.
41 (87).
Rape of the Virgins. James W. Green. BRV. 5:2 p.
37 (73).
Raptures & Recuperaciones. Rafael Ocasio. BRV.
16:1 p. 40 (88).
Rare Bird. John A. Booth. BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Rasta Crime. A Confidential Report. NYCPD. ART.
14:1 p. 12 (85).
The Rastas. Roy Simon Bryce-Laporte. BRV. 2:2 p.
3(70).
The Reagan Administration & Latin America. An
Uneasy Beginning. William D. Rogers and Jeffrey
A. Meyers. ART. 11:2 p. 14(82).
Reagan Policy: Global Chess or Local Crap
Shooting. A Critique From the Right. L. Francis
Bouchey. ART. 11:2 p. 20 (82).
The Real Clear & Present Danger. A Critique from
the Left. Richard R. Fagen. ART. 11:2 p. 18 (82).
The Reality of Immigration Reform. Alejandro
Portes. ED. 15:4 p. 3 (87).
Recycling a Forgotten Colony. From Green Hell to
Outer Space in French Guiana. Frank Sch-
warzbeck. ART. 13:2 p. 22 (84).


Reflections on Grandfather from Guyana. Ex-
cerpts. 0. R. Dathorne. EXC. 7:3 p. 32 (78).
Refugee Chess. Policy by Default. Mario A. Rivera.
ART. 13:4 p. 5 (84).
Reggae International. Spiritual Balm for a Trem-
bling World. Alan Greenberg. BRV. 12:2 p. 32
(83).
Relations with Cuba. Ezequiel Ramirez Novoa.
ART. 4:3 p. 22 (72).
Religion Among The Caribs. Anthony Layng. ART.
8:2 p. 36 (79).
Religion & Politics in Bermuda. Revivalist politics
& the language of power. Frank E. Manning. ART.
8:4 p. 18 (79).
Remembrances of a Jamaica Past. And Reflec-
tions on Its Future. Wendell Bell. ART. 14:1 p. 5
(85).
Remembrances of New York. The Puerto Rican
Community From the American Civil War to 1947.
Eugene V. Mohr. BRV. 10:4 p. 34 (81).
Remembrances of Things Puerto Rican. Vig-
nettes from "The Islander." John Hawes. EXC. 9:3
p. 22 (80).
Remembrances of Things Dominican. Ligia Espi-
nal de Hoetink. EXC. 5:1 p. 18 (73).
Reminiscences of an Aging Puerto Rican. Oscar
Lewis. EXC. 2:3 p. 1 (70).
Report Redux. Thoughts on the Imaginary Docu-
ment. Nelson P. Vald6s. FIC. 15:2 p. 21 (86).
Requiem for a Lost Leader. Luis Muhoz Manin,
1989-1980. Gordon K. Lewis. ART. 9:3 p. 5 (80).
Requiem for a Pen Name. John Cooke. BRV. 13:2
p. 53 (84).
Requiem for the Artist. Roland E. Bush. BRV. 15:1
p. 41 (86).
"Residence on Earth." Pablo Neruda. POE. 6:2 p.
32 (74).
Resilient Self-Delusion. Lowell Gudmundson.
BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
A Response to Berrios. Jaime Benitez. ART. 8:2 p.
21 (79).
Rethinking Cuba. Barry B. Levine. ED. 15:2 p. 3
(86).
The Retreat from Integration. Compton Bourne.
ED. 14:3 p. 3 (85).
Revolting Conditions. Peter Johnson. BRV. 15:4
p. 41 (87).
Revolutionary Comics. Political Humor from Nic-
aragua. R6ger SAnchez Flores. ART. 15:1 p. 16
(86).
Revolutionary Cuban. Octavio Pino. ART. 6:4 p.
20 (74).
Rican Richness. Edna Acosta-Bel6n. BRV. 14:1 p.
51 (85).
The Rise & Fall of the Maya. Mysteries of an
Ancient Civilization. Prudence M. Rice. RES. 13:4
p. 28 (84).
Risk Taking in the Stock Market. Gambling and
Politics in Bermuda. Frank E. Manning. ART. 11:4
p. 20 (82).
Ritual, Paradox & Death in Managua. Inter-
nacionalistas in Nicaragua. Alfred Padula. ART.
15:1 p. 18 (86).
Rockers. A Different Image of Jamaica. Aaron
Segal. CRV. 10:2 p. 38 (81).
The Role of the Opposition in Trinidad and
Tobago. Basdeo Panday. ART. 7:4 p. 31 (78).
The Role of the Opposition in the Caribbean.
Anthony P. Maingot. ART. 7:4 p. 22 (78).
The Role of the Opposition in El Salvador.
Guillermo Ungo. ART. 8:2 p. 22 (79).
The Role of the Opposition in Guyana. Cheddi
Jagan. ART. 7:4 p. 37 (78).
The Role of the Opposition in Jamaica. Edward
Seaga. ART. 7:4 p. 27 (78).
The Role of the Press in the Caribbean. Private
Ownership & Public Responsibility. Ramesh De-
osaran. ART. 13:4 p. 16 (84).
Romancing the Dictator. Irving Louis Horowitz.
BRV. 16:1 p. 25 (88).
Romans, Natives & Helots. Gordon K. Lewis. ART.
2:1 p. 3 (70).
The Roots of Anti-Americanism in Cuba. Sover-
eignty in an Age of World Cultural Homogeneity.
Carlos Alberto Montaner. ART. 13:2 p. 13 (84).
The Ruin of Jamaica. Gardiner Greene Hubbard.
RES. 3:2 p. 8 (71).


__








Rumupmanship. Barry B. Levine. BRV. 16:1 p. 42
(88).
Running Out Of Options in Jamaica. Seaga and
Manley Compared. Carl Stone. ART. 15:3 p. 10
(87).
Russia & Latin America. Leon Goure. BRV. 4:4 p.
39 (72).
S
The Sacred Drums of the Lucumi. Roberto Nodal.
ART. 7:2 p. 20 (78).
Sacrificial Equality. Armando Bengochea. BRV.
14:4 p. 49 (85).
Sadists & Sycophants. George W. Grayson. BRV.
14:1 p. 49 (85).
The Samurai & the Machete. Harold Sims. BRV.
13:3 p. 54 (84).
Sanctuary for Central Americans. A Threat to INS
Policy?Kathy Barber Hersh. ART. 12:1 p. 16 (83).
Sandinista Chess. How the Left Took Control.
Stephen Gorman. ART. 10:1 p. 14 (81).
Sandinista Socialization. David Bray. BRV. 14:3 p.
48 (85).
The Sandinistas & the Indians. The "Problem" of
the Indian in Nicaragua. Richard N. Adams. ART.
10:1 p. 22 (81).
The Sandinistas & the Costeios. Re-
conciliation & Integration? Margaret D. Wilde.
ART. 10:4 p. 8 (81).
Saving Slaves. Herman J. Flax. BRV. 14:4 p. 48
(85).
Seaga Is In Trouble. Polling the Jamaican Polity in
Mid-Term. Carl Stone. ART. 11:4 p. 4 (82).
Searching for Pretto. Politics & Art in Panama.
Sandra Serrano. EXC. 15:1 p. 28 (86).
Second-Hand Haiti. Christian A. Girault. BRV. 14:2
p. 51 (85).
Shango. Brenda Flanagan. SS. 8:4 p. 26 (79).
The Shifting Sands of Haitian Legitimacy. Barry
B. Levine. ED. 16:2 p. 3 (88).
A Shortcut to Development? Selwyn Ryan. ED.
12:3 p. 3 (83).
"Si Abuela..." Garcia Marquez's Erotic Fairy Tale.
Aaron Segal. CRV. 13:4 p. 34 (84).
Six Months in the West Indies in 1825. H. N.
Coleridge. EXC. 5:4 p. 30 (73).
Slave Health. Bonham C. Richardson. BRV. 15:4 p.
42 (87).
Slavery & Race in Haitian Letters. Literature and
the Peculiar Institution. Lbon-Frangois Hoffman.
RES. 9:2 p. 28 (80).
Slaves as People. Melvin Drimmer. ART. 3:2 p. 5
(71).
Slaying the Dragon. Felix Morisseau-Leroy. BRV.
14:1 p. 49 (85).
A Sling Shot at the Soap Giant. Ram6n Mendoza.
BRV. 8:2 p. 45 (79).
Small & Vulnerable. Roy Patman. BRV. 16:1 p. 42
(88).
Small States. Anselm Francis. BRV. 15:3 p. 42
(87).
Smith on Smiths' Smith. Larry J. Smith. BRV. 16:1
p. 42 (88).
The Sniper. Pedro Juan Soto. EXC. 1:3 p. 3 (69).
So it Wasn't a Picnic. Joel Magruder. BRV. 1:2 p.
12(69).
So Near... Steven E. Sanderson. BRV. 14:3 p. 49
(85).
Social Strata in Esperanza. Carlos Buitrago-Ortiz.
ART. 2:3 p. 11 (70).
The Socialist International & Latin America.
Progress & Problems. Karl-Ludolf HObener. ART.
11:2 p. 38 (82).
Sociobiography. Kamla Lewis. BRV. 15:4 p. 40
(87).
Solid Survey. Lowell Gudmundson. BRV. 15:1 p.
43 (86).
A Source of Human Experience. Felix Morisseau-
Leroy. BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Sources of Ethnic Identity for Latin Florida. Barry
B. Levine. ART. 8:1 p. 30 (79).
Spanish Maimed. Aar6n G. Ramos. BRV. 1:1 p. 11
(69).
Spic Chic. Spanglish As Equipment for Living.
Gustavo Perez Firmat. ART. 15:3 p. 20 (87).
The Springtime of Elections. The Status of De-
mocracy in the Caribbean. Don Bohning, Juan 0.


Tomayo & Bernard Diederich. ART. 11:3 p. 4 (82).
Starting to Redistribute. John Waterbury. BRV.
15:1 p. 42 (86).
The Status of Democracy in the Caribbean. Barry
B. Levine. ED. 10:2 p. 4 (81).
The Status Soap Opera. Jos6 J. Villamil. ED. 13:1
p. 3 (84).
Storm Over Cape Horn. Farrokh Jhabvala. ART.
8:4 p. 12 (79).
Story's Story. Ben Schneider. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Stranger in Paradise. Eric W. Blake. ART. 6:2 p. 8
(74).
Strangers in Paradise. The Jewish Enclave at
Sosua. Frances Henry. ART. 14:4 p. 16 (85).
Strategic Flexibility in the West Indies. A Social
Psychology of Caribbean Migrations. Charles V.
Carnegie. ART. 11:1 p. 10 (82).
Street Reform. Celia F. de Cintr6n. BRV. 1:4 p. 13
(69).
Structure & Culture in Santo Domingo. Anthony
P. Maingot. BRV. 5:3 p. 43 (73).
The Struggle for the Underdeveloped World: I.
Joseph Bensman & Arthur Vidich. ART. 2:3 p. 3
(70).
The Struggle for the Underdeveloped World: IL
Joseph Bensman & Arthur Vidich. ART. 2:4 p. 4
(70).
Stuck on Status. New Ideas about an Old Problem.
James L. Dietz. RES. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Studying in the States. A Rap Session. Augustus
C. Small. ART. 11:4 p. 22 (82).
Sugar & East Indian Indentureship in Trinidad.
Ken Boodhoo. ART. 5:2 p. 17 (73).
Sugar High. Jorge I. Dominguez. BRV. 7:2 p. 52
(78).
Sugarcake Day. E. A. Markham. SS. 9:4 p. 36 (80).
Summit. Paul St. Vincent. POE. 7:3 p. 60 (78).
Sun Lust Tourism in the Caribbean. Herbert L.
Hiller. ART. 7:4 p. 12 (78).
Surinam Politics. Robert H. Manley. BRV. 1:1 p. 12
(69).
Suriname Surprises. Small Country, Smaller
Revolution. Gary Brana-Shute. ART. 15:4 p. 4
(87).
Suriname Tar Baby. The Signature of Terror.
Edward Dew. ART. 12:1 p. 4 (83).
Surplus Populations. Economic Migrants and
Political Refugees. Barry B. Levine. ED. 11:1 p. 4
(82).
Susu. Daniel Levin. ART. 7:1 p. 19 (75).
Sweet Temptation. Joann Biondi. BRV. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
Swine Fever Ironies. The Slaughter of the Haitian
Black Pig. Bernard Diederich. ART. 14:1 p. 16
(85).
The System is Upstairs. Selections from "Benjy
Lopez." Barry B. Levine. EXC. 9:3 p. 36 (80).
T
A Taino Tale. A Mythological Statement of Social
Order. Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo. ART. 13:4 p.
24 (84).
The Tainos of Hispaniola. The Island's First
Inhabitants. Frank Moya Pons. ART. 13:4 p. 21
(84).
Tales of the High Seas. Gay Pirates in the 17th
Century Caribbean. Arthur N. Gilbert. BRV. 12:3 p.
34 (83).
The Teaching of Don Juan. Carlos Castaneda.
EXC. 1:2 p. 7 (69).
Technologism. Arnold K. Ventura. BRV. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
That Was The Way It Wasn't. Edward Dew. BRV.
16:1 p. 43 (88).
Theological Opium. Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo.
BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Theory & Practice in Nicaragua. The Economics
of Class Dynamics. Forrest D. Colburn. ART. 12:3
p. 6 (83).
The Third World of the West. Ricardo Arias
Calder6n. ED. 13:4 p. 3 (84).
The Thirty Years War Between Figueres & the
Somozas. Charles D. Ameringer. ART. 8:4 p. 4
(79).
This Train. A St. Lucian Short Story. Augustus C.
Small. SS. 9:2 p. 24 (80).
Thoughts From a Policy-Maker. Jorge Salazar-


Carrillo. BRV. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
Thoughts On A Democratic Consortium. The
World is Small to Stay. Gregory B. Wolfe. ED. 11:2
p. 4 (82).
Thoughts on Caribbean Society. An Anthropo-
logical Critique. Sidney W. Mintz. BRV. 13:1 p. 28
(84).
Three Men by the River. Rene Marqu6s. SS. 1:4 p.
7(69).
Three Rebellious Lieutenants. Anthony P. Main-
got. BRV. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Three Trapped Tigers. J. Raban Bilder. BRV. 4:3 p.
28 (72).
The Tidy Tico Way. John P. Harrison. BRV. 13:2 p.
53 (84).
A Time for Straight Talk. Anthony P. Maingot. ED.
12:1 p. 3 (83).
Tired Latin Liberals. Wolfgang A. Luchting. ART.
2:1 p. 6 (70).
Tis English? Norman Weinstein. BRV. 15:4 p. 41
(87).
Tobago's Quest for Autonomy. From Colony to
Ward to... Selwyn Ryan. ART. 14:2 p. 7 (85).
Tomorrow's Child. Jos6 R. Garcia. BRV. 7:1 p. 36
(75).
Too Much of a Good Thing. Aaron Segal. RES. 5:4
p. 37 (73).
Toussaint Breda. John Hawes. EXC. 3:2 p. 6 (71).
Toward a New American Presence in the Carib-
bean. Franklin W. Knight. ART. 9:1 p. 36 (80).
Toward Resolving the Debt Crisis. Rt. Hon.
Edward Seaga. ED. 16:1 p. 3 (88).
Towards a New Central American Dialogue.
Daniel Oduber. ART. 10:1 p. 10 (81).
Trade Tactics. Anselm Francis. BRV. 14:4 p. 48
(85).
The Tradition of Democracy in the Caribbean.
Betancourt, Figueres, Mutoz & the Democratic
Left. Charles D. Ameringer. ART. 11:2 p. 28 (82).
Transfer of Power: British-Style. Basil A. Ince.
ART. 1:1 p. 7 (69).
Transition to Nowhere. How Haiti's Democratic
Transition Might Have Worked. Jorge Heine. ART.
16:2 p. 4 (88).
The Traumas of Exile. "Contra Viento y Marea."
Luis P. Salas. BRV. 9:1 p. 42 (80).
Tropical Hamlet. Carlos Alberto Montaner. BRV.
2:2 p. 12 (70).
The Trouble with Latin America. Jean-Frangois
Revel. ART. 8:3 p. 13 (79).
The Troubled Island of Hispaniola. Riots in Haiti
and the Dominican Republic. Bernard Diederich.
ART. 13:3 p. 18 (84).
Try to Write...and You Will See What Happens.
Vignettes from Haiti's Journalistic Past. Jean
Desquiron. ART. 16:2 p. 13 (88).
Turning the Times Tables. Gustavo Pbrez Firmat.
POE. 15:3 p. 37 (87).
Twenty Years After the Cuban Revolution. Carlos
Alberto Montaner. ART. 8:1 p. 4 (79).
Two Brazilian Short Stories. The Fight Goes On
and Tourism, Oh, Tourism... Edilberto Coutinho.
SS. 8:2 p. 42 (79).
Two Hundred Islands of Soledad. International
Law & the South Atlantic. Farrokh Jhabvala. ART.
11:3 p. 8 (82).
Two Views of "Benjy Lopez." A Tale of Wit and
Woe. Helen I. Safa. BRV. 9:3 p. 41 (80).
Two Views of "Benjy Lopez." A Man & His
Potential. Miguel Barnet. BRV. 9:3 p. 40 (80).
Two Views of Ecuador. Leopold Kohr. BRV. 2:4 p.
1 (70).
Tecnicos vs. Politicos. The Aftermath of the
Mexican Earthquakes. George W. Grayson. ART.
15:4 p. 20 (87).
U
The U.S. & Latin America. Thomas Mathews. BRV.
4:4 p. 42 (72).
US Press Coverage of Grenada. Articles in the
New York Times, October 1983. Marian Goslinga.
ART. 12:4 p. 66 (83).
Unconventional Geopolitics. H. Michael Erisman.
BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Underdevelopment Is A State Of Mind. The Latin
American Case. Lawrence E. Harrison. ART. 15:4
p. 16 (87).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /47








Unflattering Analysis. Ben Schneider. BRV. 16:1
p. 41 (88).
The Unholy Trinity. Anselme Remy. ART. 6:2 p. 14
(74).
Uptight West Indians. Ivor L. Livingston. BRV. 13:4
p. 51 (84).
The US & A New Haiti. Robert Maguire. ED. 15:3 p.
3 (87).
The US & Central America. Thomas W. Walker.
ART. 8:3 p. 18 (79).
The US & Cuba, 1880-1934. Pedro J. Montiel. BRV.
8:1 p. 51 (79).
The US & the Caribbean. Issues of Economics and
Security. Vaughan A. Lewis. ART. 11:2 p. 6 (82).

V
Varieties of Labor Organization. The Caribbean
and Central America Compared. Steve Charno-
vitz. ART. 14:2 p. 14 (85).
Venezuela & the Caribbean. Demetrio Boersner.
ART. 8:4 p. 8 (79).
The Venezuelan Reception. Human Resources
and Development. Andres Serbin. ART. 11:1 p. 42
(82).
The View from the Barrio. Angelina Pollack-Eltz.
BRV. 2:1 p. 13 (70).
Violence of the Hours. Cesar Vallejo. POE. 1:3 p.
10 (69).
Virgin Island Vignettes. S. B. Jones-Hendrickson.
BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Virology of Revolution. Assessing Castro's In-
ternational Activities. Edward Gonzalez. RES.
13:2 p. 32 (84).
Vito Marcantonio. An Italian-American's Defense
of Puerto Rico & Puerto Ricans. Adalberto L6pez.
ART. 8:1 p. 16 (79).
Vote Dem Out. The Demise of the PNM in Trinidad
and Tobago. Kevin A. Yelvington. ART. 15:4 p. 8
(87).

W
Wagenheim on Lewis' Wagenheim. Kal Wagen-
heim. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
Wagenheim's Profile. Gordon K. Lewis. BRV. 3:2
p. 11 (71).
Was Bishop A Social Democrat? The Speeches


of Maurice Bishop. Carl Henry Feuer. BRV. 12:4 p.
37 (83).
We Wish to be Looked Upon. Ursula M. Von
Eckardt. BRV. 2:2 p. 10 (70).
Weary Traveler. Roy Pateman. BRV. 15:3 p. 40
(87).
Weber & Latin America. Reinhard Bendix. BRV.
2:4 p. 3 (70).
West Indian Dialogue. Harmannus Hoetink. BRV.
1:4 p. 6 (69).
West Indian Fiction is Alive & Well. Eugene V.
Mohr. RES. 5:4 p. 23 (73).
West Indian Paysans. Jean Benoist. BRV. 13:3 p.
53 (84).
What About my Tip? Forrest D. Colburn. BRV.
13:2 p. 55 (84).
What Debate? Thomas P. Anderson. BRV. 16:1 p.
42 (88).
What Did He Say? What Did He Mean? An
Ethnography of Discourse in Puerto Rico. Gerald
Guinness. BRV. 10:4 p. 32 (81).
What Ever Happened to Polarization in the
Caribbean. Thomas Mathews. ART. 5:1 p. 26
(73).
What Graham Greene Didn't Tell Us. Five Ac-
counts of the Torrijos Legacy. Neale Pearson.
RES. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
What Happened in Cartagena. The Gloved Hand
of the Debtor. Robert A. Liff. ART. 13:3 p. 14 (84).
What Happened in Ocho Rios. Last Chance for
CARICOM? Mirlande Hippolyte-Manigat. ART.
12:2 p. 10 (83).
What Hath Intervention Wrought. Reflections on
the Dominican Republic. James W. Nash. ART.
14:4 p. 7 (85).
What the Sandinistas Want. Not a new Cuba, but
a new Nicaragua. Sergio Ramirez. ART. 8:3 p. 24
(79).
What Was Uncovered in Grenada. The Weapons
and Documents. Nestor D. Sanchez. ART. 12:4 p.
20 (83).
What's A Rasta? Claudia Rogers. ART. 7:1 p. 9
(75).
Whatever Happened to Cancdn? The 600 Billion
Dollar Question. Pamela S. Falk. ART. 11:3 p. 14
(82).


When the Turtle Collapses, the World Ends.
Modernization & the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua.
Bernard Nietschmann. ART. 9:2 p. 14 (80).
When They Worked in Guyana. Thomas J.
Spinner, Jr. BRV. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
Where to Study Central America. A Geography of
Historical Materials. Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr.
ART. 10:1 p. 47 (81).
Which Way the French West Indies? Aaron Segal.
BRV. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Which Way the U.S. Virgin Islands? Gordon K.
Lewis. ART. 5:4 p. 16 (73).
Who Cares About the Caribbean? Colin G.
Clarke. BRV. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Who Got the Oil? Bernard E. Segal. BRV. 13:2 p.
54 (84).
Who is the Devil? Monsignor Bryan 0. Walsh.
BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Who Needs a Guest Worker Program? They Do;
We Do. Franklin W. Knight. ART. 11:1 p. 46 (82).
Who's Who? Gary Brana-Shute. BRV. 13:2 p. 54
(84).
Why Latin America Is Poor. Cultural Factors in
Latin Poverty. Michael Novak. ART. 11:3 p. 18
(82).
Why Migrate. Nancy Robinson. BRV. 16:1 p. 41
(88).
Why the Black Man is Black. G. Llewellyn Watson.
BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Wifredo Lam. Ricardo Pau-Llosa. BRV. 7:4 p. 54
(78).
Will Allende Make It? T.V. Sathyamurthy. ART. 4:1
p. 7 (72).
Will the OAS Live To Be 100? Does it Deserve To?
Francis X. Gannon. ART. 13:4 p. 12 (84).
Wives, Husbands, & More Wives. Sexual Op-
portunities Among the Saramaka. Sally Price.
ART. 12:2 p. 26 (83).

Y
Yankee Boo-Boos. John J. Johnson. BRV. 13:2 p.
52 (84).
The Year of the Sergeants. What Happened in
Suriname. Edward Dew. ART. 9:2 p. 4 (80).
Young Cuba. Elizabeth Sutherland. EXC. 1:4 p. 9
(69).


BOOKS REVIEWED, BY AUTHOR

A
Adams, R.E.W., ed. The Origins of Maya Civiliza-
tion. Review by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
Adelman, Alan, & Reid Reading, eds. Con-
frontation in the Caribbean Basin. Review by
Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
Aguilar, Luis E. Cuba 1933: Prologue to Revolu-
tion. Review by Roberto Leyva (pseud.). 5:2 p. 33
(73).
Aitken, Thomas. Poet in the Fortress: The Story of
Luis Munoz Marin. Review by Gordon K. Lewis.
1:4 p. 3 (69).
Alves, Rubem. Tomorrow's Child: Imagination,
Creativity & The Rebirth Of Culture. Review by
Jose R. Garcia. 7:1 p. 36 (75).
Ambursley, Fitzroy, & Robin Cohen, eds. Crisis in
the Caribbean. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29
(84).
Ameringer, Charles D. Democracy in Costa Rica.
Review by John P. Harrison. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Anderson, Thomas D. Geopolitics of the Carib-
bean: Ministates in a Wider World. Review by H.
Michael Erisman. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Andic, Fuat M. What Price Equity? A Macroeco-
nomic Evaluation of Government Policies in Costa
Rica. Review by Irma T. de Alonso. 15:1 p. 44
(86).
Anna, Timothy E. Spain & the Loss of America.
Review by Joaquin Roy. 15:2 p. 48 (86).
Arias Calderon, Ricardo. Panama, Desastre..o
Democracia. Review by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26
(86).
Arias de Para, Raul. Anatomy of a Fraud: the 1984
Presidential Election in Panama. Review by Steve
C. Ropp. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
48 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Arieto, Grupo. Contra Viento YMarea. Review by
Luis P. Salas. 9:1 p. 42 (80).
Ascher, William. Scheming for the Poor: The
Politics of Redistribution in Latin America. Review
by John Waterbury. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
Ashmore, W., ed. Lowland Maya Settlement Pat-
terns. Review by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28
(84).
Aspe Armella, Pedro, Rudiger Dornbusch and
Maurice Obstfeld. Financial Policies & the World
Capital Market: The Problem of Latin American
Countries. Review by Juan A. Yafies. 14:2 p. 50
(85).
Austin, Diane J. A Review of Urban Life in
Kingston, Jamaica. Review by Bernard D.
Headley. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
B
Balaguer, Joaquin. La isla al rev6s: Haiti y el
destiny dominicano. Review by Pierre L. Hudi-
court. 14:4 p. 21 (85).
Barnet, Miguel. Gallego. Review by Leonel A. de la
Cuesta. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Barradas, Efrain. Apalabramiento: Cuentos
puertorriquehos de hoy. Review by Kal Wagen-
helm. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Barratt, RJ.H. Grand Bahama. Review by Aaron
Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Barrett, Jeffrey W. Impulse to Revolution in Latin
America. Review by Daniel H. Levine. 15:4 p. 19
(87).
Barrett, Leonard E. The Rastafarians: A Study of
Messianic Cultism in Jamaica. Review by Roy
Simon Bryce-Laporte. 2:2 p. 3 (70).
Barry, Tom, Beth Wood & Deb Preusch. The
Other Side of Paradise. Review by Carl Henry
Feuer. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Barty-King, Hugh, & Anton Massel. Rum-


Yesterday & Today. Review by Barry B. Levine.
16:1 p. 42 (88).
Benjamin, Jules Robert. The United States and
Cuba: Hegemony & Dependent Development,
1880-1934. Review by Pedro J. Montiel. 8:1 p. 51
(79).
Benjamin, Medea, Joseph Collins, & Michael
Scott. No Free Lunch: Food & Revolution in Cuba
Today. Review by James E. Austin. 15:2 p. 45
(86).
Bennett, Mark. Public Policy & Industrial De-
velopment: The Case of the Mexican Auto Parts
Industry. Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Bennett, Douglas E. & Kenneth E. Sharpe.
Transnational Corporations Versus the State: The
Political Economy of the Mexican Auto Industry.
Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Bernardo, Robert M. The Theory of Moral Incen-
tives in Cuba. Review by Irving Louis Horowitz. 4:4
p. 33 (72).
Bethel, Paul D. The Losers. Review by Andres
Subrez. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Bishop, Maurice. Forward Ever: Three Years of the
Grenadian Revolution. Review by Carl Henry
Feuer. 12:4 p. 37 (83).
Bissoondath, Neil. Digging Up The Mountains.
Review by Augusta Dwyer. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Black, George, with Milton Jamail & Norman
Stultz Chinchilla. Garrison Guatemala. Review
by Virginia C. Garrard. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Blasier, Cole. The Giant's Rival: The USSR and
Latin America. Review by Leon Goure. 13:4 p. 51
(84).
Bloomfield, Richard J., ed. Puerto Rico: The
Search for a National Policy. Review by James L.
Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Bodard, Lucien. Green Hell: Massacre of the
Brazilian Indians. Review by Paul Vidich. 5:2 p. 31


_ I _dl _


RC~PCII -111- --I


- -r I -- I








(73).
Bonpane, Blase. Guerrillas of Peace: Liberation
Theology & the Central American Revolution.
Review by Michele Heisler. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Bonsai, Philip W. Cuba, Castro & the United
States. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Borges, Jorge Luis. The Book of Imaginary
Beings. Review by Kal Wagenheim. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Bosch, Juan. De Cristobal Colon a Fidel Castro. El
Caribe. Frontera Imperial. Review by Anthony P.
Maingot. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
Bosch, Juan. Dictadura con respaldo popular.
Review by Kal Wagenheim. 2:1 p. 10 (70).
Bosch, Juan. Pentagonism. Review by Kal Wagen-
heim. 2:1 p. 10 (70).
Bowdler, George A. & Patrick Cotter. Voter
Participation in Central America, 1954-1981: An
Exploration. Review by Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr.
13:2 p. 55 (84).
Boyer, William W. America's Virgin Islands: A
History of Human Rights & Wrongs. Review by S.
B. Jones-Hendrickson. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Braithwaite, Edward. The Development of Creole
Society in Jamaica:1770-1820. Review by Ena
Campbell. 5:2 p. 42 (73).
Brathwaite, Edward Kamau. History of the Voice:
The Development of Nation Language in Anglo-
phone Caribbean Poetry. Review by Norman
Weinstein. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Bregenzer, John. Tryin' to Make It: Adapting to the
Bahamas. Review by Frank E. Manning. 13:4 p.
49 (84).
Brock, Colin, ed. The Caribbean In Europe.
Aspects of the West Indian Experience in Britain,
France & The Netherlands. Review by Nancy
Robinson. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
Brundenius, Claes. Revolutionary Cuba: The Chal-
lenge of Economic Growth with Equity. Review by
Sergio Roca. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Bryden, John M. Tourism & Development, A Case
Study of the Commonwealth Caribbean. Review
by Ramash Ramsaran. 7:1 p. 41 (75).
Buisseret, David. Historic Architecture of the
Caribbean. Review by Aaron Segal. 12:1 p. 32
(83).
Buissert, David. Histoire de I'architecture dans la
Caraibe. Review by Ellen L. Belknap. 14:3 p. 49
(85).
Burbach, Roger, & Patricia Flynn, eds. Politics of
Invervention: The United States in Central Amer-
ica. Review by Marvin Alisky. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
Burg, B. R. Sodomy & the Perception of Evil:
English Sea Rovers in the Seventeenth Century
Caribbean. Review by Arthur N. Gilbert. 12:3 p. 34
(83).
Burgos-Debray, Elisabeth, ed. I...Rigoberta
MenchO: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. Review
by David Bray. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Burnett, Paula, ed. The Penguin Book of Carib-
bean Verse in English. Review by Emily M.
Belcher. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Burnham, Forbes. A Destiny to Mold. Review by
Gordon K. Lewis. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
Burns, E. Bradford. Poverty of Progress: Latin
America in the Nineteenth Century. Review by
Mark D. Szuchman. 10:3 p. 28 (81).
Burrowes, Reynold. The Wild Coast: An Account
of Politics in Guyana. Review by Edward Dew.
16:1 p. 43 (88).
Burton, Julianne. New Latin American Cinema: An
Annotated Bibliography of Sources in English,
Spanish & Portuguese: 1960-1980. Review by
Dennis West. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
C
Cabezas, Omar. La montaia es algo mis que una
inmensa estepa verde. Review by David Bray.
14:3 p. 48 (85).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Infante's Inferno.
Review by Donald Gwynn Watson. 13:3 p. 30 (84).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. La Habana para un
infante difunto. Review by Cruz Hernandez. 9:4 p.
40 (80).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Three Trapped Tigers.
Review by J. Raban Bilder. 4:3 p. 28 (72).
Cardenal, Ernesto. Nueva Antologia Pobtica. Re-
view by Aaron Segal. 10:1 p. 26 (81).


Cardenal, Ernesto. Zero Hour & Other Docu-
mentary Poems. Review by Aaron Segal. 10:1 p.
26(81).
Carlton, Robert G. Soviet Image of Contemporary
Latin America, A Documentary History, 1960-
1968. Review by Leon Gour6. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
Carr, Raymond. Puerto Rico: A Colonial Exper-
iment. Review by James L. Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Carrillo, Justo. Cuba 1933: Estudiantes Yanquis y
Soldados. Review by Adolfo Leyva. 16:2 p. 48
(88).
Carter, William E. Cannabis in Costa Rica. Review
by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Castaneda, Carlos. Journey to Ixtlan: The Lessons
of Don Juan. Review by Randy Frances Kandel.
6:4 p. 32 (74).
Castaneda, Carlos. A Separate Reality: Further
Conversations With Don Juan. Review by Randy
Frances Kandel. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
Castaneda, Carlos. The Teachings of Don Juan: A
Yaqui Way of Knowledge. Review by Randy
Frances Kandel. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
Centro de Investigaciones y Documentation de
la Costa Atlantica. Miskitu Bila Aisanka:
Gramatica Miskita. Review by Forrest D. Colburn.
14:4 p. 49 (85).
Centro de Investigaciones y Documentati6n de
la Costa Atlantica. Miskitu Kisi Nani: Cuentos
Miskitos. Review by Forrest D. Colburn. 14:4 p. 49
(85).
Chace, James. Endless War: How We Got Involved
in Central America & What Can Be Done About It.
Review by Alexander H. Mclntire, Jr. 15:1 p. 44
(86).
Chaplin, David, ed. Population Policies & Growth in
Latin America. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4 p. 37
(73).
City Demonstration Agency. Model Cities Pro-
gram: Municipality of San Juan. Review by
Howard Stanton. 1:1 p. 9 (69).
Clarke, Austin C. The Prime Minister. Review by
Harry T. Antrim. 8:4 p. 38 (79).
Cleary, Edward L. Crisis & Change: The Church in
Latin America Today. Review by Stephen D.
Glazier. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Clements, Charles. Witness to War: An American
Doctor in El Salvador. Review by Neale J.
Pearson. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Clinton, Richard L., William S. Flash, R. Kenneth
Godwin, eds. Political Science in Population
Studies. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Comitas, Lambros. The Complete Caribbeana
1900-1975. Review by lan I. Smart. 10:3 p. 32
(81).
Commonwealth Secretariat. Vulnerability: Small
States in the Global Society. Report of a Common-
wealth Consultative Group. Review by Roy Pat-
man. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Cond6, Maryse. Heremakhonon, a Novel. Review
by Richard Dwyer. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
Conde, Maryse. Heremakhonon. Review by Marie-
Denise Shelton. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
Consuegra, Jos6. El Control de la Natalidad Como
Arma del Imperialismo. Review by Aaron Segal.
5:4 p. 37 (73).
Cordasco, Francesco, & Eugene Bucchioni, eds.
The Puerto Rican Experience. Review by Adal-
berto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Cordasco, Francesco, & Eugene Bucchioni, eds.
Puerto Ricans On The United States: A Bibliogra-
phy. Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Corkran, Jr., Herbert. Patterns of International
Cooperation in the Caribbean. Review by Basil A.
Ince. 4:3 p. 36 (72).
Coronel, Gustavo. The Nationalization of the
Venezuelan Oil Industry. Review by John D. Wirth.
13:3 p. 55 (84).
Correa, Miguel. Al norte del infierno. Review by
Leonel de la Cuesta. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Cortazar, Julio. Cronopios & Famas. Review by Kal
Wagenheim. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Cortazar, Julio. A Manual for Manuel. Review by
Gerald Guinness. 8:3 p. 40 (79).
Cowan, Paul. The Making of an Unamerican.
Review by Leopold Kohr. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Craig, Susan. Contemporary Caribbean: A Socio-
logical Reader. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29


(84).
Crassweller, Robert D. The Caribbean Com-
munity: Changing Societies & U.S. Policy. Review
by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Craton, Michael. A History of the Bahamas. Review
by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Craton, Michael. Testing the Chains: Resistance to
Slavery in the British West Indies. Review by
Roger N. Buckley. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Culbert, T. P. The Classic Maya Collapse. Review
by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
D
Dance, Daryl C. Folklore from Contemporary
Jamaicans. Review by G. Llewellyn Watson. 14:4
p. 49 (85).
Davis, Richard Harding. The Cuban & Porto Rican
Campaigns. Review by Joel Magruder. 1:2 p. 12
(69).
Davis, Shelton H. Victims of the Miracle: Devel-
opment & the Indians of Brazil. Review by William
T. Vickers. 8:2 p. 50 (79).
Davis, Stephen. Bob Marley. Review by Kamla
Lewis. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Davis & Peter Simon, Stephen. Reggae Interna-
tional. Review by Alan Greenberg. 12:2 p. 32 (83).
de Granda, German. Transculturacidn e inter-
ferencia linguistica en el Puerto Rico contem-
porineo. Review by Aar6n G. Ramos. 1:1 p. 11
(69).
De Jong, Theo P. M. De Krimpende Horizon van de
Hollandse Kooplieden, Een Studie Over Hoal-
lands Welvaren in Het Caribisch Zeegebied
(1780-1830). Review by Albert Gastmann. 1:1 p.
13(69).
del Aguila, Jan M. Cuba: Dilemmas of A Revolu-
tion. Review by Armando Bengochea. 14:4 p. 49
(85).
Delson, Roberta Marx, ed. Readings in Caribbean
History & Economics: An Introduction to the
Region. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Depestre, Ren6. Cantate d'Octobre. Review by
Aaron Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Diederich, Bernard. Somoza & the Legacy of US
Involvement in Central America. Review by Carlos
M. Vilas. 11:3 p. 34 (82).
Diederich, Bernard, & Al Burt. Papa Doc: The
Truth About Haiti Today. Review by Jean-Claude
Garcia-Zamor. 2:1 p. 8 (70).
Dixon, Marlene, & Susanne Jonas, eds. Nicara-
gua Under Siege. Review by John A. Booth. 15:2
p. 47 (86).
Dominguez, Jorge. Cuba: Order & Revolution.
Review by Pedro J. Montiel. 9:1 p. 40 (80).
Dorschner, John, & Roberto Fabricio. The Winds
of December. Review by Justo Carrillo. 10:4 p. 38
(81).
Dozier, Craig L. Nicaragua's Mosquito Shore: The
Years of British & American Presence. Review by
Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Dreher, Melanie Creagan. Working Men and
Ganja. Review by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Dressier, William W. Hypertension & Culture
Change: Acculturation & Disease in the West
Indies. Review by Ivor L. Livingston. 13:4 p. 51
(84).
Driver, Edwin D. Essays on Population Policy.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Dumont, Ren6. Cuba: Est-ll Socialiste? Review by
Jos6 Arsenio Torres. 4:1 p. 36 (72).
Duncan, Neville, & Kenneth O'Brien. Women and
Politics in Barbados, 1948-1981. Review by Betty
Jane Punnett. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Dunkerley, James. The Long War: Dictatorship and
Revolution in El Salvador. Review by Dennis
Gilbert. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Dupuch, Jr., Etienne. Bahamas Handbook. Re-
view by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Duran, Roberto, Judith Ortiz Cofer & Gustavo
Perez. Triple Crown. Review by Carolina Hospital.
16:2 p. 49 (88).
Durrell, Zoe C. The Innocent Island: Abaco in the
Bahamas. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Duvalier, Frangois. Breviare d'une Revolution.
Review by Gbrard R. Latortue. 2:1 p. 9 (70).
Duvalier, Francois. Memoires d'un Leader Du
Tiers Monde. Review by Gerard R. Latortue. 2:1 p.
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989/49








9(70).
Diaz-Briquets, Sergio. The Health Revolution in
Cuba. Review by Lisandro Perez. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
E
Edgell, Zee. Beka Lamb. Review by Richard Dwyer.
13:3 p. 34 (84).
Edquist, Charles. Capitalism, Socialism and
Technology. A Comparative Study of Cuba and
Jamaica. Review by Arnold K. Ventura. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
Edwards, S. Hylton. Lengthening Shadows: Birth
and Revolt of the Trinidad Army. Review by
Anthony P. Maingot. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Esman, Milton J., & Norman T. Uphoff. Local
Organizations: Intermediaries in Rural Develop-
ment. Review by David Zweig. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Ewell, Judith. Venezuela, A Century of Change.
Review by Richard Parker. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
F
Falcoff, Mark. Small Countries, Large Issues.
Studies in US-Latin American Asymmetries. Re-
view by Paul Hollander. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Falcoff, Mark, & Robert Royal, eds. Crisis and
Opportunity: US Policy in Central America & the
Caribbean. Review by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4
p. 34 (85).
Farugia, Laurent. Le Fait National Guadeloupeen.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Fauriol, Georges A. Foreign Policy Behavior of
Caribbean States: Guyana, Haiti & Jamaica.
Review by Anselm Francis. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Fauriol, Georges, ed. Latin American Insur-
gencies. Review by Peter Johnson. 15:4 p. 41
(87).
Fermor, Patrick Leigh. The Traveller's Tree: A
Journey Through the Caribbean Islands. Review
by Daniel J. Crowley. 12:3 p. 36 (83).
Fernandez Marina, R., U. von Eckardt, & E.
Maldonado Sierra. The Sober Generation: Chil-
dren of Operation Bootstrap. A Topology of
Competent Coping by Adolescents in Modern
Puerto Rico. Review by Barry B. Levine. 1:1 p. 6
(69).
Figueroa, John. Caribbean Voices: An Anthology
of Caribbean Poetry Selected by John Figueroa (2
vols.). Review by J. Raban Bilder. 4:1 p. 24 (72).
Figueroa, John J. Ignoring Hurts...poems. Review
by St. George Tucker Arnold, Jr. 7:3 p. 54 (78).
Figueroa, Loyda. Breve Historia de Puerto Rico.
Review by Juan Rodriguez Cruz. 3:1 p. 14 (71).
Flinter, Colonel. An Account of the Present State of
the Island of Puerto Rico. Review by Edinburgh
Review. 2:4 p. 8 (70).
Fouchet, Max-Pol. Wifredo Lam. Review by Ri-
cardo Pau-Llosa. 7:4 p. 54 (78).
Fuentes, Carlos. The Old Gringo. Review by Roy
Pateman. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
G
Galeano, Eduardo. Guatemala, Occupied Country.
Review by Rafael Garzaro. 1:3 p. 7 (69).
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. 100 Years of Solitude.
Review by Eneid Routte G6mez. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
Garcia Mdrquez, Gabriel. The Autumn of the
Patriarch. Review by Ram6n Mendoza. 7:2 p. 38
(78).
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Cien Ahos de Solitude.
Review by Eneid Routt6 G6mez. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
Garcia-Passalacqua, Juan M. Puerto Rico:
Freeedom & Equality at Issue. Review by James
L. Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Gaspar, David Barry. Bondsmen & Rebels: A
Study of Master-Slave Relations in Antigua.
Review by Bonham C. Richardson. 15:3 p. 40
(87).
Gastmann, Albert L. The Politics of Surinam and
the Netherlands Antilles. Review by Robert H.
Manley. 1:1 p. 12 (69).
Geggus, David. Slavery, War, & Revolution: The
British Occupation of Saint Domingue, 1793-1798.
Review by Roger N. Buckley. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Giacalone de Romero, Rita. Estudio Hist6rico de la
Guayana Britanica. Review by Edward Dew. 14:2
p. 49 (85).
Giacalone de Romero, Rita. Guyana Hoy. Review
50 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


by Edward Dew. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Gil, Federico G. The Political System of Chile.
Review by Louis Wolf Goodman. 3:2 p. 14 (71).
Gilderhus, Mark T. Pan American Visions:
Woodrow Wilson in the Western Hemisphere,
1913-1921. Review by Lowell Gudmundson. 16:1
p. 40 (88).
Gilroy, Beryl. Frangipani House. Review by L. P.
Fletcher. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Girault, Christian A. Le Commerce du Cafd en
Haiti: Habitants, Speculateurs et Exportateurs.
Review by Alex Stepick. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Girvan, Norman, & Owen Jefferson, eds. Read-
ings in the Political Economy of the Caribbean.
Review by Aaron Segal. 4:3 p. 32 (72).
Glassman, Ronald. Political History of Latin Amer-
ica. Review by Reinhard Bendix. 2:4 p. 3 (70).
Glissant, Edouard. La Ldzarde. Review by Lauren
W. Yoder. 10:3 p. 24 (81).
Glissant, Edouard. Le Quatrieme Sidcle. Review
by Lauren W. Yoder. 10:3 p. 24 (81).
Glissant, Edouard. Monsieur Toussaint. Review by
Felix Morisseau-Leroy. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Goetz, Delia, & Sylvanus G. Morley, trans. Popul
Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Ancient Quichd
Maya. Review by Charles Lacombe. 9:2 p. 42
(80).
Gollas, Manuel. La economic desigual: Empleo y
distribuci6n en Mexico. Review by Jorge Salazar-
Carrillo. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Gonzalez Echevarria, Roberto. La ruta de Sarduy.
Review by Rafael Ocasio. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Gosner, Pamela. Caribbean Georgian, The Great
and Small Houses of The West Indies. Review by
Aaron Segal. 12:1 p. 32 (83).
Grabendortf, Wolf, H.W. Krumwiede & Jorg Todt,
eds. Political Change in Central America: Internal
& External Dimensions. Review by Marvin Alisky.
14:1 p. 26 (85).
Graham, Norman A., & Keith L. Edwards. The
Caribbean Basin to the Year 2000. Review by
Thomas D. Boswell. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Gravil, Roger. Anglo-Argentine Connection, 1900-
1939. Review by Anselm Francis. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Greene, Graham. Getting to Know the General, The
Story of an Involvement. Review by Neale Pear-
son. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Grunwald, Joseph, Miguel S. Wicnezek and
Martin Carney, Latin American Economic Inte-
gration & U.S. Policy. Review by Ramesh
Ramsaran. 5:4 p. 41 (73).
Guillen, Nicolas. Man-Making Words. Selected
Poems of Nicolas Guillen. Review by Florence L.
Yudin. 5:3 p. 30 (73).
Guillen, Nicolas. Patria o Muerte! The Great Zoo
and Other Poems. Review by Florence L. Yudin.
5:3 p. 31 (73).
Gutierrez, Carlos Maria. The Dominican Republic:
Rebellion & Repression. Review by Jorge
Rodriguez Beruff. 5:4 p. 45 (73).
Guzman, German C. Camilo, Presencia y Destino.
Review by Rafael Garzaro. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
H
Hagelberg, G. B. Caribbean Sugar Industries:
Constraints & Opportunities. Review by Jorge I.
Dominguez. 7:2 p. 52 (78).
Hall, Anthony L. Drought & Irrigation in North-East
Brazil. Review by William T. Vickers. 8:2 p. 50
(79).
Harrison, Lawrence E. Underdevelopment Is a
State of Mind: The Latin American Case. Review
by Daniel H. Levine. 15:4 p. 19 (87).
Hartlyn, Jonathan, & Samuel A. Morley, eds.
Latin American Political Economy: Financial Crisis
and Political Change. Review by Ben Schneider.
16:1 p. 41 (88).
Hayter, Teresa. Aid As Imperialism. Review by
Thomas Mathews. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
Heine, Jorge. Time for Decision: The United States
and Puerto Rico. Review by James L. Dietz. 14:3
p. 34 (85).
Heine, Jorge, & Juan M. Garcia-Passalacqua.
The Puerto Rican Question. Review by James L.
Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Helman, Albert. Avonturen aan de Wilde Kust.
(Adventures on the Wild Coast). Review by


Cornelis Ch. Goslinga. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Helms, Mary. Cuna Molas & Cocle Art Forms:
Reflections on Panamanian Design Styles and
Symbols. Review by Laurel Herbenar Bossen.
13:4 p. 31 (84).
Hemming, John, ed. Change in the Amazon Basin,
Volume I: Man's Impact On Forest & Rivers.
Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Hemming, John, ed. Change in the Amazon Basin,
Volume II: The Frontier After a Decade of
Colonisation. Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3
p. 26 (87).
Henry, Paget, & Carl Stone, eds. The Newer
Caribbean: Decolonization, Democracy & De-
velopment. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29
(84).
Herdeck, Donald E., et. al. Caribbean Writers: A
Bio-Bibliographical-Critical Encyclopedia. Review
by lan I. Smart. 10:3 p. 32 (81).
Herrera, Hayden. Friday: A Biography of Frida
Kahlo. Review by Jan Michael Hanvik. 15:3 p. 22
(87).
Herrera, Rene, & Mario Ojeda. La political de
Mdxico hacia Centroamerica. Review by Roger
Quant. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Higman, B. W. Slave Populations of the British
Caribbean 1807-1834. Review by Bonham C.
Richardson. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
Hijuelos, Oscar. Our House in the Last World.
Review by Efrain Barradas. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Hill, Hon. Richard. The Light & Shadows of
Jamaica History. Review by Gardiner Greene
Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Hill, Robert A., ed. The Marcus Garvey & the
Universal Negro Improvement Association Pa-
pers. Review by John McCartney. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
Hirschman, Albert 0. Getting Ahead Collectively:
Grassroots Experiences in Latin America. Review
by Forrest D. Colburn. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
History Task Force, The. Labor Migration Under
Capitalism: The Puerto Rican Experience. Review
by James W. Wessman. 9:3 p. 42 (80).
Hoetink, Harmannus. El Pueblo Dominicano:1850-
1900. Apuntes para su sociologia hist6rica. Re-
view by Anthony P. Maingot. 5:3 p. 43 (73).
Hoffmann, Leon Frangois. Le Roman Haitien:
Ideologie et Structure. Review by Felix Morisseau-
Leroy. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Hogan, J. Michael. Panama Canal in American
Politics: Domestic Advocacy & the Evolution of
Policy. Review by Robert A. Pastor. 15:4 p. 22
(87).
Holzberg, Carol S. Minorities & Power in a Black
Society: The Jewish Community of Jamaica.
Review by Michael Hanchard. 16:1 p. 13 (88).
Hopkins, Jack, ed. Latin America & Caribbean
Contemporary Record, Vol. 1:1981-82. Review by
Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Horowitz, Michael M. Peoples & Cultures of The
Caribbean: An Anthropological Reader. Review
by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
J
Jagan, Cheddi. The West on Trial. My Fight for
Guyana's Freedom. Review by Gordon Lewis. 3:1
p. 2 (71).
Jamaica Committee. Jamaica Papers. Review by
Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Jamaica Royal Commission. Report of the Ja-
maica Royal Commission. Review by Gardiner
Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Jenkins, Rhys. Transnational Corporations & the
Latin American Automobile Industry. Review by
Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Johnson, Cecil. Communist China & Latin Amer-
ica. Review by Joe Olander. 4:4 p. 35 (72).
Johnson, Doris. The Quiet Revolution in the
Bahamas. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Jorden, William J. Panama Odyssey. Review by
Ambler H. Moss, Jr. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Jorden, William J. Panama Odyssey. Review by
Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
K
Karol, K.S. Guerillas in Power: The Course of the
Cuban Revolution. Review by Robert W. Ander-
son. 4:1 p. 31 (72).


-- I








Kiev, Ari. Curanderismo: Mexican-American Folk
Psychiatry. Review by Joan Koss. 1:2 p. 6 (69).
Kiple, Kenneth F. The Caribbean Slave: A Biologi-
cal History. Review by Bonham C. Richardson.
15:4 p. 42 (87).
Klomp, Ank. Politics on Bonaire. Review by Dennis
Conway. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Knapp, Herbert & Mary. Red, White & Blue
Paradise, The American Canal Zone in Panama.
Review by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Knight, Franklin W. Slave Society in Cuba. Review
by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Kronish, Rich, & Kenneth S. Mericle. Political
Economy of the Latin American Motor Vehicle
Industry. Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
L
Laguerre, Michel S. The Complete Haitiana: A
Bibliographic Guide to the Scholarly Literature
1900-1980. Review by Le6n-Frangois Hoffmann.
12:2 p. 30 (83).
The Latin American Bureau. Guyana: Fraudulent
Revolution. Review by Edward Dew. 16:1 p. 43
(88).
Layng, Anthony. The Carib Reserve: Identity and
Security in the West Indies. Review by Gary
Brana-Shute. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Ledeen, Michael, & Herbert Romerstein, eds.
Grenada Documents: An Overview & Selection.
Review by Kai Schoenhals. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
Leiken, Robert S. Central America, Anatomy of
Conflict. Review by Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. 14:3
p. 50 (85).
Lemoine, Maurice. Sucre Amer: Esclaves
Aujourd'hui dans les Caraibes. Review by Paul R.
Latortue. 11:3 p. 36 (82).
Leridon, Henri, Elisabeth Zucker, & Maite Ca-
zenave. Fecondit6 et Famille en Martinique.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Lessac, Frane. My Little Island. Review by Joann
Biondi. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Levine, Barry B. Benjy Lopez. Review by Helen I.
Safa. 9:3 p. 41 (80).
Levine, Barry B. Benjy Lopez. Review by Miguel
Barnet. 9:3 p. 40 (80).
Levine, Barry B. The New Cuban Presence in the
Caribbean. Review by Edward GonzAlez. 13:2 p.
32 (84).
Levine, Barry B., Rafael Ramirez, & Carlos
Buitrago, eds. Problems de desigualdad social
en Puerto Rico. Review by Robert W. Anderson.
5:3 p. 35 (73).
Levine, Daniel H. Religion & Political Conflict in
Latin America. Review by Dale Story. 16:1 p. 38
(88).
Lewis, Gordon K. The Growth of the Modern West
Indies. Review by Harmannus Hoetink. 1:4 p. 6
(69).
Lewis, Gordon K. Main Currents in Caribbean
Thought: The Historical Evolution of Caribean
Society in Its Ideological Aspects, 1492-1900.
Review by Sidney W. Mintz. 13:1 p. 28 (84).
Lewis, Marvin A. Afro-Hispanic Poetry 1940-1980:
From Slavery to "Negritude" in South American
Verse. Review by lan I. Smart. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Lewis, Oscar, Ruth M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon.
Four Men: Living the Revolution, An Oral History
of Contemporary Cuba. Review by Francine J.
Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Lewis, Oscar, Ruth M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon.
Four Women: Living the Revolution, An Oral
History of Contemporary Cuba. Review by
Francine J. Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Lewis, Oscar, Ruth M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon.
Neighbors: Living the Revolution, An Oral History
of Contemporary Cuba. Review by Francine J.
Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Liebman, Arthur. The Politics of Puerto Rican
University Students. Review by Barry B. Levine.
2:4 p. 11 (70).
Lowenthal, Abraham F. The Dominican Inter-
vention. Review by Jorge Rodriguez Beruff. 5:4 p.
45 (73).
Lowenthal, David. West Indian Societies. Review
by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Lundahl, Mats. The Haitian Economy: Man, Land
and Markets. Review by Christian A. Girault. 14:2


p. 51 (85).
Levi-Strauss, Claude. Tristes Tropiques. Review
by David Goddard. 1:2 p. 10 (69).
L6pez, Alfredo. The Puerto Rican Papers: Notes
On The Re-Emergence Of A Nation. Review by
Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).

