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Title: All at sea
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095558/00026
 Material Information
Title: All at sea
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Kennan Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: St. Thomas, USVI
Publication Date: May 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095558
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
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Full Text






MAY 2010


.. *** iiiE ...iiniiipJ
c INSIDE:
Scenes From
St. Thomas Rolex


I


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The

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SHAPE CONFORMING AIR-BUNK SUPPORT:
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LIFTS HIGHER: Sea-Lifts are able to lift a boat up to
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Port Louis Marina another


great reason to visit Grenada


Grenada remains one of the most unspoilt and welcoming cruising
destinations in the Caribbean.
Now, with Port Louis, visiting yachts can enjoy the security and
convenience of a beautifully appointed, fully serviced marina -
located in the lagoon adjacent to the island's capital, St George's.
Grenada's southern location allows for year-round cruising,
including the summer months, and with an international airport
just five miles away, Port Louis is the ideal base for exploring
the wonderful islands of the Grenadines.
As a Port of Entry, it's easy to clear in and out through Port Louis,
and our 24-hour security, dockside facilities and marina-wide wi-fi
all contribute to making your stay safe and relaxed.


GRENADA
WEST INDIES


Port Louis is owned and operated by Camper & Nicholsons
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For more information about securing a berth at Port Louis,
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contact our Sales and Marketing Co-ordinator, Danny Donelan on
+1 (473)435 7432 or email danny.donelan@cnportlouismarina.com
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YACHTING SINCE 1782
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ALL AT SEA WANTS TO HEAR FROM YOU

SEND YOUR CORRESPONDENCE BY EMAIL TO EDITOR@ALLATSEA.NET, OR MAIL LETTERS TO:
ALL AT SEA, PO BOX 7277, ST. THOMAS, VI 00801


Dear Editor,

In the article about Puerto Rico
laws by Carol Bareuther in the
February 2010 issue, re: "Current-
ly, in-transit vessels are charged a
sales tax (or entry fee equal to
seven percent of the total value
of the vessel), when they enter
Puerto Rico's waters."
I've been transitingg" in and
out of PR and Culebra for the last
three years in a USA boat, spend-
ing about six months of each year
there, and no one has ever hassled
me about registering my boat or
paying a seven percent sales tax
or entry fee. Maybe it's in the law,
that if you buy a boat in USA and
import it into PR without paying
sales tax in USA, PR wants the
sales tax? Or maybe you meant to
say "not in-transit vessels" instead
of "in-transit vessels"?


BOATER-FRIENDLY NAUTICAL LEGISLATION


ALL AT SEAs



Publisher:
CHRIS KENNAN
publisher@allatsea.net


Editorial Director:
CHRIS GOODIER
chrisgoodier@allatsea.net


Creative Director:
NICOLE KENNAN
nicole@allatsea.net


Art Director:
AMY KLINEDINST
amyk@allatsea.net


Graphic Designer:
NEVA HURLEY


Advertising:
International
RICHARD BARKER
richard@yachtessentials.com

Florida
LAURA PARENT
laura@yachtessentials.com


Accounting,
Subscriptions:
accounting@allatsea.net


Thanks,
Bill Dietrich, S/ Magnolia, 1973 Gulfstar 44 ketch motor-sailer



Tim Keogh of Marina Management Services, Inc. sent us the following information, an ex-
cerpt from the new Guideline to the Nautical Tourism Act 2009 signed into law in De-
cember by Governor Luis G. Fortuio. This information was provided by the Puerto Rico
Tourism Company:

"The NTA eliminates the entry fee for in transit vessels, and also allows them to stay
in Puerto Rico for periods of up to one (1) year without the need to obtain a li-
cense and registration in Puerto Rico (the current law allowed them for a period of 60
days only).
"Boaters that want to have their vessels repaired in Puerto Rico can do so
and are not going to be charged entry fee for the period of time the boat is be-
ing repaired.
"For boaters who want to visit Puerto Rico as Nautical Tourists: Vessels that stopped
in Puerto Rico used to be required to pay an entry fee that represented 7% of the dol-
lar value of their vessel. After its signage, there will be no entry fee in the new Nautical
Tourism Bill. Before, vessels that stayed in Puerto Rico longer than 60 days were required
to license and register their vessels in the Commonwealth and this resulted in additional
fees."- Editor


Owned and Published by
Kennan Holdings, LLC
P.O. Box 7277
St. Thomas, USVI 00801
phone (443) 321-3797
fax (340) 715-2827


6 ALLATSEA.NET


Check us
out online at:

www.allatsea.net



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VILLAGE CAY MARINA
TORTOLA, BVI

YACH IHAN GRANDE
ST. THOMAS, USVI






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ST. THOMAS, USVI


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ST. MAARTEN, NA
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THE YACHT CUB
AT ISLE DE SOL
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COM G SOON:
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TURKS & CACOS, BWI
YACHT HWBEN GRANDE
ANGUILLA, BWI
For information or reservations
1.88B.IGY.MARINAS 1.954.302.6000
WWW.IGYMARINAS.COM
Become o fan of IGY on facho
and follow us on


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RODNEY BAY MARINA
ST. LUCIA, Wl '""...