M
MacEoin, Gary. Revolution Next Door. Review by
Thomas Mathews. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
Maldonado Denis, Manuel. La conciencia national
puertorrequeha: Pedro Albizu Campos. Review by
Benjamin Torres Ortiz. 6:2 p. 43 (74).
Maldonado Denis, Manuel. Puerto Rico: Una
interpretacion historico-social. Review by Norman
Matlin. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Mandle, Jay R. Patterns of Caribbean De-
velopment: An Interpretive Essay on Economic
Change. Review by Terry McCoy. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Maran, Ren6. Batouala. Review by Marie-Denise
Shelton. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
Maslow, Jonathan Evan. Bird of Life, Bird of Death.
Review by Gilbert B. Snyder. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Mathews, T.G., & F.M. Andic. Politics and
Economics in the Caribbean. Review by Joseph
D. Olander. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
McCartney, Timothy 0. Neuroses in the Sun.
Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
McClelland, Donald H. The Central American
Common Market, Economic Policies, Economic
Growth, & Choices for the Future. Review by
Ramesh Ramsaran. 6:2 p. 47 (74).
McCullough, David. The Path Between the Seas:
The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914.
Review by Mark B. Rosenberg. 7:3 p. 61 (78).
Mesa-Lago, Carmelo. Revolutionary Change in
Cuba. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Michaus, Henri. Ecuador. Review by Barry Wallen-
stein. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
Miller, Jake C. The Plight of Haitian Refugees.
Review by Alejandro Portes. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Miller, Robert Ryal. Mexico: A History. Review by
Lowell Gudmundson. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Millet, Ricahrd & W. Marvin Wills, eds. The
Restless Caribbean: Changing Patterns of Inter-
national Relations. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2
p. 29 (84).
Millett, Richard. Guardians of the Dynasty: A
History of the U.S. Created Guardia Nacional de
Nicaragua. Review by Neill Macaulay. 7:3 p. 30
(78).
Mistral, Gabriela. Selected Poems. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Mittelholzer, Edgar. A Morning at the Office.
Review by John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Mittelholzer, Edgar. Corentyne Thunder. Review
by John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Mittelholzer, Edgar. Shadows Move Among Them.
Review by John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Moffett III, George D. The Limits of Victory, The
Ratification of the Panama Canal Treaties. Review
by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Moffett III, George D. The Limits of Victory: The
Ratification of the Panama Canal Treaties. Review
by Robert A. Pastor. 15:4 p. 22 (87).
Moore, James E. Pelican Guide to the Bahamas.
Review by Nancy Olson. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Morales Carri6n, Arturo, et. al. Puerto Rico: A
Political & Cultural History. Review by Olga
Jimbnez de Wagenheim. 13:1 p. 31 (84).
Morgan, Esq., W. Report of W. Morgan, Esq. on His
Mission to Jamaica. Review by Gardiner Greene
Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Morris, Marshall. Saying & Meaning in Puerto Rico:
Some Problems in the Ethnography of Discourse.
Review by Gerald Guinness. 10:4 p. 32 (81).
Morris, Michael, & Victor Millan, eds. Controlling
Latin American Conflicts: Ten Approaches. Re-
view by Jiri Valenta & Frederick F. Shaheen. 14:3
p. 50 (85).
Morrish, Ivor. Obeah, Christ & Rastaman: Jamaica
& its Religion. Review by G. Llewellyn Watson.
14:1 p. 51 (85).
N
Naipaul, Shiva. Love & Death in a Hot Country.
Review by Eric Lott. 14:4 p. 51 (85).


Naipaul, V.S. The Overcrowded Barracoon & Other
Articles. Review by John Thieme. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
Naipaul, V.S. The Return of Eva Perdn. Review by
Gerald Guinness. 10:2 p. 36 (81).
Naipaul, V.S. The Enigma of Arrival. Review by
Robert D. Hamner. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Nassau Guardian. The Best of Pot Luck. Review by
Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Neruda, Pablo. Heights of Macchu Picchu. Review
by Barry Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. Residence on Earth. Review by
Florence L. Yudin. 6:2 p. 38 (74).
Neruda, Pablo. Selected Poems of Pablo Neruda.
Review by Barry Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. Twenty Poems. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. We Are Many. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Nettleford, Rex. Manley & the New Jamaica:
Selected Speeches & Writings. Review by Gordon
K. Lewis. 5:2 p. 44 (73).
Nettleford, Rex. Mirror, Mirror: Identity Race and
Protest in Jamaica. Review by Carl Stone. 4:4 p.
28 (72).
Newfarmer, Richard. From Gunboats to Diplo-
macy: New US Policies for Latin America. Review
by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
Nicholls, David. Haiti in Caribbean Context: Ethnic-
ity, Economy & Revolt. Review by Lbon-Frangois
Hoffmann. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Nietschmann, Bernard. Caribbean Edge. Review
by Nigel J. H. Smith. 9:2 p. 20 (80).

0
O'Connor, Teresa F. Jean Rhys: The West Indian
Novels. Review by Roy Pateman. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
O'Neill, Edward A. Rape of the American Virgins.
Review by James W. Green. 5:2 p. 37 (73).
Oficina de Publicaciones del consejo de Es-
tado,. Fidel y la Religidn: Conversaciones con
FreiBetto. Review by Paul E. Sigmund. 15:2 p. 30
(86).
Orestes Nieto, Manuel. Darla cara. Review by Luis
M. Quesada. 13:1 p. 39 (84).
Orestes Nieto, Manuel. Reconstruccidn de los
hechos. Review by Luis M. Quesada. 13:1 p. 39
(84).
Ormerod, Beverley. An Introduction to the French
Caribbean Novel. Review by Leon-Frangois
Hoffmann. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Oswald, J. Gregory, & Anthony Strover, eds. The
Soviet Union & Latin America. Review by Leon
Gour6. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
Ota Mishima, Maria Elena. Siete migraciones
japoneses en Mexico, 1890-1978. Review by
Harold Sims. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Oxaal, Ivar. Black Intellectuals Come to Power: The
Rise of Creole Nationalism in Trinidad and
Tobago. Review by Basil Ince. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Oxaal, Ivar. Race & Revolutionary Consciousness:
A Documentary Interpretation. Review by Ken
Boodhoo. 5:1 p. 42 (73).
P
Padilla, Herberto. Heroes Are Grazing in My
Garden. (En mi jardin pastan los heroes). Review
by Roland E. Bush. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Palau de Lopez, Awilda, & Ernesto Ruiz. En la
calle estabas: Las vida dentro de una institucidn
para menores. Review by Celia F. de Cintr6n. 1:4
p. 13 (69).
Palmer, Ransford W. The Jamaican Economy.
Review by Byron White. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
Palmer, Ransford W. Problems of Development in
Beautiful Countries: Perspectives on the Carib-
bean. Review by James Dietz. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
Panton, Rev. Mr. The Present Crisis, & How To
Meet It. Review by Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2
p. 8 (71).
Paquette, Romain. Desengagement paysan et
sous production alimentaire. Review by Jean
Benoist. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Parker, Ann. Los Ambulantes: The Itinerant
Photographers of Guatemala. Review by Gary
Monroe. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Parra, Nicanor. Emergency Poems. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /51








Parra, Nicanor. Poems & Antipoems. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Pastor, Robert A. Condemned to Repetition: The
United States & Nicaragua. Review by Richard L.
Millett. 16:2 p. 24 (88).
Pasztory, Esther. Aztec Art. Review by William T.
Vickers. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Payne, Anthony. The International Crisis in the
Caribbean. Review by H. Michael Erisman. 15:3 p.
42 (87).
Payne, Anthony, & Paul Sutton, eds. Dependency
under Challenge: The Political Economy of the
Commonwealth Caribbean. Review by David A.
Lake. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
Payne, Anthony, Paul Sutton, & Tony Thorndike.
Grenada: Revolution & Invasion. Review by Kai
Schoenhals. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
Peattie, Lisa Redfield. The View from the Barrio.
Review by Angelina Pollack-Eltz. 2:1 p. 13 (70).
Peckenham, Nancy, & Annie Street, eds. Hondu-
ras: Portrait of a Captive Nation. Review by
Thomas P. Anderson. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Perusse, Roland I. A Strategy for Caribbean
Economic Integration. Review by Thomas Math-
ews. 4:3 p. 41 (72).
Petras, James. Politics & Social Forces in Chilean
Development. Review by Louis Wolf Goodman.
3:2 p. 14 (71).
Philip, George. Oil & Politics in Latin America:
Nationalist Movements & State Companies. Re-
view by Jonathan C. Brown. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
Phillips, Sir Fred. Freedom In The Caribbean: A
Study In Constitutional Change. Review by Gor-
don K. Lewis. 7:2 p. 49 (78).
Pic6, Fernando. "Deshumanizaci6n del trabajo...
Los comienzos del caf6 en el Utuado del siglo
XIX." Review by Lowell Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34
(84).
Pic6, Fernando. Amargo cafd. Review by Lowell
Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
Pic6, Fernando. Libertad y servidumbre en el
Puerto Rico del siglo XIX. Review by Lowell
Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
Pierre-Charles, G6rard. Haiti: Radiografia de una
dictadura. Review by Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor.
2:1 p. 8 (70).
Pietri, Pedro. Loose Joints. (recording). Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Pietri, Pedro. The Masses Are Asses. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Pietri, Pedro. Puerto Rican Obituary. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Pietri, Pedro. Traffic Violations. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Price, Sally & Richard. Afro-American Arts of the
Suriname Rain Forest. Review by Dorothea and
Norman Whitten. 11:4 p. 24 (82).
Perez, Jr., Louis A. Cuba Between Empires,
1872-1902. Review by Enrique A. Baloyra. 13:4 p.
48 (84).
R
Rabe, Stephen G. The Road to OPEC: United
States Relations with Venezuela. Review by
George W. Grayson. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Rangel, Carlos. El Tercermundismo. Review by
Adolfo Leyva. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Republic of Trinidad & Tobago. White Paper on
National Institute of Higher Education. Review by
Anthony P. Maingot. 7:3 p. 48 (78).
Reynolds, Clark W., & Carlos Tello, eds. US-
Mexico Relations: Economic & Social Aspects.
Review by Bernard E. Segal. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Richard, Pablo. Idols of Death & the God of Life: A
Theology. Review by Monsignor Bryan 0. Walsh.
13:3 p. 53 (84).
Richardson, Bonham. Caribbean Migrants: En-
vironment & Human Survival on St. Kitts and
Nevis. Review by Alex Stepick. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Riding, Alan. Distant Neighbors: A Portrait of the
Mexicans. Review by Steven E. Sanderson. 14:3
p. 49 (85).
Rios, Arturo. El "Entre" Policiaco. Review by
Forrest D. Colburn. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Robbins, Carla Anne. The Cuban Threat. Review
by Edward Gonzalez. 13:2 p. 32 (84).


Rodman, Hyman. Lower Class Families: The
Culture of Poverty in Negro Trinidad. Review by
Ronald G. Parris. 4:3 p. 44 (72).
Rodney, Walter. The History of the Guyanese
Working People, 1881-1905. Review by Thomas
J. Spinner, Jr. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
Roelofsz, M.A.P. Meilink, ed. Dutch Authors on
West Indian History. Review by Cornelis C.
Goslinga. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Rojo, Benitez. Estatuas sepultadas y otros relatos.
Review by Guillermo S. Edelberg. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Ropp, Steve C., & James A. Morris, eds. Central
America: Crisis & Adaptation. Review by Marvin
Alisky. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
Rosenberg, Mark B., & Philip L. Shepherd, eds.
Honduras Confronts Its Future: Contending Per-
spectives on Critical Issues. Review by Thomas P.
Anderson. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Rowe, Ann Pollard. A Century of Change in
Guatemalan Textiles. Review by Laurel Herbenar
Bossen. 13:4 p. 31 (84).
Rubin, Vera, & Lambros Comitas. Ganja in
Jamaica. Review by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Rubin, Vera, & Marisa Zavalloni. We Wished To
Be Looked Upon: A Study of the Aspirations of
Youth in a Developing Society. Review by Ursula
M. Von Eckardt. 2:2 p. 10 (70).
S
Salazar, Maria Cristina. Aparceros en Boyaca: Los
condenados del tabaco. Review by Philip Shep-
herd. 13:1 p. 36 (84).
Salkey, Andrew. Havana Journal. Review by Aaron
Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Sanchez Korrol, Virginia. From Colonia to Com-
munity: The History of Puerto Ricans in New York
City, 1917-1948. Review by Edna Acosta-Bel6n.
14:1 p. 51 (85).
Sanger, Clyde. Half A Loaf: Canada's Semi-Role
Among Developing Countries. Review by Aaron
Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Scarano, Francisco A. Sugar & Slavery in Puerto
Rico: The Plantation Economy of Ponce, 1800-
1850. Review by Roderick A. McDonald. 15:3 p.
41 (87).
Schmitz, Hubert. Manufacturing in the Backyard:
Case Studies on Accumulation & Employment in
Small-Scale Brazilian Industry. Review by Richard
P. Harber. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Schwartz, Marvin. Puerto Rico. Review by Kal
Wagenheim. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Schwarz-Bart, Simone. The Bridge of Beyond.
Review by Richard Dwyer. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
Scott, Rebecca J. Slave Emancipation in Cuba.
The Transition to Free Labor, 1866-1899. Review
by David Kyle. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Seabury, Paul, & Walter A. McDougall, eds. The
Grenada Papers. Review by Kai Schoenhals. 14:2
p. 34 (85).
Semidei, Manuela. Kennedy et la Revolution
Cubaine. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Semidei, Manuela. Les Etats-Unis etla Revolution
Cuba'ine. Review by Aaron Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Serbin, Andr6s. Nacionalismo, etnicidad y political
en la Republica Cooperativa de Guyana. Review
by Edward Dew. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Serbin, Andres. Venezuela y las relaciones inter-
nacionales en la Cuenca del Caribe. Review by
Dennis J. Gayle. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Sewell, W. G. The Ordeal of Free Labor in the
British West Indies. Review by Gardiner Greene
Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Shane, Douglas R. Hoofprints on the Forest.
Review by Ellen Calmus. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Sharlowe (pseud.). Requiem for a Village/Aparteid
Love. Review by John Cooke. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Sheridan, Richard B. Doctors & Slaves. Review by
Herman J. Flax, M.D. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Silva Gotay, Samuel. El pensamiento cristiano
revolucionario en America Latina y el Caribe.
Review by Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo. 14:1 p. 50
(85).
Silva Herzog, JesOs. En defense de M6xico:
pensamiento econdmico politico. Review by Jorge
Salazar-Carrillo. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
Singham, A. W. The Hero & the Crowd in a Colonial


Polity. Review by Milton Pab6n. 1:2 p. 13 (69).
Singham, Archie. The Hero & the Crowd in a
Colonial Polity. Review by Aaron Segal. 12:4 p. 40
(83).
Smith, M. G. Stratification in Grenada. Review by
Aaron Segal. 12:4 p. 40 (83).
Smith, T. Lynn. Colombia: Social Structure & the
Process of Development. Review by Barry B.
Levine. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Smith, Wayne S. The Closest of Enemies: A
Personal & Diplomatic Account of US-Cuban
Relations Since 1957. Review by Irving Louis
Horowitz. 16:1 p. 25 (88).
Smith, Keithlyn B., & Fernando C. Smith. To
Shoot Hard Labor: The Life & Times of Samuel
Smith, an Antiguan Workingman, 1877-1982.
Review by Larry J. Smith. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Sojo, Ana. Estado empresario y lucha political en
Costa Rica. Review by Francisco A. Leguizam6n.
15:2 p. 45 (86).
Solien Gonzdlez, Nancy L. Black Carib Household
Structure: A Study in Migration & Modernization.
Review by Angelina Pollack-Eltz. 2:3 p. 6 (70).
Soto, Pedro Juan. El Francotirador. Review by
Carlos Alberto Montaner. 2:2 p. 12 (70).
Soto, Pedro Juan. Hot Land, Cold Season. Review
by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Soto, Pedro Juan. Spiks. Review by Adalberto
L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Stephens, John D. & Evelyne Huber Stephens.
Democratic Socialism in Jamaica. Review by
Howard Handelman. 16:2 p. 41 (88).
Stermer, Dugald. The Art of Revolution. Castro's
Cuba. Review by Mela Pons de Alegria. 3:2 p. 13
(71).
Stierlin, Henri. Art of the Aztecs. Review by Ellen L.
Belknap. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Stone, Roger D. Dreams of Amazonia. Review by
William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Story, Dale. Industry, the State & Public Policy.
Review by Ben Schneider. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Stycos, J. Mayone. Ideology, Faith, & Family
Planning in Latin America. Review by Aaron
Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Suchliki, Jaime. Cuba, Castro, & Revolution.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Szulc, Tad, ed. The United States & the Caribbean.
Review by Joseph D. Olander. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
T
Tanna, Laura. Jamaican Folk Tales & Oral Histo-
ries. (Book, audiotape, videotape). Review by
Richard A. Dwyer. 16:1 p. 22 (88).
Theroux, Paul. V.S. Naipaul:An Introduction To His
Work. Review by John Thieme. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
Third World Group. Bahamas Independence
Issue. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Thomas, Hugh. Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Thomas, Piri. Savior, Savior, Hold My Hand.
Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Thomas, Gordon, & Max Morgan Witts. The Day
the World Ended. Review by Susan Sheinman.
1:4 p. 12 (69).
Thomsen, Moritz. Living Poor. Review by Leopold
Kohr. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Toscano, F., & James Hiester. Anti-Yankee Feel-
ings in Latin America. Review by John J. Johnson.
13:2 p. 52 (84).
Trotman, David Vincent. Crime in Trinidad: Con-
flict & Control in a Plantation Society, 1838-1900.
Review by Frank E. Manning. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
Turner Yau, Anayansi. Relaciones Centroamerica-
M6xico. Panamd: Crisis, soberania y el carbcter
de sus relaciones con Mexico, 1978-1986. Review
by Nancy Robinson. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
U
Underhill, Rev. Dr. The West Indies. Review by
Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
United States Information Agency. Documents
Pertaining to Relations Between Grenada, the
USSR & Cuba. Review by Kai Schoenhals. 14:2 p.
34 (85).


52 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989


I








V
Vaky, Viron P. Governance in the Western Hemi-
sphere. Review by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p.
34 (85).
Valentine, Charles A. Culture & Poverty. Review by
Oscar Lewis. 1:1 p. 5 (69).
Valladares, Armando. Against All Hope: The
Prison Memoirs of Armando Valladares. Review
by Jorge Dominguez. 16:1 p. 24 (88).
Vallejo, Cesar. Poemas Humanos/Human Poems.
Review by Barry Wallenstein. 1:3 p. 11 (69).
Vallejo de Paredes, Margarita. Antologia literaria
dominicana. Review by Emilio Bejel. 13:4 p. 49
(84).
Vails, Lito. Ole Time Sayin's: Proverbs of the West
Indies. Review by G. Llewellyn Watson. 14:2 p. 51
(85).
Vargas Llosa, Mario. La Tia Julia y El Ecribidor.
Review by Ram6n Mendoza. 8:2 p. 45 (79).
Vega, Bernardo. La Migraci6n Espahola de 1939 y
los inicios del Marxismo-Leninismo en la Republic
Dominicana. Review by Harold Sims. 14:4 p. 50
(85).
Vega, Bernardo. Memorias de Bernardo Vega.
Review by Eugene V. Mohr. 10:4 p. 34 (81).
Vega, Jose Luis, ed. Reunion de espejos. Review
by Kal Wagenheim. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Vernhes, Monique, & Jean Bloch. Pour La
Guadeloupe Independante. Review by Aaron
Segal. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Villanueva, Victor. 100 Anos de Ejercito Peruano:
Frustraciones Y Cambios. Review by Jorge
Rodriguez Beruff. 5:1 p. 44 (73).
Vitale, Luis. Hacia una historic del ambiente en
Amdrica Latina. Review by George M. Guess.


13:3 p. 54 (84).
Vivo, Paquita, ed. The Puerto Ricans: An Anno-
tated Bibliography. Review by Adalberto L6pez.
6:4 p. 41 (74).
W
Wagenheim, Kal. Puerto Rico: A Profile. Review by
Gordon K. Lewis. 3:2 p. 11 (71).
Wagenheim, Kal & Olga Jimenez de Wagenheim,
eds. The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History.
Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Walcott, Derek. Another Life. Review by John J.
Figueroa. 7:1 p. 30 (75).
Walcott, Derek. The Arkansas Testament. Review
by Robert D. Hamner. 16:2 p. 51 (88).
Walcott, Derek. Sea Grapes. Review by John
Thieme. 7:4 p. 51 (78).
Ward, S. R. Reflections on the Gordon Rebellion.
Review by Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8
(71).
Wasserstrom, Robert. Grassroots Development In
Latin America & The Caribbean: Oral Histories of
Social Change. Review by Linda Miller. 15:1 p. 41
(86).
Waters, Anita M. Race, Class, & Political Symbols.
Review by Carl H. Feuer. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Weinstein, Brian, & Aaron Segal. Haiti, Political
Failures, Cultural Successes. Review by Don
Bohning. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Weisskoff, Richard. Factories & Food Stamps: The
Puerto Rican Model of Development. Review by
Lawrence C. Phipps IV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Wells, Henry. The Modernization of Puerto Rico: A
Political Study of Changing Values & Institutions.
Review by Barry B. Levine. 1:4 p. 2 (69).


Wesson, Robert. The Latin American Military
Institution. Review by Lawrence H. Hall. 15:4 p. 43
(87).
Wesson, Robert. US Influence in Latin America in
the 1980s. Review by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p.
34 (85).
Whitten, Jr., Norman E. Sicuanga Runa: The Other
Side of Development in Amazonian Ecuador.
Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Wiarda, Howard. The Dominican Republic, A
Nation in Transition. Review by Thomas Mathews.
1:3 p. 12 (69).
Wiarda, Howard J. & Michael J. Kryzanek. The
Dominican Republic. Review by lan Bell. 13:3 p.
52 (84).
Wilkie, James W. The Mexican Revolution: Federal
Expenditure & Social Change Since 1910. Review
by H6ctor Orci. 4:1 p. 28 (72).
Willems, Emilio. Followers of the New Faith.
Review by Samuel Silva Gotay. 2:1 p. 11 (70).
Williams, Byron. Puerto Rico: Commonwealth,
State, or Nation? Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4
p. 41 (74).
Williams, Eric. From Colombus to Castro: The
History of the Caribbean 1492-1969. Review by
Anthony P. Maingot. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
Williams, Eric. Inward Hunger, The Education of a
Prime Minister. Review by Gordon Lewis. 3:1 p. 2
(71).
Wilson, Carlos Guillermo. Cuentos del Negro
Cubena. Review by lan I. Smart. 8:3 p. 34 (79).
Wilson, Carlos Guillermo. Pensamientos del
Negro Cubena. Review by lan I. Smart. 8:3 p. 34
(79).


BOOKS REVIEWED, BY TITLE
A
100 Ahos de Ejercito Peruano: Frustraciones Y
Cambios. Victor Villanueva. Review by Jorge
Rodriguez Beruff. 5:1 p. 44 (73).
100 Years of Solitude. Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
Review by Eneid Routt6 Gomez. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
An Account of the Present State of the Island of
Puerto Rico. Colonel Flinter. Review by Ed-
inburgh Review. 2:4 p. 8 (70).
Afro-American Arts of the Suriname Rain Forest.
Sally & Richard Price. Review by Dorothea and
Norman Whitten. 11:4 p. 24 (82).
Afro-Hispanic Poetry 1940-1980: From Slavery
to "Negritud" in South American Verse. Marvin
A. Lewis. Review by lan I. Smart. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Against All Hope: The Prison Memoirs of Ar-
mando Valladares. Armando Valladarees. Re-
view by Jorge Dominguez. 16:1 p. 24 (88).
Aid As Imperialism. Teresa Hayter. Review by
Thomas Mathews. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
Al norte del inferno. Miguel Correa. Review by
Leonel de la Cuesta. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Amargo cafd. Fernando Pic6. Review by Lowell
Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
America's Virgin Islands: A History of Human
Rights & Wrongs. William W. Boyer. Review by
S. B. Jones-Hendrickson. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Los Ambulantes: The Itinerant Photographers of
Guatemala. Ann Parker. Review by Gary Monroe.
14:2 p. 48 (85).
Anatomy of a Fraud: the 1984 Presidential
Election in Panama. Rail Arias de Para. Review
by Steve C. Ropp. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
Anglo-Argentine Connection, 1900-1939. Roger
Gravil. Review by Anselm Francis. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Another Life. Derek Walcott. Review by John J.
Figueroa. 7:1 p. 30 (75).
Anti-Yankee Feelings in Latin America. F. Tos-
cano & James Hiester. Review by John J.
Johnson. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
Antologia literaria dominicana. Margarita Vallejo
de Paredes. Review by Emilio Bejel. 13:4 p. 49
(84).
Apalabramiento: Cuentos puertorriqueios de
hoy. Efrain Barradas. Review by Kal Wagenheim.
13:3 p. 53 (84).


Aparceros en Boyaca: Los condenados del
tabaco. Maria Cristina Salazar. Review by Philip
Shepherd. 13:1 p. 36 (84).
The Arkansas Testament. Derek Walcott. Review
by Robert D. Hamner. 16:2 p. 51 (88).
The Art of Revolution. Castro's Cuba. Dugald
Stermer. Review by Mela Pons de Alegria. 3:2 p.
13 (71).
Art of the Aztecs. Henri Stierlin. Review by Ellen L.
Belknap. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
The Autumn of the Patriarch. Gabriel Garcia
Marquez. Review by RamOn Mendoza. 7:2 p. 38
(78).
Avonturen aan de Wilde Kust. (Adventures on
the Wild Coast). Albert Helman. Review by
Cornelis Ch. Goslinga. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Aztec Art. Esther Pasztory. Review by William T.
Vickers. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
B
Bahamas Handbook. Etienne Dupuch, Jr. Review
by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Bahamas Independence Issue. Third World
Group. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Batouala. Renb Maran. Review by Marie-Denise
Shelton. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
Beka Lamb. Zee Edgell. Review by Richard Dwyer.
13:3 p. 34 (84).
Benjy Lopez. Barry B. Levine. Review by Miguel
Barnet. 9:3 p. 40 (80).
Benjy Lopez. Barry B. Levine. Review by Helen I.
Safa. 9:3 p. 41 (80).
The Best of Pot Luck. Nassau Guardian. Review
by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Birdof Life, Bird of Death. Jonathan Evan Maslow.
Review by Gilbert B. Snyder. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Black Carib Household Structure: A Study in
Migration & Modernization. Nancy L. Solien
Gonzalez. Review by Angelina Pollack-Eltz. 2:3 p.
6(70).
Black Intellectuals Come to Power: The Rise of
Creole Nationalism in Trinidad & Tobago. Ivar
Oxaal. Review by Basil Ince. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Bob Marley. Stephen Davis. Review by Kamla
Lewis. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Bondsmen & Rebels: A Study of Master-Slave
Relations in Antigua. David Barry Gaspar.
Review by Bonham C. Richardson. 15:3 p. 40


(87).
The Book of Imaginary Beings. Jorge Luis
Borges. Review by Kal Wagenheim. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Breve historic de Puerto Rico. Loyda Figueroa.
Review by Juan Rodriguez Cruz. 3:1 p. 14 (71).
Breviare d'une Revolution. Frangois Duvalier.
Review by G6rard R. Latortue. 2:1 p. 9 (70).
The Bridge of Beyond. Simone Schwarz-Bart.
Review by Richard Dwyer. 13:3 p. 34 (84).

C
Camilo, Presencia yDestino. German C. Guzman.
Review by Rafael Garzaro. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
Cannabis in Costa Rica. William E. Carter. Review
by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Cantate d'Octobre. Ren6 Depestre. Review by
Aaron Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Capitalism, Socialism & Technology. A Com-
parative Study of Cuba & Jamaica. Charles
Edquist. Review by Arnold K. Ventura. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
The Carib Reserve: Identity & Security in the
West Indies. Anthony Layng. Review by Gary
Brana-Shute. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
The Caribbean Basin to the Year 2000. Norman A.
Graham & Keith L. Edwards. Review by Thomas
D. Boswell. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
The Caribbean Community: Changing Societies
and U.S. Policy. Robert D. Crassweller. Review
by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Caribbean Edge. Bernard Nietschmann. Review by
Nigel J. H. Smith. 9:2 p. 20 (80).
Caribbean Georgian, The Great & Small Houses
of The West Indies. Pamela Gosner. Review by
Aaron Segal. 12:1 p. 32 (83).
The Caribbean In Europe. Aspects of the West
Indian Experience in Britain, France & The
Netherlands. Colin Brock, ed. Review by Nancy
Robinson. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
Caribbean Migrants: Environment & Human
Survival on St. Kitts & Nevis. Bonham Ri-
chardson. Review by Alex Stepick. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
The Caribbean Slave: A Biological History.
Kenneth F. Kiple. Review by Bonham C. Ri-
chardson. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Caribbean Sugar Industries: Constraints and
Opportunities. G. B. Hagelberg. Review by Jorge
I. Dominguez. 7:2 p. 52 (78).


CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /53


- I


C







Caribbean Voices: An Anthology of Caribbean
Poetry Selected by John Figueroa (2 vols.).
John Figueroa. Review by J. Raban Bilder. 4:1 p.
24 (72).
Caribbean Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical-
Critical Encyclopedia. Donald E. Herdeck et al.
Review by lan I. Smart. 10:3 p. 32 (81).
Central America, Anatomy of Conflict. Robert S.
Leiken. Review by Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. 14:3
p. 50 (85).
Central America: Crisis & Adaptation. Steve C.
Ropp & James A. Morris, eds. Review by Marvin
Alisky. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
The Central American Common Market, Eco-
nomic Policies, Economic Growth, and
Choices for the Future. Donald H. McClelland.
Review by Ramesh Ramsaran. 6:2 p. 47 (74).
A Century of Change in Guatemalan Textiles.
Ann Pollard Rowe. Review by Laurel Herbenar
Bossen. 13:4 p. 31 (84).
Change in the Amazon Basin, Volume II: The
Frontier After a Decade of Colonisation. John
Hemming, ed. Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3
p. 26 (87).
Change in the Amazon Basin, Volume I: Man's
Impact On Forest & Rivers. John Hemming, ed.
Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Cien Ahos de Solitude. Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
Review by Eneid Routt6 Gomez. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
The Classic Maya Collapse. T. P. Culbert. Review
by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
The Closest of Enemies: A Personal & Diplo-
matic Account of US-Cuban Relations Since
1957. Wayne S. Smith. Review by Irving Louis
Horowitz. 16:1 p. 25 (88).
Colombia: Social Structure & the Process of
Development. T. Lynn Smith. Review by Barry B.
Levine. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Le Commerce du Cafe en Haiti: Habitants,
Speculateurs et Exportateurs. Christian A. Gi-
rault. Review by Alex Stepick. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
La conciencia national puertorrequeha: Pedro
Albizu Campos. Manuel Maldonado Denis. Re-
view by Benjamin Torres Ortiz. 6:2 p. 43 (74).
El Control de la Natalidad Como Arma del
Imperialismo. Jose Consuegra. Review by Aaron
Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Communist China & Latin America. Cecil
Johnson. Review by Joe Olander. 4:4 p. 35 (72).
The Complete Caribbeana 1900-1975. Lambros
Comitas. Review by lan I. Smart. 10:3 p. 32 (81).
The Complete Haitiana: A Bibliographic Guide to
the Scholarly Literature 1900-1980. Michel S.
Laguerre. Review by Leon-Frangois Hoffmann.
12:2 p. 30 (83).
Condemned to Repetition: The United States
and Nicaragua. Robert A. Pastor. Review by
Richard L. Millett. 16:2 p. 24 (88).
Confrontation in the Caribbean Basin. Alan
Adelman & Reid Reading, eds. Review by Lynn-
Darrell Bender. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
Contemporary Caribbean: A Sociological
Reader. Susan Craig. Review by Aaron Segal.
13:2 p. 29 (84).
Contra Viento YMarea. Grupo Arieto. Review by
Luis P. Salas. 9:1 p. 42 (80).
Controlling Latin American Conflicts: Ten Ap-
proaches. Michael Morris & Victor Millan, eds.
Review by Jiri Valenta & Frederick F. Shaheen.
14:3 p. 50 (85).
Corentyne Thunder. Edgar Mittelholzer. Review by
John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Crime in Trinidad: Conflict & Control in a
Plantation Society, 1838-1900. David Vincent
Trotman. Review by Frank E. Manning. 16:1 p. 41
(88).
Crisis & Change: The Church in Latin America
Today. Edward L. Cleary. Review by Stephen D.
Glazier. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Crisis & Opportunity: US Policy in Central
America & the Caribbean. Mark Falcoff and
Robert Royal, eds. Review by Lynn-Darrell
Bender. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
Crisis in the Caribbean. Fitzroy Ambursley and
Robin Cohen, eds. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2
p. 29 (84).
Cronopios & Famas. Julio Cortazar. Review by Kal


Wagenheim. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Cuba 1933: Estudiantes Yanquis y Soldados.
Justo Carrillo. Review by Adolfo Leyva. 16:2 p. 48
(88).
Cuba 1933: Prologue to Revolution. Luis E.
Aguilar. Review by Roberto Leyva (pseud.). 5:2 p.
33 (73).
Cuba Between Empires, 1872-1902. Louis A.
Perez, Jr. Review by Enrique A. Baloyra. 13:4 p.
48 (84).
Cuba, Castro & the United States. Philip W.
Bonsai. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Cuba, Castro, & Revolution. Jaime Suchliki.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Cuba: Dilemmas of A Revolution. Jan M. del
Aguila. Review by Armando Bengochea. 14:4 p.
49 (85).
Cuba: Est-11 Socialiste?. Rene Dumont. Review by
Jos6 Arsenio Torres. 4:1 p. 36 (72).
Cuba: Order & Revolution. Jorge I. Dominguez.
Review by Pedro J. Montiel. 9:1 p. 40 (80).
Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom. Hugh Thomas.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
The Cuban & Porto Rican Campaigns. Richard
Harding Davis. Review by Joel Magruder. 1:2 p.
12(69).
The Cuban Threat. Carla Anne Robbins. Review by
Edward Gonzalez. 13:2 p. 32 (84).
Cuentos del Negro Cubena. Carlos Guillermo
Wilson. Review by lan I. Smart. 8:3 p. 34 (79).
Culture & Poverty. Charles A. Valentine. Review
by Oscar Lewis. 1:1 p. 5 (69).
Cuna Molas & Code Art Forms: Reflections on
Panamanian Design Styles & Symbols. Mary
Helms. Review by Laurel Herbenar Bossen. 13:4
p. 31 (84).
Curanderismo: Mexican-American Folk Psy-
chiatry. Ari Kiev. Review by Joan Koss. 1:2 p. 6
(69).
D
Dar la cara. Manuel Orestes Nieto. Review by Luis
M. Quesada. 13:1 p. 39 (84).
The Day the World Ended. Gordon Thomas and
Max Morgan Witts. Review by Susan Sheinman.
1:4 p. 12 (69).
De Cristobal Colon a Fidel Castro. El Caribe,
frontera imperial. Juan Bosch. Review by An-
thony P. Maingot. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
De Krimpende Horizon van de Hollandse Koop-
lieden, Een Studie Over Hoallands Welvaren in
Het Caribisch Zeegebied (1780-1830). Theo P.
M. De Jong. Review by Albert Gastmann. 1:1 p. 13
(69).
Democracy in Costa Rica. Charles D. Ameringer.
Review by John P. Harrison. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Democratic Socialism in Jamaica. Evelyne Huber
and John D. Stephens. Review by Howard
Handelman. 16:2 p. 41 (88).
Dependency under Challenge: The Political
Economy of the Commonwealth Caribbean.
Anthony Payne & Paul Sutton, eds. Review by
David A. Lake. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
Desengagement paysan et sous production
alimentaire. Romain Paquette. Review by Jean
Benoist. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Deshumanizacion del trabajo... Los comienzos
del cafe en el Utuado del siglo XIX. Fernando
Pic6. Review by Lowell Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34
(84).
A Destiny to Mold. Forbes Burnham. Review by
Gordon K. Lewis. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
The Development of Creole Society in Ja-
maica:1770-1820. Edward Braithwaite. Review
by Ena Campbell. 5:2 p. 42 (73).
Dictadura con respaldo popular. Juan Bosch.
Review by Kal Wagenheim. 2:1 p. 10 (70).
Digging Up The Mountains. Neil Bissoondath.
Review by Augusta Dwyer. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Distant Neighbors: A Portrait of the Mexicans.
Alan Riding. Review by Steven E. Sanderson.
14:3 p. 49 (85).
Doctors & Slaves. Richard B. Sheridan. Review by
Herman J. Flax. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Documents Pertaining to Relations Between
Grenada, the USSR & Cuba. USIA. Review by
Kai Schoenhals. 14:2 p. 34 (85).


The Dominican Intervention. Abraham F. Lowen-
thal. Review by Jorge Rodriguez Beruff. 5:4 p. 45
(73).
The Dominican Republic. Howard J. Wiarda and
Michael J. Kryzanek. Review by lan Bell. 13:3 p.
52 (84).
The Dominican Republic, A Nation in Transition.
Howard Wiarda. Review by Thomas Mathews. 1:3
p. 12 (69).
The Dominican Republic: Rebellion & Re-
pression. Carlos Maria Gutierrez. Review by
Jorge Rodriguez Beruff. 5:4 p. 45 (73).
Dreams of Amazonia. Roger D. Stone. Review by
William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Drought & Irrigation in North-East Brazil. An-
thony L. Hall. Review by William T. Vickers. 8:2 p.
50 (79).
Dutch Authors on West Indian History. M.A.P.
Meilink Roelofsz, ed. Review by Cornelis C.
Goslinga. 14:2 p. 49 (85).

E
Ecuador. Henri Michaus. Review by Barry Wal-
lenstein. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
La economic desigual: Empleo y distribucion en
Mexico. Manuel Gollas. Review by Jorge Salazar-
Carrillo. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
El "Entre" Policiaco. Arturo Rios. Review by
Forrest D. Colburn. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Emergency Poems. Nicanor Parra. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
En defense de Mexico: pensamiento econ6mico
politico. Jesis Silva Herzog. Review by Jorge
Salazar-Carrillo. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
En la calle estabas: Las vida dentro de una
institution para menores.. Awilda Palau de
L6pez & Ernesto Ruiz. Review by Celia F. de
Cintr6n. 1:4 p. 13 (69).
Endless War: How We Got Involved in Central
America & What Can Be Done About It. James
Chace. Review by Alexander H. Mclntire, Jr. 15:1
p. 44 (86).
The Enigma of Arrival. V.S. Naipaul. Review by
Robert D. Hamner. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Essays on Population Policy. Edwin D. Driver.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Estado empresario y lucha political en Costa
Rica. Ana Sojo. Review by Francisco A. Le-
guizam6n. 15:2 p. 45 (86).
Estatuas sepultadas y otros relatos. Benitez
Rojo. Review by Guillermo S. Edelberg. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
Estudio Hist6rico de la Guayana Britanica. Rita
Giacalone de Romero. Review by Edward Dew.
14:2 p. 49 (85).
Les Etats-Unis et la Revolution Cubaine. Man-
uela Semidei. Review by Aaron Segal. 4:1 p. 40
(72).

F
Factories & Food Stamps: The Puerto Rican
Model of Development. Richard Weisskoff. Re-
view by Lawrence C. Phipps IV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Le Fait National Guadeloupeen. Laurent Farugia.
Review by Aaron Segal. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Fecondite et Famille en Martinique. Henri Leri-
don, Elisabeth Zucker, Maite Cazenave. Review
by Aaron Segal. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Fidel y la Religion: Conversaciones con Frei
Betto. Oficina de Publicaciones del consejo de
Estado. Review by Paul E. Sigmund. 15:2 p. 30
(86).
Financial Policies & the World Capital Market:
The Problem of Latin American Countries.
Pedro Aspe Armella, Rudiger Dornbusch and
Maurice Obstfeld. Review by Juan A. Yahes. 14:2
p. 50 (85).
Folklore from Contemporary Jamaicans. Daryl C.
Dance. Review by G. Llewellyn Watson. 14:4 p. 49
(85).
Followers of the New Faith. Emilio Willems.
Review by Samuel Silva Gotay. 2:1 p. 11 (70).
Foreign Policy Behavior of Caribbean States:
Guyana, Haiti & Jamaica. Georges A. Fauriol.
Review by Anselm Francis. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Forward Ever: Three Years of the Grenadian
Revolution. Maurice Bishop. Review by Carl


54 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989


I _








Henry Feuer. 12:4 p. 37 (83).
Four Men: Living the Revolution, An Oral History
of Contemporary Cuba. Oscar Lewis, Ruth M.
Lewis & Susan Rigdon. Review by Francine J.
Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Four Women: Living the Revolution, An Oral
History of Contemporary Cuba. Oscar Lewis,
Ruth M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon. Review by
Francine J. Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
El Francotirador. Pedro Juan Soto. Review by
Carlos Alberto Montaner. 2:2 p. 12 (70).
Frangipani House. Beryl Gilroy. Review by L. P.
Fletcher. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Freedom In The Caribbean: A Study In Consti-
tutional Change. Sir Fred Phillips. Review by
Gordon K. Lewis. 7:2 p. 49 (78).
Friday: A Biography of Frida Kahlo. Hayden
Herrera. Review by Jan Michael Hanvik. 15:3 p.
22 (87).
From Colombus to Castro: The History of the
Caribbean 1492-1969. Eric Williams. Review by
Anthony P. Maingot. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
From Colonia to Community: The History of
Puerto Ricans in New York City, 1917-1948.
Virginia Sanchez Korrol. Review by Edna Acosta-
Belen. 14:1 p. 51 (85).
From Gunboats to Diplomacy: New US Policies
for Latin America. Richard Newfarmer. Review
by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p. 34 (85).

G
Gallego. Miguel Barnet. Review by Leonel A. de la
Cuesta. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Ganja in Jamaica. Vera Rubin & Lambros Comitas.
Review by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Garrison Guatemala. George Black, with Milton
Jamail & Norman Stultz Chinchilla. Review by
Virginia C. Garrard. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Geopolitics of the Caribbean: Ministates in a
Wider World. Thomas D. Anderson. Review by H.
Michael Erisman. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Getting Ahead Collectively: Grassroots ex-
periences in Latin America. Albert 0. Hirsch-
man. Review by Forrest D. Colburn. 14:2 p. 48
(85).
Getting to Know the General, The Story of an
Involvement. Graham Greene. Review by Neale
Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
The Giant's Rival: The USSR & Latin America.
Cole Blasier. Review by Leon Goure. 13:4 p. 51
(84).
Governance in the Western Hemisphere. Viron P.
Vaky. Review by Lynn-Darrell Bender. 14:4 p. 34
(85).
Grand Bahama. P.J.H. Barratt. Review by Aaron
Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Grassroots Development In Latin America and
The Caribbean: Oral Histories of Social
Change. Robert Wasserstrom. Review by Linda
Miller. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Green Hell: Massacre of the Brazilian Indians.
Lucien Bodard. Review by Paul Vidich. 5:2 p. 31
(73).
Grenada Documents: An Overview & Selection.
Michael Ledeen & Herbert Romerstein, eds.
Review by Kai Schoenhals. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
The Grenada Papers. Paul Seabury & Walter A.
McDougall, eds. Review by Kai Schoenhals. 14:2
p. 34 (85).
Grenada: Revolution & Invasion. Anthony Payne,
Paul Sutton, & Tony Thorndike. Review by Kai
Schoenhals. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
The Growth of the Modern West Indies. Gordon
K. Lewis. Review by Harmannus Hoetink. 1:4 p. 6
(69).
Guardians of the Dynasty: A History of the U.S.
Created Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua. Rich-
ard Millett. Review by Neill Macaulay. 7:3 p. 30
(78).
Guatemala, Occupied Country. Eduardo Galeano.
Review by Rafael Garzaro. 1:3 p. 7 (69).
Guerillas in Power: The Course of the Cuban
Revolution. K.S. Karol. Review by Robert W.
Anderson. 4:1 p. 31 (72).
Guerrillas of Peace: Liberation Theology & the
Central American Revolution. Blase Bonpane.
Review by Michele Heisler. 16:2 p. 48 (88).


Guyana Hoy. Rita Giacalone de Romero. Review
by Edward Dew. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Guyana: Fraudulent Revolution. The Latin Ameri-
can Bureau. Review by Edward Dew. 16:1 p. 43
(88).
H
La Habana para un infante difunto. Guillermo
Cabrera Infante. Review by Cruz Hernandez. 9:4
p. 40 (80).
Hacia una historic del ambiente en America
Latina. Luis Vitale. Review by George M. Guess.
13:3 p. 54 (84).
Haiti in Caribbean Context: Ethnicity, Economy
and Revolt. David Nicholls. Review by L6on-
Frangois Hoffmann. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Haiti, Political Failures, Cultural Successes.
Brian Weinstein & Aaron Segal. Review by Don
Bohning. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Haiti: Radiografia de una dictadura. G6rard
Pierre-Charles. Review by Jean-Claude Garcia-
Zamor. 2:1 p. 8 (70).
The Haitian Economy: Man, Land & Markets.
Mats Lundahl. Review by Christian A. Girault. 14:2
p. 51 (85).
Half A Loaf: Canada's Semi-Role Among De-
veloping Countries. Clyde Sanger. Review by
Aaron Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Havana Journal. Andrew Salkey. Review by Aaron
Segal. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
The Health Revolution in Cuba. Sergio Diaz-
Briquets. Review by Lisandro Pbrez. 14:1 p. 48
(85).
Heights of Macchu Picchu. Pablo Neruda. Review
by Barry Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Heremakhonon. Maryse Cond6. Review by Marie-
Denise Shelton. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
Heremakhonon, a Novel. Maryse Conde. Review
by Richard Dwyer. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
The Hero & the Crowd in a Colonial Polity. Archie
Singham. Review by Aaron Segal. 12:4 p. 40 (83).
The Hero & the Crowd in a Colonial Polity. A. W.
Singham. Review by Milton Pab6n. 1:2 p. 13 (69).
Heroes Are Grazing in My Garden. (En mijardin
pastan los heroes). Herberto Padilla. Review by
Roland E. Bush. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Histoire de I'architecture dans la Caraibe. David
Buissert. Review by Ellen L. Belknap. 14:3 p. 49
(85).
Historic Architecture of the Caribbean. David
Buisseret. Review by Aaron Segal. 12:1 p. 32 (83).
A History of the Bahamas. Michael Craton.
Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
The History of the Guyanese Working People,
1881-1905. Walter Rodney. Review by Thomas J.
Spinner, Jr. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
History of the Voice: The Development of Nation
Language in Anglophone Caribbean Poetry.
Edward Kamau Brathwaite. Review by Norman
Weinstein. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Honduras Confronts Its Future: Contending
Perspectives on Critical Issues. Mark B. Rosen-
berg & Philip L. Shepherd, eds. Review by
Thomas P. Anderson. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Honduras: Portrait of a Captive Nation. Nancy
Peckenham & Annie Street, eds. Review by
Thomas P. Anderson. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Hoofprints on the Forest. Douglas R. Shane.
Review by Ellen Calmus. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Hot Land, Cold Season. Pedro Juan Soto. Review
by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Hypertension & Culture Change: Acculturation
& Disease in the West Indies. William W.
Dressier. Review by Ivor L. Livingston. 13:4 p. 51
(84).

l...Rigoberta Menchd: An Indian Woman in
Guatemala. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, ed. Re-
view by David Bray. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Ideology, Faith, & Family Planning in Latin
America. J. Mayone Stycos. Review by Aaron
Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Idols of Death & the God of Life: A Theology.
Pablo Richard. Review by Monsignor Bryan 0.
Walsh. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Ignoring Hurts...poems. John J. Figueroa. Review


by St. George Tucker Arnold, Jr. 7:3 p. 54 (78).
Impulse to Revolution in Latin America. Jeffrey
W. Barrett. Review by Daniel H. Levine. 15:4 p. 19
(87).
Industry, the State & Public Policy. Dale Story.
Review by Ben Schneider. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Infante's Inferno. Guillermo Cabrera Infante. Re-
view by Donald Gwynn Watson. 13:3 p. 30 (84).
The Innocent Island: Abaco in the Bahamas. Zoe
C. Durrell. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
The International Crisis in the Caribbean. An-
thony Payne. Review by H. Michael Erisman. 15:3
p. 42 (87).
An Introduction to the French Caribbean Novel.
Beverley Ormerod. Review by L6on-Frangois
Hoffmann. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Inward Hunger, The Education of a Prime
Minister. Eric Williams. Review by Gordon Lewis.
3:1 p. 2 (71).
La isla al reves: Haiti y el destiny dominicano.
Joaquin Balaguer. Review by Pierre L. Hudicourt.
14:4 p. 21 (85).
J
Jamaica Papers. Jamaica Committee. Review by
Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
The Jamaican Economy. Ransford W. Palmer.
Review by Byron White. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
Jamaican Folk Tales & Oral Histories. (Book,
audiotape, videotape). Laura Tanna. Review by
Richard A. Dwyer. 16:1 p. 22 (88).
Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novels. Teresa F.
O'Connor. Review by Roy Pateman. 16:2 p. 49
(88).
Journey to Ixtlan: The Lessons of Don Juan.
Carlos Castaneda. Review by Randy Frances
Kandel. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
K
Kennedy et la Revolution Cubarne. Manuela
Semidei. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
L
Labor Migration Under Capitalism: The Puerto
Rican Experience. The History Task Force.
Review by James W. Wessman. 9:3 p. 42 (80).
Latin America & Caribbean Contemporary Re-
cord, Vol. 1:1981-82. Jack Hopkins, ed. Review
by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Latin American Economic Integration & US
Policy. Joseph Grunwald, Miguel S. Wicnezek
and Martin Carney. Review by Ramesh
Ramsaran. 5:4 p. 41 (73).
Latin American Insurgencies. Georges Fauriol,
ed. Review by Peter Johnson. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
The Latin American Military Institution. Robert
Wesson. Review by Lawrence H. Hall. 15:4 p. 43
(87).
Latin American Political Economy: Financial
Crisis & Political Change. Jonathan Hartlyn and
Samuel A. Morley, eds. Review by Ben Schneider.
16:1 p. 41 (88).
Lengthening Shadows: Birth & Revolt of the
Trinidad Army. S. Hylton Edwards. Review by
Anthony P. Maingot. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
La Lezarde. Edouard Glissant. Review by Lauren
W. Yoder. 10:3 p. 24 (81).
Libertad y servidumbre en el Puerto Rico del
siglo XIX. Fernando Pic6. Review by Lowell
Gudmundson. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
The Light & Shadows of Jamaica History. Hon.
Richard Hill. Review by Gardiner Greene Hub-
bard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
The Limits of Victory, The Ratification of the
Panama Canal Treaties. George D. Moffest IIl.
Review by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
The Limits of Victory: The Ratification of the
Panama Canal Treaties. George D. Moffett Ill.
Review by Robert A. Pastor. 15:4 p. 22 (87).
Living Poor. Moritz Thomsen. Review by Leopold
Kohr. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Local Organizations: Intermediaries in Rural
Development. Milton J. Esman & Norman T.
Uphoff. Review by David Zweig. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
The Long War: Dictatorship & Revolution in El
Salvador. James Dunkerley. Review by Dennis
Gilbert. 13:3 p. 55 (84).


CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /55


I








Loose Joints. (recording). Pedro Pietri. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
The Losers. Paul D. Bethel. Review by Andr6s
Suarez. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Love & Death in a Hot Country. Shiva Naipaul.
Review by Eric Lott. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
Lower Class Families: The Culture of Poverty in
Negro Trinidad. Hyman Rodman. Review by
Ronald G. Parris. 4:3 p. 44 (72).
Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns. W. Ashmore,
ed. Review by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
M
Main Currents in Caribbean Thought: The
Historical Evolution of Caribbean Society in Its
Ideological Aspects, 1492-1900. Gordon K.
Lewis. Review by Sidney W. Mintz. 13:1 p. 28
(84).
The Making of an Unamerican. Paul Cowan.
Review by Leopold Kohr. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Man-Making Words. Selected Poems of Nicolas
Guillen. Nicolas Guill6n. Review by Florence L.
Yudin. 5:3 p. 30 (73).
Manley & the New Jamaica: Selected Speeches
& Writings. Rex Nettleford. Review by Gordon K.
Lewis. 5:2 p. 44 (73).
A Manual for Manuel. Julio Cortazar. Review by
Gerald Guinness. 8:3 p. 40 (79).
Manufacturing in the Backyard: Case Studies on
Accumulation & Employment in Small-Scale
Brazilian Industry. Hubert Schmitz. Review by
Richard P. Harber. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
The Marcus Garvey & the Universal Negro
Improvement Association Papers. Robert A.
Hill, ed. Review by John McCartney. 14:2 p. 50
(85).
The Masses Are Asses. Pedro Pietri. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Memoires d'un Leader Du Tiers Monde. Frangois
Duvalier. Review by Gerard R. Latortue. 2:1 p. 9
(70).
Memories de Bernardo Vega. Bernardo Vega.
Review by Eugene V. Mohr. 10:4 p. 34 (81).
The Mexican Revolution: Federal Expenditure
and Social Change Since 1910. James W.
Wilkie. Review by Hector Orci. 4:1 p. 28 (72).
Mexico: A History. Robert Ryal Miller. Review by
Lowell Gudmundson. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
La migracion espahola de 1939 y los inicios del
Marxismo-Leninismo en la Republic Domini-
cana. Bernardo Vega. Review by Harold Sims.
14:4 p. 50 (85).
Minorities & Power in a Black Society: The
Jewish Community of Jamaica. Carol S.
Holzberg. Review by Michael Hanchard. 16:1 p.
13 (88).
Mirror, Mirror: Identity Race & Protest in Ja-
maica. Rex Nettleford. Review by Carl Stone. 4:4
p. 28 (72).
Miskitu Bila Aisanka: Gramatica Miskita. Centro
de Investigaciones y Documentati6n de la Costa
AtlIntica. Review by Forrest D. Colburn. 14:4 p.
49 (85).
Miskitu Kisi Nani: Cuentos Miskitos. Centro de
Investigaciones y Documentati6n de la Costa
Atl6ntica. Review by Forrest D. Colburn. 14:4
p. 49 (85).
Model Cities Program: Municipality of San Juan.
City Demonstration Agency. Review by Howard
Stanton. 1:1 p. 9 (69).
The Modernization of Puerto Rico: A Political
Study of Changing Values & Institutions. Henry
Wells. Review by Barry B. Levine. 1:4 p. 2 (69).
Monsieur Toussaint. Edouard Glissant. Review by
Felix Morisseau-Leroy. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
La montafia es algo mas que una inmensa
estepa verde. Omar Cabezas. Review by David
Bray. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
A Morning at the Office. Edgar Mittelholzer.
Review by John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
My Little Island. Frane Lessac. Review by Joann
Biondi. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
N
Nacionalismo, etnicidad y political en la Repub-
lica Cooperativa de Guyana. Andr6s Serbin.
Review by Edward Dew. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
56 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


The Nationalization of the Venezuelan Oil Indus-
try. Gustavo Coronel. Review by John D. Wirth.
13:3 p. 55 (84).
Neighbors: Living the Revolution, An Oral His-
tory of Contemporary Cuba. Oscar Lewis, Ruth
M. Lewis & Susan Rigdon. Review by Francine J.
Daner. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Neuroses in the Sun. Timothy 0. McCartney.
Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
The New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean.
Barry B. Levine. Review by Edward Gonzalez.
13:2 p. 32 (84).
New Latin American Cinema: An Annotated
Bibliography of Sources in English, Spanish
and Portuguese:1960-1980. Julianne Burton.
Review by Dennis West. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
The Newer Caribbean: Decolonization, De-
mocracy, & Development. Paget Henry and Carl
Stone, eds. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29
(84).
Nicaragua Under Siege, Marlene Dixon and
Susanne Jonas, eds. Review by John A. Booth.
15:2 p. 47 (86).
Nicaragua's Mosquito Shore: The Years of
British & American Presence. Craig L. Dozier.
Review by Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. 15:4 p. 40
(87).
No Free Lunch: Food & Revolution in Cuba
Today. Medea Benjamin, Joseph Collins and
Michael Scott. Review by James E. Austin. 15:2 p.
45 (86).
Nueva Antologia Poetica. Ernesto Cardenal. Re-
view by Aaron Segal. 10:1 p. 26 (81).
0
Obeah, Christ & Rastaman: Jamaica & its
Religion. Ivor Morrish. Review by G. Llewellyn
Watson. 14:1 p. 51 (85).
Oil & Politics in Latin America: Nationalist
Movements & State Companies. George Philip.
Review by Jonathan C. Brown. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
The Old Gringo. Carlos Fuentes. Review by Roy
Pateman. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Ole Time Sayin's: Proverbs of the West Indies.
Lito Valls. Review by G. Llewellyn Watson. 14:2 p.
51 (85).
The Ordeal of Free Labor in the British West
Indies. W. G. Sewell. Review by Gardiner Greene
Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
The Origins of Maya Civilization. R. E. W. Adams,
ed. Review by Prudence M. Rice. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
The Other Side of Paradise. Tom Barry, Beth
Wood & Deb Preusch. Review by Carl Henry
Feuer. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Our House in the Last World. Oscar Hijuelos.
Review by Efrain Barradas. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
The Overcrowded Barracoon & Other Articles. V.
S. Naipaul. Review by John Thieme. 7:1 p. 32
(75).
P
Pan American Visions: Woodrow Wilson in the
Western Hemisphere, 1913-1921. Mark T.
Gilderhus. Review by Lowell Gudmundson. 16:1
p. 40 (88).
The Panama Canal in American Politics: Do-
mestic Advocacy & the Evolution of Policy. J.
Michael Hogan. Review by Robert A. Pastor. 15:4
p. 22 (87).
Panama Odyssey. William J. Jorden. Review by
Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Panama Odyssey. William J. Jorden. Review by
Ambler H. Moss, Jr. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Panama, Desastre...o Democracia. Ricardo Arias
Calder6n. Review by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26
(86).
Papa Doc: The Truth About Haiti Today. Bernard
Diederich & Al Burt. Review by Jean-Claude
Garcia-Zamor. 2:1 p. 8 (70).
The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the
Panama Canal, 1870-1914. David McCullough.
Review by Mark B. Rosenberg. 7:3 p. 61 (78).
Patria o Muerte! The Great Zoo & Other Poems.
NicolAs Guill6n. Review by Florence L. Yudin. 5:3
p. 31 (73).
Patterns of Caribbean Development: An In-
terpretive Essay on Economic Change. Jay R.


Mandle. Review by Terry McCoy. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Patterns of International Cooperation in the
Caribbean. Herbert Corkran, Jr. Review by Basil
A. Ince. 4:3 p. 36 (72).
Pelican Guide to the Bahamas. James E. Moore.
Review by Nancy Olson. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
The Penguin Book of Caribbean Verse in Eng-
lish. Paula Burnett, ed. Review by Emily M.
Belcher. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
El pensamiento Cristiano revolucionario en
America Latina y el Caribe. Samuel Silva Gotay.
Review by Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo. 14:1 p. 50
(85).
Pensamientos del Negro Cubena. Carlos Guill-
ermo Wilson. Review by lan I. Smart. 8:3 p. 34
(79).
Pentagonism. Juan Bosch. Review by Kal Wagen-
heim. 2:1 p. 10 (70).
Peoples & Cultures of The Caribbean: An
Anthropological Reader. Michael M. Horowitz.
Review by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
The Plight of Haitian Refugees. Jake C. Miller.
Review by Alejandro Portes. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Poemas Humanos/Human Poems. C6sar Vallejo.
Review by Barry Wallenstein. 1:3 p. 11 (69).
Poems & Antipoems. Nicanor Parra. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Poet in the Fortress: The Story of Luis Mufoz
Marin. Thomas Aitken. Review by Gordon K.
Lewis. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
La political de Mexico hacia Centroamirica. Ren6
Herrera & Mario Ojeda. Review by Roger Quant.
14:3 p. 49 (85).
Political Change in Central America: Internal and
External Dimensions. Wolf Grabendorff, H.W.
Krumwiede & Jorg Todt, eds. Review by Marvin
Alisky. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
Political Economy of the Latin American Motor
Vehicle Industry. Rich Kronish & Kenneth S.
Mericle. Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Political History of Latin America. Ronald Glass-
man. Review by Reinhard Bendix. 2:4 p. 3 (70).
Political Science in Population Studies. Richard
L. Clinton, William S. Flash, R. Kenneth Godwin,
eds. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
The Political System of Chile. Federico G. Gil.
Review by Louis Wolf Goodman. 3:2 p. 14 (71).
Politics & Economics in the Caribbean. T.G.
Mathews & F.M. Andic. Review by Joseph D.
Olander. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
Politics & Social Forces in Chilean Deve-
lopment. James Petras. Review by Louis Wolf
Goodman. 3:2 p. 14 (71).
Politics of Invervention: The United States in
Central America. Roger Burbach & Patricia
Flynn, eds. Review by Marvin Alisky. 14:1 p. 26
(85).
The Politics of Puerto Rican University Stu-
dents. Arthur Liebman. Review by Barry B:
Levine. 2:4 p. 11 (70).
The Politics of Surinam & the Netherlands
Antilles. Albert L. Gastmann. Review by Robert
H. Manley. 1:1 p. 12 (69).
Politics on Bonaire. Ank Klomp. Review by Dennis
Conway. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Popul Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Ancient
Quich6 Maya. Delia Goetz & Sylvanus G. Morley,
trans. Review by Charles Lacombe. 9:2 p. 42 (80).
Population Policies & Growth in Latin Ameri-
ca. David Chaplin, ed. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:4
p. 37 (73).
Pour La Guadeloupe Independante. Monique
Vernhes & Jean Bloch. Review by Aaron Segal.
5:3 p. 39 (73).
Poverty of Progress: Latin America in the
Nineteenth Century. E. Bradford Burns. Review
by Mark D. Szuchman. 10:3 p. 28 (81).
The Present Crisis & How To Meet It. Rev. Mr.
Panton. Review by Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2
p. 8 (71).
The Prime Minister. Austin C. Clarke. Review by
Harry T. Antrim. 8:4 p. 38 (79).
Problems de desigualdad social en Puerto
Rico. Barry B. Levine, Rafael Ramirez, & Carlos
Buitrago (eds.). Review by Robert W. Anderson.
5:3 p. 35 (73).
Problems of Development in Beautiful Coun-


_ __


- -- -a I-I--







tries: Perspectives on the Caribbean. Ransford
W. Palmer. Review by James Dietz. 13:3 p. 52
(84).
El Pueblo Dominicano:1850-1900. Apuntes para
su sociologia hist6rica. Harmannus Hoetink.
Review by Anthony P. Maingot. 5:3 p. 43 (73).
Public Policy & Industrial Development: The
Case of the Mexican Auto Parts Industry. Mark
Bennett. Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
The Puerto Rican Experience. Francesco Cor-
dasco & Eugene Bucchioni eds. Review by
Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Puerto Rican Obituary. Pedro Pietri. Review by
Barry Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
The Puerto Rican Papers: Notes On The Re-
Emergence Of A Nation. Alfredo L6pez. Review
by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
The Puerto Rican Question. Jorge Heine & Juan
M. Garcia-Passalacqua. Review by James L.
Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Puerto Ricans In The United States: A Bibli-
ography. Francesco Cordasco & Eugene Buc-
chioni eds. Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41
(74).
The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History. Kal
and Olga Jimenez de Wagenheim, eds. Review by
Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
The Puerto Ricans: An Annotated Bibliography.
Paquita Vivo, ed. Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4
p. 41 (74).
Puerto Rico. Marvin Schwartz. Review by Kal
Wagenheim. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Puerto Rico: A Colonial Experiment. Raymond
Carr. Review by James L. Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Puerto Rico: A Political & Cultural History. Arturo
Morales Carri6n, et. al. Review by Olga Jimenez
de Wagenheim. 13:1 p. 31 (84).
Puerto Rico: A Profile. Kal Wagenheim. Review by
Gordon K. Lewis. 3:2 p. 11 (71).
Puerto Rico: Commonwealth, State, or Nation?.
Byron Williams. Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p.
41 (74).
Puerto Rico: Freeedom & Equality at Issue. Juan
M. Garcia-Passalacqua. Review by James L.
Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Puerto Rico: The Search for a National Policy.
Richard J. Bloomfield, ed. Review by James L.
Dietz. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Puerto Rico: Una interpretaci6n histdrico-social.
Manuel Maldonado Denis. Review by Norman
Matlin. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Q
Le Quatrieme Si6cle. Edouard Glissant. Review by
Lauren W. Yoder. 10:3 p. 24 (81).
The Quiet Revolution in the Bahamas. Doris
Johnson. Review by Aaron Segal. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
R
Race & Revolutionary Consciousness: A Doc-
umentary Interpretation. Ivar Oxaal. Review by
Ken Boodhoo. 5:1 p. 42 (73).
Race, Class, & Political Symbols. Anita M.
Waters. Review by Carl H. Feuer. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Rape of the American Virgins. Edward A. O'Neill.
Review by James W. Green. 5:2 p. 37 (73).
The Rastafarians: A Study of Messianic Cultism
in Jamaica. Leonard E. Barrett. Review by Roy
Simon Bryce-Laporte. 2:2 p. 3 (70).
Readings in Caribbean History & Economics: An
Introduction to the Region. Roberta Marx Del-
son, ed. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Readings in the Political Economy of the Carib-
bean. Norman Girvan & Owen Jefferson, eds.
Review by Aaron Segal. 4:3 p. 32 (72).
Reconstrucci6n de los hechos. Manuel Orestes
Nieto. Review by Luis M. Quesada. 13:1 p. 39
(84).
Red, White & Blue Paradise, The American Canal
Zone in Panama. Herbert & Mary Knapp. Review
by Neale Pearson. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Reflections on the Gordon Rebellion. S. R. Ward.
Review by Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8
(71).
Reggae International. Stephen Davis & Peter
Simon. Review by Alan Greenberg. 12:2 p. 32
(83).


Relaciones Centroam6rica-Mdxico. Panama: Cri-
sis, soberania y el cardcter de sus relaciones
con Mexico, 1978-1986. Anayansi Turner Yau.
Review by Nancy Robinson. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Religion & Political Conflict in Latin America.
Daniel H. Levine. Review by Dale Story. 16:1 p. 38
(88).
Report of the Jamaica Royal Commission.
Jamaica Royal Commission. Review by Gardiner
Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Report of W. Morgan, Esq. on His Mission to
Jamaica. W. Morgan, Esq. Review by Gardiner
Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Requiem fora Village/Aparteid Love. Sharlowe
(pseud.). Review by John Cooke. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Residence on Earth. Pablo Neruda. Review by
Florence L. Yudin. 6:2 p. 38 (74).
The Restless Caribbean: Changing Patterns of
International Relations. Richard Millet & W.
Marvin Wills, eds. Review by Aaron Segal. 13:2 p.
29 (84).
The Return of Eva Per6n. V. S. Naipaul. Review by
Gerald Guinness. 10:2 p. 36 (81).
Reunidn de espejos. Jose Luis Vega, ed. Review
by Kal Wagenheim. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
A Review of Urban Life in Kingston, Jamaica.
Diane J. Austin. Review by Bernard D. Headley.
15:1 p. 42 (86).
Revolution Next Door. Gary MacEoin. Review by
Thomas Mathews. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
Revolutionary Change in Cuba. Carmelo Mesa-
Lago. Review by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Revolutionary Cuba: The Challenge of Eco-
nomic Growth with Equity. Claes Brundenius.
Review by Sergio Roca. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
The Road to OPEC: United States Relations with
Venezuela. Stephen G. Rabe. Review by George
W. Grayson. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Le Roman Haitien: Ideologie et Structure. Leon
Frangois Hoffmann. Review by Felix Morisseau-
Leroy. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Rum-Yesterday & Today. Hugh Barty-King and
Anton Massel. Review by Barry B. Levine. 16:1 p.
42 (88).
La ruta de Sarduy. Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria.
Review by Rafael Ocasio. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
S
Savior, Savior, Hold My Hand. Piri Thomas.
Review by Adalberto L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
Saying & Meaning in Puerto Rico: Some Prob-
lems in the Ethnography of Discourse. Marshall
Morris. Review by Gerald Guinness. 10:4 p. 32
(81).
Scheming for the Poor: The Politics of Redistri-
bution in Latin America. William Ascher. Review
by John Waterbury. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
Sea Grapes. Derek Walcott. Review by John
Thieme. 7:4 p. 51 (78).
Selected Poems. Gabriela Mistral. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Selected Poems of Pablo Neruda. Pablo Neruda.
Review by Barry Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
A Separate Reality: Further Conversations With
Don Juan. Carlos Castaneda. Review by Randy
Frances Kandel. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
Shadows Move Among Them. Edgar Mittelholzer.
Review by John Thieme. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Sicuanga Runa: The Other Side of Development
in Amazonian Ecuador. Norman E. Whitten, Jr.
Review by William T. Vickers. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
Siete migraciones japoneses en Mexico, 1890-
1978. Maria Elena Ota Mishima. Review by Harold
Sims. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Slave Emancipation in Cuba. The Transition to
Free Labor, 1866-1899. Rebecca J. Scott. Re-
view by David Kyle. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Slave Populations of the British Caribbean,
1807-1834. B. W. Higman. Review by Bonham C.
Richardson. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
Slave Society in Cuba. Franklin W. Knight. Review
by Aaron Segal. 5:1 p. 40 (73).
Slavery, War, & Revolution: The British Occu-
pation of Saint Domingue, 1793-1798. David
Geggus. Review by Roger N. Buckley. 13:4 p. 50
(84).
Small Countries, Large Issues. Studies in U.S.-


Latin American Asymmetries. Mark Falcoff.
Review by Paul Hollander. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
The Sober Generation: Children of Operation
Bootstrap. A Topology of Competent Coping
by Adolescents in Modern Puerto Rico. R.
Fernandez Marina, U. von Eckardt, E. Maldonado
Sierra. Review by Barry B. Levine. 1:1 p. 6 (69).
Sodomy & the Perception of Evil: English Sea
Rovers in the Seventeenth Century Caribbean.
B. R. Burg. Review by Arthur N. Gilbert. 12:3 p. 34
(83).
Somoza & the Legacy of US Involvement in
Central America. Bernard Diederich. Review by
Carlos M. Vilas. 11:3 p. 34 (82).
Soviet Image of Contemporary Latin America, A
Documentary History, 1960-1968. Robert G.
Carlton. Review by Leon Gourd. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
The Soviet Union & Latin America. J. Gregory
Oswald & Anthony Strover, eds. Review by Leon
Gour6. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
Spain & the Loss of America. Timothy E. Anna.
Review by Joaquin Roy. 15:2 p. 48 (86).
Spiks. Pedro Juan Soto. Review by Adalberto
L6pez. 6:4 p. 41 (74).
A Strategy for Caribbean Economic Integration.
Roland I. Perusse. Review by Thomas Mathews.
4:3 p. 41 (72).
Stratification in Grenada. M. G. Smith. Review by
Aaron Segal. 12:4 p. 40 (83).
Sucre Amer: Esclaves Aujourd'hui dans les
Caraibes. Maurice Lemoine. Review by Paul R.
Latortue. 11:3 p. 36 (82).
Sugar & Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation
Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850. Francisco A.
Scarano. Review by Roderick A. McDonald. 15:3
p. 41 (87).
T
The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of
Knowledge. Carlos Castaneda. Review by Randy
Frances Kandel. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
El Tercermundismo. Carlos Rangel. Review by
Adolfo Leyva. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Testing the Chains: Resistance to Slavery in the
British West Indies. Michael Craton. Review by
Roger N. Buckley. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
The Theory of Moral Incentives in Cuba. Robert
M. Bernardo. Review by Irving Louis Horowitz. 4:4
p. 33 (72).
Three Trapped Tigers. Guillermo Cabrera Infante.
Review by J. Raban Bilder. 4:3 p. 28 (72).
La Tia Julia y El Ecribidor. Mario Vargas Llosa.
Review by Ram6n Mendoza. 8:2 p. 45 (79).
Time for Decision: The United States & Puerto
Rico. Jorge Heine. Review by James L. Dietz.
14:3 p. 34 (85).
To Shoot Hard Labor: The Life & Times of
Samuel Smith, an Antiguan Workingman,
1877-1982. Keithlyn B. Smith & Fernando C.
Smith. Review by Larry J. Smith. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Tomorrow's Child: Imagination, Creativity And
The Rebirth Of Culture. Rubem Alves. Review by
Jos6 R. Garcia. 7:1 p. 36 (75).
Tourism & Development: A Case Study of the
Commonwealth Caribbean. John M. Bryden.
Review by Ramash Ramsaran. 7:1 p. 41 (75).
Traffic Violations. Pedro Pietri. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Transculturaci6n e interferencia linguistica en el
Puerto Rico contempordneo. German de
Granda. Review by Aar6n G. Ramos. 1:1 p. 11
(69).
Transnational Corporations Versus the State:
The Political Economy of the Mexican Auto
Industry. Douglas E. Bennett & Kenneth E.
Sharpe. Review by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
Transnational Corporations & the Latin Ameri-
can Automobile Industry. Rhys Jenkins. Review
by Aaron Segal. 15:4 p. 24 (87).
The Traveller's Tree: A Journey Through the
Caribbean Islands. Patrick Leigh Fermor. Re-
view by Daniel J. Crowley. 12:3 p. 36 (83).
Triple Crown. Roberto Duran, Judith Ortiz Cofer
and Gustavo Perez. Review by Carolina Hospital.
16:2 p. 49 (88).
Tristes Tropiques. Claude Levi-Strauss. Review
by David Goddard. 1:2 p. 10 (69).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /57


I - I~







Tryin' to Make It: Adapting to the Bahamas. John
Bregenzer. Review by Frank E. Manning. 13:4 p.
49 (84).
Twenty Poems. Pablo Neruda. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
U
Underdevelopment Is a State of Mind: The Latin
American Case. Lawrence E. Harrison. Review
by Daniel H. Levine. 15:4 p. 19 (87).
The United States & Cuba: Hegemony and
Dependent Development, 1880-1934. Jules
Robert Benjamin. Review by Pedro J. Montiel. 8:1
p. 51 (79).
The United States & the Caribbean. Tad Szulc,
ed. Review by Joseph D. Olander. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
US Influence in Latin America in the 1980s.
Robert Wesson. Review by Lynn-Darrell Bender.
14:4 p. 34 (85).
US-Mexico Relations: Economic & Social As-
pects. Clark W. Reynolds & Carlos Tello, ed.
Review by Bernard E. Segal. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
V
V.S. Naipaul: An Introduction To His Work. Paul
Theroux. Review by John Thieme. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
Venezuela y las Relaciones Internacionales en la
Cuenca del Caribe. Andrbs Serbin. Review by
Dennis J. Gayle. 16:1 p. 40 (88).


Venezuela, A Century of Change. Judith Ewell.
Review by Richard Parker. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Victims of the Miracle: Development & the
Indians of Brazil. Shelton H. Davis. Review by
William T. Vickers. 8:2 p. 50 (79).
The View from the Barrio. Lisa Redfield Peattie.
Review by Angelina Pollack-Eltz. 2:1 p. 13 (70).
Voter Participation in Central America, 1954-
1981: An Exploration. George A. Bowdler and
Patrick Cotter. Review by Ralph Lee Woodward,
Jr. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Vulnerability: Small States in the Global Society.
Report of a Commonwealth Consultative
Group. Commonwealth Secretariat. Review by
Roy Patman. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
W
We Are Many. Pablo Neruda. Review by Barry
Wallenstein. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
We Wished To Be Looked Upon: A Study of the
Aspirations of Youth in a Developing Society.
Vera Rubin & Marisa Zavalloni. Review by Ursula
M. Von Eckardt. 2:2 p. 10 (70).
West Indian Societies. David Lowenthal. Review
by Colin G. Clarke. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
The West Indies. Rev. Dr. Underhill. Review by
Gardiner Greene Hubbard. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
The West on Trial. My Fight for Guyana's
Freedom. Cheddi Jagan. Review by Gordon


Lewis. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
What Price Equity? A Macroeconomic Evalu-
ation of Government Policies in Costa Rica.
Fuat M. Andic. Review by Irma T. de Alonso. 15:1
p. 44 (86).
White Paper on National Institute of Higher
Education. Republic of Trinidad & Tobago.
Review by Anthony P. Maingot. 7:3 p. 48 (78).
Wifredo Lam. Max-Pol Fouchet. Review by Ricardo
Pau-Llosa. 7:4 p. 54 (78).
The Wild Coast: An Account of Politics in
Guyana. Reynold Burrowes. Review by Edward
Dew. 16:1 p. 43 (88).
The Winds of December. John Dorschner and
Roberto Fabricio. Review by Justo Carrillo. 10:4 p.
38 (81).
Witness to War: An American Doctor in El
Salvador. Charles Clements. Review by Neale J.
Pearson. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Women & Politics in Barbados, 1948-1981.
Neville Duncan & Kenneth O'Brien. Review by
Betty Jane Punnett. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Working Men & Ganja. Melanie Creagan Dreher.
Review by Aaron Segal. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Z
Zero Hour & Other Documentary Poems. Ernesto
Cardenal. Review by Aaron Segal. 10:1 p. 26 (81).


SUBJECT, BY DISCIPLINE

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
Bahamas. Bahamas. Aaron Segal, Bahama Watch-
ing. RES. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Caribbean Archipelago. Caribbean Archipelago.
Colin G. Clarke, Who Cares About the Caribbean?
BRV. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Caribbean identity. Caribbean, Hispanic. Carlos
Alberto Montaner, On the Antillian Identity. ART.
7:3 p. 11 (78).
Caribbean identity. Caribbean, Hispanic. Mark D.
Szuchman, On the Balkanization of America.
ART. 7:4 p. 42 (78).
Cuba. Cuba. Aaron Segal, Cubanology. RES. 5:1 p.
40 (73).
Cultural diversity. Caribbean Archipelago. Sidney
W. Mintz, Thoughts on Caribbean Society. BRV.
13:1 p. 28 (84).
Cultural identity. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Rex
Nettleford, Cultivating A Caribbean Sensibility.
ART. 15:3 p. 4 (87).
Culture & politics. Haiti. Don Bohning, Haitian
Errors. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Culture & politics. Puerto Rico. Eneid Routt6
Gomez, The Agony of Puerto Rican Art. ART. 9:3
p. 16 (80).
Everyday life. Puerto Rico. Charles Rosario, The
Phenomenology of Everyday Life. ART. 9:3 p. 28
(80).
Foreign students. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Au-
gustus C. Small, Studying in the States. ART. 11:4
p. 22 (82).
Guyana. Guyana. Edward Dew, Guyana Glimpses.
BRV. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Language. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Norman
Weinstein, Tis English? BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Language changes. Cuba. Octavio Pino, Revo-
lutionary Cuban. ART. 6:4 p. 20 (74).
Library collections. Caribbean Basin. Marguerite
C. Subrez-Murias, An Important Library on the
Caribbean. ART. 9:2 p. 52 (80).
Library collections. Central America. Ralph Lee
Woodward, Jr., Where to Study Central America.
ART. 10:1 p. 47 (81).
Media. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Ramesh De-
osaran, The Role of the Press in the Caribbean.
ART. 13:4 p. 16 (84).
Mexico. Mexico. Steven E. Sanderson, So Near...
BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Peace Corps. Ecuador. Leopold Kohr, Two Views
of Ecuador. BRV. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Gordon K. Lewis,
Wagenheim's Profile. BRV. 3:2 p. 11 (71).
58 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Kal Wagenheim, Wagen-
heim on Lewis' Wagenheim. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Adalberto Lopez, Litera-
ture for the Puerto Rican Diaspora. ART. 5:2 p. 5
(73).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Gordon K. Lewis, Lewis
on L6pez's Diaspora. LED. 5:3 p. 2 (73).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Adalberto L6pez, L6pez
on Lewis. LED. 5:4 p. 2 (73).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Adalberto L6pez, Litera-
ture For The Puerto Rican Diaspora: Part II. RES.
6:4 p. 41 (74).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Barry B. Levine, Puerto
Rican Culture at the Turning Point. ED. 9:3 p. 4
(80).
Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico. Loretta Phelps de
Cordova et als., La Fortaleza Replies. ART. 10:2
p. 32 (81).
Reminiscences. Puerto Rico. Oscar Lewis, Rem-
iniscences of an Aging Puerto Rican. EXC. 2:3 p.
1 (70).
Sandinistas. Nicaragua. David Bray, Sandinista
Socialization. BRV. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
Sociolinguistics. Puerto Rico. Gerald Guinness,
What Did He Say? What Did He Mean? BRV. 10:4
p. 32 (81).
Spanglish. Puerto Rico. Gustavo P6rez Firmat,
Spic Chic. ART. 15:3 p. 20 (87).
Street life. Guyana. David J. Dodd, A Day in
Babylon. ART. 10:4 p. 24 (81).
Testimonial. Cuba. Barry Record, Does Fidel Eat
More than Your Father? EXC. 4:4 p. 4 (72).
Testimonial. Cuba. Francine J. Daner, Living the
Revolution. BRV. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Testimonial. Puerto Rico. Jos6 M. Alonso Garcia,
Conversations with Guillermo. ART. 5:3 p. 6 (73).
Tradition, loss of. Aruba. Sam Cole, Paradise
Lost? ART. 14:3 p. 22 (85).
Transculturation. Puerto Rico. Aar6n G. Ramos,
Spanish Maimed. BRV. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
Transculturation. USVI. James W. Green, Rape of
the Virgins. BRV. 5:2 p. 37 (73).
Travel guide. Bahamas. Nancy Olson, Not for the
Birds. BRV. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Women in politics. Barbados. Betty Jane Punnett,
Lady Law. BRV. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
ECONOMICS
Agriculture. Central America. William C. Thie-
senhusen, Campesinos Versus Landlords. ART.
14:4 p. 30 (85).
Auto industry. Latin America. Aaron Segal, Grow-
ing Pains: Latin America's Auto Industry. RES.
15:4 p. 24 (87).
Coffee trade. Haiti. Alex Stepick, Haitian Coffee.


BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Culture, tobacco. Colombia. Philip Shepherd,
Colombia's Tobacco Road. BRV. 13:1 p. 36 (84).
Demographic factors. Haiti. Christian A. Girault,
Second-Hand Haiti. BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Energy. Cuba. Alfred Padula, Cuba's Pending
Energy Crisis. ART. 8:2 p. 4 (79).
Export trade. Costa Rica. John C. Edmunds and
William Renforth, The Costa Rican Solution. ART.
14:2 p. 27 (85).
Export trade. Puerto Rico. Suphan Andic, The
Decision to Trade. ART. 14:2 p. 22 (85).
Federal budget. Cuba. Jorge Salazar-Carillo, Is the
Cuban Economy Knowable? ART. 15:2 p. 24 (86).
Federal budget. Mexico. Hector Orci, Mexico
Budgeted. BRV. 4:1 p. 28 (72).
Financial problems. Latin America. Juan A. Yahes,
Gospel. BRV. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
Foreign investment. Caribbean Archipelago. Carl
Henry Feuer, Jargon Liberation. BRV. 15:4 p. 43
(87).
Foreign investment. Latin America. Galo Plaza,
Latin American Development. ART. 1:4 p. 5 (69).
Government policies. Costa Rica. Irma T. de
Alonso, Economic Erosion. BRV. 15:1 p. 44 (86).
Industrial policy. Mexico. Ben Schneider, Story's
Story. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Industry, small scale. Brazil. Richard P. Harber,
Little Backyards. BRV. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Informal credit association. Trinidad. Daniel
Levin, Susu. ART. 7:1 p. 19 (75).
Labor surplus. Caribbean Archipelago. Ransford
W. Palmer, Absorbing the Caribbean Labor Sur-
plus. ART. 11:3 p. 22 (82).
National policy. Mexico. Dale Truett, Creeping
Mexicanization. ART. 6:3 p. 19 (74).
Oil. Caribbean Basin. George W. Grayson, The
Joint Oil Facility. ART. 12:2 p. 19 (83).
Oil. Cuba. Jorge F. P6rez-L6pez, Cuba As An Oil
Trader. ART. 15:2 p. 26 (86).
Oil. Latin America. Jonathan C. Brown, Not Greasy
Kid Stuff. BRV. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
Oil. Mexico. Bernard E. Segal, Who Got the Oil?
BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Oil. Mexico. George W. Grayson, An Overdose of
Corruption. ART. 13:3 p. 22 (84).
Oil. Venezuela. John D. Wirth, Mistreated Goose.
BRV. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Oil. Venezuela. George W. Grayson, Sadists and
Sycophants. BRV. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Oil, Lago Refinery. Aruba. Bernard Diederich,
Clouds Over Aruba. ART. 14:3 p. 21 (85).
Policy options. Caribbean Basin. Fuat M. Andic,
Efficiency Versus Equity. ART. 13:1 p. 16 (84).
Political economy. Caribbean, Commonwealth.


I







Aaron Segal, A New World Or Old Bargain Town?
BRV. 4:3 p. 32 (72).
Political economy. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
David A. Lake, A Pessimistic Picture. BRV. 14:3 p.
48 (85).
Political economy. Latin America & the Caribbean.
Ben Schneider, Unflattering Analysis. BRV. 16:1
p. 41 (88).
Political economy. Mexico. Jorge Salazar-Carrillo,
Thoughts From a Policy-Maker. BRV. 15:2 p. 46
(86).
Political economy. Puerto Rico. Lawrence C.
Phipps IV, Puerto Rico Without Politics. BRV. 16:2
p. 49 (88).
Sugar. Caribbean Archipelago. Jorge I. Dominguez,
Sugar High. BRV. 7:2 p. 52 (78).
Sugar. Caribbean Archipelago. Arnold K. Ventura,
Technologism. BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Tourism. Caribbean Archipelago. Herbert L. Hiller,
Sun Lust Tourism in the Caribbean. ART. 7:4 p. 12
(78).
Tourism. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Ramash
Ramsaran, The "M" Factor of Tourism. BRV. 7:1
p. 41 (75).
Tourism. Jamaica. Brian J. Hudson, The End of
Paradise. ART. 8:3 p. 32 (79).
Trade relations. Argentina. Anselm Francis, Trade
Tactics. BRV. 14:4 p.48 (85).

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
936. Puerto Rico. Rafael Hernandez Col6n, Puerto
Rico, 936 & the Caribbean. ED. 14:4 p. 3 (85).
Administrative deficiencies. Trinidad. Selwyn
Ryan, A Shortcut to Development? ED. 12:3 p. 3
(83).
Alternatives. Caribbean Archipelago. Rex Nettle-
ford, Definition & Development. ART. 14:3 p. 6
(85).
Alternatives. Caribbean Basin. James Dietz,
Beauty & the Beast. BRV. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
Alternatives. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Terry
McCoy, Postpartum Perils. BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Amazon Basin. South America. William T. Vickers,
Farewell to Amazonia? RES. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
ANCOM. South America. Robert Grosse, A Guide to
the Andean Pact. ART. 10:3 p. 16 (81).
CARICOM. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Mirlande
Hippolyte-Manigat, What Happened in Ocho Rios.
ART. 12:2 p. 10 (83).
CARICOM. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Anthony P.
Gonzales, The Future of CARICOM. ART. 13:4 p.
8 (84).
CARICOM. Caribbean, Commonwealth. June S.
Belkin, CARICOM: Caribbean Community and
Common Market. ART. 13:4 p. 11 (84).
CBI. Caribbean Basin. Richard E. Feinberg, Richard
Newfarmer & Bernadette Orr, The Battle Over The
CB/. ART. 12:2 p. 15 (83).
CBI. Caribbean Basin. Bernardo Vega, The CBI
Faces Adversity. ART. 14:2 p. 18 (85).
CBI. Honduras. Marta Ortiz-Buonafina, The CBI Is
Not Enough. ART. 14:2 p. 20 (85).
Culture & poverty. Latin America. Michael Novak,
Why Latin America Is Poor. ART. 11:3 p. 18 (82).
Culture, role of. Latin America. Lawrence E.
Harrison, Underdevelopment Is A State Of Mind.
ART. 15:4 p. 16 (87).
Culture, role of. Latin America. Daniel H. Levine, If
Only They Could Be More Like Us. RES. 15:4 p.
19 (87).
Debt. Hemisphere. Rt. Hon. Edward Seaga, Toward
Resolving the Debt Crisis. ED. 16:1 p. 3 (88).
Debt. Latin America. Pamela S. Falk, Whatever
Happened to CancOn?ART. 11:3 p. 14 (82).
Debt. Latin America. Belisario Betancur, Cartagena
Proposal, The. ART. 13:3 p. 10 (84).
Debt. Latin America. Robert A. Liff, What Happened
in Cartagena. ART. 13:3 p. 14 (84).
Debt. Mexico. Timothy Heyman, Chronicle of A
Financial Crisis. ART. 12:1 p. 8 (83).
Development models. Jamaica. Peter L. Berger,
Can the Caribbean Learn from East Asia? ART.
13:2 p. 6 (84).
Development recommendations. Jamaica. Byron
White, Jamaica's Economy. BRV. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
Development, agricultural. Caribbean Archi-
pelago. Jean Benoist, West Indian Paysans. BRV.


13:3 p. 53 (84).
Development, philosophies of. Latin America.
Wolfgang A. Luchting, Tired Latin Liberals. ART.
2:1 p. 6 (70).
Development, sociology of. Colombia. Barry B.
Levine, Colombia: Cowboy Country. BRV. 1:2 p.
11 (69).
Development, sociology of. Puerto Rico. Barry B.
Levine, Cultural Tag. BRV. 1:4 p. 2 (69).
Ecological concerns. Latin America. Ellen Cal-
mus, Beefprints. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Economic forecast. Caribbean Archipelago. Aaron
Segal, The Caribbean in the Year 2000. ART. 8:3
p. 4 (79).
Economic inequality. Mexico. Jorge Salazar-
Carrillo, An Old Refrain. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Grassroots efforts. Latin America & the Caribbean.
Linda Miller, A Development Agency with a
Difference. BRV. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Independence, economic. Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. William G. Demas, How To Be
Independent. ART. 6:4 p. 9 (74).
Integration, economic. Caribbean Archipelago.
Thomas Mathews, R.I.R BRV. 4:3 p. 41 (72).
Integration, economic. Caribbean, Common-
wealth. Compton Bourne, The Retreat from Inte-
gration. ED. 14:3 p. 3 (85).
Integration, economic. Central America. Ramesh
Ramsaran, Central American Economic Integra-
tion. BRV. 6:2 p. 47 (74).
Integration, economic. Central America. Bernard
Coard, Central America's Economic Family. ART.
7:1 p. 24 (75).
Integration, economic. Latin America. Ramesh
Ramsaran, Latin American Economic Integration.
BRV. 5:4 p. 41 (73).
Local organizations. Latin America. Forrest D.
Colburn, Enterprising Enclaves. BRV. 14:2 p. 48
(85).
Local organizations. Third World. David Zewig,
Local Yokels. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Marginality, economic. Bahamas. Frank E. Man-
ning, International Eleuthera. BRV. 13:4 p. 49
(84).
Modernization. French Guiana. Frank Sch-
warzbeck, Recycling a Forgotten Colony. ART.
13:2 p. 22 (84).
Moral incentives. Cuba. Irving Louis Horowitz,
Cuban Morality: Ethics & Economics in Cuba.
BRV. 4:4 p. 33 (72).
Overdevelopment. Third World. Anatol Murad,
Kohr's Size Theory. REP. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
Policy issues. Brazil. William T. Vickers, Devel-
opment Without Them. RES. 8:2 p. 50 (79).
Resource exploitation. Latin America. George M.
Guess, On Capitalist Weather. BRV. 13:3 p. 54
(84).
State, role of. Costa Rica. Francisco A. Leguiza-
m6n, Costa Rica & the Beast. BRV. 15:2 p. 45
(86).
Underdevelopment. Third World. Adolfo Leyva,
In-betweenism? BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Underdevelopment, indigenous. Latin America.
Jean-Fran ois Revel, The Trouble with Latin
America. ART. 8:3 p. 13 (79).

GEOPOLITICS
Attidudes towards US. Caribbean Basin. Robert A.
Pastor, Psychological Divide in the Caribbean
Basin. ED. 15:1 p. 3 (86).
Canal treaties. Central America. Robert A. Pastor,
The Canal Treaties. RES. 15:4 p. 22 (87).
Caribbean Basin. Caribbean Basin. Aaron Segal,
Collecting the Caribbean. RES. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Chinese policy. Latin America. Joe Olander, China
& Latin America. BRV. 4:4 p. 35 (72).
Conflict, border. Argentina. Farrokh Jhabvala,
Storm Over Cape Horn. ART. 8:4 p. 12 (79).
Conflict, border. Belize. A. E. Thorndike, Belize
Among Her Neighbors. ART. 7:2 p. 13 (78).
Conflict, border. Chile. Farrokh Jhabvala, Storm
Over Cape Horn. ART. 8:4 p. 12 (79).
Conflict, border. Guyana. Basil A. Ince, Transfer of
Power: British-Style. ART. 1:1 p. 7 (69).
Conflict, border. South America. Farrokh
Jhabvala, Two Hundred Islands of Soledad. ART.
11:3 p. 8 (82).


Conflict, border. Venezuela. Basil A. Ince, Transfer
of Power: British-Style. ART. 1:1 p. 7 (69).
Conflict, ideological. Caribbean Archipelago. H.
Michael Erisman, Caribbean Whirlpool. BRV. 15:3
p. 42 (87).
Conflict, political. Central America. Charles D.
Ameringer, The Thirty Years War Between
Figures & the Somozas. ART. 8:4 p. 4 (79).
Conflict, political. Central America. Richard Millet,
Can We Live with Revolution in Central America?
ART. 10:1 p. 6 (81).
Conflict, political. Central America. Mark B.
Rosenberg, Central America Devastated. ED.
12:2 p. 3 (83).
Conflict, political. Central America. Marvin Alisky,
Central American Sancocho. RES. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
Conflict, political. Central America. Ralph Lee
Woodward, Jr., Dispassionate Conflict. BRV. 14:3
p. 50 (85).
Conflict, political. Dominican Republic. Kal Wa-
genheim, Juan Bosch's New Stance. BRV. 2:1 p.
10 (70).
Conflict, political. El Salvador. Dennis Gilbert, A
Plague of Distrust. BRV. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Conflict, political. Latin America. Jiri Valenta and
Frederick F. Shaheen, Controlling Latin America.
BRV. 14:3 p. 50 (85).
Conflict, political. Latin America. Peter Johnson,
Revolting Conditions. BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Crisis, sociopolitical. Latin America. Ricardo Arias
Calder6n, The Third World of the West. ED. 13:4
p. 3 (84).
Cuban influence. Grenada. Nestor D. Sanchez,
What Was Uncovered in Grenada. ART. 12:4 p.
20 (83).
Cultural perceptions. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Andrbs Serbin, The Nonexistent Caribbean. ED.
14:1 p. 3 (85).
Diplomatic relations. Caribbean Basin. Demetrio
Boersner, Venezuela & the Caribbean. ART. 8:4
p. 8 (79).
Foreign policy. Caribbean Basin. Anthony T.
Bryan, Mexico & the Caribbean. ART. 10:3 p. 4
(81).
Foreign policy. Caribbean, Commonwealth. An-
selm Francis, Small States. BRV. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Foreign policy. Mexico. Carlos Rangel, Mexico and
Other Dominoes. ART. 10:3 p. 8 (81).
Foreign policy. Mexico. Roger Quant, Pithy Poli-
tics. BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
French policy. Latin America. Barry B. Levine, The
French Connection. INT. 11:2 p. 46 (82).
Future possibilities. Grenada. Anthony P. Main-
got, Options for Grenada. ART. 12:4 p. 24 (83).
Geography & politics. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
H. Michael Erisman, Unconventional Geopolitics.
BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Grenadian crisis, major actors. Grenada. Judith
C. Faerron, Dramatis Personae. ART. 12:4 p. 12
(83).
Human rights. Nicaragua. Thomas W. Walker,
Nicaragua & Human Rights. ART. 7:3 p. 24 (78).
Independence. Aruba. George Cvejanovich, Future
Aruba. ART. 14:3 p. 18 (85).
Independence. Jamaica. Anthony John Payne,
Creative Politics. ART. 16:1 p. 4 (88).
Independence movement. Anguilla. Gordon
Lewis, The Anguilla Imbroglio: As Seen From
London. ART. 1:2 p. 2 (69).
Influence, competition for. Latin America & the
Caribbean. Martin C. Needler, Hegemonic Toler-
ance. ART. 11:2 p. 32 (82).
International relations. Caribbean Archipelago.
Aaron Segal, Cuba & the Caribbean. RES. 4:1 p.
40 (72).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. Thomas
Mathews, Puerto Rico & The Caribbean. ART. 5:3
p. 14 (73).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. William
M. LeoGrande, Cuba & Nicaragua. ART. 9:1 p. 11
(80).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. Steve C.
Ropp, Cuba & Panama. ART. 9:1 p. 15 (80).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. Gordon
K. Lewis, On the Limits of the New Cuban
Presence in the Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p. 33 (80).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. Franklin
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /59


I - L -I L


-I -








W. Knight, Toward a New American Presence in
the Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p. 36 (80).
International relations. Caribbean Basin. Dennis
J. Gayle, Caribbean Concepts. BRV. 16:1 p. 40
(88).
International relations. Central America. Daniel
Oduber, Towards a New Central American Dia-
logue. ART. 10:1 p. 10 (81).
International relations. Central America. Ricardo
Arias Calderon, Political Systems as Export
Commodities. ART. 15:1 p. 20 (86).
International relations. Cuba. Ezequiel Ramirez
Novoa, Relations with Cuba. ART. 4:3 p. 22 (72).
International relations. Cuba. Barry B. Levine, The
New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean. ART. 9:1
p. 4 (80).
International relations. Cuba. Anthony P. Maingot,
Cuba & the Commonwealth Caribbean. ART. 9:1
p. 7 (80).
International relations. Cuba. Max Azicri, Cuba
and the US. ART. 9:1 p. 26 (80).
International relations. Cuba. Edward Gonzalez,
Virology of Revolution. RES. 13:2 p. 32 (84).
International relations. Latin America. Gregory B.
Wolfe, Thoughts On A Democratic Consortium.
ED. 11:2 p. 4 (82).
International relations. Latin America. Paul Hol-
lander, Big Stuff. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
International relations. Nicaragua. Mark B. Rosen-
berg, Nicaragua & Her Neighbors. ED. 10:1 p. 4
(81).
International relations. Third World. Joseph Bens-
man & Arthur Vidich, The Struggle for the
Underdeveloped World: I. ART. 2:3 p. 3 (70).
International relations. Third World. Joseph Bens-
man & Arthur Vidich, The Struggle for the
Underdeveloped World: II. ART. 2:4 p. 4 (70).
Invasion, 1965. Dominican Republic. Jorge
Rodriguez Beruff, The Dominican Invasion. RES.
5:4 p. 45 (73).
Invasion, 1965. Dominican Republic. James W.
Nash, What Hath Intervention Wrought. ART. 14:4
p. 7 (85).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Errol Barrow, The Dan-
ger of Rescue Operations. ED. 12:4 p. 3 (83).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Michael Manley, Gre-
nada in the Context of History. ART. 12:4 p. 6 (83).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Otto J. Reich, Com-
mentary on Grenada. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Wayne S. Smith, Com-
mentary on Grenada. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Kai Schoenhals, A
Caribbean Lilliput. RES. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Jorge I. Dominguez,
Grenadian Party Paper. FIC. 15:2 p. 16 (86).
Invasion, 1983. Grenada. Nelson P. Valdes, Report
Redux. FIC. 15:2 p. 21 (86).
Invasion, 1983; press coverage. Grenada. World
Press Review, Press Reaction to the Invasion.
ART. 12:4 p. 33 (83).
Invasion, 1983; press coverage, US. Grenada.
Marian Goslinga, U.S. Press Coverage of Gre-
nada. ART. 12:4 p. 66 (83).
Invasion, 1983; reaction to. Jamaica. Carl Stone,
The Jamaican Reaction. ART. 12:4 p. 31 (83).
Law of the Sea. Bahamas. Lyden 0. Pindling,
Hydrospace & the Law of the Sea. ART. 6:3 p. 6
(74).
Military presence. Cuba. Aaron Segal, Cubans in
Africa. ART. 7:3 p. 4 (78).
Nonaligned Nations Movement. Cuba. H. Michael
Erisman, Cuba's Struggle for Third World Leader-
ship. ART. 8:3 p. 8 (79).
Nonaligned Nations Movement. Cuba. H. Michael
Erisman, Cuba & the Third World. ART. 9:1 p. 26
(80).
Panama Canal treaty. Panama. Ambler H. Moss,
Jr., Insider's View. BRV. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Political economy. Caribbean Archipelago. Joseph
D. Olander, The Caribbean Watchers. RES. 5:1 p.
35 (73).
Political economy. Caribbean Basin. Vaughan A.
Lewis, The US & the Caribbean. ART. 11:2 p. 6
(82).
Political theory. Caribbean Basin. Norman Matlin,
The Myth of Mastery. ART. 9:4 p. 22 (80).
Relations with Central America. Mexico. Nancy
60 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Robinson, Mexico's Southern Neighbors. BRV.
16:2 p. 50 (88).
Research agenda. Caribbean Archipelago. Gordon
K. Lewis, Caribbean in the 1980s. ART. 10:4 p. 18
(81).
Revolution & invasion. Grenada. Barry B. Levine,
Grenada Explodes. ED. 12:4 p. 2 (83).
Revolution, 1979. Grenada. Selwyn Ryan, The
Grenada Questions. ART. 13:3 p. 6 (84).
Revolution, Castro. Cuba. Pedro J. Montiel, On the
Politics of the Cuban Revolution. BRV. 9:1 p. 40
(80).
Revolutionary language. Caribbean Basin. An-
thony P. Maingot, A Time for Straight Talk. ED.
12:1 p. 3 (83).
Shifting alliances. Suriname. Edward Dew, Did
Suriname Switch? ART. 12:4 p. 29 (83).
Socialist International. Latin America. Karl-Ludolf
HObener, The Socialist International & Latin
America. ART. 11:2 p. 38 (82).
Socialist International. Latin America. Carlos Al-
berto Montaner, The Mediation of the Socialist
International. ART. 11:2 p. 42 (82).
Soviet penetration. Cuba. Andrhs Suarez, John
Wayne on Cuba. BRV. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Soviet policy. Latin America. Leon Goure, Russia &
Latin America. BRV. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
Soviet policy. Latin America. Jos6 M. Aybar, On
Gourd's Non-Review. LED. 5:1 p. 2 (73).
Soviet policy. Latin America. Leon Goure, Gourd's
Response: Aybar Expected Too Much. LED. 5:2 p.
2(73).
Soviet policy. Latin America. Leon Gour6, Fear of
the Bear. BRV. 13:4 p. 51 (84).
Sovereignty, national. Cuba. Carlos Alberto Mon-
taner, The Roots of Anti-Americanism in Cuba.
ART. 13:2 p. 13 (84).
Timeline. Grenada. Judith C. Faerron, Chronology
of Events. ART. 12:4 p. 10 (83).
US policy. Caribbean Basin. Amb. Thomas 0.
Enders, A Comprehensive Strategy for the Carib-
bean Basin. ART. 11:2 p. 10 (82).
US policy. Caribbean Basin. Wayne S. Smith, The
Grenada Complex in Central America. ART. 12:4
p. 34 (83).
US policy. Caribbean Basin. Bob Graham, Florida
and the Caribbean. ED. 14:2 p. 3 (85).
US policy. Central America. Thomas W. Walker,
The US & Central America. ART. 8:3 p. 18 (79).
US policy. Central America. Daniel Oduber, The
Dead Are All Ours. ED. 13:2 p. 3 (84).
US policy. Central America. Alexander H. Mclntire,
Jr., Once Too Many. BRV. 15:1 p. 44 (86)..
US policy. Haiti. Robert Maguire, The US & A New
Haiti. ED. 15:3 p. 3 (87).
US policy. Hemisphere. Lynn-Darrell Bender,
Hemispheric Debate. RES. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
US policy. Latin America. Thomas Mathews, The
U.S. & Latin America. BRV. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
US policy. Latin America. William D. Rogers and
Jeffrey A. Meyers, The Reagan Administration
and Latin America. ART. 11:2 p. 14 (82).
US policy. Latin America. Richard R. Fagen, The
Real Clear & Present Danger. ART. 11:2 p. 18
(82).
US policy. Latin America. L. Francis Bouchey,
Reagan Policy: Global Chess or Local Crap
Shooting. ART. 11:2 p. 20 (82).
US policy. Netherlands Antilles. Scott B. Mac-
Donald, Endangering Friendships. ART. 14:3 p.
21 (85).
US policy. Nicaragua. John A. Booth, Rare Bird.
BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
US policy. Nicaragua. Robert A. Pastor, Getting
Your Hands Dirty. ART. 16:2 p. 20 (88).
US policy. Nicaragua. Richard L. Millett, Could
Nicaragua Have Been ODiter-e.i BR. 16:2 p. 24
(88).
US-Cuban relations. Cuba. Irving Louis Horowitz,
Romancing the Dictator. BRV. 16:1 p. 25 (88).
Vulnerability. British Commonwealth. Roy Patman,
Small & Vulnerable. BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
War, ravages of. El Salvador. Neale J. Pearson,
The Good Doctor. BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).


HISTORY
Acculturation. Puerto Rico. Charles H. Allen, First
Annual Report of Charles H. Allen, Governor of
Porto Rico. EXC. 3:1 p. 8 (71).
Albizu Campos, Pedro. Puerto Rico. Benjamin
Torres Ortiz, Don Pedro. BRV. 6:2 p. 43 (74).
Anti-Americanism. Latin America. John J.
Johnson, Yankee Boo-Boos. BRV. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
Black activism. Jamaica. John McCartney, The
Garvey Papers. BRV. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
Creole culture. Jamaica. Ena Campbell, Creole
Jamaica. BRV. 5:2 p. 42 (73).
Culture & politics. Puerto Rico. Olga Jimenez de
Wagenheim, The Dual Colonization of an Island.
BRV. 13:1 p. 31 (84).
Culture & society. Dominican Republic. Har-
mannus Hoetink, Dominican Patrimony. ART. 3:1
p. 6 (71).
Culture & society. Dominican Republic. Anthony P.
Maingot, Structure & Culture in Santo Domingo.
BRV. 5:3 p. 43 (73).
Development, consequences of. Latin America.
Mark D. Szuchman, The Case for Indigenous
Development. BRV. 10:3 p. 28 (81).
Dutch historical writings. Caribbean Archipelago.
Cornelis C. Goslinga, Dutch Details. BRV. 14:2 p.
49 (85).
Gender roles, women. Brazil. Ann Pescatello,
Ladies & Whores in Colonial Brazil. ART. 5:2 p. 26
(73).
Genocide. Brazil. Paul Vidich, Green Hell. BRV. 5:2
p. 31 (73).
Good Neighbor Policy. Latin America. Bryce
Wood, The End of the Good Neighbor Policy.
ART. 11:2 p. 25 (82).
Grito de Lares. Puerto Rico. Olga Jimenez de
Wagenheim, Prelude to Lares. ART. 8:1 p. 39
(79).
Grito de Lares. Puerto Rico. Olga Jim6nez de
Wagenheim, The Drama of Lares. ART. 12:1 p. 22
(83).
Hegemony. Cuba. Pedro J. Montiel, The US and
Cuba, 1880-1934. BRV. 8:1 p. 51 (79).
Historical consciousness. Caribbean Archi-
pelago. Richard Price, An Absence of Ruins?
ART. 14:3 p. 24 (85).
History, political. Cuba. Enrique A. Baloyra, Be-
tween a Rock & a Hard Place. BRV. 13:4 p. 48
(84).
Integration movements. Caribbean Archipelago.
0. Carlos Stoetzer, Dreams of Integration. ART.
7:2 p. 28 (78).
Literature survey. Caribbean Archipelago. Thomas
G. Mathews, Historical Writing in the Caribbean.
ART. 2:3 p. 4 (70).
Literature survey. Caribbean Archipelago. Thomas
Mathews, Caribbean Economic History. ART. 3:1
p. 4 (71).
Manley, Norman. Jamaica. Gordon K. Lewis,
Jamaica's Manley. BRV. 5:2 p. 44 (73).
Marcantonio, Vito. Puerto Rico. Adalberto L6pez,
Vito Marcantonio. ART. 8:1 p. 16 (79).
Media. Haiti. Jean Desquiron, Try to Write...and You
Will See What Happens. ART. 16:2 p. 13 (88).
Mercantilism. Netherlands Antilles. Albert Gast-
mann, Holland's Narrowing Horizon. BRV. 1:1 p.
13 (69).
Mosquito Coast. Nicaragua. Ralph Lee Woodward,
Jr., Mosquito Control. BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Natural disaster, volcanic eruption. Martinique.
Susan Sheinman, Caribbean Inferno. BRV. 1:4 p.
12 (69).
Oil. Mexico. Jerry B. Brown, Oil on the Periphery.
ART. 10:3 p. 12 (81).
Panama Canal. Panama. Mark B. Rosenberg, The
Panamanian Connection. BRV. 7:3 p. 61 (78).
Persecution, religious. Cuba. Bryan 0. Walsh,
One Came To Dinner. ART. 5:3 p. 10 (73).
Pirates. Caribbean Basin. Arthur N. Gilbert, Tales of
the High Seas. BRV. 12:3 p. 34 (83).
Plantation life. Puerto Rico. Roderick A. McDonald,
Raising Cane. BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Plantation life. Trinidad. Frank E. Manning, Planta-
tions & Crime. BRV. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
Political change. Jamaica. Wendell Bell, Remem-
brances of a Jamaica Past. ART. 14:1 p. 5 (85).
Race vs. class. Caribbean Archipelago. Anthony P.


I -








Maingot, The New Caribbean History. BRV. 3:2 p.
2 (71).
Race vs. class. Caribbean Archipelago. Thomas
Mathews, Mathews on Maingot's Bosch. LED. 4:1
p. 54 (72).
Race vs. class. Caribbean Archipelago. Gerard R.
Latortue, Latortue on Maingot's Bosch. LED. 4:1
p. 54 (72).
Race vs. class. Caribbean Archipelago. Anthony P.
Maingot, Maingot's Response: The Old Bosch
Was Better. LED. 4:3 p. 2 (72).
Revolution, 1933. Cuba. Adolfo Leyva, Brief Tri-
umph. BRV. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Revolution, 1933. Cuba. Roberto Leyva pseudd.),
Cuba's Other Revolution. BRV. 5:2 p. 33 (73).
Sandino, Gen. Augusto C. Nicaragua. Salvador
Calder6n Ramirez, The Last Days of Sandino.
EXC. 7:4 p. 4 (78).
Slave emancipation. Cuba. David Kyle, Race and
Revolution. BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Slave resistance. Caribbean Archipelago. Roger
N. Buckley, Culture Against Chains. BRV. 13:4 p.
50 (84).
Slavery. Antigua. Bonham C. Richardson, Invitation
to a Party. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Slavery. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Thomas Car-
lyle, Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question.
REP. 4:1 p. 18 (72).
Slavery. Caribbean, Commonwealth. John Stuart
Mill, The Negro Question. REP. 4:3 p. 24 (72).
Slavery. Caribbean, Commonwealth. H. N. Co-
leridge, Six Months in the West Indies in 1825.
EXC. 5:4 p. 30 (73).
Slavery. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Bonham C.
Richardson, Anniversary Publication. BRV. 15:2
p. 46 (86).
Slavery. Hemisphere. Melvin Drimmer, Slaves as
People. ART. 3:2 p. 5 (71).
Slavery. Jamaica. Gardiner Greene Hubbard, The
Ruin of Jamaica. RES. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Slavery, health. Caribbean Archipelago. Bonham
C. Richardson, Slave Health. BRV. 15:4 p. 42
(87).
Slavery, health. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Her-
man J. Flax, Saving Slaves. BRV. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Social change. Dominican Republic. Thomas
Mathews, Poor DR!BRV. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
Social change. Panama. Neale Pearson, What
Graham Greene Didn't Tell Us. RES. 15:1 p. 26
(86).
Social change. Puerto Rico. Juan Rodriguez Cruz,
A Puerto Rican History of Puerto Rico. BRV. 3:1 p.
14 (71).
Social change. Suriname. Cornelis Ch. Goslinga,
Benign Neglect. BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Social change. Venezuela. Richard Parker, Intel-
ligent History. BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Social classes. Dominican Republic. Harmannus
Hoetink, 19th Century Santo Domingo. ART. 2:4
p. 6 (70).
Social structure. Latin America. Reinhard Bendix,
Weber & Latin America. BRV. 2:4 p. 3 (70).
Social structure. Puerto Rico. Edinburgh Review,
Puerto Rico in 1834. BRV. 2:4 p. 8 (70).
Societies, post-colonial. Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. Harmannus Hoetink, West Indian
Dialogue. BRV. 1:4 p. 6 (69).
Spanish Empire, decline of. Latin America.
Joaquin Roy, The Divided Kingdom. BRV. 15:2 p.
48 (86).
Spanish immigrants. Dominican Republic. Harold
Sims, Civilistas. BRV. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Spanish-American War. Caribbean, Hispanic. Joel
Magruder, So it Wasn't a Picnic. BRV. 1:2 p. 12
(69).
Spanish-American War. Puerto Rico. Edwin Emer-
son, Jr., Alone in Porto Rico. REP. 5:3 p. 18 (73).
Sugar. Dominican Republic. Bruce J. Calder, The
Dominican Turn Toward Sugar. ART. 10:3 p. 18
(81).
Sugar. Trinidad. Ken Boodhoo, Sugar & East Indian
Indentureship in Trinidad. ART. 5:2 p. 17 (73).
Sugar. Trinidad. Charles Kingsley, Coolie Labor in
Trinidad. EXC. 5:2 p. 21 (73).
Survey. Mexico. Lowell Gudmundson, Solid Sur-
vey. BRV. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Testimonial. Antigua. Larry J. Smith, Smith on


Smiths'Smith. BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Transportation. Caribbean Basin. Alfred L. Padula,
Pan Am in the Caribbean. ART. 12:1 p. 24 (83).
US policy. Hemisphere. Lowell Gudmundson,
Resilient Self-Delusion. BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Working class. Guyana. Thomas J. Spinner, Jr.,
When They Worked in Guyana. BRV. 13:2 p. 52
(84).

LITERARY ARTS
Borges, Jorge Luis. Argentina. Jorge Luis Borges,
Game of Chess. POE. 1:3 p. 5 (69).
Braithwaite, Edward Kamau. Barbados. Edward
Kamau Brathwaite, Gods of the Middle Passage.
EXC. 11:4 p. 18 (82).
Carrero, Jaime. Puerto Rico. Jaime Carrero, The
Leper. POE. 3:1 p. 10 (71).
Carrero, Jaime. Puerto Rico. Jaime Carrero, The
Neorican Dream, A Poem. POE. 9:3 p. 34 (80).
Chicanos. Mexico. Tino Villanueva, Pachuco Re-
membered. POE. 3:1 p. 5 (71).
Chicanos. Mexico. Tino Villanueva, Day-Long Day.
POE. 4:4 p. 32 (72).
Childhood fantasies. Puerto Rico. Miguelangel
Rodriguez, Chagito, The Dreamer. SS. 11:3 p. 12
(82).
Cockfighting. Caribbean Archipelago. Dena
Hirsch, The Cockfight. SS. 4:4 p. 15 (72).
Cr6nicas. Brazil. Edilberto Coutinho, Two Brazilian
Short Stories. SS. 8:2 p. 42 (79).
Dario, Ruben. Nicaragua. Rub6n Dario, I Seek a
Form. POE. 1:4 p. 12 (69).
de Andrade, Mario. Brazil. Mario de Andrade,
Landscape 2. POE. 1:4 p. 5 (69).
Displacement. Jamaica. Geoffry Philp, Florida
Bound. POE. 12:1 p. 28 (83).
Displacement. St. Lucia. Augustus C. Small, This
Train. SS. 9:2 p. 24 (80).
Dreams. Mexico. Xavier Villaurrutia, Nocturne of the
Statue. POE. 4:1 p. 30 (72).
Everyday life. Puerto Rico. John Hawes, Re-
membrances of Things Puerto Rican. EXC. 9:3 p.
22 (80).
Fiction, excerpt. Guyana. 0. R. Dathorne, The
Future of Tomorrow. SS. 7:1 p. 28 (75).
Guillen, Nicolas. Cuba. NicolAs Guill6n, El Caribe,
Mujernueva, Cancion puertorriqueia. POE. 5:3 p.
28 (73).
Howes, Barbara. Caribbean Archipelago. Barbara
Howes, Mercedes. POE. 2:4 p. 5 (70).
Mariel exodus. Cuba. Miguel Correa, A Decent
Woman. EXC. 12:3 p. 30 (83).
Marques, Rend. Puerto Rico. Rend Marqubs, Three
Men by the River. SS. 1:4 p. 7 (69).
Marques, Rend. Puerto Rico. Rend Marques, The
Informer. SS. 7:2 p. 24 (78).
Myth. Hispaniola. Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo, A
Taino Tale. ART. 13:4 p. 24 (84).
Myth. Peru. Abraham Valdelomar, Apumarcu, the
Potter. EXC. 2:2 p. 13 (70).
Neruda, Pablo. Chile. Pablo Neruda, Caballero
Solo. POE. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. Chile. Pablo Neruda, "Residence
on Earth." POE. 6:2 p. 32 (74).
Pietri, Pedro. Puerto Rico. Pedro Juan Pietri,
Puerto Rican Obituary. POE. 2:3 p. 14 (70).
P6rez Firmat, Gustavo. Cuba. Gustavo Perez
Firmat, Turning the Times Tables. POE. 15:3 p. 37
(87).
Perez Firmat, Gustavo. Cuba. Gustavo Pbrez
Firmat, Bilingual Blues. POE. 15:3 p. 37 (87).
Race identity. Panama. Carlos Guillermo Wilson,
The Flour Boy. SS. 9:2 p. 25 (80).
Reminiscences. Dominican Republic. Julia Al-
varez, Homecoming. POE. 12:1 p. 30 (83).
Reminiscences. Guyana. 0. R. Dathorne, Poem I.
POE. 6:3 p. 38 (74).
Reminiscences. Guyana. 0. R. Dathorne, Re-
flections on Grandfather from Guyana. EXC. 7:3 p.
32 (78).
Reminiscences. Mexico. Augustin YAbez, The
Lean Lands. EXC. 1:2 p. 8 (69).
Reminiscences. Montserrat. E. A. Markham,
Sugarcake Day. SS. 9:4 p. 36 (80).
Reminiscences. Puerto Rico. John Hawes, The
Islander. EXC. 2:1 p. 2 (70).
Ribeiro, Darcy. Brazil. Darcy Ribeiro, Pieces of


Mule. EXC. 14:4 p. 23 (85).
Sabines, Jaime. Mexico. Jaime Sabines, In the
House of the Day. POE. 2:4 p. 4 (70).
Soto, Pedro Juan. Puerto Rico. Pedro Juan Soto,
The Sniper. EXC. 1:3 p. 3 (69).
St. Vincent, Paul. Antigua. Paul St. Vincent,
Summit. POE. 7:3 p. 60 (78).
Superstitions. Trinidad. Brenda Flanagan,
Shango. SS. 8:4 p. 26 (79).
Sanchez, Luis Rafael. Puerto Rico. Luis Rafael
Sanchez, La Guagua Area/The Airbus. SS. 13:3 p.
26 (84).
Touissaint L'Ouverture. Haiti. John Hawes, Tous-
saint Breda. EXC. 3:2 p. 6 (71).
Travelogue. Caribbean Archipelago. Daniel J.
Crowley, An Aristocratic Briton Views the Twilight
of Empire. BRV. 12:3 p. 36 (83).
Vallejo, C6sar. Peru. C6sar Vallejo, Violence of the
Hours. POE. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Walcott, Derek. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Derek
Walcott, A far cry from Africa. POE. 3:2 p. 4 (71).

LITERARY COMMENTARY
Acculturation. Cuba. Efrain Barradas, Formerly.
BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
African origins. Caribbean, French-speaking.
Marie-Denise Shelton, Africa Revisited. RES. 9:2
p. 33 (80).
Anthology, literary. Dominican Republic. Emilio
Bejel, 1605 Dominican Pages. BRV. 13:4 p. 49
(84).
Anthology, poetry. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Emily M. Belcher, Poetic Permutation. BRV. 15:4
p. 42 (87).
Anthology, short stories. Puerto Rico. Kal Wagen-
heim, Puerto Rican Downpour. BRV. 13:3 p. 53
(84).
Barnet, Miguel. Cuba. Leonel A. de la Cuesta,
Gallego. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Bicultural poetry. Caribbean, Hispanic. Carolina
Hospital, Betwixt & Between. PRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Bissoondath, Neil. Trinidad. Augusta Dwyer, Fu-
ture Fiction. BRV. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Borges, Jorge Luis. Argentina. Kal Wagenheim,
Imaginary Beings & Cronopios. BRV. 2:2 p. 11
(70).
Borges, Jorge Luis. Argentina. J. Raban Bilder,
Borges: Into The Mainstream Via The Back Door.
ART. 4:4 p. 18 (72).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Cuba. J. Raban Bilder,
Three Trapped Tigers. BRV. 4:3 p. 28 (72).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Cuba. J. Raban Bilder,
Interviewing Cabrera Infante. INT. 6:4 p. 17 (74).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Cuba. Cruz Her-
nandez, Oh, You Sexy Kid You. BRV. 9:4 p. 40
(80).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Cuba. Donald Gwynn
Watson, Apolitical Fiction in a Political World.
RES. 13:3 p. 30 (84).
Cardenal, Ernesto. Nicaragua. Aaron Segal, Po-
etry & Politics in Nicaragua. RES. 10:1 p. 26 (81).
Chamorro, Pedro Joaquin. Nicaragua. Grafton
Conliffe & Thomas W. Walker, The Literary Works
of Pedro Joaquin Chamorro. ART. 7:4 p. 46 (78).
Children's fiction. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Joann Biondi, Sweet Temptation. BRV. 15:3 p. 43
(87).
Clarke, Austin C. Barbados. Harry T. Antrim,
Paradise Is In The Mind. BRV. 8:4 p. 38 (79).
Cortazar, Julio. Argentina. Kal Wagenheim, Imag-
inary Beings & Cronopios. BRV. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Cortazar, Julio. Argentina. Gerald Guinness, A
Manual for Manuel. BRV. 8:3 p. 40 (79).
Endangered species. Guatemala. Gilbert B.
Snyder, Political Ornithology. BRV. 16:1 p. 38
(88).
Figueroa, John. Caribbean, Commonwealth. J.
Raban Bilder, London Knows, Do You? BRV. 4:1
p. 24 (72).
Figueroa, John. Caribbean, Commonwealth. St.
George Tucker Arnold, Jr., A Celebration of
Caribbean Color. BRV. 7:3 p. 54 (78).
Fuentes, Carlos. Mexico. Roy Pateman, Weary
Traveler. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Garcia M6rquez, Gabriel. Caribbean Basin.
Ram6n Mendoza, A Caribbean Carnival of Abun-
dance. BRV. 7:2 p. 38 (78).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /61








Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Colombia. Eneid Routt6
Gomez, 100 Years of Solitude. BRV. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
Gender roles, women. Caribbean Basin. Richard
Dwyer, Caribbean Eve. BRV. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
Glissant, Edouard. Martinique. Lauren W. Yoder, A
Caribcentric View of the World. RES. 10:3 p. 24
(81).
Guillen, Nicolas. Cuba. Florence L. Yudin, The
Great Zoo. BRV. 5:3 p. 30 (73).
Haitian novels. Haiti. Leon Fran.oi? Hoffman, The
Originality of the Haitian 'ic -' : T. 8:1 p. 44
(79).
Hemingway, Ernest. Cuba. Barry B. Levine, The
End of the Search. INT. 10:3 p. 22 (81).
Lamming, George. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Janet Butler, The Existentialism of George Lam-
ming. ART. 11:4 p. 15 (82).
Literature & politics. Mexico. Edward J. Mullen,
Paz & Fuentes: How Close? ART. 6:2 p. 27 (74).
Literature survey. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Eu-
gene V. Mohr, West Indian Fiction is Alive and
Well. RES. 5:4 p. 23 (73).
Literature survey. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Richard Dwyer. Caribbean Textuality. ART. 11:4
p. 12 (82).
Literature survey. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Eu-
gene V. Mohr, The Pleasures of West Indian
Writing. ART. 11:4 p. 13 (82).
Literature survey. Cuba. Florence L. Yudin, Casa
de las Americas, Whose Home? ART. 6:3 p. 33
(74).
Literature survey. Haiti. Yvette Gindine, The Magic
of Black History: Images of Haiti. ART. 6:4 p. 25
(74).
Literature survey. Haiti. Leon-Frangois Hoffman,
Slavery & Race in Haitian Letters. RES. 9:2 p. 28
(80).
Literature survey. Haiti. Felix Morisseau-Leroy, A
Source of Human Experience. BRV. 14:3 p. 49
(85).
Literature survey. Latin America. Ian I. Smart, Dual
Identity. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Mistral, Gabriela. Chile. Barry Wallenstein, Chile:
Poetry & Anti-Poetry. RES. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Mittelholzer, Edgar. Guyana. John Thieme, Catch-
ing Mullet & Chasing Shadows. RES. 8:4 p. 36
(79).
Morality tales. Trinidad. John Cooke, Requiem for
a Pen Name. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Naipaul, Shiva. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Eric
Lott, The Chronic Caribbean. BRV. 14:4 p. 51
(85).
Naipaul, V.S. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Nana
Wilson-Tagoe, No Place. ART. 9:2 p. 37 (80).
Naipaul, V.S. Trinidad. John Thieme, Naipauliana.
BRV. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
Naipaul, V.S. Trinidad. Gerald Guinness, The Black
Power Killings in Trinidad. BRV. 10:2 p. 36 (81).
Naipaul, V.S. Trinidad. Robert D. Hamner, A New
Naipaul? BRV. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Neruda, Pablo. Chile. Barry Wallenstein, Neruda in
English. BRV. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. Chile. Florence L. Yudin, Earth
Words. BRV. 6:2 p. 38 (74).
Novels, French Caribbean. Caribbean, French-
speaking. L6on-Frangois Hoffmann, More Than
Language. BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Old age. Guyana. L. P. Fletcher, Benign Neglect.
BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Oral vs. written traditions. Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. Kenneth Ramchand, The Fate of
Writing in the West Indies. ART. 11:4 p. 16 (82).
Padilla, Herberto. Cuba. Roland E. Bush, Requiem
for the Artist. BRV. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Panama Canal zone. Panama. Luis M. Quesada,
Panama Wounded. BRV. 13:1 p. 39 (84).
Parra, Nicanor. Chile. Barry Wallenstein, Chile:
Poetry & Anti-poetry RES. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Pietri, Pedro. Puerto Rico. Barry Wallenstein,
Pedro Pietri. RES. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Proverbs. Caribbean, Commonwealth. G. Llewellyn
Watson, If Crab Walk... BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Race identity. Panama. lan I. Smart, Big Rage &
Big Romance. RES. 8:3 p. 34 (79).
Race relations. Panama. Mirna Perez-Venero, A
Novelist's Erotic Racial Revenge. ART. 4:4 p. 24
(72).
62 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Reference. Caribbean Archipelago. Ian I. Smart,
Discovering the Caribbean. RES. 10:3 p. 32 (81).
Reference. Haiti. Le6n-Frangois Hoffmann, The
Incomplete Haitiana. BRV. 12:2 p. 30 (83).
Reference. Latin America. Dennis West, Latin
Talkies. BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Revolution & art. Chile. Fernando Alegria, Litera-
ture & Revolution in Chile. ART. 5:2 p. 13 (73).
Revolution & myth. Cuba. Leonel de la Cuesta,
Devil's Geography. BRV. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Rhys, Jean. Dominica. Roy Pateman, Old White
Jumby. BRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Sarduy, Severo. Cuba. Rafael Ocasio, Raptures
and Recuperaciones. BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Short stories. Cuba. Guillermo S. Edelberg,
Bergman On The Beach. BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Soto, Pedro Juan. Cuba. Carlos Alberto Montaner,
Tropical Hamlet. BRV. 2:2 p. 12 (70).
Testimonial literature. Cuba. Barry B. Levine,
Miguel Barnet on the Testimonial. INT. 9:4 p. 32
(80).
Toussaint L'Ouverture. Martinique. Felix Mo-
risseau-Leroy, Slaying the Dragon. BRV. 14:1 p.
49 (85).
Travelogue. Ecuador. Barry Wallenstein, Infinity.
BRV. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
Vallejo, Cesar. Peru. Barry Wallenstein, Human
Poems. BRV. 1:3 p. 11 (69).
Vargas Llosa, Mario. Peru. Kal Wagenheim, Mario
Vargas Llosa. INT. 1:1 p. 3 (69).
Vargas Llosa, Mario. Peru. Ram6n Mendoza, A
Sling Shot at the Soap Giant. BRV. 8:2 p. 45 (79).
Walcott, Derek. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Rich-
ard Dwyer, One Walcott. ART. 11:4 p. 14 (82).
Walcott, Derek. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Robert D. Hamner, Ambiguity Without Crisis.
PRV. 16:2 p. 51 (88).
Walcott, Derek. St. Lucia. John J. Figueroa,
Another Life. BRV. 7:1 p. 30 (75).
Walcott, Derek. St. Lucia. John Thieme, Gnarled
Sour Grapes. BRV. 7:4 p. 51 (78).

MIGRATION
Barbadians in Panama. Barbados. Bonham C.
Richardson, Go West Young Man. ART. 14:2 p. 10
(85).
Brain drain. Suriname. Edward Dew, The Draining
of Surinam. ART. 5:4 p. 8 (73).
Caribbean exodus. Caribbean Basin. Barry B.
Levine, Surplus Populations. ED. 11:1 p. 4 (82).
Caribbean exodus. Caribbean Basin. Gary P.
Freeman, Caribbean Migration to Britain and
France. ART. 11:1 p. 30 (82).
Caribbean exodus. Caribbean Basin. Frances
Henry, A Note on Caribbean Migration to Canada.
ART. 11:1 p. 38 (82).
Caribbean exodus. Caribbean, Dutch. Frank Bov-
enkerk, Caribbean Migration to the Netherlands.
ART. 11:1 p. 34 (82).
Civil war, flight from. Central America. Guy
Gughi.:.r a, The Central American Exodus. ART.
11:1 p. 26 (82).
Cuban exiles. Cuba. Luis P. Salas, The Traumas of
Exile. BRV. 9:1 p. 42 (80).
Diaspora, Haitian. Haiti. Thomas D. Boswell, The
New Haitian Diaspora. ART. 11:1 p. 18 (82).
Diaspora, Haitian. Haiti. Christian A. Girault, The
Haitian Diaspora. ART. 16:2 p. 14 (88).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. Puerto Rico. Barry B.
Levine, The System is Upstairs. EXC. 9:3 p. 36
(80).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. Puerto Rico. Miguel
Barnet, A Man & his Potential. BRV. 9:3 p. 40 (80).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. Puerto Rico. Helen 1.
Safa, A Tale of Wit & Woe. BRV. 9:3 p. 41 (80).
Emigration to Europe. Caribbean Archipelago.
Nancy Robinson, Why Migrate. BRV. 16:1 p. 41
(88).
Immigration to New York. Puerto Rico. Eugene V.
Mohr, Remembrances of New York. BRV. 10:4 p.
34(81).
Immigration to US. Latin America. Alejandro
Portes, Notes on the Reconquest. ART. 12:3 p. 22
(83).
Kleptocracy, flight from. Haiti. Alex Stepick, The
New Haitian Exodus. ART. 11:1 p. 14 (82).
Labor migration. Caribbean Basin. Franklin W.


Knight, Who Needs a Guest Worker Program?
ART. 11:1 p. 46 (82).
Labor migration. Dominican Republic. Marcy Fink,
A Dominican Harvest of Shame. ART. 8:1 p. 34
(79).
Labor migration. Dominican Republic. Paul R.
Latortue, Neoslavery in the Cane Fields. ART.
14:4 p. 18 (85).
Labor migration. Puerto Rico. James W. Wess-
man, The Puerto Rican Circuit. BRV. 9:3 p. 42
(80).
Labor migration. USVI. Gordon K. Lewis, Romans,
Natives & Helots. ART. 2:1 p. 3 (70).
Labor migration. USVI. Mark J. Miller & William W.
Boyer, Foreign Workers in the USVI. ART. 11:1 p.
48 (82).
Labor repressive mechanisms. Hispaniola. Paul
R. Latortue, Haitian Neo-Slavery in Santo Dom-
ingo. BRV. 11:3 p. 36 (82).
Marielitos. Cuba. Siro del Castillo, A Plea to
Destigmatize Mariel. ART. 13:4 p. 7 (84).
Migrant women. Puerto Rico. Virginia Sanchez
Korrol, On the Other Side of the Ocean. ART. 8:1
p. 22 (79).
Migrant women. Puerto Rico. Virginia E. SAnchez
Korrol, Between Two Worlds. ART. 12:3 p. 26
(83).
Migration, history of. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Dawn I. Marshall, The History of Caribbean
Migrations. ART. 11:1 p. 6 (82).
Migration, motivations for. Cuba. Robert L. Bach,
The New Cuban Exodus. ART. 11:1 p. 22 (82).
Migration, social psychology of. Caribbean, Com-
monwealth. Charles V. Carnegie, Strategic Flexi-
bility in the West Indies. ART. 11:1 p. 10 (82).
Puerto Ricans in New York. Puerto Rico. Edna
Acosta-Belbn, Rican Richness. BRV. 14:1 p. 51
(85).
Racial consciousness. USVI. Eric W. Blake,
Stranger in Paradise. ART. 6:2 p. 8 (74).
Refugees. El Salvador. Kathy Barber Hersh,
Sanctuary for Central Americans. ART. 12:1 p. 16
(83).
Refugees, Haitian. Haiti. Alejandro Portes, Bring-
ing Misery Along? BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
St. Kitts & Nevis. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Alex
Stepick, Ideology of Migration. BRV. 16:1 p. 39
(88).
US immigration policy. Caribbean Basin. Terry L.
McCoy, A Primer for US Policy on Caribbean
Emigration. ART. 8:1 p. 10 (79).
US immigration policy. Cuba. Mario A. Rivera,
Refugee Chess. ART. 13:4 p. 5 (84).
US immigration policy. Third World. Alejandro
Portes, The Reality of Immigration Reform. ED.
15:4 p. 3 (87).
Venezuela, migration to. Caribbean Basin. Andres
Serbin, The Venezuelan Reception. ART. 11:1 p.
42 (82).

PERFORMING ARTS/COMMENTARY
Alonzo, Alicia. Cuba. Aaron Segal, Dance and
Diplomacy. ART. 9:1 p. 30 (80).
Calypso. Trinidad. Linden Lewis, The Mighty
Shadow. ART. 10:4 p. 20 (81).
Culture & poverty ("Children of Sanchez").
Mexico. Eugene L. Komrad, Lewis's Novela. CRV.
8:1 p. 54 (79).
Dance. Latin America & the Caribbean. Peggo
Cromer, National Dances of the Caribbean and
Latin America. ART. 6:3 p. 26 (74).
Dance. Montserrat. Jay D. Dobbin, A Jombee
Dance. ART. 10:4 p. 28 (81).
Exile ("El Super"). Cuba. Alonso Alegria, El Super.
CRV. 8:2 p. 54 (79).
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel ("Erendira"). Colombia.
Aaron Segal, "Si Abuela..." CRV. 13:4 p. 34 (84).
Gender roles, women ("Lucia"). Cuba. Oliva M.
Espin, Lucia. CRV. 6:4 p. 36 (74).
Guevara, Ernesto ("Che"). Cuba. Robert Fried-
man, Che. Hmm. CRV. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Human rights ("Perro de Alambre"). Cuba.
Marcia Morgado, Perro de Alambre. CRV. 9:4 p.
42 (80).
Legendary figure. Mexico. Tombs Rivera, A Clash
of Cultures. CRV. 12:3 p. 32 (83).
Marley, Bob. Jamaica. Kamla Lewis, Sociobi-


-I II-


I- -








ography. BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Migration ("El Norte"). Guatemala. Christina
Bruce, For the American Dream. CRV. 13:3 p. 37
(84).
Music & politics. Jamaica. Jay S. Kaufman, Music
& Politics in Jamaica. ART. 15:3 p. 9 (87).
Music & politics. Puerto Rico. Francis Schwartz,
The Bureaucracy of Music in Puerto Rico. ART.
9:3 p. 19 (80).
Music, Afro-Cuban. Cuba. Roberto Nodal, The
Sacred Drums of the Lucumi. ART. 7:2 p. 20 (78).
Musical instruments. Caribbean Archipelago.
Donald Thompson, Poor Man's Bass Fiddle. ART.
3:1 p. 11 (71).
Picaresque tale ("The Harder They Come").
Jamaica. Julianne Burton, The Harder They
Come. CRV. 7:2 p. 33 (78).
Plantation life ("Sugar Cane Alley"). Martinique.
Deborah Kanter, Plantation Society. CRV. 14:1 p.
32 (85).
Rastafarians ("The Land of Look Behind").
Jamaica. Aaron Segal, The Land of Look Behind.
CRV. 12:2 p. 36 (83).
Reggae. Jamaica. Alan Greenberg, Reggae In-
ternational. BRV. 12:2 p. 32 (83).
Reggae ("Rockers"). Jamaica. Aaron Segal, Rock-
ers. CRV. 10:2 p. 38 (81).
Revolutionary consciousness, obstacles to ("De
Cierta Manera"). Cuba. Dennis West, One Way
or Another. CRV. 8:3 p. 42 (79).
Theatre. Netherlands Antilles. Johannes Baptist de
Caluwb, Drama Writing in Papiamentu. ART. 8:4
p. 33 (79).

POLITICAL PROCESSES/STRUCTURES
Authoritarianism. Suriname. Gary Brana-Shute,
Politicians in Uniform. ART. 10:2 p. 24 (81).
Balaguer, Joaquin. Dominican Republic. Peter R.
Greiff, Caribbean Swan Song. ART. 15:3 p. 17
(87).
Betancur, Belisario. Colombia. Gary Hoskin, Co-
lombia Under Stress. ART. 15:1 p. 6 (86).
Betancur, Belisario. Colombia. Bernard Diederich,
Betancur's Battles. ART. 15:1 p. 10 (86).
Bishop, Maurice. Grenada. Carl Henry Feuer, Was
Bishop A Social Democrat? BRV. 12:4 p. 37 (83).
Bonaire. Netherlands Antilles. Dennis Conway, Big
Theories, Small Island. BRV. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Burnham, Forbes. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Gordon Lewis, An Anatomy of Caribbean Vanity.
BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
Burnham, Forbes. Guyana. Thomas J. Spinner,
Jr., The Emperor Burnham Has Lost His Clothes.
ART. 9:4 p. 4 (80).
Burnham, Forbes. Guyana. Thomas J. Spinner,
Jr., Guyana Update. ART. 11:4 p. 8 (82).
Castro, Fidel. Cuba. Carlos Alberto Montaner,
Twenty Years After the Cuban Revolution. ART.
8:1 p. 4 (79).
Christian Democratic Party. Latin America. Ri-
cardo Arias Calder6n, The Christian Democrats in
Latin America. ART. 11:2 p. 34 (82).
Confederation. Hispaniola. Pierre L. Hudicourt,
Prejudice & Paranoia. BRV. 14:4 p. 21 (85).
Conflict, political. Central America. Irving Louis
Horowitz, Passion & Compassion. ART. 14:1 p. 23
(85).
Conflict, political. Colombia. Ricardo Santamaria
Salamanca & Gabriel Silva LujAn, Colombia in the
Eighties. ART. 15:1 p. 12 (86).
Conflict, political. Cuba. Justo Carrillo, Could
Cuba Have Been Different? BRV. 10:4 p. 38 (81).
Conflict, political. El Salvador. Ambassador
Robert White, In Defense of the Junta. ART. 10:1
p. 30 (81).
Conflict, political. El Salvador. Guillermo Manuel
Ungo, In Defense of the Frente Democratico.
ART. 10:1 p. 34 (81).
Conflict, political. El Salvador. Luis Escalante
Arce, In Defense of Restoring Constitutional
Order. ART. 10:1 p. 35 (81).
Conflict, political. Guatemala. Rafael Garzaro,
Guatemala: Occupied Country. BRV. 1:3 p. 7 (69).
Conflict, political. Haiti. Jorge Heine, Transition to
Nowhere. ART. 16:2 p. 4 (88).
Conflict, political. Haiti. Jean-Claude Bajeux, The
Little Game of January 17th. ART. 16:2 p. 7 (88).


Conflict, political. Honduras. Mark B. Rosenberg,
Honduran Scorecard. ART. 12:1 p. 12 (83).
Conflict, political. Puerto Rico. Tomas Stella,
Cerro Maravilla. ART. 9:3 p. 12 (80).
Conflict, political. Puerto Rico. Pedro Juan Soto,
Fiction or Reality. ART. 9:3 p. 15 (80).
Conflict, political. Suriname. Edward Dew, Suri-
name Tar Baby. ART. 12:1 p. 4 (83).
Conflict, political. Suriname. Gary Brana-Shute,
Suriname Surprises. ART. 15:4 p. 4 (87).
Conflict, political. Trinidad. Ken Boodhoo, A Little
Black Book.. BRV. 5:1 p. 42 (73).
Constitutional law. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Gordon K. Lewis, In Re: The West Indies. BRV.
7:2 p. 49 (78).
Contradictions, inherent. Nicaragua. Forrest D.
Colburn, Theory & Practice in Nicaragua. ART.
12:3 p. 6 (83).
Cooperation, international. Caribbean Ar-
chipelago. Basil A. Ince, The Caribbean Com-
missions. BRV. 4:3 p. 36 (72).
Counterrevolution. Grenada. Bernard Diederich,
Interviewing George Louison. INT. 12:4 p. 17 (83).
Coup d'etat, 1979. Suriname. Edward Dew, The
Year of the Sergeants. ART. 9:2 p. 4 (80).
Culture of politics. Puerto Rico. C. Albizu-Miranda
and Norman Matlin, Mascaras y Vejigantes: The
Folklore of Puerto Rican Politics. ART. 1:2 p. 5
(69).
Democratic left. Caribbean Basin. Charles D.
Ameringer, The Tradition of Democracy in the
Caribbean. ART. 11:2 p. 28 (82).
Development, impediments to. Chile. Louis Wolf
Goodman, Chile's Past Malaise? RES. 3:2 p. 14
(71).
Duvalier regime. Haiti. Jean-Claude Garcla-Zamor,
Papadocracy. BRV. 2:1 p. 8 (70).
Duvalier regime. Haiti. G6rard R. Latortue, Chair-
man Duvalier. BRV. 2:1 p. 9 (70).
Duvalier regime. Haiti. William Paley pseudd.),
Haiti's Dynastic Despotism. ART. 13:1 p. 13 (84).
Duvalier regime. Haiti. Lbon-Frangois Hoffmann,
Bye Bye Baby. BRV. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Elections, 1968. Puerto Rico. Charlie Albizu and
Norman Matlin, The Death of Poetry. ART. 1:1 p. 2
(69).
Elections, 1973. Suriname. Edward Dew, Elections
Surinam Style. ART. 6:2 p. 20 (74).
Elections, 1979-80. Caribbean Archipelago. Barry
B. Levine, The Status of Democracy in the
Caribbean. ED. 10:2 p. 4 (81).
Elections, 1980. Dominica. Robert A. Michaels,
Changing the Guard in Dominica. ART. 10:2 p. 18
(81).
Elections, 1980. Guyana. Lord Avebury & the
British Parliamentary Human Rights Group,
Guyana's 1980 Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 8 (81).
Elections, 1980. Jamaica. Carl Stone, Jamaica's
1980 Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 5 (81).
Elections, 1980. Puerto Rico. Ismaro Velazquez,
Munoz & the 1980 Elections in Puerto Rico. ART.
9:3 p. 7 (80).
Elections, 1980. Puerto Rico. Harold Lidin, Puerto
Rico's 1980 Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 28 (81).
Elections, 1982. Caribbean Basin. Don Bohning,
Juan 0. Tomayo & Bernard Diederich, The
Springtime of Elections. ART. 11:3 p. 4 (82).
Elections, 1984. Grenada. Anthony P. Maingot,
Politics Caribbean Style. ART. 14:2 p. 4 (85).
Elections, 1984. Nicaragua. James M. Malloy,
Nicaragua's Uncertain Political Future. ART. 14:1
p. 18 (85).
Elections, 1984. Panama. Steve C. Ropp, Nice
Show! BRV. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
Elections, 1986. Dominican Republic. Jonathan
Hartlyn, A Democratic Shoot-Out in the D.R. ART.
15:3 p. 14 (87).
Elections, 1986. Jamaica. Bernard D. Headley, A
Contest that Became A Referendum. ART. 15:3 p.
13 (87).
Elections, 1986. Trinidad. Kevin A. Yelvington,
Vote Dem Out. ART. 15:4 p. 8 (87).
Electoral democracy. Trinidad. Selwyn Ryan, The
Church That Williams Built. ART. 10:2 p. 12 (81).
Fraud. Guyana. Edward Dew, That Was the Way It
Wasn't. BRV. 16:1 p. 43 (88).
Freedom of the press. Nicaragua. Beatriz Parga


de Bay6n, Freedom of the Press in Nicaragua.
INT. 12:1 p. 20 (83).
Gairy, Eric. Grenada. Milton Pab6n, The Hero and
the Crowd. BRV. 1:2 p. 13 (69).
Guardia Nacional. Nicaragua. Neill Macaulay,
Guardians of the Dynasty. BRV. 7:3 p. 30 (78).
Guerrilla lifestyle. El Salvador. Mark Fazlollah,
Behind the Lines. ART. 12:2 p. 6 (83).
Guerrillas. Latin America. Luis Mercier Vega,
Guerrillas in Latin America. EXC. 2:3 p. 9 (70).
History, political. Dominican Republic. Ian Bell,
Bruised Apples. BRV. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
Jagan, Cheddi. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Gor-
don K. Lewis, An Anatomy of Caribbean Vanity.
BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
Labor organization. Caribbean Basin. Steve Char-
novitz, Varieties of Labor Organization. ART. 14:2
p. 14 (85).
Manigat & Latortue. Haiti. Barry B. Levine, After
the Fall. INT. 16:2 p. 8 (88).
Manley, Michael & Edward Seaga. Jamaica.
Richard S. Hillman, Jamaica's Political Leaders.
INT. 8:3 p. 28 (79).
Manley, Michael & Edward Seaga. Jamaica. Carl
Stone, Running Out Of Options in Jamaica. ART.
15:3 p. 10 (87).
Militarization of. Cuba. Jose Arsenio Torres,
Military Cuba? BRV. 4:1 p. 36 (72).
Military. Mexico. Edward J. Williams, Mexico's
Modern Military. ART. 10:4 p. 12 (81).
Military. Peru. Jorge Rodriguez Beruff, 100 Years of
Military. BRV. 5:1 p. 44 (73).
Mitchell, James F. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Gary Brana-Shute, An Eastern Caribbean Cen-
trist. INT. 14:4 p. 27 (85).
Mutiny, 1970. Trinidad. Anthony P. Maingot, Three
Rebellious Lieutenants. BRV. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Mufioz Marin, Luis. Puerto Rico. Gordon K. Lewis,
A Puritan in Babylon. BRV. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Mufioz Marin, Luis. Puerto Rico. Gordon K. Lewis,
Requiem for a Lost Leader. ART. 9:3 p. 5 (80).
Natural disaster, response to. Mexico. George W.
Grayson, Tecnicos vs. Politicos. ART. 15:4 p. 20
(87).
NJM minutes. Grenada. Barry B. Levine, ed.,
Alienation of Leninist Group Therapy. EXC. 12:4
p. 14 (83).
OAS. Hemisphere. Francis X. Gannon, Will the OAS
Live To Be 100? ART. 13:4 p. 12 (84).
Opinion poll, 1982. Jamaica. Carl Stone, Seaga Is
In Trouble. ART. 11:4 p. 4 (82).
Opposition, role of. Caribbean, Commonwealth.
Anthony P. Maingot, Role of the Opposition in the
Caribbean. ART. 7:4 p. 22 (78).
Opposition, role of. El Salvador. Guillermo Ungo,
The Role of the Opposition in El Salvador. ART.
8:2 p. 22 (79).
Opposition, role of. Guyana. Cheddi Jagan, The
Role of the Opposition in Guyana. ART. 7:4 p. 37
(78).
Opposition, role of. Guyana. Bishwaishwar
Ramsaroop, The Opposition in Guyana-A Re-
sponse. ART. 8:2 p. 28 (79).
Opposition, role of. Jamaica. Edward Seaga, The
Role of the Opposition in Jamaica. ART. 7:4 p. 27
(78).
Opposition, role of. Jamaica. Janis Johnson and
Robert A. Rankin, Interviewing Michael Manley.
INT. 11:3 p. 26 (82).
Opposition, role of. St. Vincent. Gary Brana-Shute,
Interviewing James F. "Son" Mitchell. INT. 12:3 p.
10 (83).
Opposition, role of. Trinidad. Basdeo Panday, The
Role of the Opposition in Trinidad & Tobago. ART.
7:4 p. 31 (78).
Pastora, Eden. Nicaragua. Beatriz Pargade Bay6n,
Interviewing Eden Pastora. INT. 11:3 p. 30 (82).
Peila G6mez, Jose Francisco. Dominican Re-
public. Mark B. Rosenberg, Interviewing Peha
Gdmez. INT. 9:4 p. 10 (80).
PNM. Trinidad. J. E. Greene, The Party's Over.
ART. 15:4 p. 13 (87).
PNP. Jamaica. Evelyne Huber & John D. Stephens,
Manley Prepares to Return. ART. 16:2 p. 16 (88).
PNP. Jamaica. Howard Handelman, Manley's Ja-
maica. BRV. 16:2 p. 41 (88).
Police, modernization of. Caribbean, Com-
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /63


I I


L -I








monwealth. Bernard Diederich, The End of West
Indian Innocence. ART. 13:2 p. 10 (84).
Political economy. Costa Rica. Samuel Stone,
Costa Rica's Political Turmoil. ART. 10:1 p. 42
(81).
Political economy. Costa Rica. John P. Harrison,
The Tidy Tico Way. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Political economy. Cuba. Armando Bengochea,
Sacrificial Equality. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Political economy. Dominican Republic. Richard
C. Kearney, Dominican Update. ART. 14:4 p. 12
(85).
Political parties. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Pat-
rick Emmanuel, Elections & Parties in the Eastern
Caribbean. ART. 10:2 p. 14 (81).
Political prisoners. Cuba. Jorge Dominguez,
Cuba's Inhumanity Towards Cubans. BRV. 16:1 p.
24 (88).
Political stability. Honduras. James A. Morris,
Honduras. ART. 10:1 p. 38 (81).
Political tourism. Nicaragua. Alfred Padula, Ritual,
Paradox & Death in Managua. ART. 15:1 p. 18
(86).
Popular Democratic Party. Puerto Rico. Thomas
Mathews, PDP + NPP = A*pa*thy. ART. 9:3 p. 9
(80).
Race relations. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Ken I.
Boodhoo, The Case of the Missing Majority. ART.
6:2 p. 3 (74).
Sandinistas. Nicaragua. Sergio Ramirez, What the
Sandinistas Want. ART. 8:3 p. 24 (79).
Sandinistas. Nicaragua. Stephen Gorman, Sandin-
ista Chess. ART. 10:1 p. 14 (81).
Sandinistas. Nicaragua. Carlos M. Vilas, The
Legacy of Dictatorship: Nicaragua. RES. 11:3 p.
34 (82).
Seaga, Edward. Jamaica. Stephen Davis, Ja-
maican Politics, Economics & Culture. INT. 10:4 p.
14 (81).
Social change. Chile. T.V. Sathyamurthy, Will
Allende Make It? ART. 4:1 p. 7 (72).
Social change. Honduras. Thomas P. Anderson,
What Debate? BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Socialization, political. Guatemala. David Bray,
Learning About Politics. BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Somoza. Nicaragua. Bernard Diederich, Did
Human Rights Kill Anastasio Somoza? EXC. 10:4
p. 4 (81).
Spadafora, Hugo. Panama. Beatriz Parga de
Bay6n, An Interview with Hugo Spadafora. INT.
15:1 p. 24 (86).
State, legitimation of. Haiti. Barry B. Levine, The
S r,itg Sands of Haitian Legitimacy. ED. 16:2 p. 3
(88).
State, military control of. Guatemala. Virginia C.
Garrard, Popular Progressives. BRV. 15:4 p. 43
(87).
Status, political. Caribbean Archipelago. Thomas
Mathews, What Ever Happened to Polarization in
the Caribbean. ART. 5:1 p. 26 (73).
Status, political. Caribbean, French-speaking. Ger-
ard R. Latortue, French West Indian Autonomy.
ART. 2:2 p. 8 (70).
Status, political. Caribbean, French-speaking.
Aaron Segal, Which Way the French West Indies?
BRV. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
Status, political. Caribbean, French-speaking.
Scott B. MacDonald & Albert L. Gastmann,
Mitterrand's Headache. ART. 13:2 p. 18 (84).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Norman Matlin, Left,
Center, Right. BRV. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Garry Hoyt, Puerto
Rico: A Chronicle of American Carelessness.
ART. 8:2 p. 9 (79).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Rub6n Berrios
Martinez, Independence For Puerto Rico: The
Only Solution. ART. 8:2 p. 15 (79).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Jaime Benitez, A
Response to Berrios. ART. 8:2 p. 21 (79).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Jos6 J. Villamil, The
Status Soap Opera. ED. 13:1 p. 3 (84).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Juan M. Garcia-
Passalacqua, Puerto Rico: Equality or Freedom?
ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Roberto SAnchez
Vilella, Puerto Rico & the U.S. ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. Maurice Wolf, Break-
64 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


ing the Puerto Rico Logjam. ART. 14:3 p. 30 (85).
Status, political. Puerto Rico. James L. Dietz,
Stuck on Status. RES. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Status, political. Suriname. Robert H. Manley,
Surinam Politics. BRV. 1:1 p. 12 (69).
Status, political. Trinidad. Selwyn Ryan, Tobago's
Quest for Autonomy ART. 14:2 p. 7 (85).
Status, political. USVI. Gordon K. Lewis, Which
Way the U.S. Virgin Islands?ART. 5:4 p. 16 (73).
Status, political. USVI. S. B. Jones-Hendrickson,
Virgin Island Vignettes. BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Totalitarianism. Cuba. Robert W. Anderson, Cuba:
Creole Stalinism? BRV. 4:1 p. 31 (72).
Unrest, political. Hispaniola. Bernard Diederich,
The Troubled Island of Hispaniola. ART. 13:3 p.
18(84).
Voter participation. Central America. Ralph Lee
Woodward, Jr., Ballots Amidst Bullets. BRV. 13:2
p. 55 (84).
Williams, Eric. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Gor-
don Lewis, An Anatomy of Caribbean Vanity.
BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
RELIGION
Caribs. Dominica. Anthony Layng, Religion Among
The Caribs. ART. 8:2 p. 36 (79).
Castro & Catholics. Cuba. Paul E. Sigmund, Fidel
& the Friars. BRV. 15:2 p. 30 (86).
Jonestown. Guyana. Donald J. Waters, Jungle
Politics. ART. 9:2 p. 8 (80).
Liberation theology. Central America. Michele
Heisler, Marxian Worship. BRV. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Liberation theology. Latin America. Stephen D.
Glazier, Might It Be A Fad? BRV. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Liberation theology. Latin America & the Carib-
bean. Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo, Theological
Opium. BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Mayan, ancient. Guatemala. Charles Lacombe,
The Book of the Quichd. BRV. 9:2 p. 42 (80).
Pluralism, religious. Jamaica. G. Llewellyn Wat-
son, Caribbean Cult Cultures. BRV. 14:1 p. 51
(85).
Protestant cartel. Puerto Rico. Howard B. Grose,
The Protestant Cartel in Puerto Rico. REP. 5:1 p.
11 (73).
Protestantism. Latin America. Samuel Silva Gotay,
Followers of the New Faith. BRV. 2:1 p. 11 (70).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. Roy Simon Bryce-Laporte,
The Rastas. BRV. 2:2 p. 3 (70).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. Claudia Rogers, What's A
Rasta?ART. 7:1 p. 9 (75).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. Klaus de Albuquerque, The
Future of the Rastafarian Movement. ART. 8:4 p.
22 (79).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. Leahcim T. Semaj, Inside
Rasta. ART. 14:1 p. 8 (85).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. NYCPD, Rasta Crime.
ART. 14:1 p. 12 (85).
Rastafarians. Jamaica. Carl H. Feuer, The Political
Use of Rasta. BRV. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Religion & politics. Latin America. Dale Story,
Poor Bodies, Poor Spirits. BRV. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Revivalist politics. Bermuda. Frank E. Manning,
Religion & Politics in Bermuda. ART. 8:4 p. 18
(79).
Santerfa. Cuba. Judith Hoch-Smith & Ernesto
Pichardo, Having Thrown a Stone Today, Eshu
Kills a Bird of Yesterday. ART. 7:4 p. 16 (78).
Theology. Brazil. Jos6 R. Garcia, Tomorrow's
Child. BRV. 7:1 p. 36 (75).
Theology. Cuba. Monsignor Bryan 0: Walsh, Who
is the Devil? BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Torres, Camilo. Colombia. Rafael Garzaro, Camilo:
Rebel Priest. BRV. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
Voudou. Haiti. Nelida Agosto Muhoz, Haitian
Voodoo: Social Control of the Unconscious. ART.
4:3 p. 6 (72).
Voudou. Haiti. Bernard Diederich, On the Nature of
Zombie Existence. ART. 12:3 p. 14 (83).
Voudou. Haiti. E. Wade Davis, The Ethnobiology of
the Haitian Zombie. ART. 12:3 p. 18 (83).
Walker, Francis. Jamaica. Donald W. Hogg, Elegy
fora Christian Pagan. ART. 2:2 p. 1 (70).
Yaqui knowledge. Mexico. Carlos Castaneda, The
Teaching of Don Juan. EXC. 1:2 p. 7 (69).
Yaqui knowledge. Mexico. Randy Frances Kandel,
Journey to Ixtlan. RES. 6:4 p. 32 (74).


SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS/GROUPS
Black power. Trinidad. Basil Ince, Black Power in
Trinidad. BRV. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Black power. Trinidad. Lloyd Best, Black Power &
Doctor Politics. ART. 2:2 p. 5 (70).
Culture & poverty. Caribbean, Hispanic. Oscar
Lewis, Culture & Poverty. BRV. 1:1 p. 5 (69).
Culture & poverty. Ecuador. Moritz Thomsen,
Living Poor. EXC. 1:4 p. 8 (69).
Culture & poverty. Latin America. John Waterbury,
Starting to Redistribute. BRV. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
Culture & poverty. Puerto Rico. Luis Nieves
Falc6n, Demythology of the Showcase. BRV. 2:3
p. 12 (70).
Culture & poverty. Trinidad. Ronald G. Parris,
Poverty in Trinidad. BRV. 4:3 p. 44 (72).
Culture & poverty. Venezuela. Angelina Pollack-
Eltz, The View from the Barrio. BRV. 2:1 p. 13
(70).
Ethnic identity. Cuba. Barry B. Levine, Sources of
Ethnic Identity for Latin Florida. ART. 8:1 p. 30
(79).
Ethnic Indians. Nicaragua. Margaret D. Wilde, The
Sandinistas & the Costehos. ART. 10:4 p. 8 (81).
Ethnic politics. Belize. Alma Harrington Young,
Ethnic Politics in Belize. ART. 7:3 p. 38 (78).
Ethnic politics. Bermuda. Frank E. Manning, Race
and Democracy in Bermuda. ART. 10:2 p. 20 (81).
Food policy. Cuba. James E. Austin, Calories
Count in Cuba. BRV. 15:2 p. 45 (86).
Growth projections. Caribbean Basin. Thomas D.
Boswell, Caribbean Crystal Ball. BRV. 14:3 p. 51
(85).
Health. Caribbean, Commonwealth. Ivor L. Liv-
ingston, Uptight West Indians. BRV. 13:4 p. 51
(84).
Health. Third World. John Bryant, Health & the
Developing World. EXC. 2:3 p. 7 (70).
Health & literacy. Cuba. Nicholas Eberstadt, Did
Fidel Fudge the Figures? ART. 15:2 p. 4 (86).
Health care. Cuba. Lisandro P6rez, Cuban Hip-
pocrisy. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Health, development and. Cuba. Sergio Diaz-
Briquets, How To Figure Out Cuba. ART. 15:2 p. 8
(86).
Income distribution. Latin America. Louis Wolf
Goodman, Inequality in Latin America. ART. 4:1 p.
15(72).
Japanese immigration. Mexico. Harold Sims, The
Samurai & the Machete. BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Javanese. Suriname. Annemarie de Waal Malefijt,
The Passing of Wajang. ART. 7:3 p. 43 (78).
Jews. Dominican Republic. Frances Henry, Strang-
ers in Paradise. ART. 14:4 p. 16 (85).
Jews. Dominican Republic. Kai Schoenhals, An
Extraordinary Migration. ART. 14:4 p. 17 (85).
Jews. Jamaica. Michael Hanchard, Jamaica's
Jews. BRV. 16:1 p. 13 (88).
Population policy. Third World. Jeffrey J. W.
Baker, Galileo, Onan & the Pope. ART. 1:3 p. 6
(69).
Population policy. Third World. Aaron Segal, Too
Much of a Good Thing. RES. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Race & economics. Jamaica. Carl Stone, Race
and Economic Power in Jamaica. ART. 16:1 p. 10
(88).
Race policy. Cuba. Carlos Moore, Congo or
Carabali?ART. 15:2 p. 12 (86).
Race vs. class. Martinique. Anselme Remy, The
Unholy Trinity. ART. 6:2 p. 14 (74).
Racial pluralism. Jamaica. Carl Stone, Mirror,
Mirror. BRV. 4:4 p. 28 (72).
Racial politics. Bahamas. A. G. LaFlamme, Black
And White On Green Turtle Cay. ART. 7:1 p. 13
(75).
Racial politics. Bermuda. Frank E. Manning,
Anatomy of a Riot. ART. 7:2 p. 4 (78).
Social inequality. Puerto Rico. Robert W. Ander-
son, A Hint of Something Bad. BRV. 5:3 p. 35 (73).
Social research. Grenada. Aaron Segal, Back-
ground to Grenada. RES. 12:4 p. 40 (83).
Social stratification. Puerto Rico. Carlos Buitrago-
Ortiz, Social Strata in Esperanza. ART. 2:3 p. 11
(70).
Socialization. Puerto Rico. Barry B. Levine, Boot-
strap Babies. BRV. 1:1 p. 6 (69).
Socialization. Trinidad. Ursula M. Von Eckardt, We


-- II I ---


I I








Wish to be Looked Upon. BRV. 2:2 p. 10 (70).
Socioeconomic indicators. Cuba. Sergio Roca,
Flawed Analysis. BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Stratification, racial. Colombia. Mauricio Solaun,
Eduardo Vblez, & Cynthia Smith, Claro, Trigueio,
Moreno. ART. 15:3 p. 18 (87).
Urban planning. Puerto Rico. Howard Stanton,
Model City: Dawn or Disaster? BRV. 1:1 p. 9 (69).
Urban planning. Puerto Rico. Leopold Kohr, La
Puntilla Reborn. EXC. 7:3 p. 16 (78).
Urban settlement. Jamaica. L. Alan Eyre, Quasi-
Urban Melange Settlements. ART. 8:2 p. 32 (79).
SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS
Armed forces. Latin America. Lawrence H. Hall,
In-Depth Military. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Baseball. Dominican Republic. Bernard Diederich,
Baseball In Their Blood: The San Pedro Syn-
drome. ART. 14:4 p. 15 (85).
Cockfighting. Caribbean Archipelago. Mace de
Challes, Cockfighting in the 19th Century Carib-
bean. ART. 4:4 p. 12 (72).
Cricket. Caribbean, Commonwealth. L. O'Brien
Thompson, How Cricket Is West Indian Cricket?
ART. 12:2 p. 22 (83).
Drugs. Trinidad. Frank Fonda Taylor, Does Trinidad
Have A Drug Problem? ART. 15:4 p. 15 (87).
Drugs, cannabis. Caribbean Basin. Aaron Segal,
Cross-Cultural Gold. RES. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Education, philosophy of. Puerto Rico. Ivan Illich,
Holy Mother School. ART. 1:3 p. 1 (69).
Enculturation, political. Cuba. Elizabeth Suth-
erland, Young Cuba. EXC. 1:4 p. 9 (69).
Energy. Caribbean Archipelago. Juan A. Bonnet, Jr.
and Angel Calder6n-Cruz, Caribbean Energy
Dependence. ART. 14:3 p. 16 (85).
Europe's space center. French Guiana. Gerhard
Drekonja-Kornat, On the Edge of Civilization.
ART. 13:2 p. 26 (84).
Gambling. Bermuda. Frank E. Manning, Risk
Taking in the Stock Market. ART. 11:4 p. 20 (82).
Gender roles, women. Caribbean Archipelago.
Eneid Routt6 G6mez, The Politics of Intuition. ED.
13:3 p. 3 (84).
Higglers. Jamaica. Elsie LeFranc, Higglering in
Kingston. ART. 16:1 p. 15 (88).
Literacy. Nicaragua. Leonor Blum, The Literacy
Campaign. ART. 10:1 p. 18 (81).
Media. Haiti. Bernard Diederich, A Poor King
Without a Crown. ART. 16:2 p. 10 (88).
Natural disaster, reaction to. Colombia. Bernard
Diederich, Nature Strikes at Colombia. ART. 15:1
p. 15 (86).
Police, Mexican. Mexico. Forrest D. Colburn, What
About my Tip? BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Political tourism. Nicaragua. Forrest D. Colburn,
Pilgrimages to Managua. ART. 14:1 p. 21 (85).
Public schools. Puerto Rico. David D. HernAndez,
Puerto Rico's Blackboard Jungle. INT. 4:1 p. 3
(72).
Reform school. Puerto Rico. Celia F. de Cintr6n,
Street Reform. BRV. 1:4 p. 13 (69).
Rum. Caribbean Basin. Barry B. Levine, Rumup-
manship. BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
Science & technology. Caribbean Archipelago.


Wallace C. Koehler & Aaron Segal, Caribbean
Science & Technology. ART. 14:3 p. 11 (85).
Sciences, role of. Trinidad. Anthony P. Maingot,
Future of the University of The West Indies. BRV.
7:3 p. 48 (78).
Street urchins. Colombia. Thomas M. liams, Los
Gamines of Bogota. ART. 9:2 p. 22 (80).
Student politics. Puerto Rico. Barry B. Levine,
Bread vs. Soul. BRV. 2:4 p. 11 (70).
Totalitarianism. Cuba. Barry B. Levine, Rethinking
Cuba. ED. 15:2 p. 3 (86).
Transportation. Jamaica. Patricia Anderson, The
Hassle & the Hustle. ART. 16:1 p. 18 (88).
Urban life. Jamaica. Bernard D. Headley, Cultural
Confusion. BRV. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
TRADITIONAL SOCIETIES
Black Caribs. Central America. Angelina Pollack-
Eltz, Black Carib Households. BRV. 2:3 p. 6 (70).
Caribs. Dominica. Gary Brana-Shute, Who's Who?
BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Culture as commodity. Suriname. Sally and
Richard Price, Exotica & Commodity. ART. 9:4 p.
12 (80).
Culture as commodity. Suriname. Dorothea and
Norman Whitten, Ethnoaesthetics in the Rain
Forest. BRV. 11:4 p. 24 (82).
Culture change. Jamaica. Kenneth Bilby, Ja-
maica's Maroons at the Crossroads. ART. 9:4 p.
18(80).
Culture, coffee. Puerto Rico. Lowell Gudmundson,
Puerto Rican Counterpoint. RES. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
Folk psychiatry. Mexico. Joan Koss, Curan-
derismo: Folk psychiatry. BRV. 1:2 p. 6 (69).
Folklore. Antigua. Althea V. Prince, Anansi Folk
Culture. ART. 13:1 p. 24 (84).
Folklore. Jamaica. G. Llewellyn Watson, Why the
Black Man is Black. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Folklore. Jamaica. Richard A. Dwyer, Jamaica
Well-Told. BRV. 16:1 p. 22 (88).
Gender roles, women. Suriname. Sally Price,
Wives, Husbands, & More Wives. ART. 12:2 p. 26
(83).
Maya. Central America. Prudence M. Rice, The
Rise & Fall of the Maya. RES. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
Miskito Indians. Nicaragua. Bernard Nietschmann,
When the Turtle Collapses, the World Ends. ART.
9:2 p. 14 (80).
Miskito Indians. Nicaragua. Nigel J. H. Smith,
Caribbean Edge. BRV. 9:2 p. 20 (80).
Miskito Indians. Nicaragua. Richard N. Adams,
The Sandinistas & the Indians. ART. 10:1 p. 22
(81).
Miskito Indians. Nicaragua. Forrest D. Colburn,
Bird Bath. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Myth. Brazil. Sara C. Weiss, Oh, Those Amazon
Women! ART. 6:3 p. 11 (74).
Peasants. Haiti. Bernard Diederich, Swine Fever
Ironies. ART. 14:1 p. 16 (85).
Peasants. Latin America. Carlos M. Rama, Peas-
ants Considered. ART. 3:1 p. 13 (71).
Primitive culture. Latin America. David Goddard,
L6vi-Strauss in Latin America. BRV. 1:2 p. 10 (69).
Reminiscences. Dominican Republic. Ligia Espinal
de Hoetink, Remembrances of Things Dominican.


EXC. 5:1 p. 18 (73).
Saramaka. Suriname. Richard Price, First-Time.
ART. 13:1 p. 20 (84).
Tainos. Hispaniola. Frank Moya Pons, The Tainos
of Hispaniola. ART. 13:4 p. 21 (84).
VISUAL ARTS/COMMENTARY
Alfonzo, Carlos. Cuba. Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Carlos
Alfonzo. ARC. 16:1 p. 28 (88).
Architecture. Caribbean Archipelago. Aaron Segal,
Caribbean Architecture. RES. 12:1 p. 32 (83).
Architecture. Caribbean Archipelago. Ellen L.
Belknap, Mere Description. BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Art & politics. Panama. Sandra Serrano, Exhibition
for National Peace. ART. 15:1 p. 33 (86).
Art, Aztec. Mexico. Ellen L. Belknap, Coffee Table
Aztecs. BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Art, Aztec. Mexico. William T. Vickers, Not for the
Coffee Table. BRV. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Art, Haitian. Haiti. Herv6 Mehu, Haiti's Art. ART. 3:1
p. 14 (71).
Calzada, Humberto. Cuba. Ricardo Pau-Llosa,
Calzada's Architecture of Memory. ARC. 13:2 p.
38 (84).
Central American painters. Central America. Ri-
cardo Pau-Llosa, Man & Nature in Central Ameri-
can Painting. ART. 10:1 p. 50 (81).
Folk art. St. Vincent. Andrea E. Leland, Collages,
Carvings & Quilts. ARC. 14:1 p. 28 (85).
Kahlo, Frida. Mexico. Jan Michael Hanvik, The
Biography of an Artist. BRV. 15:3 p. 22 (87).
Lam, Wifredo. Cuba. Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Wifredo
Lam. BRV. 7:4 p. 54 (78).
Lam, Wifredo. Cuba. Juan A. Martinez, Mythical
Landscapes of a Cuban Painter. ARC. 15:2 p. 32
(86).
Lepe, Manuel. Mexico. Bea Bender, The Charmed
World of Manuel Lepe. ARC. 13:1 p. 41 (84).
Oiler, Francisco. Puerto Rico. Haydee Venegas,
Francisco Oiler. ART. 12:2 p. 38 (83).
Painters. Mexico. Paul P. Kennedy, Mexican Art-
ists. EXC. 4:3 p. 12 (72).
Photography. Guatemala. Gary Monroe, Gua-
temalan Wanderers. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Photography. Puerto Rico. Kal Wagenheim, An
Affair with Puerto Rico. BRV. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Political cartoons. Nicaragua. R6ger Sanchez
Flores, Revolutionary Comics. ART. 15:1 p. 16
(86).
Poster art. Cuba. Mela Pons de Alegria, Bread and
Roses. BRV. 3:2 p. 13 (71).
Pretto, Rogelio. Panama. Sandra Serrano, Search-
ing for Pretto. EXC. 15:1 p. 28 (86).
Rod6n, Francisco. Argentina. Francisco Rod6n,
Painting Jorge Luis Borges. ARC. 10:3 p. 53 (81).
Rosado del Valle, Julio. Puerto Rico. Ricardo
Pau-Llosa, Abstraction & Representation. ARC.
14:4 p. 36 (85).
Soriano, Rafael. Cuba. Ricardo Pau-Llosa, In
Light's Dominion. ARC. 11:3 p. 38 (82).
Textile designs. Central America. Laurel Herbenar
Bossen, Huipiles, Tzutes & Molas. RES. 13:4 p.
31 (84).


SUBJECT, BY COUNTRY

ANGUILLA
Independence movement. (GP). Gordon K. Lewis,
The Anguilla Imbroglio: As Seen From London.
ART. 1:2 p. 2 (69).
ANTIGUA
Folklore. (TS). Althea V. Prince, Anansi Folk
Culture. ART. 13:1 p. 24 (84).
Slavery. (HI). Bonham C. Richardson, Invitation to a
Party. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
St. Vincent, Paul. (LA). Paul St. Vincent, Summit.
POE. 7:3 p. 60 (78).
Testimonial. (HI). Larry J. Smith, Smith on Smiths'
Smith. BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).


ARGENTINA
Borges, Jorge Luis. (LC). J. Raban Bilder, Borges:
Into The Mainstream Via The Back Door. ART. 4:4
p. 18 (72).
Borges, Jorge Luis. (LA). Jorge Luis Borges,
Game of Chess. POE. 1:3 p. 5 (69).
Borges, Jorge Luis. (LC). Kal Wagenheim, Imagi-
nary Beings & Cronopios. BRV. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Conflict, border. (GP). Farrokh Jhabvala, Storm
Over Cape Horn. ART. 8:4 p. 12 (79).
Cortazar, Julio. (LC). Gerald Guinness, A Manual
for Manuel. BRV. 8:3 p. 40 (79).
Cortdzar, Julio. (LC). Kal Wagenheim, Imaginary
Beings & Cronopios. BRV. 2:2 p. 11 (70).
Rod6n, Francisco. (VA). Francisco Rod6n, Paint-
ing Jorge Luis Borges. ARC. 10:3 p. 53 (81).
Trade relations. (EC). Anselm Francis, Trade
Tactics. BRV. 14:4 p. 48 (85).


ARUBA
Independence. (GP). George Cvejanovich, Future
Aruba. ART. 14:3 p. 18 (85).
Oil, Lago Refinery. (EC). Bernard Diederich,
Clouds Over Aruba. ART. 14:3 p. 21 (85).
Tradition, loss of. (CC). Sam Cole, Paradise Lost?
ART. 14:3 p. 22 (85).
BAHAMAS
Bahamas. (CC). Aaron Segal, Bahama Watching.
RES. 6:3 p. 40 (74).
Law of the Sea. (GP). Lyden 0. Pindling, Hydro-
space & the Law of the Sea. ART. 6:3 p. 6 (74).
Marginality, economic. (ED). Frank E. Manning,
International Eleuthera. BRV. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Racial politics. (SC). A. G. LaFlamme, Black And
White On Green Turtle Cay. ART. 7:1-p. 13 (75).
Travel guide. (CC). Nancy Olson, Not for the Birds.
BRV. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /65


I


I I







BARBADOS
Barbadians in Panama. (M). Bonham C. Richardson,
Go West Young Man. ART. 14:2 p. 10 (85).
Braithwaite, Edward Kamau. (LA). Edward Kamau
Braithwaite, Gods of the Middle Passage. EXC.
11:4 p. 18 (82).
Clarke, Austin C. (LC). Harry T. Antrim, Paradise Is In
The Mind. BRV. 8:4 p. 38 (79).
Women in politics. (CC). Betty Jane Punnett, Lady
Law. BRV. 13:4 p. 50 (84).

BELIZE
Conflict, border. (GP). A. E. Thomdike, Belize
Among Her Neighbords. ART. 7:2 p. 14 (78).
Ethnic politics. (SC). Alma Harrington Young,
Ethnic Politics in Belize. ART. 7:3 p. 38 (78).

BERMUDA
Ethnic politics. (SC). Frank E. Manning, Race and
Democracy in Bermuda. ART. 10:2 p. 20 (81).
Gambling. (SI). Frank E. Manning, Risk Taking in
the Stock Market. ART. 11:4 p. 20 (82).
Racial politics. (SC). Frank E. Manning, Anatomy of a
Riot. ART. 7:2 p. 4 (78).
Revivalist politics. (RL). Frank E. Manning, Reli-
gion & Politics in Bermuda. ART. 8:4 p. 18 (79).

BRAZIL
Cr6nicas. (LA). Edilberto Coutinho, Two Brazilian
Short Stories. SS. 8:2 p. 42 (79).
de Andrade, Mario. (LA). Mario de Andrade,
Landscape 2. POE. 1:4 p. 5 (69).
Gender roles, women. (HI). Ann Pescatello, Ladies
and Whores in Colonial Brazil. ART. 5:2 p. 26 (73).
Genocide. (HI). Paul Vidich, Green Hell. BRV. 5:2 p.
31 (73).
Industry, small scale. (EC). Richard P. Harber,
Little Backyards. BRV. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Myth. (TS). Sara C. Weiss, Oh, Those Amazon
Women!. ART. 6:3 p. 11 (74).
Policy issues. (ED). William T. Vickers, Develop-
ment Without Them. RES. 8:2 p. 50 (79).
Ribeiro, Darcy. (LA). Darcy Ribeiro, Pieces of Mule.
EXC. 14:4 p. 23 (85).
Theology. (RL). Jose R. Garcia, Tomorrow's Child.
BRV. 7:1 p. 36 (75).

BRITISH COMMONWEALTH
Vulnerability. (GP). Roy Patman, Small and
Vulnerable. BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).

CARIBBEAN ARCHIPELAGO
Alternatives. (ED). Rex Nettleford, Definition and
Development. ART. 14:3 p. 6 BRV. 5:1 p. 31 (73).
Cockfighting. (SI). Mac6 de Challes, Cockfighting in
the 19th Century Caribbean. ART. 4:4 p. 12
(72).
Cockfighting. (LA). Dena Hirsch, The Cockfight.
SS. 4:4 p. 15 (72).
Conflict, ideological. (GP). H. Michael Erisman,
Caribbean Whirlpool. BRV. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Cooperation, international. (PS). Basil A. Ince,
The Caribbean Commissions. BRV. 4:3 p. 36 (72).
Cultural diversity. (CC). Sidney W. Mintz,
Thoughts on Caribbean Society. BRV. 13:1 p. 28
(84).
Development, agricultural. (ED). Jean Benoist,
West Indian Paysans. BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Dutch historical writings. (HI). Cornelis C. Gos-
linga, Dutch Details. BRV. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Economic forecast. (ED). Aaron Segal, The Carib-
bean in the Year 2000. ART. 8:3 p. 4 (79).
Elections, 1979-80. (PS). Barry B. Levine, The
Status of Democracy in the Caribbean. ED. 10:2 p.
4(81).
Emigration to Europe. (MI). Nancy Robinson, Why
Migrate. BRV. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
Energy. (SI). Juan A. Bonnet, Jr. & Angel Calder6n-
Cruz, Caribbean Energy Dependence. ART. 14:3 p.
16(85).
Foreign investment. (EC). Carl Henry Feuer,
Jargon Liberation. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Gender roles, women. (SI). Eneid Routte Gomez, The
Politics of Intuition. ED. 13:3 p. 3 (84).
Historical consciousness. (HI). Richard Price, An
Absence of Ruins? ART. 14:3 p. 24 (85).
Howes, Barbara. (LA). Barbara Howes, Mercedes.
66 / CARIBBEAN E I t F\\ DEX 1969-1989 -


POE. 2:4 p. 5 (70).
Integration movements. (HI). 0. Carlos Stoetzer,
Dreams of Integration. ART. 7:2 p. 28 (78).
Integration, economic. (ED). Thomas Mathews.
R.I.P. BRV. 4:3 p. 41 (72).
International relations. (GP). Aaron Segal, Cuba
and the Caribbean. BRV. 4:1 p. 40 (72).
Labor surplus. (EC). Ransford W. Palmer, Absorbing
the Caribbean Labor Surplus. ART. 11:3 p. 22 (82).
Literature survey. (HI). Thomas G. Mathews,
Historical Writing in the Caribbean. ART. 2:3 p. 4
(70).
Literature survey. (HI). Thomas Mathews, Carib-
bean Economic History. ART. 3:1 p. 4 (71).
Musical instruments. (PA). Donald Thompson,
Poor Man's Bass Fiddle. ART. 3:1 p. 11 (71).
Political economy. (GP). Joseph D. Olander, The
Caribbean Watchers. RES. 5:1 p. 35 (73).
Race vs. class. (HI). Gerard R. Latortue. Latortue
on Maingot's Bosch. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
Race vs. class. (HI). Anthony P. Maingot, The New
Caribbean History. BRV: 3:2 p. 2 (71).
Race vs. class. (HI). Anthony P. Maingot, The New
Caribbean History. BRV. 3:2 p. 2 (71).
Race vs. class. (HI). Anthony P. Maingot, Maingot's
Response: The Old Bosch Was Better. LED. 4:3 p. 2
(72).
Race vs. class. (HI). Thomas Mathews, Mathews
on Maingot's Bosch. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
Reference. (LC). Ian I. Smart, Discovering the
Caribbean. RES. 10:3 p. 32 (81).
Research agenda. (GP). Gordon K. Lewis, Carib-
bean in the 1980s. ART. 10:4 p. 18 (81).
Science & technology. (SI). Wallace C. Koehler
and Aaron Segal, Caribbean Science and
Technology. ART. 14:3 p. 11 (85).
Slave resistance. (HI). Roger N. Buckley, Culture
Against Chains. BRV. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Slavery, health. (HI). Bonham C. Richardson,
Slave Health. BRV. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Status, political. (PS). Thomas Mathews, What
Ever Happened to Polarization in the Caribbean.
ART. 5:1 p. 26 (73).
Sugar. (EC). Jorge I. Dominguez, Sugar High. BRV.
7:2 p. 52 (78).
Sugar. (EC). Arnold K. Ventura, Technologism.
BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Tourism. (EC). Herbert L Hiller, Sun Lust Tourism
in the Caribbean. ART. 7:4 p. 12 (78).
Travelogue. (LA). Daniel J. Crowley, An Aristocratic
Briton Views the Twilight of Empire. BRV. 12:3 p. 36
(83).

CARIBBEAN BASIN
Alternatives. (ED). James Dietz, Beauty & the
Beast. BRV. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
Attidudes towards US. (GP). Robert A. Pastor,
Psychological Divide in the Caribbean Basin. ED.
15:1 p. 3 (86).
Caribbean Basin. (GP). Aaron Segal, Collecting
the Caribbean. RES. 13:2 p. 29 (84).
Caribbean exodus. (MI). Gary P. Freeman, Carib-
bean Migration to Britain & France. ART. 11:1 p.
30 (82).
Caribbean exodus. (MI). Frances Henry, A Note on
Caribbean Migration to Canada. ART. 11:1 p. 38
(82).
Caribbean exodus. (MI). Barry B. Levine, Surplus
Populations. ED. 11:1 p. 4 (82).
CBI. (ED). Richard E. Feinberg, Richard Newfarmer
and Bernadette Orr, The Battle Over The CBI. ART.
12:2 p. 15 (83).
CBI. (ED). Bernardo Vega, The CBI Faces Adver-
sity. ART. 14:2 p. 18 (85).
Democratic left. (PS). Charles D. Ameringer, The
Tradition of Democracy in the Caribbean. ART.
11:2 p. 28 (82).
Diplomatic relations. (GP). Demetrio Boersner,
Venezuela & the Caribbean. ART. 8:4
p. 8 (79).
Drugs, cannabis. (SI). Aaron Segal, Cross-Cultural
Gold. RES. 11:4 p. 26 (82).
Elections, 1982. (PS). Don Bohning, Juan 0.
Tomayo & Bernard Diederich, The Springtime of
Elections. ART. 11:3 p. 4 (82).
Foreign policy. (GP), Anthony T. Bryan, Mexico
and the Caribbean. ART. 10:3 p. 4 (81).


Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. (LC). Ram6n Mendoza, A
Caribbean Carnival of Abundance. BRV. 7:2 p.
38 (78).
Gender roles, women. (LC). Richard Dwyer,
Caribbean Eve. BRV. 13:3 p. 34 (84).
Growth projections. (SC). Thomas D. Boswell,
Caribbean Crystal Ball. BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
International relations. (GP). Dennis J. Gayle,
Caribbean Concepts. BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
International relations. (GP). Franklin W. Knight,
Toward a New American Presence in the Carib-
bean. ART. 9:1 p. 36 (80).
International relations. (GP). William M. Leo-
Grande, Cuba & Nicaragua. ART. 9:1 p. 11 (80).
International relations. (GP). Gordon K. Lewis, On
the Limits of the New Cuban Presence in the
Caribbean. ART. 9:1 p. 33 (80).
International relations. (GP). Thomas Mathews,
Puerto Rico & The Caribbean. ART. 5:3 p. 14 (73).
International relations. (GP). Steve C. Ropp, Cuba
and Panama. ART. 9:1 p. 15 (80).
Labor migration. (MI). Franklin W. Knight, Who
Needs a Guest Worker Program? ART. 11:1 p. 46
(82).
Labor organization. (PS). Steve Chamovitz, Varie ties
of Labor Organization. ART. 14:2 p. 14 (85).
Library collections. (CC). Marguerite C. Suarez-
Murias, An Important Library on the Caribbean.
ART. 9:2 p. 52 (80).
Oil. (EC). George W. Grayson, The Joint Oil Facility.
ART. 12:2 p. 19 (83).
Pirates. (HI). Arthur N. Gilbert, Tales of the High
Seas. BRV. 12:3 p. 34 (83).
Policy options. (EC). Fuat M. Andic, Efficiency
Versus Equity. ART. 13:1 p. 16 (84).
Political economy. (GP). Vaughan A. Lewis, The
US & the Caribbean. ART. 11:2 p. 6 (82).
Political theory. (GP). Norman Matlin, The Myth of
Mastery. ART. 9:4 p. 22 (80).
Revolutionary language. (GP). Anthony P. Main-
got, A Time for Straight Talk. ED. 12:1 p. 3 (83).
Rum. (SI). Barry B. Levine, Rumupmanship. BRV.
16:1 p. 42 (88).
Transportation. (HI), Alfred L. Padula, Pan Am in the
Caribbean. ART. 12:1 p. 24 (83).
US immigration policy. (MI). Terry L. McCoy, A
Primer for US Policy on Caribbean Emigration.
ART. 8:1 p. 10 (79).
US policy. (GP). Amb. Thomas 0. Enders, A
Comprehensive Strategy for the Caribbean Basin.
ART. 11:2 p. 10 (82).
US policy. (GP). Bob Graham, Florida, & the
Caribbean. ED. 14:2 p. 3 (85).
US policy. (GP) Wayne S. Smith, The Grenada
Complex in Central America. ART. 12:4 p. 34 (83).
Venezuelan, migration to. (MI). Andrbs Serbin, The
Venezuelan Reception. ART. 11:1 p. 42 (82).

CARIBBEAN, COMMONWEALTH
Alternatives. (ED). Terry McCoy, Postpartum Perils.
BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Anthology, poetry. (LC). Emily M. Belcher, Poetic
Permutation. BRV. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Burnham, Forbes. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, An
Anatomy of Caribbean Vanity. BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
CARICOM. (ED). June S. Belkin, CARICOM: Carib
bean Community & Common Market. ART. 13:4 p.
11 (84).
CARICOM. (ED). Anthony P. Gonzalez, The Future of
CARICOM. ART. 13:4 p. 8 (84).
CARICOM. (ED). Mirlande Hippolyte-Manigat, What
Happened in Ocho Rios. ART. 12:2 p. 10 (83).
Children's fiction. (LC). Joann Biondi, Sweet
Tempation. BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Constitutional law. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, In Re:
The West Indies. BRV. 7:2 p. 49 (78).
Cricket. (SI). L. O'Brien Thompson, How Cricket Is
West Indian Cricket? ART. 12:2 p. 22 (83).
Cultural identity. (CC). Rex Nettleford, Cultivating A
Caribbean Sensibility. ART. 15:3 p. 4 (87).
Cultural perceptions. (GP). Andrbs Serbin, The
Nonexistent Caribbean. ED. 14:1 p. 3 (85).
Figueroa, John. (LC). St. George Tucker Arnold,
Jr., A Celebration of Caribbean Color. BRV. 7:3 p.
54 (78).
Figueroa, John. (LC). J. Raban Bilder, London
Knows, Do You? BRV. 4:1 p. 24 (72).


I








Foreign policy. (GP). Anselm Francis, Small
States. BRV. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Foreign students. (CC). Augustus C. Small, Study-
ing in the States. ART. 11:4 p. 22 (82).
Geography & politics. (GP). H. Michael Erisman,
Unconventional Geopolitics. BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).
Health. (SC). Ivor L. Livingston, Uptight West
Indians. BRV. 13:4 p. 51 (84).
Independence, economic. (ED). William G.
Demas, How To Be Independent. ART. 6:4 p. 9
(74).
Integration, economic. (ED). Compton Bourne,
The Retreat from Integration. ED. 14:3 p. 3 (85).
Jagan, Cheddi. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, An Anat-
omy of Caribbean Vanity. BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).
Lamming, George. (LC). Janet Butler, The Existen-
tialism of George Lamming. ART. 11:4 p. 15 (82).
Language. (CC). Norman Weinstein, Tis English?
BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Literature survey. (LC). Richard Dwyer, Caribbean
Textuality. ART. 11:4 p. 12 (82).
Literature survey. (LC). Eugene V. Mohr, West
Indian Fiction is Alive & Well. RES. 5:4 p. 23 (73).
Literature survey. (LC). Eugene V. Mohr, The
Pleasures of West Indian Writing. ART. 11:4 p. 13
(82).
Media. (CC). Ramesh Deosaran, The Role of the
Press in the Caribbean. ART. 13:4 p. 16 (84).
Migration, history of. (MI). Dawn I. Marshall, The
History of Caribbean Migrations. ART. 11:1 p. 6
(82).
Migration, social psychology of. (MI). Charles V.
Carnegie, Strategic Flexibility in the West Indies.
ART. 11:1 p. 10 (82).
Mitchell, James F. (PS). Gary Brana-Shute, An
Eastern Caribbean Centrist. INT. 14:4 p. 27 (85).
Naipaul, Shiva. (LC). Eric Lott, The Chronic
Caribbean. BRV. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
Naipaul, V.S. (LC). Nana Wilson-Tagoe, No Place.
ART. 9:2 p. 37 (80).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Anthony P. Maingot,
Role of the Opposition in the Caribbean. ART. 7:4
p. 22 (78).
Oral vs. written traditions. (LC). Kenneth
Ramchand, The Fate of Writing in the West Indies.
ART. 11:4 p. 16 (82).
Police, modernization of. (PS). Bernard Diederich,
The End of West Indian Innocence. ART. 13:2 p.
10 (84).
Political economy. (EC). David A. Lake, A
Pessimistic Picture. BRV. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
Political economy. (EC). Aaron Segal, A New
World Or Old Bargain Town? BRV. 4:3 p. 32 (72).
Political parties. (PS). Patrick Emmanuel, Elec-
tions & Parties in the Eastern Caribbean. ART.
10:2 p. 14 (81).
Proverbs. (LC). G. Llewellyn Watson, If Crab
Walk... BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Race relations. (PS). Ken I. Boodhoo, The Case of
the Missing Majority. ART. 6:2 p. 3 (74).
Slavery. (HI). Thomas Carlyle, Occasional Dis-
course on the Negro Question. REP. 4:1 p. 18
(72).
Slavery. (HI). H. N. Coleridge, Six Months in the
West Indies in 1825. EXC. 5:4 p. 30 (73).
Slavery. (HI). John Stuart Mill, The Negro Question.
REP. 4:3 p. 24 (72).
Slavery. (HI). Bonham C. Richardson, Anniversary
Publication. BRV. 15:2 p. 46 (86).
Slavery, health. (HI). Herman J. Flax, M.D., Saving
Slaves. BRV. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Societies, post-colonial. (HI). Harmannus Hoet-
ink, West Indian Dialogue. BRV. 1:4 p. 6 (69).
St. Kitts & Nevis. (MI). Alex Stepick, Ideology of
Migration. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Tourism. (EC). Ramash Ramsaran, The "M"Factor
of Tourism. BRV. 7:1 p. 41 (75).
Walcott, Derek. (LC). Richard Dwyer, One Walcott.
ART. 11:4 p. 14 (82).
Walcott, Derek. (LC). Robert D. Hamner, Ambiguity
Without Crisis. PRV. 16:2 p. 51 (88).
Walcott, Derek. (LA). Derek Walcott, A far cry from
Africa. POE. 3:2 p. 4 (71).
Williams, Eric. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, An Anatomy
of Caribbean Vanity. BRV. 3:1 p. 2 (71).


CARIBBEAN, DUTCH
Caribbean exodus. (MI). Frank Bovenkerk, Carib-
bean Migration to the Netherlands. ART. 11:1 p.
34 (82).
CARIBBEAN, FRENCH-SPEAKING
African origins. (LC). Marie-Denise Shelton, Africa
Revisited. RES. 9:2 p. 33 (80).
Novels, French Caribbean. (LC). Lbon-Frangois
Hoffmann, More Than Language. BRV. 15:4 p. 41
(87).
Status, political. (PS). G6rard R. Latortue, French
West Indian Autonomy. ART. 2:2 p. 8 (70).
Status, political. (PS). Scott B. MacDonald and
Albert L. Gastmann, Mitterrand's Headache. ART.
13:2 p. 18 (84).
Status, political. (PS). Aaron Segal, Which Way
-the French West Indies? BRV. 5:3 p. 39 (73).
CARIBBEAN, HISPANIC
Bicultural poetry. (LC). Carolina Hospital, Betwixt
and Between. PRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Caribbean identity. (CC). Carlos Alberto Montaner,
On the Antillian Identity. ART. 7:3 p. 11 (78).
Caribbean identity. (CC). Mark D. Szuchman, On
the Balkanization of America. ART. 7:4 p. 42 (78).
Culture & poverty. (SC). Oscar Lewis, Culture and
Poverty. BRV. 1:1 p. 5 (69).
Spanish-American War. (HI). Joel Magruder, So it
Wasn'ta Picnic. BRV. 1:2 p. 12 (69).

CENTRAL AMERICA
Agriculture. (EC). William C. Thiesenhusen, Cam-
pesinos Versus Landlords. ART. 14:4 p. 30 (85).
Black Caribs. (TS). Angelina Pollack-Eltz, Black
Carib Households. BRV. 2:3 p. 6 (70).
Canal treaties. (GP). Robert A. Pastor, The Canal
Treaties. RES. 15:4 p. 22 (87).
Central American Common Market. (ED). Ber-
nard Coard, Central America's Economic Family.
ART. 7:1 p. 24 (75).
Central American painters. (VA). Ricardo Pau-
Llosa, Man & Nature in Central American Painting.
ART. 10:1 p. 50 (81).
Civil war, flight from. (MI). Guy Gugliotta, The
Central American Exodus. ART. 11:1 p. 26 (82).
Conflict, political. (GP). Marvin Alisky, Central
American Sancocho. RES. 14:1 p. 26 (85).
Conflict, political. (GP). Charles D. Ameringer, The
Thirty Years War Between Figueres & the So-
mozas. ART. 8:4 p. 4 (79).
Conflict, political. (PS). Irving Louis Horowitz,
Passion & Compassion. ART. 14:1 p. 23 (85).
Conflict, political. (GP). Richard Millet, Can We
Live with Revolution in Central America? ART.
10:1 p. 6 (81).
Conflict, political. (GP). Mark B. Rosenberg,
Central America Devastated. ED. 12:2 p. 3 (83).
Conflict, political. (GP). Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr.,
Dispassionate Conflict. BRV. 14:3 p. 50 (85).
Integration, economic. (ED). Ramesh Ramsaran,
Central American Economic Integration. BRV. 6:2
p. 47 (74).
International relations. (GP). Ricardo Arias
Calder6n, Political Systems as Export Com-
modities. ART. 15:1 p. 20 (86).
International relations. (GP). Daniel Oduber, To-
wards a New Central American Dialogue. ART.
10:1 p. 10 (81).
Liberation theology. (RL). Michele Heisler, Marx-
ian Worship. BRV. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Library collections. (CC). Ralph Lee Woodward,
Jr., Where to Study Central America. ART. 10:1 p.
47(81).
Maya. (TS). Prudence M. Rice, The Rise & Fall of
the Maya. RES. 13:4 p. 28 (84).
Textile designs. (VA). Laurel Herbenar Bossen,
Huipiles, Tzutes & Molas. RES. 13:4 p. 31 (84).
US policy. (GP). Alexander H. Mclntire, Jr., Once
Too Many. BRV. 15:1 p. 44 (86).
US policy. (GP). Daniel Oduber, The Dead Are All
Ours. ED. 13:2 p. 3 (84).
US policy. (GP). Thomas W. Walker, The US and
Central America. ART. 8:3 p. 18 (79).
Voter participation. (PS). Ralph Lee Woodward,
Jr., Ballots Amidst Bullets. BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).


CHILE
Conflict, border. (GP). Farrokh Jhabvala, Storm
Over Cape Horn. ART. 8:4 p. 12 (79).
Development, impediments to. (PS). Louis Wolf
Goodman, Chile's Past Malaise? RES. 3:2 p. 14
(71).
Mistral, Gabriela. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Chile:
Poetry & Anti-Poetry. RES. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Neruda, Pablo. (LA). Pablo Neruda, Caballero
Solo. POE. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. (LA). Pablo Neruda, "Residence on
Earth." POE. 6:2 p. 32 (74).
Neruda, Pablo. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Neruda in
English. BRV. 1:2 p. 3 (69).
Neruda, Pablo. (LC). Florence L. Yudin, Earth
Words. BRV. 6:2 p. 38 (74).
Parra, Nicanor. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Chile:
Poetry & Anti-poetry. RES. 5:1 p. 4 (73).
Revolution & art. (LC). Fernando Alegria, Litera-
ture & Revolution in Chile. ART. 5:2 p. 13 (73).
Social change. (PS). T.V. Sathyamurthy, Will
Allende Make It? ART. 4:1 p. 7 (72).

COLOMBIA
Betancur, Belisario. (PS). Bernard Diederich,
Betancur's Battles. ART. 15:1 p. 10 (86).
Betancur, Belisario. (PS). Gary Hoskin, Colombia
Under Stress. ART. 15:1 p. 6 (86).
Conflict, political. (PS). Ricardo Santamaria Sala-
manca & Gabriel Silva LujAn, Colombia in the
Eighties. ART. 15:1 p. 12 (86).
Culture, tobacco. (EC). Philip Shepherd, Co-
lombia's Tobacco Road. BRV. 13:1 p. 36 (84).
Development, sociology of. (ED). Barry B. Levine,
Colombia: Cowboy Country. BRV. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. (LC). Eneid Routte
G6mez, 100 Years of Solitude. BRV. 2:1 p. 5 (70).
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel ("Erendira"). (PA).
Aaron Segal, "SiAbuela..." CRV. 13:4 p. 34 (84).
Natural disaster, reaction to. (SI). Bernard Dieder-
ich, Nature Strikes at Colombia. ART. 15:1 p. 15
(86).
Stratification, racial. (SC). Mauricio Solain, Edu-
ardo Velez, & Cynthia Smith, Claro, Trigueho,
Moreno. ART. 15:3 p. 18 (87).
Street urchins. (SI). Thomas M. liams, Los
Gamines of Bogota. ART. 9:2 p. 22 (80).
Torres, Camilo. (RL). Rafael Garzaro, Camilo:
Rebel Priest. BRV. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
COSTA RICA
Export trade. (EC). John C. Edmunds & William
Renforth, The Costa Rican Solution. ART. 14:2 p.
27 (85).
Government policies. (EC). Irma T. de Alonso,
Economic Erosion. BRV. 15:1 p. 44 (86).
Political economy. (PS). John P. Harrison, The
Tidy Tico Way. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Political economy. (PS). Samuel Stone, Costa
Rica's Political Turmoil. ART. 10:1 p. 42 (81).
State, role of. (ED). Francisco A. Leguizam6n,
Costa Rica & the Beast. BRV. 15:2 p. 45 (86).
CUBA
Acculturation. (LC). Efrain Barradas, Formerly.
BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Alfonzo, Carlos. (VA). Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Carlos
Alfonzo. ARC. 16:1 p. 28 (88).
Alonzo, Alicia. (PA). Aaron Segal, Dance and
Diplomacy. ART. 9:1 p. 30 (80).
Barnet, Miguel. (LC). Leonel A. de la Cuesta,
Gallego. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. (LC). J. Raban Bilder,
Three Trapped Tigers. BRV. 4:3 p. 28 (72).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. (LC). J. Raban Bilder,
Interviewing Cabrera Infante. INT. 6:4 p. 17 (74).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. (LC). Cruz Her-
nbndez, Oh, You Sexy Kid You. BRV. 9:4 p. 40
(80).
Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. (LC). Donald Gwynn
Watson, Apolitical Fiction in a Political World.
RES. 13:3 p. 30 (84).
Calzada, Humberto. (VA). Ricardo Pau-Llosa,
Calzada's Architecture of Memory. ARC. 13:2 p.
38 (84).
Castro & Catholics. (RL). Paul E. Sigmund, Fidel
and the Friars. BRV. 15:2 p. 30 (86).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /67







Castro, Fidel. (PS). Carlos Alberto Montaner,
Twenty Years After the Cuban Revolution. ART.
8:1 p. 4 (79).
Conflict, political. (PS). Justo Carrillo, Could Cuba
Have Been Different? BRV. 10:4 p. 38 (81).
Cuba. (CC). Aaron Segal, Cubanology. RES. 5:1 p.
40 (73).
Cuban exiles. (MI). Luis P. Salas, The Traumas of
Exile. BRV. 9:1 p. 42 (80).
Enculturation, political. (SI). Elizabeth Sutherland,
Young Cuba. EXC. 1:4 p. 9 (69).
Energy. (EC). Alfred Padula, Cuba's Pending
Energy Crisis. ART. 8:2 p. 4 (79).
Ethnic identity. (SC). Barry B. Levine, Sources of
Ethnic Identity for Latin Florida. ART. 8:1 p. 30 (79).
Exile ("El Super"). (PA). Alonso Alegria, El Super.
CRV. 8:2 p. 54 (79).
Federal budget (EC). Jorge Salazar-Carillo, Is the
Cuban Economy Knowable? ART. 15:2 p. 24 (86).
Food policy. (SC). James E. Austin, Calories Count
in Cuba. BRV. 15:2 p. 45 (86).
Gender roles, women ("Lucia"). (PA). Oliva M.
Espin, Lucia. CRV. 6:4 p. 36 (74).
Guevara, Ernesto ("Che"). (PA). Robert Friedman,
Che. Hmm. CRV. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Guillen, Nicolas. (LA). Nicolas Guill6n, El Caribe,
Mujer nueva, Canci6n puertorriqueFa. POE. 5:3 p.
28 (73).
Guillen, Nicolas. (LC). Florence L. Yudin, The Great
Zoo. BRV. 5:3 p. 30 (73).
Health & literacy. (SC). Nicholas Eberstadt, Did
Fidel Fudge the Figures? ART. 15:2 p. 4 (86).
Health care. (SC). Lisandro Perez, Cuban Hippo-
crisy. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Health, development and. (SC). Sergio Diaz-
Briquets, How To Figure Out Cuba. ART. 15:2 p. 8
(86).
Hegemony. (HI). Pedro J. Montiel, The US and
Cuba, 1880-1934. BRV. 8:1 p. 51 (79).
Hemingway, Ernest. (LC). Barry B. Levine, The
End of the Search. INT. 10:3 p. 22 (81).
History, political. (HI). Enrique A. Baloyra, Be-
tweena Rock& a Hard Place. BRV. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
Human rights ("Perro de Alambre"). (PA). Marcia
Morgado, Perro de Alambre. CRV. 9:4 p. 42 (80).
International relations. (GP). Max Azicri, Cuba and
the US. ART. 9:1 p. 26 (80).
International relations. (GP). Edward Gonzalez, Vi-
rology of Revolutions. RES. 13:2 p. 32 (84).
International relations. (GP). Barry B. Levine, The
New Cuban Presence in the Caribbean. ART. 9:1
p. 4 (80).
International relations. (GP). Anthony P. Maingot,
Cuba & the Commonwealth Caribbean. ART. 9:1
p. 7 (80).
International relations. (GP). Ezequiel Ramirez
Novoa, Relations with Cuba. ART. 4:3 p. 22 (72).
Lam, Wifredo. (VA). Juan A. Martinez, Mythical
Landscapes of a Cuban Painter. ARC. 15:2 p. 32
(86).
Lam, Wifredo. (VA). Ricardo Pau-Uosa, Wifredo
Lam. BRV. 7:4 p. 54 (78).
Language changes. (CC). Octavio Pino, Revo-
lutionary Cuban. ART. 6:4 p. 20 (74).
Literature survey. (LC). Florence L. Yudin, Casa
de las Americas, Whose Home? ART. 6:3 p. 33
(74).
Mariel exodus. (LA). Miguel Correa, A Decent
Woman. EXC. 12:3 p. 30 (83).
Marielitos. (MI). Siro del Castillo, A Plea to
Destigmatize Mariel. ART. 13:4 p. 7 (84).
Migration, motivations for. (MI). Robert L Bach, The
New Cuban Exodus. ART. 11:1 p. 22 (82).
Militarization of. (PS). Jos6 Arsenio Torres, Military
Cuba? BRV. 4:1 p. 36 (72).
Military presence. (GP). Aaron Segal, Cubans in
Africa. ART. 7:3 p. 4 (78).
Moral incentives. (ED). Irving Louis Horowitz,
Cuban Morality: Ethics & Economics in Cuba.
BRV. 4:4 p. 33 (72).
Music, Afro-Cuban. (PA). Roberto Nodal, The
Sacred Drums of the Lucumi. ART. 7:2 p. 20 (78).
Nonaligned Nations Movement (GP). H. Michael
Erisman, Cuba's Struggle for Third World Leader-
ship. ART. 8:3 p. 8 (79).
68 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989


Nonaligned Nations Movement. (GP). H. Michael
Erisman, Cuba & the Third World. ART. 9:1 p. 26
(80).
Oil. (EC). Jorge F. Perez-L6pez, Cuba As An Oil
Trader. ART. 15:2 p. 26 (86).
Padilla, Herberto. (LC). Roland E. Bush, Requiem
for the Artist. BRV. 15:1 p. 41 (86).
Persecution, religious. (HI). Bryan 0. Walsh, One
Came To Dinner. ART. 5:3 p. 10 (73).
Political economy. (PS). Armando Bengochea,
Sacrificial Equality. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Political prisoners. (PS). Jorge I. Dominguez,
Cuba's Inhumanity Towards Cubans. BRV. 16:1 p.
24 (88).
Poster art. (VA). Mela Pons de Alegria, Bread and
Roses. BRV. 3:2 p. 13 (71).
Perez Firmat, Gustavo. (LA). Gustavo Perez
Firmat, Bilingual Blues. POE. 15:3 p. 37 (87).
Perez Firmat, Gustavo. (LA). Gustavo P6rez
Firmat, Turning the Times Tables. POE. 15:3 p. 37
(87).
Race policy. (SC). Carlos Moore, Congo or Cara-
bali? ART. 15:2 p. 12 (86).
Revolution & myth. (LC). Leonel de la Cuesta,
Devil's Geography. BRV. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Revolution, 1933. (HI). Adolfo Leyva, Brief Triumph.
BRV. 16:2 p. 48 (88).
Revolution, 1933. (HI). Roberto Leyva pseudd.),
Cuba's Other Revolution. BRV. 5:2 p. 33 (73).
Revolution, Castro. (GP). Pedro J. Montiel, On the
Politics of the Cuban Revolution. BRV. 9:1 p. 40
(80).
Revolutionary consciuosness, obstacles to ("De
Cierta Manera"). (PA). Dennis West, One Way or
Another. CRV. 8:3 p. 42 (79).
Santeria. (RL). Judith Hoch-Smith & Ernesto
Pichardo, Having Thrown a Stone Today, Eshu
Kills a Bird of Yesterday. ART. 7:4 p. 16 (78).
Sarduy, Severo. (LC). Rafael Ocasio, Raptures and
Recuperaciones. BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
Short stories. (LC). Guillermo S. Edelberg,
Bergman On The Beach. BRV. 15:3 p. 43 (87).
Slave emancipation. (HI). David Kyle, Race and
Revolution. BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).
Socioeconomic indicators. (SC). Sergio Roca,
Flawed Analysis. BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Soriano, Rafael. (VA). Ricardo Pau-Llosa, In Light's
Dominion. ARC. 11:3 p. 38 (82).
Soto, Pedro Juan. (LC). Carlos Alberto Montaner,
Tropical Hamlet. BRV. 2:2 p. 12 (70).
Soviet penetration. (GP). Andr6s SuArez, John
Wayne on Cuba. BRV. 1:4 p. 11 (69).
Sovereignty, national. (GP). Carlos Alberto Mon-
taner, The Roots of Anti-Americanism in Cuba.
ART. 13:2 p. 13 (84).
Testimonial. (CC). Francine J. Daner, Living the
Revolution. BRV. 7:2 p. 44 (78).
Testimonial. (CC). Barry Record, Does Fidel Eat
More than Your Father? EXC. 4:4 p. 4 (72).
Testimonial literature. (LC). Barry B. Levine,
Miguel Barnet on the Testimonial. INT. 9:4 p. 32
(80).
Theology. (RL). Monsignor Bryan 0. Walsh, Who is
the Devil? BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Totalitarianism. (PS). Robert W. Anderson, Cuba:
Creole Stalinism? BRV. 4:1 p. 31 (72).
Totalitarianism. (SI). Barry B. Levine, Rethinking
.Cuba. ED. 15:2 p. 3 (86).
US immigration policy. (MI). Mario A. Ribera,
Refugee Chess. ART. 13:4 p. 5 (84).
US-Cuban relations. (GP). Irving Louis Horowitz, Ro-
mancing the Dictator. BRV. 16:1 p. 25 (88).

DOMINICA
Caribs. (TS). Gary Brana-Shute, Who's Who? BRV.
13:2 p. 54 (84).
Caribs. (RL). Anthony Layng, Religion Among The
Caribs. ART. 8:2 p. 36 (79).
Elections, 1980. (PS). Robert A. Michaels, Chang-
ing the Guard in Dominica. ART. 10:2 p. 18 (81).
Rhys, Jean. (LC). Roy Pateman, Old White Jumby.
BRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Anthology, literary. (LC). Emilio Bejel, 1605
Dominican Pages. BRV. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Balaguer, Joaquin. (PS). Peter R. Greif, Carib-


bean Swan Song. ART. 15:3 p. 17 (87).
Baseball. (SI). Bernard Diederich, Baseball In Their
Blood: The San Pedro Syndrome. ART. 14:4 p. 15
(85).
Conflict, political. (GP). Kal Wagenheim, Juan
Bosch's New Stance. BRV. 2:1 p. 10 (70).
Culture & society. (HI). Harmannus Hoetink,
Dominican Patrimony. ART. 3:1 p. 6 (71).
Culture & society. (HI). Anthony P. Maingot,
Structure & Culture in Santo Domingo. BRV. 5:3 p.
43 (73).
Elections, 1986. (PS). Jonathan Hartlyn, A Demo-
cratic Shoot-Out in the D.R. ART. 15:3 p. 14 (87).
History, political. (PS). Ian Bell, Bruised Apples.
BRV. 13:3 p. 52 (84).
Invasion, 1965. (GP). James W. Nash, What Hath
Intervention Wrought. ART. 14:4 p. 7 (85).
Invasion, 1965. (GP). Jorge Rodriguez Beruff, The
Dominican Invasion. RES. 5:4 p. 45 (73).
Jews. (SC). Frances Henry, Strangers in Paradise.
ART. 14:4 p. 16 (85).
Jews. (SC). Kai Schoenhals, An Extraordinary
Migration. ART. 14:4 p. 17 (85).
Labor migration. (MI). Marcy Fink, A Dominican
Harvest of Shame. ART. 8:1 p. 34 (79).
Labor migration. (MI). Paul R. Latortue, Neoslav-
eryin the Cane Fields. ART. 14:4 p. 18 (85).
Pefia G6mez, Jos6 Francisco. (PS). Mark B.
Rosenberg, Interviewing Peha G6mez. INT. 9:4 p.
10 (80).
Political economy. (PS). Richard C. Kearney,
Dominican Update. ART. 14:4 p. 12 (85).
Reminiscences. (LA). Julia Alvarez, Homecoming.
POE. 12:1 p. 30 (83).
Reminiscences. (TS). Ligia Espinal de Hoetink,
Remembrances of Things Dominican. EC. 5:1 p.
18(73).
Social change. (HI). Thomas Mathews, Poor DRL
BRV. 1:3 p. 12 (69).
Social classes. (HI). Harmannus Hoetink, 19th
Century Santo Domingo. ART. 2:4 p. 6 (70).
Spanish immigrants. (HI). Harold Sims, Civilistas.
BRV. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Sugar. (HI). Bruce J. Calder, The Dominican Turn
Toward Sugar. ART. 10:3 p. 18 (81).

ECUADOR
Culture & poverty. (SC). Moritz Thomsen, Living
Poor. EXC. 1:4 p. 8 (69).
Peace Corps. (CC). Leopold Kohr, Two Views of
Ecuador. BRV. 2:4 p. 1 (70).
Travelogue. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Infinity. BRV.
2:4 p. 12 (70).

EL SALVADOR
Conflict, political. (PS). Luis Escalante Arce, In
Defense of Restoring Constitutional Order. ART.
10:1 p. 35 (81).
Conflict, political. (GP). Dennis Gilbert, A Plague of
Distrust. BRV. 13:3 p. 55 (84).
Conflict, political. (PS). Guillermo Manuel Ungo, In
Defense of the Frente Democrdtico. ART. 10:1 p.
34(81).
Conflict, political. (PS). Ambassador Robert
White, In Defense of the Junta. ART. 10:1 p. 30
(81).
Guerrilla lifestyle. (PS). Mark Fazlollah, Behind the
Lines. ART. 12:2 p. 6 (83).
Opposition, role, of. (PS). Guillermo Ungo, The Role
of the Opposition in El Salvador. ART. 8:2 p.
22 (79).
Refugees. (MI). Kathy Barber Hersch, Sanctuary for
Central Americans. ART. 12:1 p. 16 (83).
War, ravages of. (GP). Neale J. Pearson, The
Good Doctor. BRV. 15:2 p. 47 (86).

FRENCH GUIANA
Europe's space center. (SI). Gerhard Drekonja-
Komat, On the Edge of Civilization. ART. 13:2 p.
26 (84).
Modernization. (ED). Frank Schwarzbeck, Re-
cycling a Forgotten Colony. ART. 13:2 p. 22 (84).
GRENADA
Bishop, Maurice. (PS). Carl Henry Feuer, Was
Bishop A Social Democrat? BRV. 12:4 p. 37 (83).
Counterrevolution. (PS). Bernad Diederich, Inter-


II


I








viewing George Louison. INT. 12:4 p. 17 (83).
Cuban influence. (GP). Nestor D. Sanchez, What
Was Uncovered in Grenada. ART. 12:4 p. 20 (83).
Elections, 1984. (PS). Anthony P. Maingot, Politics
Caribbean Style. ART. 14:2 p. 4 (85).
Future possibilities. (GP). Anthony P. Maingot,
Options for Grenada. ART. 12:4 p. 24 (83).
Gairy, Eric. (PS). Milton Pab6n, The Hero & the
Crowd. BRV. 1:2 p. 13 (69).
Grenadian crisis, major actors. (GP). Judith C.
Faerron, Dramatis Personae. ART. 12:4 p. 12
(83).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Errol Barrow, The Danger of
Rescue Operations. ED. 12:4 p. 3 (83).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Jorge I. Dominguez, Grena-
dian Party Paper. FIC. 15:2 p. 16 (86).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Michael Manley, Grenada in
the Context of History. ART. 12:4 p. 6 (83).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Otto J. Reich, Commentary
on Grenada. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Kai Schoenhals, A Caribbean
Lilliput. RES. 14:2 p. 34 (85).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Wayne S. Smith, Com-
mentary on Grenada. LED. 13:3 p. 4 (84).
Invasion, 1983. (GP). Nelson P. Vald6s, Report
Redux. FIC. 15:2 p. 21 (86).
Invasion, 1983; press coverage, US. (GP). Marian
Goslinga, U.S. Press Coverage of Grenada. ART.
12:4 p. 66 (83).
Invasion, 1983; press coverage. (GP). World
Press Review, Press Reaction to the Invasion.
ART. 12:4 p. 33 (83).
NJM minutes. (PS). Barry B. Levine, ed., Alienation
of Leninist Group Therapy. EXC. 12:4 p. 14 (83).
Revolution & invasion. (GP). Barry B. Levine,
Grenada Explodes. ED. 12:4 p. 2 (83).
Revolution, 1979. (GP). Selwyn Ryan, The Gre-
nada Questions. ART. 13:3 p. 6 (84).
Social research. (SC). Aaron Segal, Background to
Grenada. RES. 12:4 p. 40 (83).
Timeline. (GP). Judith C. Faerron, Chronology of
Events. ART. 12:4 p. 10 (83).
GUATEMALA
Conflict, political. (PS). Eduardo Galeano, Gua-
temala: Occupied Country. EXC. 1:3 p. 8 (69).
Conflict, political. (PS). Rafael Garzaro, Gua-
temala: Occupied Country. BRV. 1:3 p. 7 (69).
Endangered species. (LC). Gilbert B. Snyder,
Political Ornithology. BRV. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Maya, ancient. (RL). Charles Lacombe, The Book
of the Quich6. BRV. 9:2 p. 42 (80).
Migration ("El Norte"). (PA). Christina Bruce, For
the American Dream. CRV. 13:3 p. 37 (84).
Photography. (VA). Gary Monroe, Guatemalan
Wanderers. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Socialization, political. (PS). David Bray, Learning
About Politics. BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
State, military control of. (PS). Virginia C. Garrard,
Popular Progressives. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
GUYANA
Burnham, Forbes. (PS). Thomas J. Spinner, Jr.,
The Emperor Burnham Has Lost His Clothes.
ART. 9:4 p. 4 (80).
Burnham, Forbes. (PS). Thomas J. Spinner, Jr.,
Guyana Update. ART. 11:4 p. 8 (82).
Conflict, border. (GP). Basil A. Ince, Transfer of
Power: British-Style. ART. 1:1 p. 7 (69).
Elections, 1980. (PS). Lord Avebury & the British
Parliamentary Human Rights Group, Guyana's
1980 Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 8 (81).
Fiction, excerpt. (LA). 0. R. Dathorne, The Future
of Tomorrow. SS. 7:1 p. 28 (75).
Fraud. (PS). Edward Dew, That Was The Way It
Wasn't. BRV. 16:1 p. 43 (88).
Guyana. (CC). Edward Dew, Guyana Glimpses.
BRV. 14:2 p. 49 (85).
Jonestown. (RL). Donald J. Waters, Jungle Politics.
ART. 9:2 p. 8 (80).
Mittelholzer, Edgar. (LC). John Thieme, Catching
Mullet & Chasing Shadows. RES. 8:4 p. 36 (79).
Old age. (LC). L. P. Fletcher, Benign Neglect. BRV.
16:1 p. 40 (88).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Cheddi Jagan, The Role
of the Opposition in Guyana. ART. 7:4 p. 37 (78).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Bishwaishwar Ramsa-


roop, The Opposition in Guyana -A Response.
ART. 8:2 p. 28 (79).
Reminiscences. (LA). 0. R. Dathorne, Poem I.
POE. 6:3 p. 38 (74).
Reminiscences. (LA). 0. R. Dathorne, Reflections
on Grandfather from Guyana. EXC. 7:3 p. 32 (78).
Street life. (CC). David J. Dodd, A Day in Babylon.
ART. 10:4 p. 24 (81).
Working class. (HI). Thomas J. Spinner, Jr., When
They Worked in Guyana. BRV. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
HAITI
Art, Haitian. (VA). Herv6 Mehu, Haiti's Art. ART. 3:1
p. 14 (71).
Coffee trade. (EC). Alex Stepick, Haitian Coffee.
BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Conflict, political. (PS). Jean-Claude Bajeux, The
Little Game of January 17th. ART. 16:2 p. 7 (88).
Conflict, political. (PS). Jorge Heine, Transition to
Nowhere. ART. 16:2 p. 4 (88).
Culture & politics. (CC). Don Bohning, Haitian
Errors. BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Demographic factors. (EC). Christian A. Girault,
Second-Hand Haiti. BRV. 14:2 p. 51 (85).
Diaspora, Haitian. (MI). Thomas D. Boswell, The
New Haitian Diaspora. ART. 11:1 p. 18 (82).
Diaspora, Haitian. (MI). Christian A. Girault, The
Haitian Diaspora. ART. 16:2 p. 14 (88).
Duvalier regime. (PS). Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor,
Papadocracy. BRV. 2:1 p. 8 (70).
Duvalier regime. (PS). Leon-Frangois Hoffmann,
Bye Bye Baby. BRV. 15:3 p. 42 (87).
Duvalier regime. (PS). G6rard R. Latortue, Chair-
man Duvalier. BRV. 2:1 p. 9 (70).
Duvalier regime. (PS). William Paley pseudd.),
Haiti's Dynastic Despotism. ART. 13:1 p. 13 (84).
Haitian novels. (LC). Lbon-Frangois Hoffman, The
Originality of the Haitian Novel. ART. 8:1 p. 44
(79).
Kleptocracy, flight from. (MI). Alex Stepick, The
New Haitian Exodus. ART. 11:1 p. 14 (82).
Literature survey. (LC). Yvette Gindine, The Magic
of Black History: Images of Haiti. ART. 6:4 p. 25
(74).
Literature survey. (LC). L6on-Frangois Hoffman,
Slavery & Race in Haitian Letters. RES. 9:2 p. 28
(80).
Literature survey. (LC). Felix Morisseau-Leroy, A
Source of Human Experience. BRV. 14:3 p. 49
(85).
Manigat & Latortue. (PS). Barry B. Levine, After
the Fall. INT. 16:2 p. 8 (88).
Media. (HI). Jean Desquiron, Try to Write...and You
Will See What Happens. ART. 16:2 p. 13 (88).
Media. (SI). Bernard Diederich, A Poor King Without
a Crown. ART. 16:2 p. 10 (88).
Peasants. (TS). Bernard Diederich, Swine Fever
Ironies. ART. 14:1 p. 16 (85).
Reference. (LC). Le6n-Frangois Hoffmann, The
Incomplete Haitiana. BRV. 12:2 p. 30 (83).
Refugees, Haitian. (MI). Alejandro Portes, Bringing
Misery Along? BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
State, legitimation of. (PS). Barry B. Levine, The
Shifting Sands of Haitian Legitimacy. ED. 16:2 p. 3
(88).
Touissaint L'Ouverture. (LA). John Hawes, Tous-
saint Breda. EXC. 3:2 p. 6 (71).
US policy. (GP). Robert Maguire, The US & A New
Haiti. ED. 15:3 p. 3 (87).
Voudou. (RL). E. Wade Davis, The Ethnobiology of
the Haitian Zombie. ART. 12:3 p. 18 (83).
Voudou. (RL). Bernard Diederich, On the Nature of
Zombie Existence. ART. 12:3 p. 14 (83).
Voudou. (RL). Nelida Agosto Mutoz, Haitian Voo-
doo: Social Control of the Unconscious. ART. 4:3
p. 6 (72).
HEMISPHERE
Debt. (ED). Rt. Hon. Edward Seaga, Toward
Resolving the Debt Crisis. ED. 16:1 p. 3 (88).
OAS. (PS). Francis X. Gannon, Will the OAS Live
To Be 100? ART. 13:4 p. 12 (84).
Slavery. (HI). Melvin Drimmer, Slaves as People.
ART. 3:2 p. 5 (71).
US policy. (GP). Lynn-Darrell Bender, Hemispheric
Debate. RES. 14:4 p. 34 (85).
US policy. (HI). Lowell Gudmundson, Resilient


Self-Delusion. BRV. 16:1 p. 40 (88).
HISPANIOLA
Confederation. (PS). Pierre L. Hudicourt, Prejudice
and Paranoia. BRV. 14:4 p. 21 (85).
Labor repressive mechanisms. (MI). Paul R.
Latortue, Haitian Neo-Slavery in Santo Domingo.
BRV. 11:3 p. 36 (82).
Myth. (LA). Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo, A Taino
Tale. ART. 13:4 p. 24 (84).
Tainos. (TS). Frank Moya Pons, The Tainos of
Hispaniola. ART. 13:4 p. 21 (84).
Unrest, political. (PS). Bernard Diederich, The
Troubled Island of Hispaniola. ART. 13:3 p. 18
(84).
HONDURAS
CBI. (EC). Marta Ortiz-Buonafina, The CBI Is Not
Enough. ART. 14:2 p. 20 (85).
Conflict, political. (PS). Mark B. Rosenberg,
Honduran Scorecard. ART. 12:1 p. 12 (83).
Political stability. (PS). James A. Morris, Hondu-
ras. ART. 10:1 p. 38 (81).
Social change. (PS). Thomas P. Anderson, What
Debate? BRV. 16:1 p. 42 (88).
JAMAICA
Black activism. (HI). John McCartney, The Garvey
Papers. BRV. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
Creole culture. (HI). Ena Campbell, Creole Ja-
maica. BRV. 5:2 p. 42 (73).
Culture change. (TS). Kenneth Bilby, Jamaica's
Maroons at the Crossroads. ART. 9:4 p. 18 (80).
Development models. (ED). Peter L. Berger, Can
the Caribbean Learn from East Asia?ART. 13:2 p.
6 (84).
Development recommendations. (ED). Byron
White, The Jamaican Economy BRV. 1:3 p. 12
(69).
Displacement. (LA). Geoffry Philp, Florida Bound.
POE. 12:1 p. 28 (83).
Elections, 1980. (PS). Carl Stone, Jamaica's 1980
Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 5 (81).
Elections, 1986. (PS). Bernard D. Headley, A
Contest that Became A Referendum. ART. 15:3 p.
13(87).
Folklore. (TS). Richard A. Dwyer, Jamaica Well-
Told. BRV. 16:1 p. 22 (88).
Folklore. (TS). G. Llewellyn Watson, Why the Black
Man is Black. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Higglers. (SI). Elsie LeFranc, Higglering in King-
ston. ART. 16:1 p. 15 (88).
Independence. (GP). Anthony John Payne, Crea-
tive Politics. ART. 16:1 p. 4 (88).
Invasion, 1983; reaction to. (GP). Carl Stone, The
Jamaican Reaction. ART. 12:4 p. 31 (83).
Jews. (SC). Michael Hanchard, Jamaica's Jews.
BRV. 16:1 p. 13 (88).
Manley, Michael & Edward Seaga. (PS). Carl
Stone, Running Out Of Options in Jamaica. ART.
15:3 p. 10 (87).
Manley, Norman. (HI). Gordon K. Lewis, Jamaica's
Manley. BRV. 5:2 p. 44 (73).
Marley, Bob. (PA). Kamla Lewis, Sociobiography.
BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Music & politics. (PA). Jay S. Kaufman, Music and
Politics in Jamaica. ART. 15:3 p. 9 (87).
Opinion poll, 1982. (PS). Carl Stone, Seaga Is In
Trouble. ART. 11:4 p. 4 (82).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Janis Johnson and
Robert A. Rankin, Interviewing Michael Manley.
INT. 11:3 p. 26 (82).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Edward Seaga, The Role
of the Opposition in Jamaica. ART. 7:4 p. 27 (78).
Picaresque tale ("The Harder They Come"). (PA).
Julianne Burton, The Harder They Come. CRV.
7:2 p. 33 (78).
Pluralism, religious. (RL). G. Llewellyn Watson,
Caribbean Cult Cultures. BRV. 14:1 p. 51 (85).
PNP. (PS). Howard Handelman, Manley's Jamaica.
BRV. 16:2 p. 41 (88).
PNP. (PS). Evelyne Huber & John D. Stephens,
Manley Prepares to Return. ART. 16:2 p. 16 (88).
Political change. (HI). Wendell Bell, Remem-
brances of a Jamaica Past. ART. 14:1 p. 5 (85).
Race & economics. (SC). Carl Stone, Race and
Economic Power in Jamaica. ART. 16:1 p. 10 (88).
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /69








Racial pluralism. (SC). Carl Stone, Mirror, Mirror.
BRV. 4:4 p. 28 (72).
Rastafarians. (RL). Klaus de Albuquerque, The
Future of the Rastafarian Movement. ART. 8:4 p.
22 (79).
Rastafarians. (RL). Roy Simon Bryce-Laporte, The
Rastas. BRV. 2:2 p. 3 (70).
Rastafarians. (RL). Carl H. Feuer, The Political Use
of Rasta. BRV. 14:4 p. 48 (85).
Rastafarians. (RL). NYCPD, Rasta Crime. ART.
14:1 p. 12 (85).
Rastafarians. (RL). Claudia Rogers, What's A
Rasta?ART. 7:1 p. 9 (75).
Rastafarians. (RL). Leahcim T. Semaj, Inside
Rasta. ART. 14:1 p. 8 (85).
Rastafarians ("The Land of Look Behind"). (PA).
Aaron Segal, The Land of Look Behind. CRV. 12:2
p. 36 (83).
Reggae. (PA). Alan Greenberg, Reggae Inter-
national. BRV. 12:2 p. 32 (83).
Reggae ("Rockers"). (PA). Aaron Segal, Rockers.
CRV. 10:2 p. 38 (81).
Seaga, Edward. (PS). Stephen Davis, Jamaican
Politics, Economics & Culture. INT. 10:4 p. 14
(81).
Seaga, Edward & Michael Manley. (PS). Richard
S. Hillman, Jamaica's Political Leaders. INT. 8:3 p.
28 (79).
Slavery. (HI). Gardiner Greene Hubbard, The Ruin
of Jamaica. RES. 3:2 p. 8 (71).
Tourism. (EC). Brian J. Hudson, The End of
Paradise. ART. 8:3 p. 32 (79).
Transportation. (SI). Patricia Anderson, The Has-
sle & the Hustle. ART. 16:1 p. 18 (88).
Urban life. (SI). Bernard D. Headley, Cultural
Confusion. BRV. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
Urban settlement. (SC). L. Alan Eyre, Quasi-Urban
Melange Settlements. ART. 8:2 p. 32 (79).
Walker, Francis. (RL). Donald W. Hogg, Elegy for a
Christian Pagan. ART. 2:2 p. 1 (70).

LATIN AMERICA
Anti-Americanism. (HI). John J. Johnson, Yankee
Boo-Boos. BRV. 13:2 p. 52 (84).
Armed forces. (SI). Lawrence H. Hall, In-Depth
Military. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Auto industry. (EC). Aaron Segal, Growing Pains:
Latin America's Auto Industry. RES. 15:4 p. 24
(87).
Chinese policy. (GP). Joe Olander, China & Latin
America. BRV. 4:4 p. 35 (72).
Christian Democratic Party. (PS). Ricardo Arias
Calder6n, The Christian Democrats in Latin
America. ART. 11:2 p. 34 (82).
Conflict, political. (GP). Peter Johnson, Revolting
Conditions. BRV. 15:4 p. 41 (87).
Conflict, political. (GP). Jiri Valenta & Frederick F.
Shaheen, Controlling Latin America. BRV. 14:3 p.
50 (85).
Crisis, sociopolitical. (GP). Ricardo Arias
Calder6n, The Third World of the West. ED. 13:4
p. 3 (84).
Culture & poverty. (ED). Michael Novak, Why Latin
America Is Poor. ART. 11:3 p. 18 (82).
Culture & poverty. (SC). John Waterbury, Starting
to Redistribute. BRV. 15:1 p. 42 (86).
Culture, role of. (ED). Lawrence E. Harrison,
Underdevelopment Is A State Of Mind. ART. 15:4
p. 16 (87).
Culture, role of. (ED). Daniel H. Levine, If Only
They Could Be More Like Us!. RES. 15:4 p. 19
(87).
Debt. (ED). Belisario Betancur, Cartagena Pro-
posal, The. ART. 13:3 p. 10 (84).
Debt. (ED). Pamela S. Falk, Whatever Happened to
CancOn?ART. 11:3 p. 14 (82).
Debt. (ED). Robert A. Liff, What Happened in
Cartagena. ART. 13:3 p. 14 (84).
Development, consequences of. (HI). Mark D.
Szuchman, The Case for Indigenous Develop-
ment. BRV. 10:3 p. 28 (81).
Development, philosophies of. (ED). Wolfgang A.
Luchting, Tired Latin Liberals. ART. 2:1 p. 6 (70).
Ecological concerns. (ED). Ellen Calmus,
Beefprints. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Financial problems. (EC). Juan A. Yahes, Gospel.
BRV. 14:2 p. 50 (85).
70 / CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 -


Foreign investment. (EC). Galo Plaza, Latin
American Development. ART. 1:4 p. 5 (69).
French policy. (GP). Barry B. Levine, The French
Connection. INT. 11:2 p. 46 (82).
Good Neighbor Policy. (HI). Bryce Wood, The End
of the Good Neighbor Policy. ART. 11:2 p. 25 (82).
Guerrillas. (PS). Luis Mercier Vega, Guerrillas in
Latin America. EXC. 2:3 p. 9 (70).
Immigration to US. (MI). Alejandro Portes, Notes
on the Reconquest. ART. 12:3 p. 22 (83).
Income distribution. (SC). Louis Wolf Goodman,
Inequality in Latin America. ART. 4:1 p. 15 (72).
Integration, economic. (ED). Ramesh Ramsaran,
Latin American Economic Integration. BRV. 5:4 p.
41 (73).
International relations. (GP). Paul Hollander, Big
Stuff. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
International relations. (GP). Gregory B. Wolfe,
Thoughts On A Democratic Consortium. ED. 11:2
p. 4 (82).
Liberation theology. (RL). Stephen D. Glazier,
Might It Be A Fad? BRV. 15:4 p. 42 (87).
Literature survey. (LC). lan I. Smart, Dual Identity.
BRV. 14:1 p. 48 (85).
Local organizations. (ED). Forrest D. Colburn,
Enterprising Enclaves. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Oil. (EC). Jonathan C. Brown, Not Greasy Kid Stuff.
BRV. 13:4 p. 48 (84).
Peasants. (TS). Carlos M. Rama, Peasants Consid-
ered. ART. 3:1 p. 13 (71).
Primitive culture. (TS). David Goddard, Levi-
Strauss in Latin America. BRV. 1:2 p. 10 (69).
Protestantism. (RL). Samuel Silva Gotay, Fol-
lowers of the New Faith. BRV. 2:1 p. 11 (70).
Reference. (LC). Dennis West, Latin Talkies. BRV.
13:2 p. 55 (84).
Religion & politics. (RL). Dale Story, Poor Bodies,
Poor Spirits. BRV. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Resource exploitation. (ED). George M. Guess,
On Capitalist Weather. BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Social structure. (HI). Reinhard Bendix, Weber and
Latin America. BRV. 2:4 p. 3 (70).
Socialist International. (GP). Karl-Ludolf HObener,
The Socialist International & Latin America. ART.
11:2 p. 38 (82).
Socialist International. (GP). Carlos Alberto Mon-
taner, The Mediation of the Socialist International.
ART. 11:2 p. 42 (82).
Soviet policy. (GP). Jos6 M. Aybar, On Goure's
Non-Review. LED. 5:1 p. 2 (73).
Soviet policy. (GP). Leon Gourb, Russia & Latin
America. BRV. 4:4 p. 39 (72).
Soviet policy. (GP). Leon Gour6, Goure's Re-
sponse: Aybar Expected Too Much. LED. 5:2 p. 2
(73).
Soviet policy. (GP). Leon Goure, Fear of the Bear.
BRV. 13:4 p. 51 (84).
Spanish Empire, decline of. (HI). Joaquin Roy,
The Divided Kingdom. BRV. 15:2 p. 48 (86).
Underdevelopment, indigenous. (ED). Jean-
Frangois Revel, The Trouble with Latin America.
ART. 8:3 p. 13 (79).
US policy. (GP). L. Francis Bouchey, Reagan
Policy: Global Chess or Local Crap Shooting.
ART. 11:2 p. 20 (82).
US policy. (GP). Richard R. Fagen, The Real Clear
and Present Danger. ART. 11:2 p. 18 (82).
US policy. (GP). Thomas Mathews, The U.S. &
Latin America. BRV. 4:4 p. 42 (72).
US policy. (GP). William D. Rogers & Jeffrey A.
Meyers, The Reagan Administration & Latin
America. ART. 11:2 p. 14 (82).

LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN
Dance. (PA). Peggo Cromer. National Dances of
the Caribbean & Latin America. ART. 6:3 p. 26
(74).
Grassroots efforts. (ED). Linda Miller, A Develop-
ment Agency with a Difference. BRV. 15:1 p. 41
(86).
Influence, competition for. (GP). Martin C.
Needler, Hegemonic Tolerance. ART. 11:2 p. 32
(82).
Liberation theology. (RL). Antonio M. Stevens-
Arroyo, Theological Opium. BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Political economy. (EC). Ben Schneider, Un-
flattering Analysis. BRV. 16:1 p. 41 (88).


MARTINIQUE
Glissant, Edouard. (LC). Lauren W. Yoder, A
Caribcentric View of the World. RES. 10:3 p. 24
(81).
Natural disaster, volcanic eruption. (HI). Susan
Sheinman, Caribbean Inferno. BRV. 1:4 p. 12
(69).
Plantation life ("Sugar Cane Alley"). (PA). Debo-
rah Kanter, Plantation Society. CRV. 14:1 p. 32
(85).
Race vs. class. (SC). Anselme Remy, The Unholy
Trinity. ART. 6:2 p. 14 (74).
Toussaint L'Ouverture. (LC). Felix Morisseau-
Leroy, Slaying the Dragon. BRV. 14:1 p. 49 (85).

MEXICO
Art, Aztec. (VA). Ellen L. Belknap, Coffee Table
Aztecs. BRV. 13:2 p. 54 (84).
Art, Aztec. (TS). William T. Vickers, Not for the
Coffee Table. BRV. 13:4 p. 50 (84).
Chicanos. (LA). Tino Villanueva, Pachuco Re-
membered. POE. 3:1 p. 5 (71).
Chicanos. (LA). Tino Villanueva, Day-Long Day.
POE. 4:4 p. 32 (72).
Cortez, Gregorio ("A Clash of Cultures"). (PA).
Tomas Rivera, A Clash of Cultures. CRV. 12:3 p.
32 (83).
Culture & poverty ("Children of Sanchez"). (PA).
Eugene L. Komrad, Lewis's Novela. CRV. 8:1 p.
54 (79).
Debt. (ED). Timothy Heyman, Chronicle of A
Financial Crisis. ART. 12:1 p. 8 (83).
Dreams. (LA). Xavier Villaurrutia, Nocturne of the
Statue. POE. 4:1 p. 30 (72).
Economic inequality. (ED). Jorge Salazar-Carrillo,
An Old Refrain. BRV. 15:4 p. 43 (87).
Federal budget. (EC). Hector Orci, Mexico Budg-
eted. BRV. 4:1 p. 28 (72).
Folk psychiatry. (TS). Joan Koss, Curanderismo:
Folk psychiatry. BRV. 1:2 p. 6 (69).
Foreign policy. (GP). Roger Quant, Pithy Politics.
BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Foreign policy. (GP). Carlos Rangel, Mexico and
Other Dominoes. ART. 10:3 p. 8 (81).
Fuentes, Carlos. (LC). Roy Pateman, Weary
Traveler. BRV. 15:3 p. 40 (87).
Industrial policy. (EC). Ben Schneider, Story's
Story. BRV. 16:1 p. 39 (88).
Japanese immigration. (SC). Harold Sims, The
Samurai & the Machete. BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Kahlo, Frida. (VA). Jan Michael Hanvik, The
Biography of an Artist. BRV. 15:3 p. 22 (87).
Lepe, Manuel. (VA). Bea Bender, The Charmed
World of Manuel Lepe. ARC. 13:1 p. 41 (84).
Literature & politics. (LC). Edward J. Mullen, Paz
& Fuentes: How Close? ART. 6:2 p. 27 (74).
Mexico. (CC). Steven E. Sanderson, So Near...
BRV. 14:3 p. 49 (85).
Military. (PS). Edward J. Williams, Mexico's Modern
Military. ART. 10:4 p. 12 (81).
National policy. (EC). Dale Truett, Creeping
Mexicanization. ART. 6:3 p. 19 (74).
Natural disaster, response to. (PS). George W.
Grayson, T6cnicos vs. Politicos. ART. 15:4 p. 20
(87).
Oil. (HI). Jerry B. Brown, Oil on the Periphery. ART.
10:3 p. 12 (81).
Oil. (EC). George W. Grayson, An Overdose of
Corruption. ART. 13:3 p. 22 (84).
Oil. (EC). Bernard E. Segal, Who Got the Oil? BRV.
13:2 p. 54 (84).
Painters. (VA). Paul P. Kennedy, Mexican Artists.
EXC. 4:3 p. 12 (72).
Police, Mexican. (SI). Forrest D. Colburn, What
About my Tip? BRV. 13:2 p. 55 (84).
Political economy. (EC). Jorge Salazar-Carrillo,
Thoughts from a Policy-Maker. BRV. 15:2 p. 46
(86).
Relations with Central America. (GP). Nancy
Robinson, Mexico's Southern Neighbors. BRV.
16:2 p. 50 (88).
Reminiscences. (LA). Augustin YiMez, The Lean
Lands. EXC. 1:2 p. 8 (69).
Sabines, Jaime. (LA). Jaime Sabines, In the House
of the Day. POE. 2:4 p. 4 (70).
Survey. (HI). Lowell Gudmundson, Solid Survey.
BRV. 15:1 p. 43 (86).








Yaqui knowledge. (RL). Carlos Castaneda, The
Teaching of Don Juan. EXC. 1:2 p. 7 (69).
Yaqui knowledge. (RL). Randy Frances Kandel,
Journey to Ixtlan. RES. 6:4 p. 32 (74).
MONTSERRAT
Dance. (PA). Jay D. Dobbin, A Jombee Dance.
ART. 10:4 p. 28 (81).
Reminiscences. (LA). E. A. Markham, Sugarcake
Day. SS. 9:4 p. 36 (80).
NETHERLANDS ANTILLES
Bonaire. (PS). Dennis Conway, Big Theories, Small
Island. BRV. 16:2 p. 50 (88).
Mercantilism. (HI). Albert Gastmann, Holland's
Narrowing Horizon. BRV. 1:1 p. 13 (69).
Theatre. (PA). Johannes Baptist de Caluwb, Drama
Writing in Papiamentu. ART. 8:4 p. 33 (79).
US policy. (GP). Scott B. MacDonald, Endangering
Friendships. ART. 14:3 p. 21 (85).
NICARAGUA
Cardenal, Ernesto. (LC). Aaron Segal, Poetry and
Politics in Nicaragua. RES. 10:1 p. 26 (81).
Chamorro, Pedro Joaquin. (LC). Grafton Conliffe
and Thomas W. Walker, The Literary Works of
Pedro Joaquin Chamorro. ART. 7:4 p. 46 (78).
Contradictions, inherent. (PS). Forrest D.
Colburn, Theory & Practice in Nicaragua. ART.
12:3 p. 6 (83).
Dario, Ruben. (LA). Rub6n Dario, I Seek a Form.
POE. 1:4 p. 12 (69).
Elections, 1984. (PS). James M. Malloy, Nicara-
gua's Uncertain Political Future. ART. 14:1 p. 18
(85).
Ethnic Indians. (SC). Margaret D. Wilde, The
Sandinistas & the Costehos. ART. 10:4 p. 8 (81).
Freedom of the press. (PS). Beatriz Parga de
Bay6n, Freedom of the Press in Nicaragua. INT.
12:1 p. 20 (83).
Guardia Nacional. (PS). Neill Macaulay, Guardians
of the Dynasty. BRV. 7:3 p. 30 (78).
Human rights. (GP). Thomas W. Walker, Nicara-
gua & Human Rights. ART. 7:3 p. 24 (78).
International relations. (GP). Mark B. Rosenberg,
Nicaragua & Her Neighbors. ED. 10:1 p. 4 (81).
Literacy. (SI). Leonor Blum, The Literacy Cam-
paign. ART. 10:1 p. 18 (81).
Miskito Indians. (TS). Richard N. Adams, The
Sandinistas & the Indians. ART. 10:1 p. 22 (81).
Miskito Indians. (TS). Forrest D. Colburn, Bird
Bath. BRV. 14:4 p. 49 (85).
Miskito Indians. (TS). Bernard Nietschmann,
When the Turtle Collapses, the World Ends. ART.
9:2 p. 14 (80).
Miskito Indians. (TS). Nigel J. H. Smith, Caribbean
Edge. BRV. 9:2 p. 20 (80).
Mosquito Coast. (HI). Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr.,
Mosquito Control. BRV. 15:4 p. 40 (87).
Pastora, Eden. (PS). Beatriz Parga de Bay6n,
Interviewing Ed6n Pastora. INT. 11:3 p. 30 (82).
Political cartoons. (VA). R6ger Sanchez Flores,
Revolutionary Comics. ART. 15:1 p. 16 (86).
Political tourism. (SI). Forrest D. Colburn, Pilgrim-
ages to Managua. ART. 14:1 p. 21 (85).
Political tourism. (PS). Alfred Padula, Ritual,
Paradox & Death in Managua. ART. 15:1 p. 18
(86).
Sandinistas. (CC). David Bray, Sandinista So-
cialization. BRV. 14:3 p. 48 (85).
Sandinistas. (PS). Stephen German, Sandinista
Chess. ART. 10:1 p. 14 (81).
Sandinistas. (PS). Sergio Ramirez, What the
Sandinistas Want. ART. 8:3 p. 24 (79).
Sandinistas. (PS). Carlos M. Vilas, The Legacy of
Dictatorship: Nicaragua. RES. 11:3 p. 34 (82).
Sandino, Gen. Augusto C. (HI). Salvador Calder6n
Ramirez, The Last Days of Sandino. EXC. 7:4 p. 4
(78).
Somoza. (PS). Bernard Diederich, Did Human
Rights Kill Anastasio Somoza? EXC. 10:4 p. 4
(81).
US policy. (GP). John A. Booth, Rare Bird. BRV.
15:2 p. 47 (86).
US policy. (GP). Richard L. Millett, Could Nicaragua
Have Been Different? BRV. 16:2 p. 24 (88).
US policy. (GP). Robert A. Pastor, Getting Your


Hands Dirty. ART. 16:2 p. 20 (88).
PANAMA
Art & politics. (VA). Sandra Serrano, Exhibition for
National Peace. ART. 15:1 p. 33 (86).
Elections, 1984. (PS). Steve C. Ropp, Nice Show!
BRV. 14:4 p. 51 (85).
Panama Canal. (HI). Mark B. Rosenberg, The
Panamanian Connection. BRV. 7:3 p. 61 (78).
Panama Canal treaty. (GP). Ambler H. Moss, Jr.,
Insider's View. BRV. 15:1 p. 43 (86).
Panama Canal zone. (LC). Luis M. Quesada,
Panama Wounded. BRV. 13:1 p. 39 (84).
Pretto, Rogelio. (VA). Sandra Serrano, Searching
for Pretto. EXC. 15:1 p. 28 (86).
Race identity. (LC). lan I. Smart, Big Rage & Big
Romance. RES. 8:3 p. 34 (79).
Race identity. (LA). Carlos Guillermo Wilson, The
Flour Boy. SS. 9:2 p. 25 (80).
Race relations. (LC). Mima Pbrez-Venero, A
Novelist's Erotic Racial Revenge. ART. 4:4 p. 24
(72).
Social change. (HI). Neale Pearson, What Graham
Greene Didn't Tell Us. RES. 15:1 p. 26 (86).
Spadafora, Hugo. (PS). Beatriz Parga de Bay6n,
An Interview with Hugo Spadafora. INT. 15:1 p. 24
(86).
PERU
Military. (PS). Jorge Rodriguez Beruff, 100 Years of
Military. BRV. 5:1 p. 44 (73).
Myth. (LA). Abraham Valdelomar, Apumarcu, the
Potter. EXC. 2:2 p. 13 (70).
Vallejo, Cesar. (LA). Cesar Vallejo, Violence of the
Hours. POE. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Vallejo, Cesar. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Human
Poems. BRV. 1:3 p. 11 (69).
Vargas Llosa, Mario. (LC). Ramon Mendoza, A
Sling Shot at the Soap Giant. BRV. 8:2 p. 45 (79).
Vargas Llosa, Mario. (LC). Kal Wagenheim, Mario
Vargas Llosa. INT. 1:1 p. 3 (69).
PUERTO RICO
936. (ED). Rafael Hernandez Col6n, Puerto Rico,
936 & the Caribbean. ED. 14:4 p. 3 (85).
Acculturation. (HI). Charles H. Allen, First Annual
Report of Charles H. Allen, Governor of Porto
Rico. EXC. 3:1 p. 8 (71).
Albizu Campos, Pedro. (HI). Benjamin Torres
Ortiz, Don Pedro. BRV. 6:2 p. 43 (74).
Anthology, short stories. (LC). Kal Wagenheim,
Puerto Rican Downpour. BRV. 13:3 p. 53 (84).
Carrero, Jaime. (LA). Jaime Carrero, The Leper.
POE. 3:1 p. 10 (71).
Carrero, Jaime. (LA). Jaime Carrero, The Neorican
Dream, A Poem. POE. 9:3 p. 34 (80).
Childhood fantasies. (LA). Miguelangelo Rodri-
guez, Chagito, The Dreamer. SS. 11:3 p. 12 (82).
Conflict, political. (PS). Pedro Juan Soto, Fiction
or Reality. ART. 9:3 p. 15 (80).
Conflict, political. (PS). Tomas Stella, Cerro
Maravilla. ART. 9:3 p. 12 (80).
Culture & politics. (HI). Olga Jim6nez de Wagen-
heim, The Dual Colonization of an Island. BRV.
13:1 p. 31 (84).
Culture & politics. (CC). Eneid Routte G6mez, The
Agony of Puerto Rican Art. ART. 9:3 p. 16 (80).
Culture & poverty. (SC). Luis Nieves Falc6n,
Demythology of the Showcase. BRV. 2:3 p. 12
(70).
Culture of politics. (PS). C. Albizu-Miranda and
Norman Matlin, Mascaras y Vejigantes: The
Folklore of Puerto Rican Politics. ART. 1:2 p. 5
(69).
Culture, coffee. (TS). Lowell Gudmundson, Puerto
Rican Counterpoint. RES. 13:1 p. 34 (84).
Development, sociology of. (ED). Barry B. Levine,
Cultural Tag. BRV. 1:4 p. 2 (69).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. (MI). Miguel Barnet, A
Man & his Potential. BRV. 9:3 p. 40 (80).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. (Ml). Barry B. Levine, The
System is Upstairs. EXC. 9:3 p. 36 (80).
Diaspora, Puerto Rican. (MI). Helen I. Safa, A Tale
of Wit & Woe. BRV. 9:3 p. 41 (80).
Education, philosophy of. (SI). Ivan Illich, Holy
Mother School. ART. 1:3 p. 1 (69).
Elections, 1968. (PS). Charlie Albizu & Norman


Matlin, The Death of Poetry. ART. 1:1 p. 2 (69).
Elections, 1980. (PS). Harold Lidin, Puerto Rico's
1980 Elections. ART. 10:2 p. 28 (81).
Elections, 1980. (PS). Ismaro Velazquez, Munoz
and the 1980 Elections in Puerto Rico. ART. 9:3 p.
7 (80).
Everyday life. (LA). John Hawes, Remembrances
of Things Puerto Rican. EXC. 9:3 p. 22 (80).
Everyday life. (CC). Charles Rosario, The Phe-
nomenology of Everyday Life. ART. 9:3 p. 28 (80).
Export trade. (EC). Suphan Andic, The Decision to
Trade. ART. 14:2 p. 22 (85).
Grito de Lares. (HI). Olga Jimenez de Wagenheim,
Prelude to Lares. ART. 8:1 p. 39 (79).
Grito de Lares. (HI). Olga Jimbnez de Wagenheim,
The Drama of Lares. ART. 12:1 p. 22 (83).
Immigration to New York. (MI). Eugene V. Mohr,
Remembrances of New York. BRV. 10:4 p. 34
(81).
Labor migration. (MI). James W. Wessman, The
Puerto Rican Circuit. BRV. 9:3 p. 42 (80).
Marcantonio, Vito. (HI). Adalberto L6pez, Vito
Marcantonio. ART. 8:1 p. 16 (79).
Marques, Rene. (LA). Ren6 Marques, Three Men
by the River. SS. 1:4 p. 7 (69).
Marques, Rene. (LA). Ren6 Marques, The In-
former. SS. 7:2 p. 24 (78).
Migrant women. (MI). Virginia Sanchez Korrol, On
The Other Side of the Ocean. ART. 8:1 p. 22 (79).
Migrant women. (MI). Virginia E. Sanchez Korrol,
Between Two Worlds. ART. 12:3 p. 26 (83).
Music & politics. (PA). Francis Schwartz, The
Bureaucracy of Music in Puerto Rico. ART. 9:3 p.
19(80).
Mufioz Marin, Luis. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, A
Puritan in Babylon. BRV. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Mufioz Marin, Luis. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis,
Requiem fora Lost Leader. ART. 9:3 p. 5 (80).
Oiler, Francisco. (VA). Haydee Venegas, Fran-
cisco Oiler. ART. 12:2 p. 38 (83).
Photography. (VA). Kal Wagenheim, An Affair with
Puerto Rico. BRV. 1:2 p. 11 (69).
Pietri, Pedro. (LA). Pedro Juan Pietri, Puerto Rican
Obituary. POE. 2:3 p. 14 (70).
Pietri, Pedro. (LC). Barry Wallenstein, Pedro Pietri.
RES. 14:3 p. 38 (85).
Plantation life. (HI). Roderick A. McDonald, Raising
Cane. BRV. 15:3 p. 41 (87).
Political economy. (EC). Lawrence C. Phipps IV,
Puerto Rico Without Politics. BRV. 16:2 p. 49 (88).
Popular Democratic Party. (PS). Thomas Math-
ews, PDP + NPP = A*pa*thy. ART. 9:3 p. 9 (80).
Protestant cartel. (RL). Howard B. Grose, The
Protestant Cartel in Puerto Rico. REP. 5:1 p. 11
(73).
Public schools. (SI). David D. Hernandez, Puerto
Rico's Blackboard Jungle. INT. 4:1 p. 3 (72).
Puerto Ricans in New York. (MI). Edna Acosta-
Belen, Rican Richness. BRV. 14:1 p. 51 (85).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Barry B. Levine, Puerto Rican
Culture at the Turning Point. ED. 9:3 p. 4 (80).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Gordon K. Lewis, Wagenheim's
Profile. BRV. 3:2 p. 11 (71).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Gordon K. Lewis, Lewis on
Ldpez's Diaspora. LED. 5:3 p. 2 (73).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Adalberto Lopez, Literature for
the Puerto Rican Diaspora. ART. 5:2 p. 5 (73).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Adalberto L6pez, L6pez on
Lewis. LED. 5:4 p. 2 (73).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Adalberto L6pez, Literature For
The Puerto Rican Diaspora: Part II. RES. 6:4 p. 41
(74).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Loretta Phelps de Cordova et
als., La Fortaleza Replies. ART. 10:2 p. 32 (81).
Puerto Rico. (CC). Kal Wagenheim, Wagenheim on
Lewis' Wagenheim. LED. 4:1 p. 54 (72).
Reform school. (SI). Celia F. de Cintr6n, Street
Reform. BRV. 1:4 p. 13 (69).
Reminiscences. (LA). John Hawes, The Islander.
EXC. 2:1 p. 2 (70).
Reminiscences. (CC). Oscar Lewis, Reminis-
cences of an Aging Puerto Rican. EXC. 2:3 p. 1
(70).
Rosado del Valle, Julio. (VA). Ricardo Pau-Llosa,
Abstraction & Representation. ARC. 14:4 p. 36
(85).
Social change. (HI). Juan Rodriguez Cruz, A
- CARIBBEAN REVIEW INDEX 1969-1989 /71








Puerto Rican History of Puerto Rico. BRV. 3:1
p. 14 (71).
Social inequality. (SC). Robert W. Anderson, A
Hint of Something Bad. BRV. 5:3 p. 35 (73).
Social stratification. (SC). Carlos Buitrago-Ortiz,
Social Strata in Esperanza. ART. 2:3 p. 11 (70).
Social structure. (HI). Edinburgh Review, Puerto
Rico in 1834. BRV. 2:4 p. 8 (70).
Socialization. (SC). Barry B. Levine, Bootstrap
Babies. BRV. 1:1 p. 6 (69).
Sociolingulstics. (CC). Gerald Guinness, What Did
He Say? What Did He Mean? BRV. 10:4 p. 32
(81).
Soto, Pedro Juan. (LA). Pedro Juan Soto, The
Sniper. EXC. 1:3 p. 3 (69).
Spanglish. (CC). Gustavo Pbrez Firmat, Spic Chic.
ART. 15:3 p. 20 (87).
Spanish-American War. (HI). Edwin Emerson, Jr.,
Alone in Porto Rico. REP. 5:3 p. 18 (73).
Status, political. (PS). Jaime Benitez, A Response
to Berrios. ART. 8:2 p. 21 (79).
Status, political. (PS). Rubbn Berrios Martinez,
Independence For Puerto Rico: The Only Solution.
ART. 8:2 p. 15 (79).
Status, political. (PS). James L. Dietz, Stuck on
Status. RES. 14:3 p. 34 (85).
Status, political. (PS). Juan M. Garcia-
Passalacqua, Puerto Rico: Equality or Freedom?
ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
Status, political. (PS). Garry Hoyt, Puerto Rico: A
Chronicle of American Carelessness. ART. 8:2 p.
9 (79).
Status, political. (PS). Norman Matlin, Left, Center,
Right. BRV. 1:4 p. 3 (69).
Status, political. (PS). Roberto Sanchez Vilella,
Puerto Rico & the U.S. ART. 13:1 p. 4 (84).
Status, political. (PS). Jos6 J. Villamil, The Status
Soap Opera. ED. 13:1 p. 3 (84).
Status, political. (PS). Maurice Wolf, Breaking the
Puerto Rico Logjam. ART. 14:3 p. 30 (85).
Student politics. (SI). Barry B. Levine, Bread vs.
Soul. BRV. 2:4 p. 11 (70).
Sanchez, Luis Rafael. (LA). Luis Rafael Sanchez,
La Guagua Area/The Airbus. SS. 13:3 p. 26 (84).
Testimonial. (CC). Josb M. Alonso Garcia,
Conversations with Guillermo. ART. 5:3 p. 6 (73).
Transculturation. (CC). Aar6n G. Ramos, Spanish
Maimed. BRV. 1:1 p. 11 (69).
Urban planning. (SC). Leopold Kohr, La Puntilla
Reborn. EXC. 7:3 p. 16 (78).
Urban planning. (SC). Howard Stanton, Model City:
Dawn or Disaster? BRV. 1:1 p. 9 (69).
SOUTH AMERICA
Amazon Basin. (ED). William T. Vickers, Farewell
to Amazonia? RES. 15:3 p. 26 (87).
ANCOM. (ED). Robert Grosse, A Guide to the
Andean Pact. ART. 10:3 p. 16 (81).
Conflict, border. (GP). Farrokh Jhabvala, Two
Hundred Islands of Soledad. ART. 11:3 p. 8 (82).


ST. LUCIA
Displacement. (LA). Augustus C. Small, This Train.
SS. 9:2 p. 24 (80).
Walcott, Derek. (LC). John J. Figueroa, Another
Life. BRV. 7:1 p. 30 (75).
Walcott, Derek. (LC). John Thieme, Gnarled Sour
Grapes. BRV. 7:4 p. 51 (78).
ST. VINCENT
Folk art. (VA). Andrea E. Leland, Collages, Carv-
ings & Quilts. ARC. 14:1 p. 28 (85).
Mitchell, James F. (PS). Gary Brana-Shute, Inter-
viewing James F. "Son" Mitchell. INT. 12:3 p. 10
(83).
Mitchell, James F. (PS). Gary Brana-Shute, An
Eastern Caribbean Centrist. INT. 14:4 p. 27 (85).
SURINAME
Authoritarianism. (PS). Gary Brana-Shute, Poli-
ticians in Uniform. ART. 10:2 p. 24 (81).
Brain drain. (MI). Edward Dew, The Draining of
Surinam. ART. 5:4 p. 8 (73).
Conflict, political. (PS). Gary Brana-Shute, Suri-
name Surprises. ART. 15:4 p. 4 (87).
Conflict, political. (PS). Edward Dew, Suriname
Tar B aby. ART. 12:1 p. 4 (83).
Coup d'etat, 1979. (PS). Edward Dew, The Year of
the Sergeants. ART. 9:2 p. 4 (80).
Culture as commodity. (TS). Sally & Richard Price,
Exotica & Commodity. ART. 9:4 p. 12 (80).
Culture as commodity. (TS). Dorothea & Norman
Whitten, Ethnoaesthetics in the Rain Forest. BRV.
11:4 p. 24 (82).
Elections, 1973. (PS). Edward Dew, Elections
Surinam Style. ART. 6:2 p. 20 (74).
Gender roles, women. (TS). Sally Price, Wives,
Husbands, & More Wives. ART. 12:2 p. 26 (83).
Javanese. (SC). Annemarie de Waal Malefijt, The
Passing of Wajang. ART. 7:3 p. 43 (78).
Saramaka. (TS). Richard Price, First-Time. ART.
13:1 p. 20 (84).
Shifting alliances. (GP). Edward Dew, Did Suri-
name Switch? ART. 12:4 p. 29 (83).
Social change. (HI). Cornelis Ch. Goslinga, Benign
Neglect. BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
Status, political. (PS). Robert H. Manley, Surinam
Politics. BRV. 1:1 p. 12 (69).
THIRD WORLD
Health. (SC). John Bryant, Health & the Developing
World. EXC. 2:3 p. 7 (70).
International relations. (GP). Joseph Bensman &
Arthur Vidich, The Struggle for the Underdevelop-
ed World: I. ART. 2:3 p. 3 (70). II. ART. 2:4 p. 4 (70).
Local organizations. (ED). David Zewig, Local
Yokels. BRV. 14:2 p. 48 (85).
Overdevelopment. (ED). Anatol Murad, Kohr's Size
Theory. REP. 2:4 p. 12 (70).
Population policy. (SC). Jeffrey J. W. Baker,
Galileo, Onan & the Pope. ART. 1:3 p. 6 (69).


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SIGNATURE


Population policy. (SC). Aaron Segal, Too Much of
a Good Thing. RES. 5:4 p. 37 (73).
Underdevelopment. (ED). Adolfo Leyva, In-
betweenism? BRV. 14:1 p. 50 (85).
US immigration policy. (MI). Alejandro Portes, The
Reality of Immigration Reform. ED. 15:4 p. 3 (87).
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
Administrative deficiencies. (ED). Selwyn Ryan, A
Shortcut to Development? ED. 12:3 p. 3 (83).
Bissoondath, Neil. (LC). Augusta Dwyer, Future
Fiction. BRV. 14:4 p. 50 (85).
Black power. (SC). Lloyd Best, Black Power &
Doctor Politics. ART. 2:2 p. 5 (70).
Black power. (SC). Basil Ince, Black Power in
Trinidad. BRV. 1:3 p. 10 (69).
Calypso. (PA). Linden Lewis, The Mighty Shadow.
ART. 10:4 p. 20 (81).
Conflict, political. (PS). Ken Boodhoo, A Little
Black Book. BRV. 5:1 p. 42 (73).
Culture & poverty. (SC). Ronald G. Parris, Poverty
in Trinidad. BRV. 4:3 p. 44 (72).
Drugs. (SI). Frank Fonda Taylor, Does Trinidad
Have A Drug Problem? ART. 15:4 p. 15 (87).
Elections, 1986. (PS). Kevin A. Yelvington, Vote
Dem Out. ART. 15:4 p. 8 (87).
Electoral democracy. (PS). Selwyn Ryan, The
Church That Williams Built. ART. 10:2 p. 12 (81).
Informal credit association. (EC). Daniel Levin,
Susu. ART. 7:1 p. 19 (75).
Morality tales. (LC). John Cooke, Requiem for a
Pen Name. BRV. 13:2 p. 53 (84).
Mutiny, 1970. (PS). Anthony P. Maingot, Three
Rebellious Lieutenants. BRV. 13:4 p. 49 (84).
Naipaul, V.S. (LC). Gerald Guinness, The Black
Power Killings in Trinidad. BRV. 10:2 p. 36 (81).
Naipaul, V.S. (LC). Robert D. Hamner, A New
Naipaul? BRV. 16:1 p. 38 (88).
Naipaul, V.S. (LC). John Thieme, Naipauliana.
BRV. 7:1 p. 32 (75).
Opposition, role of. (PS). Basdeo Panday, The
Role of the Opposition in Trinidad & Tobago. ART.
7:4 p. 31 (78).
Plantation life. (HI). Frank E. Manning, Plantations
and Crime. BRV. 16:1 p. 41 (88).
PNM. (PS). J. E. Greene, The Party's Over. ART.
15:4 p. 13 (87).
Sciences, role of. (SI). Anthony P. Maingot, Future
of the University of The West Indies. BRV. 7:3 p.
48 (78).
Socialization. (SC). Ursula M. Von Eckardt, We
Wish to be Looked Upon. BRV. 2:2 p. 10 (70).
Status, political. (PS). Selwyn Ryan, Tobago's
Quest for Autonomy. ART. 14:2 p. 7 (85).
Sugar. (HI). Ken Boodhoo, Sugar & East Indian
Indentureship in Trinidad. ART. 5:2 p. 17 (73).
Sugar. (HI). Charles Kingsley, Coolie Labor in
Trinidad. EXC. 5:2 p. 21 (73).
Superstitions. (LA). Brenda Flanagan, Shango. SS.
8:4 p. 26 (79).
U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
Labor migration. (MI). Gordon K. Lewis, Romans,
Natives & Helots. ART. 2:1 p. 3 (70).
Labor migration. (MI). Mark J. Miller & William W.
Boyer, Foreign Workers in the USVI. ART. 11:1 p.
48 (82).
Racial consciousness. (MI). Eric W. Blake,
Stranger in Paradise. ART. 6:2 p. 8 (74).
Status, political. (PS). S. B. Jones-Hendrickson,
Virgin Island Vignettes. BRV. 13:3 p. 54 (84).
Status, political. (PS). Gordon K. Lewis, Which
Way the U.S. Virgin Islands? ART. 5:4 p. 16 (73).
Transculturation. (CC). James W. Green, Rape of
the Virgins. BRV. 5:2 p. 37 (73).
VENEZUELA
Venezuela Conflict, border. (GP). Basil A. Ince,
Transfer of Power: British-Style. ART. 1:1 p. 7 (69).
Culture & poverty. (SC). Angelina Pollack-Eltz, The
View from the Barrio. BRV. 2:1 p. 13 (70).
Oil. (EC). George W. Grayson, Sadists & Syco-
phants. BRV. 14:1 p. 49 (85).
Oil. (EC). John D. Wirth, Mistreated Goose. BRV.
13:3 p. 55 (84).
Social change. (HI). Richard Parker, Intelligent
History. BRV. 14:3 p. 51 (85).


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Dj Reggae
Continued from page 6
titillation of degrading, humiliating
and objectifying lyrics. There needs to
be a musical alternative that offers
more and is somehow more attractive
to Jamaican reggae audiences than
slackness.
In his sociomusical study There Ain't
No Black in the Union Jack, Paul Gilroy
proposes a correlation between the
politically and socially engaged roots
reggae of the socialistic Manley years
and the dj slackness that sprung up
when Edward Seaga came to power.
Despite Manley's difficulties in the
international and economic realm, his
style of speaking, employing Biblical
metaphors straight out of Rasta rheto-
ric, imbued in Jamaican nationalism
and cultural pride, artists had the confi-
dence to speak out; even Yellowman
was recording politically critical songs
like Operation Eradication (compare this
to his abysmal LP Yellowman Sings the
Blues, in which he explores the subtle
composition of The Gambler).
Seaga's administration coincided
with the slackness epidemic, a sign of
stagnation in popular culture. The
reversal of prime ministerial position
may yet set the stage for the future of
Jamaican national culture, and a new
phase in reggae's development.
In 1988, Bunny Wailer, the sole survi-
vor of the brilliant Marley/Tosh/
Wailer trio, was rumored to be produc-
ing a politically oriented LP. Instead he
released Rule Dance Hall, stating that
"the time is not right for that (political)
one yet." With Rule Dance Hall Wailer
declared his intentions to reform the
dance hall by producing an album
"morally fit for the youths to listen to,
cultural in its way, a next side to dance
hall... cause this thing that was being
pushed on them they had to accept
because there wasn't any other side."
But a one-man reassertion of Rasta
ideology in the dance hall didn't stop
the wave of slackness.
In February 1989, Bunny released the
long awaited Liberation LP. Inter-
estingly, the initial title of the LP was
Resistance, and the new title reflects the
urgent, demanding message of the
album. "This is a cry of a people..."
Liberation opens, announcing an album
that has the potential to turn the tide of
apolitical, slack reggae. Sly and Robbie,
Earl "Chinna" Smith and a collection of
other familiar musicians, lay down an
unabashedly roots foundation of bril-
liant horn lines and bottomless bass and
drums for Wailer's forcible and com-


pelling voice. His introductory dia-
tribes on Both the Mosquito and Rise and
Shine are particularly strong, as he
adopts the inflection of evocative ora-
tion, chanting over unadulterated nyab-
inghi syncopation.
Wailer has explained that his album
"is not subversive in any way, not
creating any isms or schisms," and
given the historical fate of reggae artists
who speak out politically, this dis-
claimer is understandable. However,
the lyrics of Liberation speak for them-
selves, and this is the kind of politically
barbed music, reminiscent of Marley's
head-on approach on Zimbabwe or War,
that will threaten those that deserve to
be denounced.
Liberation's galvanizing album jacket
is an enlargement of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights: "I know
that there has been talk about human
rights all over the universe," Wailer
comments, "But I haven't seen any
organization or publisher that has pub-
lished the Human Rights Charter and
issued it as it should be, available at
every post-office... If you know your
rights, the next time someone tries to
violate your rights they will think
twice... People should know that some-
thing like this exists, that it was set up
for their protection by the League of
Nations."
Liberation is, above all, a call to people
of all nations to examine and struggle to
improve their political and social situa-
tion. Although musically Liberation is
suggestive of roots reggae of the late
70s in many respects it is evocative of
Marley's Survival lyrically the album
has been updated in several critical
areas. Dash Wey the Vial admonishes
drug use, particularly crack, and there
is, significantly, no mention of ganja in
Liberation, perhaps indicating Wailer's
seriousness about the political issues he
confronts on the album.
More and more reggae debut al-
bums, like Foundation's Flames, are
reflecting this pattern: a vacuous trib-
ute to marijuana has no place alongside
these political and social urgencies.
And while his Rasta faith is obviously
the inspiration foundation of all of
Bunny Wailer's work and life, the
political messages of Liberation are not
obscured in Rasta metaphors.
Rather than dwell on the mystical/
allegorical dreamland of Africa,
Wailer's philosophy comes closer to
the lyrics of progressive British artists
such as Linton Kwesi Johnson who
demand change in the present social
and political system (LKJ's "Right
now, African nation, West Indian and


Black British/Stand firm inna Inglan/
Inna this here time/For no matter
what they say/Come what may/We
are here to stay inna Inglan.") The
statements on Liberation are explicit,
international and firmly grounded in
reality, demanding concrete political
and social reform.
While Jamaican reggae was making
its sluggish retreat, British and African
artists like Linton Kwesi Johnson, Pato
Banton, Benjamin Zephaniah, Fela
Kuti and Mzwakhe Mbuli carried on
the tradition of politically engaged
music. However, developments in-
dicate that Jamaican reggae may be
gearing up to join the battle. Ziggy
Marley and the Melody Makers' Con-
scious Party has gained international
popularity, as well as Grammy and
NAACP recognition.
The determining factor, of course,
lies in the power of the Jamaican
reggae audience, and they will finally
decide what kind of music achieves
popular recognition. However, politi-
cal and social trends in Jamaica sug-
gest that reggae artists are realizing, in
Bunny Wailer's words, that "now is
the time" to return to producing
music that deals with the urgent politi-
cal situations confronting the Carib-
bean and African community today,
and to offer their audience an alterna-
tive to slackness. m

Appropriation
Continued from page 7
from a degenerate "establishment."
It is not surprising then that Ameri-
can "progressives" developed and held
on to a notion that the social commen-
taries communicated by reggae songs
should revolve around marijuana,
Rastafari and the parochial dichotomi-
zation of humanity.
The music writers among these pro-
gressives tend to endorse reggae that
divides the world into opposing camps
such as Rastafari vs. baldhead, the
system vs. the suffering, good vs. bad,
us vs. them. The songs present the
camp opposed to the song writer's own
camp as the cause of the problems faced
by the songwriter, his group, or even all
of humanity. They imply or declare that
the solutions to the problems essen-
tially lay in the triumph of the song
writer's camp and the demise of the
opposition. They even view reggae as
music that is full of anger and that, in
communicating this anger, must re-
volve around a highly accentuated per-
cussion section.
No doubt because of this recon-


CARIBBEAN







ception, one "progressive" music
writer claimed that good reggae does
not fail "to terrify." And such music
writers tend to dismiss or lambaste
Caribbean music and musicians that
depart from this conception of the
essence of reggae. Perhaps the most
caustic such lambasting was in the
Rolling Stone review by Lester Bangs of
the 1978 Bob Marley and the Wailers
album Kaya. Among the Jamaican musi-
cians who have received attention in
the United States, Jimmy Cliff and
Third World most consistently depart
from this reconception of the essence of
reggae and therefore have most consis-
tently drawn the vituperation of "pro-
gressive" American music reviewers.
The expropriation and reconception
were fueled, exploited and internalized
by Caribbean special interests who
were under the influence of two major
social forces. One was the emphasis on
distinctiveness that contributed to the
breakup of the West Indies Federation
of 1958-1962 and the separate pursuit of
independence by Jamaica and by Tri-
nidad and Tobago. The other force was
the tendency of the islands to seek a
certain validation of their output from
the North American and Western Euro-
pean nations the islands regard as
models, leaders or benefactors.
Expropriation and reconception
were promoted and exploited in North
America by a number of Jamaican
musicians because this made Jamaica
and Jamaicans -the originators of reg-


gae appear distinctive from other
Caribbean islands and people, and the
popularity of reggae constituted evi-
dence of approval, thus elevating Ja-
maica and Jamaicans. Indeed expropri-
ation and reconception were the cor-
nerstones of the promotion of Robert
"Bob" Marley in North America. There
Marley and his recording company
untiringly promoted the reggae/
marijuana/Rastafari/dichotomization
package and Marley as the embodi-
ment of that package.
A few pieces of evidence indicate
Marley may have altered his output to
be consistent with this package. Before
the mid-1970s, there were many "love
songs" in his output, that dropped
markedly thereafter; the reverse held
true for dichotomizationn songs." And
when in 1978 he produced the Kaya
album, with many "soft songs," he was
roundly criticized in the U.S. for not
releasing a sufficiently aggressive
album. After 1978, he named albums
with titles such as Confrontation and
Uprising, although the albums never
quite contained the fire their titles
implied.
Expropriation and reconception
affected not only Marley and Jamaica
but the rest of the Caribbean as well.
Many song writers and performers in
the region had been aware of mari-
juana and Rastafari for decades, but
after they perceived that the reggae/
marijuana/Rastafari/dichotomization
package had been validated in North


America, they increased the represen-
tation of these elements in their
songs.
The tendency of Caribbean people to
internalize such validation has resulted
in the following: Since the 1970s, those
Caribbean artists who have adopted or
exploited the dichotomization package,
or those who have been promoted and
legitimized as embodiments of that
package in North America, have gradu-
ated from musician to leader to revolu-
tionary to national hero to prophet,
even to messiah.
In 1988, I tried to uncover the source
of admiration for Marley among secon-
dary school students in the Caribbean:
whether they held this admiration be-
cause he was popular among people
they knew personally, among people in
their own island, among people in
Jamaica, or among people in the U.S.
The only significant predictor of their
admiration was, on the basis of a
regression analysis, their perception of
Marley's popularity among people in
the United States!
Early in the history of reggae, Carib-
bean people did not distinguish reggae
from other Caribbean music on the
basis of content. But then reggae was
exported to North America where it
was reshaped. The reshaped view was
reexported to and internalized by the
Caribbean. Thus reggae seems to have
become a victim of the international
process of cultural imperialism by
reexportation. m


Who speaks for


1 the Caribbean?
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Panama
Continued from page 11
are in prison at the orders of the
attorney general.
As a result of this transformation,
public security expenses have been
reduced from approximately $150 mil-
lion under Noriega's Defense Forces to
approximately $80 million for the four
services of the new Public Force (as
proposed by the budget recently pre-
sented by the government to the Legis-
lative Assembly). Whereas these $80
million for public security represents
3.5% of the operational budget for the
whole government, the new budget
proposes to spend $260 million or 11%
on education, and $590 million or 26%
on social security and public health.

Issues of Legitimacy
Some members of the international
community have in fact expressed the
opinion that
new elections .
are necessary to
legitimize Pan-
ama's govern-
ment. In reality,
from the point
of view of the
Panamanian ,
people, who
are the only .
ones capable of
granting demo-
cratic legiti-
macy, there is
no need for
new general
elections.
The elections
of May 7, 1989,
were an authen-
tic act of self-determination on the part
of the Panamanian people. The ensuing
development of resistance to the dicta-
torship and of crisis within the dicta-
torship was directly related to the
struggle to gain respect for this expres-
sion of the electoral will of the Panama-
nian people, as the touchstone of au-
thentic democratization.
Those members of the international
community which were unwilling to
act forthrightly in defense of the self-
determination of the people of Panama,
when Noriega as dictator disregarded
it, on the grounds that to do so would
amount to intervention in the internal
affairs of Panama, cannot argue now
that they are not intervening in our
internal affairs when and if they de-
mand new elections to substitute the
already freely elected government of


Panama. The Panamanian people can-
not be expected to submit to double-
jeopardy: first denied solidarity be-
cause of non-intervention; then denied
recognition despite non-intervention.
Democracy requires in the truest
tradition of the American and French
Revolutions that national sover-
eignty be rooted in popular sover-
eignty. When Noriega's dictatorship
abused national sovereignty to repress
popular sovereignty, the only demo-
cratic response was and is to vindicate
popular sovereignty as the basis on
which to reaffirm national sovereignty.
The present democratic government of
Panama represents precisely this op-
tion and for this reason is a fully
legitimate democratic government.
It should be clear, however, that the
government will be consulting the Pan-
amanian people on at least two counts
within the year. It will do so in order to
complete the 1989 elections at the legis-


lative and the municipal levels, in those
circuits and precincts where it has been
impossible to establish beyond a rea-
sonable doubt the result of the elec-
tions. Moreover, President Endara has
announced the government's intention
to propose amendments to our Con-
stitution, which if approved by the
Legislative Assembly, must be submit-
ted to the Panamanian people for final
approval in a constitutional referen-
dum. Thus there will be ample oppor-
tunity for the people of Panama to
express their will freely on the course of
political events.
As the demilitarization of Panama's
Public Force is carried out, a second
issue is sometimes raised, as to how
Panama will comply with the Torrijos-
Carter treaties regarding the protection
of the Canal. Faithful compliance with


these treaties is not at stake. If anything,
it is now more assured than ever. Nori-
ega's criminal behavior as a dictator at
the national and international levels is
over and it no longer casts a shadow on
the reliability of Panama to assume re-
sponsibility for the Canal in accordance
with the treaties. The appointment of a
Panamanian citizen as chief administra-
tor of the Panama Canal Commission,
which had been postponed by the U.S.
Government beyond the treaty-estab-
lished date because of Noriega's re-
gime, is now on track and should be-
come effective shortly. For the Pana-
manian people the treaties constitute a
valid instrument for the full nation-
alization of the Canal by the year 2000.
On it's part, the U.S. Government has
reaffirmed it's intention to comply faith-
fully with the Canal treaties. They are
not, therefore, at stake.
But complying with the treaties does
not bind us to following the militaristic
interpretation of
the Noriega dicta-
torship, according
to which Panama
required a growing
and domineering
military establish-
ment to assure it's
role in the protec-
tion of the Canal.
This was a self-
serving abuse of
treaty stipulations
in order to use
them as a pretext
for military ag-
grandizement and
domination. It is
highly questiona-
ble whether the
Canal can be de-
fended in military terms. And it is clear
that Panama has no possibility, as far as
resources, to reproduce on it's own the
type of military defense which the U.S.
has developed and maintains under the
treaties.
Panama's policy for the protection of
the Canal can and should follow a differ-
ent pattern. It should be based on the
country being internally at peace, the
people fundamentally reconciled, liv-
ing under a democratic form of govern-
ment and assuming the administration
of the Canal as a national endeavor of
paramount importance above and be-
yond partisan differences. The protec-
tion of the Canal should count, moreo-
ver, on the security provided by mod-
ern, professional police services capable
of dealing with the local challenges to
it's safeguard, and in this respect it may


CARIBBEAN







be advisable to develop, if not a special-
ized organization, at least some person-
nel within the national police who are
specialized in providing police protec-
tion to the Canal.
Finally, the neutrality of the Canal,
proclaimed by the Torrijos-Carter trea-
ties, can become an effective, overarch-
ing factor of protection for the Canal,
now that the relationship between the
superpowers is moving away from
bipolar confrontation and now that the
Central American region begins to ad-
vance on the road towards peaceful,
democratic interaction.
A third issue can be raised, regard-
ing the manner in which the new
democratic gov-
ernment of Pan- ":
ama means to
relate to the in- ,
ternationalcom- .
munity and spe-.
cifically to Latin
America. i, -
Under a demo- :.:
cratic govern- '
ment, where --.- '
foreign policy x -
must be
worked out in
public and is
subject to con-
stitutional
checks and bal-
ances, Panama
will not have
the type of mel-
odramatic for-
eign policy,
which dictator-
ships willing to
sacrifice the
welfare of their --
own people to
the dictator's self-image are wont to
have.
A new reasonable Panamanian for-
eign policy must keep in mind that the
reconstruction of Panama's economy is
indispensable to the welfare of the
Panamanian people and that Panama's
economy, being the most open interna-
tionally and the most service-oriented
in Latin America, demands normal
relationships with a very ample spec-
trum of diverse countries, based on real
mutual respect.
Within that ample spectrum, Panama
has discovered, during the traumatic
events that have occurred during the
past months, that it is closer to Central
America than to any other group of
nations. For this reason President En-
dara has responded positively to the
invitation extended by the Central


American presidents to join the whole
process of regional dialogue, reconcilia-
tion and development. One should
expect therefore a much more Central
American-oriented foreign policy on
the part of Panama than heretofore.
But Panama will maintain very much
alive it's overall Latin American con-
cern. In our view Latin America has a
unique opportunity. For the first time
since our respective independence,
nearly all Latin American nations are
under democratic rule. This situation
presents a challenge: to act collectively
to complete as quickly as possible the
democratization of the whole hemi-
sphere, with special attention to two


countries which offer marked resis-
tance to democracy, the resistance of
extreme poverty in the case of Haiti and
the resistance of totalitarian ideology in
the case of Cuba. It is urgent for Latin
America to complete it's democratiza-
tion in order to be able finally to
undertake the next point in it's agenda:
economic and political integration.

The Meaning of Panama's
Transformation
The change which is taking place in
Panama carries with it a message. It
says that the successful completion of
an undertaking requires human re-
solve, a combination of vision, willful-
ness and endurance. The Panamanian
people were resolved to be freed from
dictatorship. For 21 years we stead-
fastly kept our minds on a vision of


democracy, our hearts on a will to resist
and overcome oppression and our
souls and bodies on the disposition to
endure whatever became necessary to
gain our freedom.
An additional element can be drawn
from a very personal dimension of this
experience. Shortly after the U.S. mili-
tary action in Panama, once President
Endara, second Vice President Ford
and myself had taken our oath of office,
in the ensuing days of sheer anarchy,
rampant vandalism and sporadic at-
tempts at guerrilla violence, we called
on the former members of the military
to return to service in terms of a new
loyalty to the Constitution and to de-
mocracy.
The call was
made through
radio and was
heard both by
those who decided
to respond posi-
tively and by some
who decided to re-
spond violently.
On the day the new
national public
force -no longer
military, but police
in nature -was to
get started, as Min-
ister of Govern-
ment and Justice in
charge of police se-
curity, I traveled by
car from the head-
quarters of the new
democratic govern-
-ment at the Legisla-
tive Palace to the
new headquarters
.- of the police force.
As we reached this
later place, an attack was launched
against us by some of Noriega's
remaining troops. For over an hour and
a half we were under direct machine
gun and bazooka fire. It was a very
close call, which could have ended
otherwise than it did.
When it was over and it became
possible to swear in old military into
new police functions, a decisive turn in
Panama's change had taken place: the
new democratic government could
begin to count on the support and
allegiance of the new public force in
order to be able to offer the Panama-
nian people security and full respect
for human rights.
This occurrence made evident the
dramatic nature of the changes in Pan-
ama in its quest for peace, for human
dignity and for justice. m


REVIEW


I


I










Narrative of a Five

Years Expedition

Against the Revolted

Negroes of Surinam
JOHN GABRIEL STEDMAN
Transcribed for the First Time from the
Original 1790 Manuscript
Edited, and with an Introduction and Notes, i
)by Richard Price and Sally Price

John Gabriel Stedman's Narrative of a Five
Years Expedition, first published in London t
in 1796, was an immediate popular success.
Illustrated by William Blake, Francesco -
Bartolozzi, and others, it was quickly trans- -
lated into a half-doizcn languages and was ,"
eventually published in over twenty -" '- f
different editions.
Now a new, unexpurgated edition based on the author's own recently
discovered manuscript reveals for the first time Stedman's true views on
slavery, his frank descriptions of relations between masters and their female
slaves, and other material deemed unsuitable for an eighteenth-century
audience. Freed from its original publisher's censorship, Stedman'sNarrative
stands as one of the strongest indictments ever to appear against New
World slavery.
"The book is a blockbuster." Stuart B. Schwartz, University of Minnesota
$95.00


Peasants and Capital
Dominica in the WorldEconomy
MICHEL-ROLPH TROUILLOT
How does one explain, Michel-Rolph Trouillot asks,
the "peculiar coexistence of peasants and capitalism"
in a country fully incorporated in the global economic
system? Combining history, political economy, and
anthropology, Peasants and Capital provides the
first scholarly examination of the island nation of
Dominica and the encounter between a little-known
Caribbean culture and the world economy.
Trouillot traces the Dominican peasants' historical
struggles with planters, colonial officials, and traders
over the organization of work and production. And in
an extended ethnographic description, Trouillot
illuminates the economic, cultural, and historical
forces at work at the level of an individual
Dominican village.
T7beohns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic Histor' and Culture
$35.00


7 ii 40hStr i75 ,ai mrM Bad211


Nicaragua
Continued from page 15
Hector Castro, and his well-trained
team of precinct officers.
Appeals by Catholic and Protestant
leaders and an interdenominational
service of prayer and reflection on
election eve also appeared helpful to set
the stage for what turned out to be an
extraordinarily tranquil election day.
On election day, February 25, our dele-
gation covered all 13 precincts at six
polling sites (all school buildings) in El
Rama itself as well as the outlying site
in El Recreo. Electoral commission pre-
cinct officers had slept on the floors of
their polling sites in order to guard the
ballot boxes and election materials.
Some told us that lines began forming at
4 a.m., although the polls were not
scheduled to open until 7 a.m.
When we arrived at our stations at
about 5:45 a.m. to observe the setting up
procedures, precinct personnel were
already well organized and voter lines
were already long. The lines cleared
well before noon, and the afternoon was
slow. After the polls closed at six,
reports were completed and ballots
accounted for. At two of the polling
sites, a discrepancy of one vote between
ballots used and names checked off the
registration lists kept officials counting
and recounting for almost an hour. In
sum, election day procedures were
scrupulously fair and honest and re-
markably orderly. An OAS observer
who serves on Venezuela's national
electoral commission remarked to us
that he wished elections in his own
country were managed as well.
The UNO won handily in El Rama, as
it did nationwide. The margin of victory
in El Rama was about 57 percent -73
percent for UNO to 26 percent for the
FSLN and 1 percent for PUCA. Voter
turnout was 75 percent; the national
figure was about 87 percent. The victory
of the opposition appeared to come as a
surprise to candidates, observers, poll-
sters, and voters alike. Monday morn-
ing quarterbacking with respect to the
outcome is sure to be a big business for
a long time to come, and surely many
authors and factors can be found to
share the credit or the blame. The
violence that so many Nicaraguans
feared as an immediate aftermath of the
election no matter who won was
averted. There was every reason to
believe that both Ortega and Chamorro
wanted to see an orderly transition and
a turn to reconciliation rather than to
revenge. Chamorro, after all, has two
children who are Sandinista leaders! m


CARIBBEAN







Burnham-Bashing
Continued from page 17
cause, in his view, certain news stories
portrayed Burnham's image and poli-
cies in too lacklustre a fashion. On one
occasion, a respected member of the
press was physically assaulted. (He
later accepted an apology.) On another,
during debate in parliament in 1971,
Hoyte threatened an opposing speaker
with a tall heavy wooden ashtray and
challenged him to hand-to-hand com-
bat over criticisms made of gov-
ernment policies. This incident oc-
curred in full view of the local and
foreign media who quietly nicknamed
him "Demon" Hoyte. And at the July
1988 CARICOM summit in Antigua,
Mr. Hoyte's "new" image as a cam-
paigner for press freedom was dealt a
severe blow when the president lost his
temper and startled those present with
a sharp verbal attack on a reporter who
had asked probing questions.
Finally, Hoyte coined the phrase
"Things are Happening" to indicate
that under his "new and inspired"
leadership Guyana has suddenly been
awakened from Burnhamite apathy to
be rapidly on the move in search of
development. A special feature in the


state-run Guyana Chronicle appeared
regularly under the caption "Things
are Happening." The state-controlled
radio stations responded by introduc-
ing a program of the same name.
This particular development pro-
vides clear evidence of the policy of
"Burnham-Bashing" elevating fact to
fiction, an odd but apparently genuine
belief by top leadership that Guyana's
serious problems are solvable by mere
bombastic boast and misapplied politi-
cal will. Hoyte himself provided the
best example of this folly, in an address
to a rowdy, unenthusiastic gathering of
labor unions marking 1987 May Day
celebrations, when he declared in sten-
torian tones, "Things are infinitely bet-
ter now than they were just a few
months ago" when Burnham had died.
But as the president and the "Things
Are Happening" news features re-
ported about "rapid and spectacular
progress" (invariably, the latter meant
front page newspaper coverage with
photographs of a few imported cows,
sheep and chickens), the observed real-
ity was clearly contradictory in the
form of increased power outages, near
nonexistent public transportation, long
lines of motorists and housewives for
gasoline, kerosene, and cooking gas,


deplorable public health standards,
worsened trade, production and other
economic indicators, ad infinitum, ad
nauseam, ad.... Cynics have thus re-
phrased Hoyte's slogan to "Worse
Things are Happening."
Another aspect of the sanctimony is
that while the "Things are Happening"
campaign was designed to show Hoyte
at the helm bringing hitherto unseen
benefits to the society in contrast to the
malaise of Burnham's leadership, the
tactic was one very much learned from
Burnham, who himself had coined
such phrases as "Hold On, Things Gon'
Change" (and, later, "Produce or Per-
ish") to contrast his so-called purpose-
ful leadership against alleged nonper-
formance by his predecessor Cheddi
Jagan. More than that, however, the
majority of what important develop-
ments were featured in Hoyte's cam-
paign just happened to be projects that
had been in various stages of incipience
during Burnham's time shortly before
his death. Such was certainly the case,
for example, regarding diversification
of the sugar industry.
As earlier acknowledged, however,
some forms of "Burnham-Bashing"
were potentially beneficial and did, at
least initially, provide important posi-


0 Those That Be In Bondage A.R.F. Webber
Those That Be in Bondage, one of the first novels to examine the conditions of the East Indians in
the Caribbean and the psychic traumas of people of color under colonialism, is reprinted for the first
time since its original publication in 1917. In this first novel from Trinidad and Tobago, A.R.E.
Webber (1880-1932) capturees the plight of his people as they attempt to overcome the burdens that
were imposed upon them by the colonial order.
254 pages; paperback ISBN 0-911565-05-1 Price: $13.95

1 Growing Up With Miss Milly Sybil Seaforth
"'J,,.,: i. ,d '1,- h r... r, ,., lr.jr ll. ..tiii i -. .:II II,.: 11 (. 1- I i. d ii .11. iP,,, but the search has
.,.,:||,, |T,, I ,. I.. ., i :, if., i ,,, , p ,ir ',h 'ii, ... by Jamaica-born author Sybil Seaforth...
This delightful novel is a refreshing antidote to much of the young-adult literature that features
Black characters." -P ul i .,.t.i.- L ..P. .:' .-n, I.. r 1988
132 pages; paperback ISBN 0-911565-04-3 Price: $10.95


SThe Still Cry


Noor Kumar Mahabir


[The Still Cry is an] admirable evocation of the Indo-T1,-, i.,i, Ii i .1 ,n,, .....11 ,I, l
historical document, a rare journey into the vanished world of these robust survivors of the
[Atlantic] crossing ... [It] is a major contribution to oral history, to Caribbean history; it may not be
repeated ... This book is an urgent appeal for us to record and learn from these voices.
Clem Shiwcharan, New Community (London)
191 pages; paperback ISBN 0-911565-03-5 Price: $10.95
Please include $1.50 (shipping and handling)
for the first book, 50 for each additional book.

I '
a u .


REVIEW


Africa's Ogun
Old World and New
Edited by Sandra T. Barnes
Africa's Ogun examines how a once-
obscure traditional religious ideology and
deity have not only survived but migrated
across several continents, attracting a
growing following in the contemporary
world, including the Caribbean. Analyzing
this international metacultural phenomenon
are scholars representing anthropology, art
history, religious studies, linguistics, folk-
lore, history, performance studies, and
sociology.
African Systems of Thought

Now back in print!
Art of the Fantastic Fantastic
Latin Americo, 1920-1987
By Holliday T. Day and Hollister Sturges
"... provides a splendid introduction to the mrit
ers, sculptors, and other artists who have fhrrru
lated an impressive and distinctive aesthetic
expression of both regional and world cultb,'e
Published in association with the Indianapolis Museum of 4,
cloth $55.00 paper $35.00

INDIANA Tenth and Morton Streets
Bloomington, IN 47405
UNIVERSITY PRESS 812-855-6804







tive results. Another set of outcomes
(addressed later) are even more encour-
aging for the country. The latter, how-
ever, have been unanticipated by Hoyte
and reflect accidental happenings more
than designed strategy. But as was the
case with the frivolous instances of
"Burnham-Bashing" cited earlier, the
more positive aspects of the policy have
also, paradoxically, intensified the poli-
tics of sanctimony. Two examples will
suffice.
When, early in his stewardship,
Hoyte decided to lift the ban on wheat
imports that had been imposed by
Burnham largely for narrow political
purposes, that act represented
"Burnham-Bashing" at its laudable
best. It was a move that won instant
wide popular support because the ban
had created a thriving blackmarket
and all sorts of high-level corruption
as Guyanese were robbed of the uni-
versal staple of daily living: bread.
Policemen were often seen seizing
bread from vendors and trampling the
loaves. Because lifting the ban cut
across ideological and ethnic lines,
many viewed the move as beginning
the slow process of healing the di-
vided crisis-ridden nation.
Again, when the new Guyanese


president reversed an earlier cabinet
decision to put Burnham's expensively
embalmed body on permanent display
with Soviet help, this too was
"Burnham-Bashing" in a positive vein.
The act diffused widespread criticism
that the late dictator should be awarded
such a distinction, which at any rate
was alien to all local cultural norms and
religious beliefs.
Even though he had been declared a
national hero by the government in yet
another of those strange acts of at-
tempting through sheer political will to
reshape reality, the fact remained that
Forbes Burnham was so unpopular
when he died that he was, euphemisti-
cally, an inappropriate role model for a
country attempting to salve the
wounds of his wrongdoings. Thus it
was that Hoyte's decision to bury the
body was well received. The burial
would be a ceremonial banishing in a
dignified way of painful times. Thereaf-
ter, the entire nation could be invited to
rally around Hoyte and support his call
for sacrifices to rebuild the country.
However, the fact that -these two
moves were liberally interspersed
with the more petty acts of "Burnham-
Bashing" significantly diminished
their statesman-like aura and gave


indication that Hoyte had a mean
streak. Ironically, the chief executive's
behavior evoked memories of how
Burnham had shown small-minded-
ness upon taking over the government
from Dr. Cheddi Jagan 21 years ear-
lier. At that time, Burnham had lev-
elled vituperative attacks against
Jagan. And in the current display of
frivolous "Burnham-Bashing," Hoyte
appeared in the eyes of many opinion
leaders oddly unthankful to his men-
tor who had defended and rewarded
him against heavy insider and wider
popular anger over harsh economic
programs.

Mixed Results
Thus it was that the intermingling of
positive "Burnham-Bashing" with
meaner and frivolous forms of it gave
rise to doubts about Hoyte's suitability
for the highest leadership post as his
behavior rekindled more and more
memories of his closeness to Burnham
and his strident and at times shrill
propagation of his late mentor's ideas.
Giving powerful credence and fillip to
an emerging groundswell of second
thoughts was the stark reality that
Burnham's death did not remove the
single most important obstacle to gov-


CARIBBEAN


tave TWOmn


Caribbean o
1650-1832
By Barbara Bush

T his is the first book on black slave women to take into account
the complexities of gender, race, and class which made their expe-
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challenges certain myths surrounding black women's lives as workers,
mothers, and as activists in the vanguard of resistance to slavery. She
redefines the woman slave's contribution to slave society in a more
positive and realistic light. Bush draws on contemporary historical
sources and on anthropological and sociological studies of African and
Caribbean societies. She also makes comparisons with the experience
of slaves in America's Old South.
cloth $29.95 paper $12.50

At bookstores, or direct from

INDIANA
UNIVERSITY PRESS
Dept. A2DR. 10th & Morton Sts., Bloomington, IN 47405 812-855-6804


White Servitude and Black Slavery
in Barbados, 1627-1715

Hilary McD. Beckles


"Richly researched and cogently argued, Beckles'
important study shows that, contrary to romantic
misconception, few indentured whites of Barbados
later became pirates and planters. More accurately,
they were 'proto-slaves,' whose oppression in the
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precedent then extended to the thousands of
captured Africans who followed them into the New
World."-Bonham C. Richardson, author of Panama
Money in Barbados, 1900-1920.
238 pages, ISBN 0-87049-601-8, $34.95




The University of Tennessee Press
Knoxville 37996-0325







ernment's credibility the perception
that Burnham's and now Hoyte's Peo-
ple's National Congress (PNC) govern-
ment was in power illegally through
gerrymandering of the electoral proc-
ess and fraudulent elections.
In his last years, nearly all of Forbes
Burnham's actions had evinced the cold
stamp of a self-interested calculus; of
opportunistically measuring precisely
the cost/benefit ratio of proposed ac-
tions to see how they enhanced or
hindered his quest for legitimacy the
voluntary conferring by the people of
the right to rule a right he had
repeatedly usurped and never honestly
won since 1968. At death, legitimacy
had still eluded him with Pimpernelian
agility. Could it be that in turning
against his mentor so unhesitatingly, so
publicly, so randomly, and so com-
pletely, President Hoyte was also woo-
ing legitimacy for the government he
had helped create and had unexpect-
edly inherited? This indeed appeared to
be the case.
If there were any doubts about this,
the general election of 1985 dispelled
them. With great fanfare, Hoyte had
introduced some token electoral re-
forms as he sought to give the election
climate a slant of fairness and to indi-


cate that he, unlike Burnham, was
amenable to change. But given deep
hostility to the PNC that "Burnham-
Bashing" had helped revive, those mild
modifications were insufficient to win
the president significant popular sup-
port. Fraudulent mechanisms had to be
relied upon. Thus, as most cynics un-
persuaded by the "new" Hoyte had
predicted, the results were once again
rigged. Predictably, too, the president
went into the familiar Burnhamite re-
frain of spirited self-denial. And thus
had "Burnham-Bashing" been exposed
more definitively as the politics of
sanctimony.
Frustrated but still disunited opposi-
tion forces wasted no time in complain-
ing about the fraud and reminding
everyone that Hoyte had been the
principal author of both the controver-
sial Guyana and PNC constitutions
-documents that seem to suggest
preference for rule by authoritarian
decree. Their charge appeared vindi-
cated when Hoyte himself moved
swiftly in early 1988, following an
unexpected reversal for the govern-
ment in the courts on the issue of
consultation with opposition groups, to
invoke the classic Burnham tactic of
amending the Guyana constitution to


forge ways around legalities while spe-
ciously impressing that dictatorial ac-
tions were rooted in the rule of law.
In another way, the Guyanese maxi-
mum leader has been hoisted on his
own petard. The vainglorious pursuit
of elusive legitimacy led him to take
some positive "Burnham-Bashing"
steps that have unleashed conse-
quences and forces he will increasingly
find difficult to control. Having slightly
raised the lid of the authoritarian box
that has stifled democracy for decades,
Hoyte has unwittingly caused a new
breath of life about freedom and indi-
vidual rights to escape and be inhaled
by the Guyanese populace. This rea-
wakening of long dormant democratic
values will have to be accommodated
in any calculus for continued authori-
tarian control because, as the evidence
in Latin America, the Caribbean and
elsewhere has shown, democracy is a
universal torch which once lit is never
easily dimmed.
Because of raised mass expectations,
therefore, and because his own por-
trayal of a split image has boomer-
anged, Mr. Hoyte will find it increas-
ingly difficult to continue muzzling the
independent press and an emerging
group of vocal influential opinion lead-


REVIEW


Three Dictators
From Waterfront Press:
Papa Doc: Haiti and its Dictator. Bernard Diederich and
Al Burt. 'Tragic, terrifying, bizarre,' wrote Graham Green in
the foreword of this book by Time Magazine and Miami
Herald correspondents. Favorably reviewed in The New
York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post. Indispensable to
future historians, or observers of Haiti today. 1990 (re-issue
of 1969 edition). 424 pp. ISBN 0-943862-43-4. Paper: $12.95.
Trujillo: The Death of the Dictator. Bernard Diederich. A
riveting, minute-by minute account of the assassination, in
1961, of Generalissimo Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, the ruthless
Dominican Republic dictator, and the ferocious wave of re-
venge that ensued before his 31-year regime collapsed. Re-
veals the role of the U.S. (and the CIA) in first propping up
Trujillo, then supplying the guns to slay him. 1990 (re-issue of
1978 edition). 264 pp. ISBN 0-943862-44-2 Paper: $12.95.
Somoza And the Legacy of U.S. Involvement in Central
America. Bernard Diederich. Shows how through terror, vio-
lence, guile, clever public relations and manipulation of U.S.
diplomats and businessmen, Somoza (who inherited control
of the country from his father) maintained power in Nicara-
gua for 20 years and built a huge personal fortune, before
being overthrown in 1979. Essential for understanding the
roots of the conflict in Nicaragua. 1989 (re-issue of 1981 edi-
tion). 352 pp. ISBN 0-943862-42-6. Paper: $12.95.
Add $2.00 per title for shipping and handling. Send orders
to, or request full catalogue from: Waterfront Press, 52 Maple
Ave., Maplewood, NJ 07040.


East Indians in Trinidad: A Study in Cultural Persistence
Morton Klass The earliest (and perhaps the most thorough) com-
munity study dealing with East Indians, this work remains
valuable in debates dealing with cultural persistence and colonial
society. 265 pages, $9.95

Green Turtle Cay: An Island in the Bahamas
Alan C. LaFlamme This general ethnography of the old Loyalist
settlement on Green Turtle Cay emphasizes ethnic relations and
the influence of outside cultural forces (including tourism, U.S.
media, international politics, and the black power ideology) upon
the community. 110 pages, $7.95

On The Corner: Male Social Life in a Paramaribo Creole
Neighborhood Gary Brana-Shute The male side of a society
is the focus of this richly documented narrative about lower status
Creole males of Paramaribo, Suriname who congregate and in-
teract in the neighborhood winkel. 123 pages, $8.50

To order. .
College faculty complimentary review copies: Write or call providing
appropriate course information.
Personal library copies: Send check for cost of the bookss,
adding $2.00 per order for postage, to Waveland Press.

P.O. Box 400 Prospect Heights, Illinois 60070
708/634-0081








ers. This is one unanticipated benefit to
the Guyanese that "Burnham-Bashing"
has yielded.
Interestingly, also, from indications
given the president will have to sus-
tain and even intensify "Burnham-
Bashing" in his unremitting, but thus
far unsuccessful, quest of US eco-
nomic assistance. Reportedly, the
United States has made it clear that
the aid Guyana so much needs will be
contingent upon more and more eco-
nomic and other reforms associated
with capitalist democratic societies.
The minor efforts to date to en-
courage the local private sector and
attract foreign investments have not
convinced the American government
that Hoyte is a suddenly reborn capi-
talist convert.
Indeed, economist Clive Thomas has
found that US-controlled lending agen-
cies are most reluctant to provide
Hoyte the US$4 billion Guyana needs
because "such agencies fully well know
that those who are now playing to the
tune of privatization were, only re-
cently, (in Burnham's time) foremost in
the anti-private sector drive...." (Car-
ibbean Contact, July 1988). According to
Thomas, it is clear that the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and other agen-


cies "harbor doubts about the sincerity
of those persons now mouthing sup-
port for the private sector."
Thus have the politics of sanctimony
failed to move Guyana forward. And
Hoyte's on again off again warm ties
with socialist countries, as well as simi-
lar somersaults on his ban of the word
"socialism" from official government
language have only compounded mat-
ters. Rather, the tactic has proven to be
a double-edged sword. US firmness
with the president is well-founded, and
to the extent that he is forced to
democratize the society, to that meas-
ure can "Burnham-Bashing" be seen to
have provided unanticipated positive
benefits to Guyana.
Another unexpected result of the
politics of sanctimony is that Hoyte will
find it much more difficult in 1990 than
in 1985 to mastermind an acceptable
general election victory for the PNC.
This is because "Burnham-Bashing" in
its frivolous forms has been unleashed
so ferociously that it has turned into a
political witch hunt that has effectively
displaced the specialized authoritarian
election machinery of the ruling party.
Most key operatives have quit or have
gone into exile overseas.
This and other unpredicted develop-


ments earlier mentioned suggest that
Hoyte has painted himself into the
proverbial corner. He is damned if he
continues "Burnham-Bashing" in
search of elusive legitimacy since the
politics of sanctimony has already been
exposed; and he is damned if he does
not since much-needed US aid appears
tied to its spirited continuance as does
the illusion of a free press and other
token reforms.
In the view of critics and sup-
porters alike, the way out of this
morass is simple. The president
should unequivocally set Guyana on
a pro-capitalist path of democratic
development, and boldly announce
his decision. It is likely, they argue,
that such action would win over-
whelming support where it matters
- among the masses who are tired
of empty socialist rhetoric and now
of an adrift nonpolicy that produces
nonperformance. Chances are slim,
however, that Hoyte will ever take
this step despite the flirtations with
democracy that "Burnham-Bashing"
has caused. The fact is that Desmond
"Demon" Hoyte is the kind of leader
whose authoritarian instincts will al-
ways overpower any occasional dem-
ocratic driftings he might engineer. m


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SIGNATURE


I







Costa Rican Art


And the Latin American Visual Imagination


Almost clandestinely,
Costa Rican contem-
porary art is emerg-
ing on the interna-
tional scene. For decades even
specialists on Latin American art
paid no more than a passing
glance at the art of the Central
American nation. And the only
internationally recognized
artist born in Costa Rica,
Francisco Ziifiiga, was long
associated with Mexico.
But all this is changing.
Costa Rica today boasts
some of the most dynamic
new artists in Latin America,
and certainly the most
important artists to emerge
from Central America in a
generation. They have en-
gaged in countless eclectic
speculations into modernist
and contemporary art.
The work of these artists
must be appreciated in
terms of the aesthetic tradi-
tions and concerns which
have prevailed in Latin
America during this cen-
tury. Many critics have er-
roneously assumed that
Latin American art is but an '
outcry against the political
and social injustices of the
continent. If a vital and
distinctively Latin American
art can flourish in a climate
of tolerance, peace and plu- Gra
ralism, then this ideological
criticism of Latin American art
collapses. Elucidating the "Latin
Americanness" of Costa Rican art
is, therefore, important if a non-
partisan vision of Latin American
art in general, and Costa Rican art
in particular, is to be obtained.

Latin American Modernism
Modernism in Europe sought to
make the pictorial image inde-
pendent of the reality to which it
referred. It did this primarily by
doing away with the illusion of a
third dimension in painting and
emphasizing the two-dimen-
sional space of the canvas. After


WWII, in the
United States,
artists of the
New York School eliminated all
attempts to have the painting refer
to reality and stressed the blunt
presence of paint and other media
as the sole theme of the work.
However, in Latin America, the
distortions associated with Euro-
pean modernism did not lead to a
complete break with reference as


fismos by Ana Isabel Marten, batik and paper,

it did in New York. Since the
mid-1920s, Latin American artists
broadened the power of reference
through devices known as tropes,
figures which reveal new links
between things and ideas, e.g.
metaphor, metonymy, irony.
Sometimes these links are based
on resemblance, as is the case of
metaphor. Other times the links
are based on physical or func-
tional proximity as in the case of
metonymy. And, still other times
as in the case of irony, the trope
means the opposite of what it
apparently "says."
For Latin American artists such


I BY ICAR


84 CARIBBEAN


Ricardo Pat-Llosa
teaches English at
Miamni-DadeCom-
,,in.;Iu, College.
He is contributing
editor for Latin
America at Art
International
Magazine.


as Mexican Rufino Tamayo, Chil-
ean Roberto Matta, Cuban
Wifredo Lam, and Peruvian Fer-
nando de Szyszlo, the issue was
not how to bracket or suspend
reference in favor of abstraction.
Rather, the problem was how to
introduce tropes to effectively
highlight the ambiguous union of
reference and abstraction (terms
which post-war North American
artists saw in radical opposition to
each other).
The quest for new tropes
] which would facilitate an
abstract reference (be it to
things in the world, e.g.,
Tamayo's melon slices or
to the world of the uncon-
scious, e.g., Matta's vol-
canic, luminous scenarios
of primal consciousness)
would permit Latin Ameri-
can artists a freedom to
explore medium without
denying reference.
One characteristic of
Latin American modern-
ism is the interest in
representing the infinite by
combining disparate
sources of imagery. This
tradition was founded by
Uruguay's Joaquin Torres-
Garcia (1874-1949). While
in Europe, Torres-Garcia
was a member of the con-
structivist circle which
sought a "pure" non-
referential art that cele-
brated the infinite pattern-
1989 ing of geometric forms.
However, after his re-
turn to Uruguay in 1932, Torres-
Garcia combined this focus with a
seemingly incongruous source of
imagery for the infinite: language.
The contradiction springs from
the fact that sign systems such as
language are the very essence of
reference. By realizing that sign-
making was an ancient and pow-
erful way to represent the infinite
he, in effect, integrated the pas-
sage of time in a human scale with
the infiniteness denoted by geo-
metric patterns.

The Costa Rican Imagination
In Costa Rica, the paintings of


84


CARIBBEAN













Ana Isabel Marten add to the
tradition of Torres-Garcia's
semantic "constructivism."
Martin's work is about the fusion
of human and non-human ele-
ments in the world. What emerges
is a feeling that reality resembles a
tumbling, ambiguous poem. This
is a mythic view of the world
rooted in a concern with the infi-
nite inherited from Latin Ameri-
can constructivism. Her work is
made sensuous by the deft,
opalescent chromaticism and
by the varied lineation which
governs the signs in her picto-
rial "texts," signs that radiate
a sense of color unequaled in s
Costa Rican art.
Following Torres-Garcia,
Marten reconciles the radical
bidimensionality of the mod-
ern pictorial plane with an
expansive reach toward the
infinite. The result is an art
patterned with modern as
well as archaic concepts of
time, man, nature, language g
and space.
Marten shares with Luis
Chac6n, Fabio Herrera and
Ott6n Solis the unique Latin
American approach to the
complex relationship between
"abstraction" and "refer-
ence."
In the work of Chac6n, the drips
and splatters associated with late
1940s abstract expressionism be-
come references to waterfalls and,
on a broader plane, to the eroti-
cism of Costa Rica's varied and
lush tropical environment.
However, reference, in Chac6n,
works also in the opposite direc-
tion. The waterfall can and does
signify the falling of paint on
canvas, and this reversal of signi-
fication is buttressed by Chac6n's
use of hinged canvases. The cas-
cade "falls" on a vertical canvas
and "crashes" on a horizontal one
beneath it.
The division between the two
pictorial planes and the disruption
of the rectangle which their inter-
section produces are fundamental
to the message; painting must
turn medium into sign to deal
with themes that deal with time
REVIEW


such as a waterfall. The double
canvas also turns the disjunction
of space itself into a sign of
temporality. But more impor-
tantly, the division underscores a
duality of reference through
which sign (paint) and referent
(waterfall) change places, so that
waterfall also "signifies" paint.
Latin American artists of the
tradition in which Chac6n works
have always asserted that art


, _- .


Eva (Eve); Adin (Adam): by Roberto Lizano.
Cardboard and colored pencil.


should explore the ambiguity of
sign/referent relationships, not
collapse them onto each other.
The medium can signify the mes-
sage, and it can simultaneously be
signified by it, but it cannot be the
message.
The work of Ott6n Solis and
Fabio Herrera also deals with the


nature of signs and their physical
immediacy, and, as in Chac6n, the
element of time is critical to their
work. Solis generates -against a
poignant surface of red, grey,
white or black tersely con-
ceived patterns and pictorial "ges-
tures." There is nothing sporadic
about these gestures. Each one is
shaped in thought before it mate-
rializes on canvas.
The element of time springs
from the recognition that
these gestures and patterns
are both sign as well as a
statement about paint as pure
image. In Solis, time is also
.* addressed by the use of pat-
tern and variation. An ele-
ment of ritual in his works,
which focuses on the relation-
ship between sign/object and
the scenario in which it finds
itself, derives its power from
the simultaneous handling of
archaic and modern contexts.

Architectural Images
No other area of the Western
visual imagination has dem-
onstrated as profound and
varied an interest with the
representation of architec-
ture as Latin America. A
huge body of significations
have attached themselves to picto-
rial images of buildings and their
elements. In the modern era, Latin
American masters such as Torres-
Garcia, Roberto Aizenberg of Ar-
gentina, Tamayo and Gunther
Gerzso of Mexico, Amelia PelAez
and Emilio SAnchez of Cuba, and
many others have drawn on the
legacy of architectural motifs that
includes Greek, Renaissance and
Baroque models of memory, as
well as Freudian and Jungian
theories.
In Costa Rica, the woodcuts of
Francisco Amighetti offer the first
modern expression of interest in
an architectural motif. However,
the Costa Ricans who have ex-
plored this theme with the great-
est originality and directness are
Fabio Herrera and Maricel
Jim6nez.
Fabio Herrera connects the
traditions of abstract reference


85


I














and those of "found-object" sculp-
ture (assembled from the junk of
everyday life) and architectural
themes. His formulation of pat-
terns and gestures clarifies the
relationship between abstraction
and reference. And the "found-
object" nature of Herrera's Puertas
("Doors") is as important as his
handling of abstract reference.
Herrera's doors are both sculp-
tures and double paintings. Like
Janus, they have two faces. Like
Hermaphrodite, they are mascu-
line and feminine. Excised from
the world of
function, like
one of Marcel
Duchamp's
readymades,
Herrera's doors
rely on the
painter's hand
and not just
their new sur-
roundings to
come alive in
the imagination.
The use of
architectural
elements is also
important in the
dream-like
sculptures and
installations .t
of Maricel
Jimenez. She .
also uses doors, A
but more fre-
quent in her
work are chairs
and stools.
These devices
echo the human I
shape in a direct
way. Buildings
can be said to
echo the human
figure less di- Fabio Herrera:
rectly but as in-
tensely. Chairs are a kind of prism
where the structure of a building
intersects with the immediate
structure of the human anatomy.
Jimenez's work deals more di-
rectly with dwelling than Her-
rera's. She forges a dreamt space
often inhabited by an ironically
minuscule bird or by plaster effi-
gies of people gazing simultane-


ously at the world and into their
psyches. Jimenez's people are not
the hardened ghosts of George
Segal. They are poised between
awareness and reflection, and the
cages, chairs and objects that sur-
round them seem to reflect their
inner life.
If Maricel Jimenez represents
the connection between oneiric
(having to do with those levels of
the unconscious where dreams,
language and memory are forged)
and architectural concerns, Jos6
Luis L6pez Escarr6 represents the


Travesuras de uno nino (A Child's Pranks), pa
connection between architectural
themes and the idiosyncratic prac-
tice of expressionism in Latin
America. L6pez Escarr6 focuses on
the image of rooms in paintings
whose ecstatic distortions are bal-
anced by an unsettling sense of
color.
L6pez alters the connotations,
not the denotations, of everyday


life space. He subverts, but does
not totally obliterate the comforts
we associate with the familiar sur-
roundings of a middle class dwell-
ing. The overriding feeling in his
painting is irony, not dread, and it
is irony which governs the major
expressionist statements of Latin
America since the early 1960s.

An Expressionism of Irony
In the 1960s, twenty years be-
fore expressionism was brought
back to life in Western Europe and
North America, Latin American
artists working in
this style were
producing break-
throughs which
are still unri-
valed, if still
largely unknown
outside the re-
gion.
In Argentina,
Jorge de la Vega,
m s io i Ernesto Deira,
R6mulo Macci6,
Luis Felipe Nod,
S Carlos Alonso
S and Mauricio La-
sansky; in Mex-
ico, Jos6 Luis
S Cuevas; in Puerto
Rico, Julio Ro-
sado del Valle;
and in Venezuela,
Jacobo Borges are
the major figures
of this tradition
which tempered
expressionist
angst with irony
and the mocking
of greed, cruelty,
stupidity and the
social entrap-
ments that de-
aint on door grade human life.
Four Costa
Rican artists can be aligned with
this tradition. Two work within
the stylistic and thematic para-
meters of Latin America's
expressionism of irony: Miguel
HernAndez and Jos6 Miguel Ro-
jas. The other two, Leonel Gon-
zilez and Roberto Lizano, intro-
duce oneiric and abstract ele-
ments into ironic, biting works.
CARIBBEAN


. 86














Power is the main theme of the
first two artists. In Hernandez this
takes the shape of physical strug-
gle. It is irony that puts the trans-
lucent wings of Icarus on a world
of violence and rebellion. In Rojas
the theme emerges as an unspar-
ing analysis of authority and its
gestural language. Irony becomes
the very substance of the pictorial
thought.
Rojas is as much a dramaturge
as he is a painter. His cast of
characters hails predominantly
from the histrionic worlds of bu-


reaucracy and
business. There
is a real struggle
as the brush-
stroke tries des-


'.5'..
*3~
..-
.. 3.33
~
3 ~ .3$.'3.~*


perately to cap- .-
ture those fatal ".:-
glimpses of per- '
sonality which "' *
the power bro-
ker, in a careless
moment, has al-
lowed to leak ',
into the social
arena.
But the artist
informs us of ,,
the failure of the
attempt, either
as brushstroke ', '
slurs and fails to
break through .
the armor of
hierarchy pro- ..
during a blur, :
or, once achiev-
ing a break-
through, finds
nothing behind .
the shell of Parque Nacional Braulio C
power but a
wounded echo. The terseness of Gon
Rojas' radical chromatic economy, and
and the sheer bluntness of his Rica
strokes give us image after image TI
of personalities wrecked by the zanc
weight of the power they wield not
but do not seem to understand. cial
As far as color and subject mat- rary
ter are concerned, the paintings of mos
Leonel GonzAlez stand in direct bral.
contrast with those of Rojas. Gon- to d
zalez paints images from the life ploy
of Lim6n, Costa Rica's principal boxes
Caribbean port. It seems to be an bles
REVIEW


easy life, tropical and ripe with
color and dance. The figures are
reduced to thick black silhouettes
where the turbulence of the brush-
stroke is engulfed in a shadow
that has become flesh. These fig-
ures stand at verandas against a
splendor of colors, neither pos-
sessing them nor eclipsing them.
They are overtaken if not fully
embraced by the design. Without
any recourse to the anecdotes of
poverty, Gonzalez has managed
to create wonderfully ambiguous
images, both lush and unsettling.


ings and collages as with his
ravenous, satirizing use of images
and motifs from art history, folk-
lore, the social environment and
historical myth.
Lizano takes and combines,
creating visual dramas where the
themes and visual resolutions of
Delacroix collide with those of
Picasso, or where Eden's protago-
nists become the uneasy masks of
the power struggle between the
sexes.
But Lizano's work is always a
form of meta-art (or art about art),


- ^.* ^ :. ,,.


IL


S..; .










........' .
... ,:. .:. ._' .',
.. "': ".;: "', :,.': ,


;


, .

arrillo (Detail) by Luis Chac6n Gonzalez, oil on canvas

zilez's eye for pattern, line missed dual
color is unequaled in Costa puppet-like
n art. Brother can
he ambiguities of Roberto Li- The vitalit
's painted assemblages are ists cannot
specifically existential or so- willingness
in focus. Of all the contempo- thinking up
artists in Costa Rica, he is the irony and
t irreverent and the most cere- desire to ex
His irreverence has as much representati
o with the medium he em- tion them
s -cardboard from shipping duced a pot
s which he cuts and assem- strengthens
as the support for his paint- tural autono


so that his Adam
and Eve are also
about the implicit
irony of making
monuments and
mythic figures.
Nothing is spared
his critical and
satirizing eye. Li-
zano's vision of an
opulent nude,
sketched on the
side of a flattened
cardboard box,
manages to ridi-
cule everything
from the nude as
genre, pop art and
graffiti art to the
conceits of portrai-
ture and the ludi-
crous exoticism of
romantic painting.
His eye is also
trained on the
pomposity of ec-
clesiastics. His
Hombre de la Mano
Roja ("Man with a
Red Hand") cap-
tures an often


lity of power -how
the cold gaze of Big
be.
y of Costa Rican art-
be doubted. Their
to base their visual
on tropes, to explore
metaphor, and the
pand the powers of
on rather than ques-
endlessly, has pro-
ent national art that
Latin America's cul-
my. N


87






FIRST
IMPRESSIONS


Critics Look at the Literature


Compiled by
Forrest D.
Colburn










































Forrest D.
Colburn teaches
politics at
Princeton Univer-
sity. His most
recent book is
Managing the
Commanding
Heights:
Nicaragua's
State Enterprises
(Un;.'i, ity of
California Press,
1990).


SEX AS SOMETHING ELSE
How to Make Love to a Negro. Dany
Laferriere. Trans. David Homel. Toronto:
The Coach House Press, 1987. 117 p.

Haitian Dany Laferriere's first
novel exhibits the wily intelli-
gence and panache of a veteran
satirist. As translator David
Homel remarks, "Despite the ef-
fective teaser title, in this book sex
is mostly an indicator of class,
ethnic, and historical conflict."
Laferriere's protagonist, like the
author, is an immigrant writer in
Canada struggling to supplant
James Baldwin as the great black
novelist. Distractions abound. A
constant stream of white women,
all according to type, wander
through his bed. His roommate
Bouba wakens to expound on
music, sex and Islam: "Allah is
great and Freud is his prophet."
Added to that, the apartment is
unbearably hot and "Beelze-
bub's" room upstairs resounds
with his sexual exploits.
Nevertheless, the novel within
the novel, Black Cruiser's Paradise,
finally emerges. The narrator even
fantasizes about rave reviews
from renowned critics and imag-
ines an interview broadcast over
Radio-Canada. Literary allusions,
puns, ironic juxtapositions of the
ordinary and the absurd serve the
headlong progress of the action.
Homel's translation retains the
complex ambiguities of the French
original.
Robert D. Hamner
Hardin-Simmons University

A GROTESQUERIE
X/SELF Edward Kamau Brathwaite.
Oxford University Press, 1987. 131 p.

Edward Brathwaite completes his
second trilogy, begun with Mother
Poem (1977) and continued with
Sun Poem (1982), in X/SELF, a
staggering lyrical fusion of Euro-
pean, Amerindian, African and
Maroon landscapes that reas-
sesses "Caribbean Man" in all his
playfulness, complexity and pa-


those. The author's fusion of these
various "selves" that constitute
the Caribbean personality is a
poetic journey that began in 1967
with Rights of Passage.
In the opening poem "Letter to
Roma," Brathwaite sets a histori-
cal stage. He uses a narrator, a
newly elected governor and son of
an emperor (of a symbolic Rome),
to show how unprepared Euro-
pean conquistadors were when
they set out to conquer the New
World. The young governor is
surrounded by a grotesquerie of
malicious news-carrying women
whose flatteries are designed for
their own selfish aims. The scene
is pathetic, tinged with a sick
humor; but at least the governor is
aware of what's going on.
The classical images/symbols
in X/SELF are of brokenness. This
underlines the paradox of a cul-
ture, itself broken, seeking to
mend and bring light to other
cultures. What Europe achieved
through its inveterate self-decep-
tion, was the destruction of most
of the territories which it sought
to dominate and, ultimately, itself.
This is clearly seen in "Edge of the
Desert" where Rome is still burn-
ing and the colosseum, which is of
course arched, now has "square
blue holes... ruined...."
In "Julia," Brathwaite lashes
out against new-day versions of
colonialism. He plays on the chic-
ness of Ceasar's daughter Julia
and of the star of an American TV
sitcom "Julia" to highlight the
illusiveness of certain values and
lifestyles. Painted women who are
a threat to indigenous culture
"dream of rubenstein of vogue
and guinevere at camelot."
This pulling together of superfi-
ciality and futility across cultures
and centuries is striking, and the
poet extends his scathing hand to
the Third World. Brathwaite's
message is that for the Third
World to make an enduring mark
on world civilization, it must use
its inherent creative potential, de-
rived from the richness of its
plural heritage as a mode of resist-
ing foreign cultural penetration.


The creative force of the Carib-
bean and the Third World is rep-
resented in the dynamic opera-
tions of Anancy/Ananse, the Car-
ibbean/ West African spider/god
of tricks, stratagems, disputations
and creativity. Outside interfer-
ence into people's lives through
old and new forms of imperialism
has grieved the god of creativity,
resulting in some turning against
each other. Our task is to rejuve-
nate our authentic modes of ex-
pressions. X/SELF plays a major
role in this quest.
Brathwaite blames outside
forces. His premise is a little less
than realistic, for he never men-
tions the local infrastructural sys-
tems which also cramp indige-
nous expression. While celebrat-
ing the music, language and cul-
ture of the region, implying that
an assertion of these is a way of
resisting outside cultural penetra-
tion, he never fully explores the
impact of internal structures.
The book shows Brathwaite in
full command of his craft and at
the height of his artistic power.
Using rhythmical structures built
on jazz, calypso, reggae and An-
glican hymns to explore the com-
plex Caribbean personality
shaped by a multiple heritage, the
poet not only gives us a crystalli-
zation of our history but a rich
musical experience.
Anthony Kellman
Louisiana State University

TWO DOCS TOO MANY
Papa Doc. Baby Doc: Haiti and the
Duvaliers. James Ferguson. Oxford:
Basil Blackwell, 1987. 171 p.

Ferguson's book is an account of
the rise and fall of the Duvalier
family dictatorship and the events
that followed its overthrow. He
argues that Duvalierism was not
an isolated phenomenon, but
rather the product of persistent
historical trends. Ferguson details
Frangois Duvalier's rise to power,
the influence of n6gritude, the
elimination or subordination of
the opposition, the creation of a
Duvalierist power structure, the
consolidation of power through
the creation of the presidency-for-


88 CARIBBEAN


CARIBBEAN


- 88










life and the successful transition of
power after his death.
Young Jean-Claude Duvalier,
according to Ferguson, was not as
efficient as his father and was the
object of a struggle between con-
tending cliques who tried to influ-
ence him. The most noticeable
among those were the "dino-
saurs," who represented the old
order, and the modernizerss,"
technocrats mostly of Jean-
Claude's generation. Ferguson de-
scribes how this struggle for influ-
ence weakened the structure of
the regime and brought about its
collapse. He also stresses the de-
terminant role of the Catholic
Church as a catalyst of popular
discontent and as the symbolical
leader of a leaderless revolt. The
author contends that little has
changed in Haiti, as the popular
insurrection was not allowed to
follow its due course.
Ernesto Sagds
University of Florida

A CHILD'S CENTRAL AMERICA
Conflict in Central America:
Approaches to Peace and Security.
Jack Child, Editor. New York: St. Mar-
tin's Press, 1986. 207 p.

The contributors represent a
range of national and professional
backgrounds. The essays present
a balanced range of perspectives
yet too many of them are simplis-
tic and not very well informed.
The book contains too many
cliches, such as a former Guatema-
lan vice-president's statement that
"each national situation is differ-
ent, as are also ideological trends
and the objectives of the various
revolutionary movements."
Howard Handelman
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

THE ONE AND THE MANY
Amirica Latina en sus ideas. Coor-
dinaci6n e introducci6n por Leopoldo
Zea. M6xico: Veintiuno Editores, 1986.

This work offers an overview of
the history of ideas in Latin Amer-
ica and the development of the
region's culture and identity. The
themes of unity, the influence and
integration of foreign ideas, the


shared history among Latin
American countries, and the evo-
lution of a uniquely Latin Ameri-
can identity are central.
The authors have chosen to
focus upon the commonalities
among Latin American nations
-the indigenous cultures, the ex-
perience of colonialism, and the
search for identity. The authors
seek to trace the development of
Latin America's thought and iden-
tity by investigating the impact of
foreign ideas on Latin American
society, and discussing the interac-
tion of these with the indigenous
cosmologies as well as the conse-
quent formation of ideas and con-
ceptions of self resulting from this
mixing of worldviews.
The authors maintain that the
colonial influence of Europe has
not precluded the possibility of
Latin America establishing its
own identity. In fact, reference is
made to Jose Vasconcelos' idea of
a cosmic race emerging from the
intermixing that has occurred and
the possibility of "...a new system
of values corresponding to the
new age... arising from the fertile
crossbreeding of ideas..."
The question of unity is inter-
twined with that of identity. The
book suggests that only through
the recognition of the unity exist-
ing among Latin American na-
tions can true integration occur,
can a true "national Latin Ameri-
can" identity be created.
Argentine philosopher Arturo
Andres Roig notes that "ideales
bolivarianos" concerning the
unity of the diverse cultures of the
continent have been resurrected
and calls for a "dialectical integra-
tion of the one and the many" to
avoid the pitfalls of utopianism, of
failure to recognize and deal with
discrepancies between desired
goals and a present reality.
While it may seem a monumen-
tal undertaking to assemble a co-
herent, and not exceedingly ab-
stract, body of work concerning
an area as diverse as Latin Amer-
ica, the authors of this volume
have made an admirable and
highly successful effort to do just
that.
Ann N. Davis
Chicago, Illinois


WHO'S WATCHING WHOM?
V.S. Naipaul: A Materialist Read-
ing. Selwyn R. Cudjoe. University of
Massachusetts Press, 1988. 287 p.

Cudjoe begins with four postu-
lates: Naipaul is the bicultural
product of Eastern and Western
philosophies; his works cannot be
perceived as self-evident truth;
the knowledge derived from
Naipaul is "independent of,
though related to, what he at-
tempts to say"; he is best under-
stood within the postcolonial con-
text of the West Indian literary
and historical tradition.
In arguing that Naipaul judges
colonial people by the social and
cultural values of the Western
colonizer, Cudjoe maintains the
obvious. He sees Naipaul's devel-
opment in three phases. The first,
culminating in his masterpiece A
House for Mr. Biswas, is the richest
because of its ambivalent por-
trayal of the individual suspended
between two alien cultures. In his
second phase, Naipaul suffers
"helplessness, isolation and un-
ease" due to an inability to estab-
lish an identity separate from the
mother country. Detached more
and more from his homeland, he
cannot conceive of functional in-
dependence for postcolonial sub-
jects. Characterized by brilliant
craftsmanship, Naipaul's third
phase is repetitious. Distin-
guished by personal hysteria, it
leads toward apocalyptic scenar-
ios, arrogance, or fantasy. In the
end, Naipaul "transfers his neuro-
ses onto others" and says for the
First World what "many white
racists wanted to say all along but
could not."
Given a writer as divisive as
Naipaul, Cudjoe offers thor-
oughly documented, engaged
analysis. If the scholar accepts the
specter of a monolithic school of
Western thought, his is a healthy
antidote. Because Naipaul clearly
invites biographical and psycho-
logical comparisons between his
fiction and his expository prose,
there remains the possibility that
his own life is an ironic commen-
tary on the insidiousness of colo-
nialism. In that case, Cudjoe could
be wrong, and Naipaul himself


REVIEW 89


REVIEW


89









becomes a victim of his own preju-
dices.
Robert D. Hamner
Hardin-Simmons University

PEASANT PATHOS
Small Farming and Peasant Re-
sources in the Caribbean. John S.
Brierly and Hymie Rubenstein, eds.
Winnipeg: University of Manitoba,
1988. 134 p.

This collection on peasants and
farming in the English-speaking
Caribbean addresses the effi-
ciency of small-scale farming, de-
cision-making by peasants and
other country folk, the role of
women in agriculture, and land
tenure.
Agriculture in the Caribbean is
in a distressed state. In 1987, the
region's food import bill was al-
most US$2 billion, an increase of
60% over the previous decade.
Unemployment and balance-of-
payments deficits contrast with
the abandonment of farm land.
John Brierley's contribution on
farming in Grenada most vividly
captures the difficulties of peasant
agriculture in the Caribbean. The
median age on the island is 18
years, but the mean age of farmers
is 57. Ingrained attitudes that agri-
culture connotes drudgery have
kept the young away, even when
unemployed. Theft, a concern of
60% of farmers interviewed in a
survey, further hampers farming.
Despite rapid population growth,
the area of land cultivated in
Grenada has declined, bringing a
reduction in food production.
The essays remind us that Car-
ibbean peasant agriculture is far
from efficient in its use of either
land or labor. The roots of this
costly malaise are social as much
as political or environmental.
Forrest D. Colburn

SENSIBLE SOLUTIONS
Patterns of Development in Latin
America: Poverty, Repression and
Economic Strategy. John Sheahan.
Princeton University Press, 1987.

This is a solid and well-written
book on the political economy of
Latin American development
from a pragmatist perspective.


Sheahan proposes that despite se-
rious obstacles of dependency and
structural problems, whether the
people of the region enjoy pros-
perity or suffer misery still de-
pends on the specific economic
policies adopted. He contrasts the
experience of countries with com-
parable historical and institutional
characteristics that have adopted
different national responses to
similar pressures from the out-
side.
With analysis ranging from the
negative impact of concentrated
land ownership to the important
role played by the elasticities of
demand and supply, he empha-
sizes three central issues. 1) The
persistence of poverty and ine-
quality despite rising national in-
comes. The author examines the
role of the educational system and
land ownership, as well as the
functioning of labor markets and
rational macroeconomic manage-
ment. 2) The relationship between
Latin America and the rest of the
world: trade, finance, direct in-
vestment, foreign aid, and IMF
stabilization programs. 3) The as-
sociation between changes toward
market-oriented economic sys-
tems and accompanying changes
toward extreme political repres-
sion.
Sheahan's familiarity with or-
thodox economics is supple-
mented by his understanding of
and sensitivity towards issues re-
lated to dependency, class con-
flicts, political repression and con-
centration of economic power.
Policymakers and their critics
should take his recommendations
seriously that there is no time
to wait for maximalist solutions
involving fundamental reforms
and that great improvements in
well-being can be achieved by
carrying out more sensible poli-
cies.
Hugo M. Hervitz
Barry University, Miami

CANADA'S CARIBBEAN
Canada and the Commonwealth
Caribbean. Brian Tennyson, ed. Lan-
ham, Md.: University Press of America,
1988. 385 p.

This book explores what has often
been called the "special relation-


ship" between Canada and the
Commonwealth Caribbean, a rela-
tionship built on trade, invest-
ment, missionary activity, and
common allegiance to the British
Empire. The trade link was forged
in the 18th century, when it saw
sugar, rum, molasses, and salt
moving north in return for cod,
timber, and animal products. Can-
ada's interests gradually shifted to
international business after Con-
federation in 1867, a process that
resulted in the West Indies becom-
ing the site of Canadian banks,
insurance companies, and other
enterprises. In the late 19th and
early 20th centuries, there was a
series of proposals for some form
of political association between
the West Indies and Canada that
would facilitate business ties and
consolidate British imperial inter-
ests in the Western Hemisphere.
Canadian missionary activity in
the West Indies gave a religious
and educational dimension to the
relationship.
In the past quarter century
these traditional links have been
superseded by population move-
ment Canadian tourists mov-
ing south and West Indian immi-
grants north and by Canada's
role in international development.
The West Indies have become a
major recipient of Canadian aid
programs, particularly in the
areas of education, transportation,
agriculture, water resources and,
in the larger countries, energy and
mining. Tennyson suggests that
the Canadian-West Indian connec-
tion is less significant now than in
the past though many would disa-
gree with him.
Frank E. Manning
University of Western Ontario

IGNORANCE RECOVERED


The History of Hayti. Thomas
Madiou. Port-au-Prince: Editions
Deschamps, 1988.

This is a most important docu-
ment for anyone who wants to be
informed about the history of
Hayti. Roaming the countryside,
the historian Thomas Madiou was
able to interview many witnesses,
both humble and famous, of the
facts he related. He himself wit-
nessed many of them, making this
CARIBBEAN


S90









history all the more vivid.
When Madiou decided to write
the history of his country, his
father asked him, "And how will
you treat the burning issues of
casts and colours?" To that he
replied, "I will tell the facts." And
his father commented, "Then, the
whole family will be shot." That is
probably the reason that in 1847
only the period from the discov-
ery of Hayti in 1492 to the death of
Dessalines in 1806 was published.
The family steadfastly refused to
remove from hiding the manu-
script dealing with the so-called
"formative years," the period
from 1807 to 1843 when Christo-
phe, Petion and Boyer reigned. In
honor of the Independence cen-
tennial, the family agreed to pub-
lish the period 1844-1848. The
volumes covering the period
1807-1818 were finally published
in early 1988, and those on 1818-
1843 were scheduled for publica-
tion thereafter.
The new Madiou was well
worth waiting for and is sure to
provoke much comment. It is in-
teresting to note what French his-
torian Michelet wrote of the first
three volumes (1492-1806): "Diffi-
cult work and certainly more diffi-
cult than any other history, be-
cause the majority of facts come
not from documents but from
interviews." He adds that without
Madiou those facts would have
remained ignored.
Jean Desquiron
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

SIMPLE SOCIALISM


African and Caribbean Politics:
From Kwame Nkrumah to Maurice
Bishop. Manning Marable. London:
Verso, 1987. 314 p.

Manning Marable undertakes a
classical Marxian analysis of Afri-
can and Caribbean politics, com-
plete with a historical account of
class and ethnic conflict in the two
regions.
While his concerns are with the
failure of social democracy in Af-
rica and its diaspora, MIaraibl]
focuses on Guyana, Ghana and
Grenada as paradigmatic exam-
ples of authoritarian regimes op-
erating under the facade of social-
ism. It is here that Marable is at his
REVIEW


best, detailing the tragic legacy of
highly personalized and vanguar-
dist politics that have hindered
the prospects for sustained popu-
lar democracy.
Marable's deterministic treat-
ment of cultural and ethnic issues
undermines the full strength of his
explication. He treats ethnicity as
merely a line of cleavage utilized
by colonizers to foment labor mar-
ket segmentation and incoherent
politics in the colonies.
Marable cites the absence of
"strong Marxist parties or cadre-
type organizations" as the miss-
ing ingredient in the failed quests
for democratic socialism in the
two regions. This is ironic for
C.L.R. James and George Pad-
more, both referred to frequently
in this book, had long ago aban-
doned "truly" Marxist party poli-
tics because of its neglect of racial
issues. Marable reduces complex
issues to a single proposition -
whether or not historical actors
such as Nkrumah or Bishop were
true Marxists. Unfortunately for
the book, as well as for the history
of anti-colonial struggle, the poli-
tics of social change has never
been so simple.
Michael Hanchard
Princeton University

FALSE ALWAYS
Guatemala: False Hope-False Free-
dom. James Painter. London: Latin
America Bureau and CIIR, 1988. 134 p.

Guatemala: Eternal Spring-Eternal
Tyranny. Jean-Marie Simon. New
York: W.W. Norton, 1988. 256 p.

These two important studies help
to sort out Guatemala's return to
"democracy and civilian rule."
Painter's study of "The rich, the
poor and the Christian Demo-
crats" contrasts President
Cerezo's "historic opportunity to
break with the past, which he lost
soon after the elections" with Ar-
gentine and Peruvian breaks with
the past.
After reviewing Guatemala's
unchanged social conditions, still
among the worst in Latin America
in terms of infant mortality, illiter-
acy, lack of health services, land
concentration, tax and income ine-
qualities, low wage levels, and


continued disappearances and
deaths, the author analyzes the
nation's socioeconomic structure.
Painter then examines the nature
of Christian Democracy, from its
European anti-communist origins
and its communitarian emphasis
to its growth in Latin America.
Painter believes that the interna-
tional community should not be
deceived by Guatemala's appar-
ent change of face but rather that it
should continue to insist on sub-
stantive reforms and to withhold
aid or tie it very carefully to
monitored changes in human
rights practice.
What Painter lacks in terms of
considering US policy or Mayan
culture is partially compensated
for by photo-journalist Jean-Marie
Simon's hauntingly beautiful and
poignant collection of pictures
and stories. Not meant to be a
political analysis, this compen-
dium of incongruities neverthe-
less reveals profound aspects of
Guatemalan society that must be
pondered and absorbed before
any reforms can be permanently
addressed. While her work is
structured chronologically
around the last four Guatemalan
regimes, it supplements a tragic
and thematic chronicle of each
period with a series of photo and
verbal vignettes that form a kalei-
doscope of haunting feelings and
deep personal experiences.
Although Simon presents Cath-
olic and Protestant churches as
forces generally favoring respect
for human rights, unlike Painter
she never holds great hope for
civilian elections or Christian
Democratic improvements. Her
thematic portrait indicates that
Guatemala's condition will not be
resolved by election promises. It
will take far deeper efforts to
comprehend the Mayan tragedy,
the army's often ingrained bestial-
ity, and the protective role of the
US State Department before this
will be accomplished.
Taken together, Painter's and
Simon's treatments need push us
toward understanding the deeper
issues that underlie Guatemala's
current dilemma.
Henry J. Frundt
Universidad Rafael Landivar
Guatemala


91


--







RECENT
BOOKS


On the Region and Its Peoples


Compiled byi
NormIa Miriami
Turconi


















































Nornii Miria(on
Turconi isa Biblio-
graphic Specialist
at the Strelilg Me-
morial Library of
Yale Lhni'ersi .ty.


ANTHROPOLOGY
AND SOCIOLOGY
Los africanos y nuestra isla.
C. Albert. Dominican
Republic: Editora Buho, 1987.
Amirique Latine: Introduction a
I'Extrine-Occident. Alain
Rouqui6. Paris: Editions du
Seuil, 1987. 446p. 140 Fr.
At the Crossroads of the Earth &
the Sky: An Andean Cosmology.
Gary Urton. U. Texas, 1988.
268p. $11.95.
Aztec Warfare: Imperial
Expansion & Political Control.
Ross Hassig. U. Oklahoma,
1988. 404p. $29.95.
The Bahamas Between Worlds.
Dean Collingwood. White
Sound, 1989. 119p. $8.95.
Between God & the Party: Relig--
ion and Politics in Revolutionary
Cuba. John M. Kirk. U. South
Florida, 1988. 231p. $22.00,
.i : i. I .

Brazil: Mixture or Massacre.
Abdiasdo Nascimento. Major-
ity, 1989. 214p. $9.95.
Brazilian Women Speak:
Contemporary Life Stories.
Daphne Patai, ed. Rutgers U.,
1988. 398p. $37.00, $13.95.
Cities in Crisis: the Urban Chal-
lenge in the Americas. Matthew
Edel & Ronald G. Hellman,
eds. CUNY: Bildner Center,
1989. 166p.
Los Colombianos en Venezuela:
Mito y Realidad. Gabriel Bide-
gain Greising & Anitza Freitez
Landaeta. Venezuela, CEPAM,
1989. 199p.
The Costa Rican Reader. Marc
Edelman & Joanne Kenen, eds.
Grove Weidenfeld, 1989. 397p.
Cuba: A Different America.
'. ll...r A. Chaffee, Jr., ed.
Rowman & Littlefield, 1988.
200p. $24.95.
Cuba: The Shaping of Revolution-
ary Consciousness. Tzvi Medin.
Reinner, 1990. 191p.


Earth & Spirit: Healing Lore &
More from Puerto Rico. Maria
Dolores Hajosey Benedetti.
Waterfront, 1989. 245p. $9.95.
La Galgada, Peru: A Preceramic
Culture in Transition. Terence
Grieder, Alberto Bueno
Mendoza, C. Earle Smith, Jr. &
Robert M. Malina. U. Texas,
1989. 328p. $35.00.
Educaci6n y desarrollo desde la
perspective sociol6gica. Miguel
A. Escotet & Orlando
Albornoz, eds. Salamanca:
Ediciones UIP, 1989. 412p.
Education & Development:
Strategies & Decisions in Central
America. Sylvain Louri6.
UNESCO: Trentham Books,
1989. 202p.
Emerging Perspectives on the
Black Diaspora. Aubrey W.
Bonnett & G. Llewellyn
Watson, eds. Univ. Press of
America, 1990. 368p. $24.50.
God & Production in a Guatema-
lan Town. Sheldon Annis.
U. Texas, 1988. $8.95.
Guyana: Politics in a Plantation
Society. Chaitram Singh.
Praeger, 1988. 176p. $37.95.
Los hijos del analfabetismo.
Emilia Ferreiro, ed. Mexico:
Siglo Veintiuno, 1989. 184p.
Hispanic USA: Assimilation or
Separatism? Thomas Weyr.
Harper & Row, 1988. 242p.
$19.95.
La iglesia electr6nica y su
impact en Amirica Latina,
Hugo Assmann. San Jose,
Costa Rica: CEI, 1988. $6.00.
Hacia una teologia judia de la
liberacidn. Marc H. Ellis. Costa
Rica: CEI, 1988. 162p. $15.00.
The Kuna Gathering: Contempo-
rary Village Politics in Panama.
James Howe. U. Texas, 1988.
i. l 1
The Many Faces of Cuilapan.
Eleanor Friend Sleight.
Orlando: Pueblo, 1988.
177p. $39.95.


The Modern Caribbean. Franklin
W. Knight & Colin A. Palmer,
eds. U. North Carolina, 1989.
382p. $39.95, $12.95.
Mythes et Rituels du Mexique
Ancien Prehispanique. Michel
Graulich. Bruxelles: Palais des
Academies, 1987.
Passage of Darkness: The Ethno-
biology of the Haitian Zombie.
Wade Davis. U. North Caro-
lina, 1988. 344p. $29.95.
Puerto Rican Houses in Socio-
historical Perspective. Carol F.
Jopling. U. Tennessee, 1988.
320p. $34.95.
Regional Integration: The Latin
American Experience. Altaf
Gauhar, ed. London: Third
World Quarterly, 1988. 280p.
16.
Three Latin American Sociolo-
gists: Gino Germani, Pablo Gon-
zdlez Casanova, Fernando Henri-
que Cardoso, Joseph A. Kahl.
Transaction Publishers, 1988.
240p. $24.95.
Todos Santos in Rural Tlaxcala: A
Syncretic, Expressive, &
Symbolic Analysis of the Cult of
the Dead. Hugo G. Nutini.
Princeton U., 1988. 471p.
$75.00.
Toward a Chicano Social Science.
Irene I. Blea. Praeger, 1988.
208p. $14.95.
With Open Arms: Cuban
Migration to the United States.
Felix Roberto Masud-Piloto.
Rowman & Littlefield, 1988.
148p. $28.95.

BIOGRAPHY
Amelia Pelaez 1898-1968, una
retrospective. Giulio V. Blanc.
Miami: Museo Cubano de
Arte y Cultura: 1988. 112p.
$30.00
Biografia del poder. Enrique
Krause. Mexico: Fondo de Cul-
tura Econ6mico, 1987. 8 vols.
$138.50.


. 92


Josi Figueres: una vida por la
justicia social. Tomds Guerra.
Costa Rica: Centro Editor de
America Latina, 1987. 292p.
Marimba. Luis Gustavo Garcfa.
Madrid: Ediciones "B," 1988.
$18.00.
Michael Manley: The Making of a
Leader. Darell E. Levi. U. Geor-
gia, 1990. 349p. $29.95.
DESCRIPTION
AND TRAVEL
The Caribbean: A Cultural Jour-
ney. Carolyn J. Curran. N.Y.:
Gumbs & Thomas, 1988. 200p.
$24.95.
Costa Rica: A Natural Destina-
tion. Ree Strange Sheck. New
Mexico: John Muir, 1990. 270p.
$15.95
Haiti. Trudy J. Hammer. N.Y.:
Watts, 1988. 96p. $9.90.
Maya Missions: Exploring the
Spanish Colonial Churches of
Yucatan. Richard & Rosalind
Perry. Santa Barbara, Cal.:
Espadana, 1988. 256p. $12.95.
Mexico Through Russian Eyes,
1806-1940. William H. Richard-
son. U. Pittsburgh, 1988. 304p.
$29.95.
Puerto Rico's Wise Book. Lewis
Manuel Medina. Puerto Rico:
Puerto Rico Executive Guide,
1988. $65.00.
Six Days in Havana. James A.
Michener & John Kings. U.
Texas, 1989. 144p.
Undiscovered Islands of the
Caribbean. Burl Willes. New
Mexico: John Muir, 1988. 208p.
$12.95.

ECONOMICS
Absentee Entrepreneurship & the
Dynamics of the Motor Vehicle
Industry in Argentina. Maria
Beatriz Nofal. Praeger, 1988.
256p. $46.00.
La agriculture en Chile. Herndn
Taune. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Flacso, 1988. 304p.










A Revolution in Arrears: The
Development Crisis in Latin
America. Leland M. Wooton.
Praeger, 1988. 224p. $39.85.
Coping with the Latin American
Debt. Ed. Robert Wesson.
Praeger, 1988. 240p. $37.00.
The Crisis of Mexican Labor.
Dan La Botz. Praeger, 1988.
208p. $37.95.
Desarrollo econ6mico
en democracia. Felipe Larrain
et al. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Universidad Cat61lica, 1988.
418p. 2,900 pesos.
La deuda externa de Amdrica
Latina y la banca international.
Luis de Sebastian. El
Salvador: UCA Editores,
1987. 197p.
Deuda externa: problema revolu-
cionario para Amirica Latina.
Z. A. Osorio. Peru: Ediciones
RA, 1987. 205p.


Developing Country Debt: The
Budgetary & Transfer Problem,
Helmut Reisen & Axel Van
Trotsenburg. Wash.D.C.:
O.E.C.D., 1988. 196p. $26.40.
Economic Management, Income
Distribution & Poverty in
Jamaica. Derick A.C. Boyd.
Praeger, 1988. 176p. $32.95.
Economic Theories of Develop-
ment. Diana Hunt. Rowman &
Littlefield, 1988. 288p. $28.50.
Exportar: un gran desaffo para
Chile. Jordi Borja. Sgo de
Chile: Ed. Universitaria, 1988.
359p. 3,000 pesos.
External Constraints on Eco-
nomic Policy in Brazil 1889-1930.
Winston Fritsch.
U. Pittsburgh, 1988. 265p.
$49.95.
Foreign Investment, Debt, & Eco-
nomic Growth in Latin America.
Antonio Jorge & Jorge Sa-
lazar-Carrillo, eds. St. Mar-
tin's, 1988. 350p. $60.00.


Green Gold: Bananas &
Dependency in the Eastern
Caribbean. Latin American
Bureau, 1988. 128p. $7.50.
Guiding the Invisible Hand: Eco-
nomic :il, uiwhl & the State in
Latin American History. Joseph
L. Love & Nils Jacobsen, eds.
Praeger, 1988. 208p. $39
Inequity & Intervention: The
Federal Budget & Central Ameri-
ca. Joshua Cohen & Joel Ro-
gers. South End, 1988. $4.75.
Inside Development in Latin
America: A Report from the
Dominican Republic, Colombia &
Brazil. James Lang. U. North
Carolina, 1988. 368p. $37.50.
The International Political
Economy of Coffee: From Juan
Valdez to Yank's Diner. Richard
L. Lucier. Praeger, 1988. $40.00.
Labor Migration in Jamaica:
White Capital & Black Labor.
Elizabeth McLean Petras.
Westview, 1988. 297p.


El marco econ6mico de un
problema politico: la inversion
extranjera. Sgo de Chile: Eco-
manager, 1988. $42.80.
La micanisation agricole:
problimes et options / Mecani-
zaci6n agricola: problems y
opciones. Wash., D.C.:
World Bank, 1988. 109p.
Price code 008.
Necesidades econ6micas para la
campaia political. Sgo de Chile:
Ecomanager, 1988. $42.80.
Nontraditional Agriculture &
Economic Development: The
Brazilian Soybean Expansion
1964-1982. Anthony B. Soskin.
Praeger, 1988. $35.00
Partners in Research: The CGIAR
in Latin America. Grant M.
Scobie. Wash., D.C.: World
Bank, 1988. Price code 002.
The Political Economy of Argen-
tina 1946-1983. Guido Di Tella
& Rudiger Dornbusch, eds. U.
Pittsburgh, 1989. 346p. $49.95.


ONE HAPPY ISLAND D\
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The Politics of External Influence
in the Dominican Republic.
Michael J. Kryzanek &
Howard J. Wiarda. Praeger,
1988. 230p. $39.95.
Republic of Trinidad & Tobago:
Medium Term Macro Planning
Framework 1989-1995. Trinidad,
1988. 250p. $8.00.
Rethinking Development: Perspec-
tives from the Caribbean & Atlan-
tic Canada. Henry Veltmeyer.
Halifax, N.S., 1988. 195p.
$12.95.
Small Island Economies: Structure
& Performance in the English-
Speaking Caribbean Since 1970.
Delisle Worrell. Praeger, 1988.
303p. $49.95.
Technology Transfer in the De-
veloping World: The Case of the
Chile Foundation. Frank Meiss-
ner. Praeger, 1988. 200p.
$38.00.
Tunnel Vision: Labor, the World
Economy & Central America.
Daniel Cantor & Juliet Schor.
South End, 1988. $5.00.
U.S.-Mexican Economic Relations:
Prospects & Problems. Ed.
Khosrow Fatemi. Praeger,
1988. $39.95.
Voluntary Approaches to Debt
Relief. John Williamson. Wash.,
D.C.: Institute for International
Economics, 1988. 180p. $10.95.

HISTORY AND
ARCHAEOLOGY
Amirica espaiiola en la ipoca de
las luces; tradicidn, innovacidn,
representaci6n. Coloquio Fran-
co-Espafiol. Madrid: Gredos,
1988. 423p. 2,700 ptas.
La apropiaci6n del signo: tres
cronistas indigenas del Peru.
Raquel Chang-Rodriguez.
Tempe: U. Arizona Center for
Latin American Studies, 1988.
132p. .-.2 .I
Central America: Historical
Perspectives on the Contemporary
Crisis. Ralph Lee Woodward,
ed. Greenwood, 1988.
Children of Colonial Despotism:
Press, Politics & Culture in Cuba,
1790-1840. Larry R. Jensen. U.
Florida, 1988. 211p. $22.00.


La conversion des indiens de
Nouvelle Espagne. Christian
Duverger. Paris: Editions du
Seuil, 1987. 135 Fr.
The Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962:
Needless or Necessary? William J.
Medland. Praeger, 1988. 192p.
$35.95.
The Diary of Christopher Colum-
bus's First Voyage to America
1492-1493; Abstracted by Fray
Bartolomi de las Casas. Oliver
Dunn & James E. Kelley, Jr.,
eds. U. Oklahoma, 1988. 424p.
$57.50.
El discurso criollista en la forma-
ci6n de la Argentina modern.
Buenos Aires, 1988. 241p.
Eisenhower & Latin America: The
Foreign Policy of Anticommnununism.
Stephen G. Rabe. U. North
Carolina, 1988. 237p. $29.25.
The Emergence of Latin America in
the Nineteenth Century. David
.u I,,,:ll Neill Macaulay. Ox-
ford U., 1988. 335p. $32.50.
Espaiia y Colombia en el siglo
XIX. Gloria Ines Ospina. Barce-
lona, 1988. 185p. 8,000 ptas.
Fidel y el 'Chi.' Jose Pardo Llara.
Barcelona, 1988. 250p.
First Encounters: Spanish Explora-
tions in the Caribbean and the
U.S., 1492-1570. Jerald T. Milan-
ich & Susan Milbrath, eds. U.
Florida, 1989. 222p. $44.95,
$16.95.
Guaman Poma: Writing & Resis-
tance in Colonial Peru. Rolena
Adorno. U. Texas, 1988. 199p.
$8.95.
Haiti: The Breached Citadel.
Patrick Bellegarde-Smith.
Westview, 1989. 217p. $34.00.
Haiti's Influence on Antebellum
America: Slumbering Volcano in
the Caribbean. Alfred N. Hunt.
Louisiana State U., 1988. 196p.
$25.00.
Historia de la Argentina; manual
de historic argentina desde 1515 a
1983. Ernesto Palacio. Buenos
Aires: Abeledo Perrot, 1988.
$40.00.


House & Street: The Domestic
World of Servants & Masters in
Nineteenth-Century Rio de
Janeiro. Sandra Lauderdale
Graham. Cambridge U., 1988.
212p. $42.50.
La Isabela y la arqueologia en la
ruta de Coldn. Elpidio J. Ortega.
Dominican Republic: Universi-
dad del Este, 1988. $12.00.
In the Land of the Olmec. Vol. 1:
The Archaeology of San Lorenzo
Tenochtithin; Vol. 2: The People of
the River. Michael D. Coe &
Richard A. Diehl. U. Texas,
1988. Vol. 1, 436p.; Vol. 2,
204p. $100.00.
Josi Antonio Echeverria: el
movimiento estudiantil en la
Revoluci6n Cubana. Marta
Harnecker. Buenos Aires; Ed.
DialIctica, 1988. 189p. $8.00.
The Maroons of Jamaica: A His-
tory of Resistance, Collaboration
& Betrayal. Mavis C. Campbell.
Bergin & Garvey, 1988. 288p
$39.95.
Medicine in the New World: New
Spain, New France & New Eng-
land. Ronald L. Numbers, ed.
U. Tennessee, 1988. 192p.
$18.95.
Narrative of a Five Years' Expedi-
tion Against the Revolted Negroes
of Surinam. John Gabriel Sted-
man; Richard Price & Sally
Price, eds. Johns Hopkins U.,
1988. 708p. $95.00.
Peyote Religion: A History. Nigel
Davies. U. Oklahoma, 1988.
$29.95.
Political Essay on the Kingdom of
New Spain. Alexander Von
Humboldt; Mary Maples
Dunn, ed. U. Oklahoma, 1988.
256p. $9.90.
Raices de Amirica: el mundo
Aymara. Xavier Alb6. Madrid:
Playor, 1988. 607p. 3,550 ptas.
Races de la nacionalidad cubana
(1763-1862). Fernando
Fernandez Escobio. U.S.: Ed.
Laurenti, 1988. 467p. $25.00.
Salvador Allende. Enrique
Lafourcade. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Alfa, 1988. 215p.


San Juan: Historia ilustrada de su
desarrollo urbano, 1508-1898.
Anibal Sepuilveda Rivera.
Puerto Rico CARIMAR, 1989.
333p.
Slave Women in Caribbean Soci-
ety, 1650-1838. Barbara Bush.
Inidana U., 1990. 190p. $29.95,
$12.50.
Slave Women in the New World,
Marietta Morrissey. U. Kansas,
1989. 202p. $29.95.
Sugar Is Made with Blood: The
Conspiracy of La Escalera & the
Conflict Between Empires over
Slavery in Cuba. Robert L.
Paquette. Wesleyan U., 1988.
352p. $29.95.
Time & Reality in the Thought of
the Maya. Miguel Le6n
Portilla. U. Oklahoma, 1988.
256p. $17.95.
El iltimo escrito de Joan Alsina.
Mario Bono. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Nuestra America, 1988. 143p.
U.S. Labor Movement & Latin
America: A History of Workers'
Response to Intervention. Vol. 1:
1846-1919. Philip S. Foner.
Bergin & Garvey, 1988. 240p.
$36.95.
War, Cooperation & Conflict: The
European Possessions in the
Caribbean 1939-1945. Fitzroy
Andre Baptiste. Greenwood,
1988. 416p. $39.95.
White Servitude & Black Slavery
in Barbados, 1627-1715, Hilary
McD. Beckles. U. Tennessee,
1989. 218p. $34.95.
William Walker: The Gray-Eyed
Man of Destiny. Vol. 1: The
Crescent City. Alejandro
Bolanos. St. Louis: Guyer Lake,
1988. 318p. $29.50.

LANGUAGE
AND LITERATURE
Los animals y el folklore en
Cuba. Lydia Cabrera. Miami:
Ed. Universal, 1988. $16.00.
Los bafios de canela. Juan
Arcocha. Miami: Ed. Univer-
sal, 1988. 119p. $9.95.
Borges en Japon. JapAn en Borges.
Guillermo Gasio. Buenos
Aires: 1988. 155p. 1,200 ptas.


94


III









Caliban & Other Essays. Roberto
FernAndez Retamar. U. Minne-
sota, 1989. 140p. $35.00, $14.95.
Canciones olvidadas. Luis
Cartana. Madrid: Ed. Betania,
1988. $7.00.
Caribbean. James A. Michener.
Random House, 1989. 973p.
$22.95.
Caribbean New Wave: Contempo-
rary Short Stories. Stewart
Brown, ed. Heiemann, 1990.
181p. $7.95.
Desertores del paraiso. LAzaro
G6mez Carrillo. Madrid:
Playor, 1988. $12.00.
La emigraci6n y el exilio en la
literature hispdnica del siglo
veinte. Myron I. Lichtbau.
Miami: Ed. Universal, 1988.
156p. $19.00.
Enigmas; tres cuentos y un relato
Rail Tapanes Estrella. Miami:
Ed. Universal, 1988. $9.00.


Enrique Larreta: el hombre
escritor. Hebe M. Campanella.
Argentina, 1987. 343p.
Ernesto Sabato; premio Miguel de
Cervantes 1984. Barcelona, 1988.
332p.
Florisardo, el siptimo elegido.
Armando Couto. Miami: Ed.
Universal, 1988. $9.95.
Historia y antologia de la litera-
tura infantil iberoamericana,
Carmen Bravo Villasante.
Spain, 1987. 2 vols., 930p.
2,200 ptas.
La importancia de llamarse Daniel
Santos. Luis Rafael SAnchez.
Edicones del Norte, 1988.
212p. $12.50.
Josi Donoso: originales y metafo-
ras. Carlos Cerda. Sgo de
Chile: Ed. Planeta, 1988.
217p. 1,740 pesos.
Josi Lezama Lima, Joyful Vision.
Gustavo Pell6n. U. Texas,
1990. 151p. $22.50.


Josi Lezama Lima, Poet of the
Image. Emilio F. Bejel. U. Flor-
ida, 1990. 176p. $19.95.
La lengua sagrada de los iidhigos.
Lydia Cabrera. Miami: Ed.
Universal, 1988. 530p. $30.00.
Latinismo y espaiiol dominicano.
Belarminio Diaz Diaz. Domin-
ican Republic: Universidad
Aut6noma, 1987. 140p.
Let It Be Arturo. Javier Francisco
Zanartu. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Particular. 110p. 1,099 pesos.
Lives on the Line: The Testimony
of Contemporary Latin American
Authors. Doris Meyer, ed. U.
California, 1988. 280p.
Lo neofantdstico en Julio Cor-
tdzar. Julia G. Cruz. Madrid:
Gredos, 1988. 178p.
Magia e historic en los cuentos
negros "Por qui" y "Ayapd" de
Lydia Cabrera. Sara Soto.
Miami: Ed. Universal, 1988.
$12.00.


Mixico en la obra de Octavio Paz,
Octavio Paz y Luis Maria
Schneider, eds. Madrid, 1988. 3
vols. 6,000 ptas.
Muchas gracias...Marielitos...siete
aiios despugs: una historic verda-
dera y siete cuentos imaginados.
Angel Perez Vidal. Miami: Ed.
Universal, 1988. 151p. $12.00.
La mueca de la paloma negra.
Jorge Ronet. Madrid: Playor,
1988. $12.00.
Muerte de Narciso. Jos6 Lezama
Lima. Mexico: Ed. Era, 1988.
$9.95.
La Obra Poitica de Eugenio Florit.
Mary Vega de Febles. Miami:
Ed. Universal, 1988. $12.00.
Oh! capitdn, mi capitdn. Luis V.
Dominguez. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Melquiades, 1988. 167p.
1,200 pesos.
Operaci6n Pun. Avila Nelson.
Sgo de Chile: Ed. Melquiades,
1988. 164p.


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El otro Garcia Mirquez. Pedro
Sorela. Madrid: Gredos, 1988.
333p.
Poetas cubanos en Nueva York.
Felipe Lizaro. Madrid, 1988.
262p. 1,550 ptas.
Que veinte afios no es nada.
Celedonio Gonzalez. Miami:
Ed. Universal, 1988. $9.95.
Relatos en sepia. Sonia
Guralnik. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Ergo Sun, 1988. 134p.
El secret de Borges: indagacidn
psicoanalitica de su obra. Julio
Woscoboinik. Buenos Aires,
1988. 263p.
Sesenta poemas. Renato
Yrarrazaval. Sgo de Chile:
Ed. Universitaria, 1988. 173p.
Teatro complete. Agustin
Cuzzani. Buenos Aires, 1988.
549p.
Theatre latinoamnricain et portu-
gais sous la contrainte. Aix-en-
Provence, 1988. 264p.
The Trinidad Awakening: West
Indian Literature of the Nineteen-
Thirties. Reinhard W. Sander.
Greenwood, 1988. $37.95.
Vanguardism in Latin American
Literature. Merlin H. Forster &
K. David Jackson, eds. Green-
wood, 1990. 214p.
Varias histories de mar. Manuel
Torres Martin. Sgo de Chile:
Ed. Andres Bello, 1988. 211p.
Los veterans del 70. Carlos
Olivares, ed. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Melquiades, 1988. 269p. 2,600
pesos.
Volveria a ser marino. Ismael
Huerta Diaz. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Andres Bello, 1988. 2 vols.,
980p. 7,200 pesos.
Women of Smoke. Marjorie
Agosin. Latin American
Literary Review, 1988. 122p.
$10.95.
Woman Who Has Sprouted Wings:
Poems by Contemporary Latin
American Women Poets. Mary
Crow, ed. Latin American
Literary Review, 1988. 205p.
$13.95.


POLITICS AND
GOVERNMENT
Argentina 1516-1987: From Span-
ish Colonization to Alfonsin.
David Rock. Berkeley: U. Cali-
fornia, 1987.
The Caribbean in World Affairs:
The Foreign Policy of the English-
Speaking States. Jacqueline
Braveboy-Wagner. Westview,
1988. 150p. $16.95.
Chile, a Quiet Revolution.
Joaquin Lavin. Sgo de Chile:
Ed. Zig-Zag, 1988. 174p.
1,440 pesos.
The Contras: Interview with
Antisandinistas. Dieter Eich &
Carlos Rincon. Bergin & Gar-
vey, 1988. 320p. $39.95.
Democracy & Development in
Latin America. David
Lehrmann. Temple U., 1990.
$44.95.
Democracy in Developing Coun-
tries. Larry Diamond, Juan
Linz & Seymour Lipset, eds.
Boulder, Colorado: London,
Adamantine, 1988, Vol. 1; in
press, Vol. 2. $30.00.
Dofia Licha's Island: Modern
Colonialism in Puerto Rico,
Alfredo L6pez. South End,
1988. $25.00.
The Grand Strategy of the United
States in Latin America. Tom J.
Farer. Transaction Publishers,
1988. 448p. $39.95.
Haiti: State Against Nation: The
Origins & Legacy of Duvalierism.
Michel-Rolph Trouillot. San
Diego: U. California, 1988.
Hemispheric Security & U.S. Pol-
icy in Latin America. Augusto
Vargas. Westview, 1989. 230p.
$43.00.
Honduras: The Making of a Ba-
nana Republic. Alison Acker.
South End, 1988. $30.00.
Ideologia y Democracia en Chile.
HernAn Larrain. Sgo de Chile:
Ed. Andante, 1988. 159p.
Inter-American Relations: The
Latin American Perspective.
Robert E. Biles, ed. Rienner,
1988. 200p. $25.00.


The Iran-Contra Connection:
Secret Teams & Covert Operations
in the Reagan Era. Jonathan
Marshall, Peter Dale Scott &
Jane Hunter. South End, 1988.
$30.00.
Mexico Through Russian Eyes
1806-1940. William Harrison
Richardson. Wash., D.C.:
Washington Institute, 1988.
287p. $29.95.
Oil & Mexican Foreign Policy.
George W. Grayson.
U. Pittsburgh, 1988. 207p.
$19.95.
El Partido Comunista en Chile.
Augusto Varas, ed. Sgo de
Chile: Ed. Cesoc-Flacso, 1988.
485p. 2,670 pesos.
People in Power: Forging a Grass-
roots Democracy in Nicaragua.
Gary Ruchwarger. Bergin &
Garvey, 1988. 320p. $39.95.
Pinochetismo y Politica. Juan
Carlos Alvear. Sgo de Chile:
Ed. Privada, 1988. 79p.
Pobreza y desempleo en
poblaciones. Mariana
Schkolnick. Sgo de Chile: Ed.
Pet, 1988. 347p. 1,920 pesos.
Politics in Mexico: An
Introduction & Overview. Wayne
A. Cornelius & Ann I. Craig.
San Diego: U. California, 1988.
$6.00.
The Politics of Latin American
Liberation Theology: The
Challenge to U.S. Public Policy.
Richard L. Rubenstein & John
K. Roth, eds. Wash., D.C.:
Washington Institute, 1988.
376p. $24.95.
Primary Medical Care in Chile:
Accessibility Under Military Rule.
Joseph L. Scarpaci. U. Pitts-
burgh, 1988. 208p. $24.95.
Restructuring Domination:
Industrialists & the State in
Ecuador, Catherine M. Con-
aghan. U. Pittsburgh, 1988.
197p. $29.95.
Revolution & Reaction: Bolivia
1964-1985. James Malloy.
Transaction Publishers, 1988.
256p. $29.95.


Rural Revolt in Mexico: National-
ism & the State & U.S. Interven-
tion. Daniel Nugent, ed. San
Diego: U. California, 1988.
$20.00.
The State & Capital Accumulation
in Latin America. Christian An-
glade & Carlos Fortin, eds. U.
Pittsburgh, 1990. $49.95.
Subject to Solution: Problems in
Cuban-U.S. Relations. Wayne S.
Smith & Esteban Morales
Dominguez, eds. Rienner,
1988. 175p. $18.00.
Transformation & Struggle: Cuba
Faces the 1990s. Sandor
Halebsky & John M. Kirk, eds.
Praeger, 1990. 291p.
U.S.-Mexican Relations, 1910-
1940: An Interpretation. Alan
Knight. San Diego: U. Califor-
nia, 1988. 146p. $15.00.
Urban Nationalism: A Study of
Political Development in Trinidad.
Alvin Magid. U. Florida, 1988.
294p.
Venezuela's Movement Toward
Socialism: From Guerrilla Defeat
to Innovative Politics. Steve Ell-
ner. Duke U., 1988. 310p.
$43.50.

REFERENCE
Biographical Dictionary of Latin
American & Caribbean Political
Leaders. Robert J. Alexander,
ed. Greenwood, 1988. 512p.
$75.00.
Cuba: An Annotated Bibliography.
Louis A. Perez, Jr., ed. Green-
wood, 1988. 315p. $45.00.
Diccionario de lo insdlito. Andre
Gaspard. Mexico: Panorama,
1988. 234p. $19.00.
Libraries & Special Collections on
Latin America & the Caribbean: A
Directory of European Resources.
Roger MacDonald & Carole
Travis. London, New Jersey:
Athlone, 1988. $75.00.
Mexican Autobiography /
La autobiografia mexicana: An
Annotated Bibliography / Una
bibliograffa anotada. Richard
Woods, ed. Greenwood, 1988.
$39.95.


96








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