OTHER LOCATIONS:
MANI A CABO SAN UKAS
CABO SAN LUCAS, MEXICO
NEWPORT YACHT CU & MARIA
NEW YORK HARBOR
MONTAUK ACHW CB RESORT & MARINA
MONTAUK, NEW YORK
FESM MMA A
DUBAI FESTIVAL CITY. DUBAI










THIS ISSUE -
THE CARIBBEAN'S WATERFRONT MAGAZINE


FEATURES
38 THE ARC PATH TO ST. LUCIA
One Sailor's Story of the
2009 Atlantic Rally for Cruisers
40 SPECIAL DELIVERY
Grenada's Chocolate Man
and his Precious Cargo

42 IF THEY BUILD IT...
Cuba Acts on Belief that
Yankee Boats are Coming
44 2010 SPORT FISHING
TOURNAMENT


COVER SHOT:
PHOTO BY CHRIS KENNAN
Megayachts line the docks of IGY's
Yacht Haven Grande on the Charlotte
Amalie waterfront, St. Thomas, USVI
www.allatsea.net


DEPARTMENTS
6 LETTERS


10 WHERE IN THE WORLD?
12 CARIBBEAN NEWS
15 EVENT CALENDAR
16 YACHT CLUB NEWS
18 SAILING HUMOR
Nitty Gritty on the Red Sea
Sailing With Charlie:
New Safety Regulations
22 TIPS &TRICKS
Brightwork: Spar Varnish
Brightwork: Teak Oil
Dr. IT: Sharing Your Photos
28 CRUISING
A Day on the Wild Coast
32 OUR NATURAL WORLD
Ticket to Extinction
for the Bluefin Tuna
34 FISHING
Golden Hook Challenge
36 CHARTERING 101
Qualifications to Charter
82 CARIBBEAN BROKERAGE


ISLAND EVENTS & INTERESTS
10 MAP
47 DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
CelticXWins Presidente Cup
49 PUERTO RICO
Bad Girl Takes Heineken Regatta
50 u.s.v.i.
Profile: "CC" Kreglo
Power Squadron Holds
Change of Watch
New Owner of Captain's School
Rolex International Regatta Results

58 B.V.I.
Scrub Island Marina Resort Opens
BVI Kite Jam Celebrates First Event

62 ST. MAARTEN / ST. MARTIN
Heineken Regatta Results
66 ANGUILLA
Anguilla Regatta Returns May 7
67 ST. BARTH
St Barth Bucket Results

69 ANTIGUA
A Weekend in Barbuda
73 GRENADA
South Grenada Regatta
Grenada's Services for Boaters: Part 1


MARKETPLACE


SPONSOR DIRECTORY
CARIBBEAN DINING
Mother's Day


RESOURCE
80 CARIBBEAN MARINAS


8 ALLATSEA.NET














--"now





.ww A








WHERE IN

THE WORLD?

CONGRATULATIONS,
LINDA,&THANKS FOR
READING ALL AT SEA!


I. a 9 .


ISLAND EVENTS

& INTERESTS

ALL AT SEA'S
CARIBBEAN COVERAGE


PAGE 47
Celtic XWins
President Cup


My husband and I live aboard our Hylas 54, Blue
Pearl, all winter, cruising the Leeward and Wind-
ward Islands, with the occasional trip home to
Lake Placid, New York for a snow fix. These photos
are at the top of Whiteface Mountain, site of the
1980 Olympics, and our home mountain.

Linda Stelmaszyk
Lake Placid, NY 12946





Win a Free Subscription!
Send us a picture of you reading All At Sea and you
may be the lucky winner. We will select one winner
a month. Please send images & your information to:
subscribe@allatsea.net or mail to: PO. Box 7277,
St. Thomas, VI 00801


10 ALLATSEA.NET








British (B.V.I.)
Virgin
Islands

-,,* Anguilla
A St.
4

U.S. Virgin
Islands
(U.S.VI.)


PAGE 58
BVI's Scrub Island j
Marina Resort Opens
PAGE 61
BVI Kite Jam
Celebrates First Event


Maarten/St. Martin
St. Barthelemy



Antigua


PAGE 67
St Barth Bucket Results


PAGE 73
South Grenada Regatta
PAGE 77
Grenada's Services
for Boaters: Part 1


Grenada


ALLATSEA.NET 11











CARIBBEAN NEWS

A BRIEF LOOK INTO THE HAPPENINGS OF OUR WORLD


Lussier Appointed
Yacht Haven
Grande G.M.
Kevin Lussier, CMM, has
been appointed general
S manager for Yacht Haven
Grande St. Thomas, as an-
nounced in February by Is-
land Global Yachting (IGY),
i parent company for the ma-
S".., rina. Lussier will oversee op
a rations at this 48-slip dedi-

g facility on Charlotte Amalie
waterfront which includes
over 40 retail boutiques,
restaurants, offices and lux-
ury condominiums. Lussier, a Certified Marina Manager, has nearly two
decades of facilities management experience, most recently as general
manager at the Amelia Island Yacht Basin in Fernandina Beach.


Aruba Customs
Now Offers Eseaclear
As of March 2010, Aruba customs has started to implement the
eSeaClear system (www.eseaclear.com) for yachts visiting Aruba. As
the vessel will have to be cleared both by Customs and by Immigra-
tion, the captain will still need to do the paperwork for immigration
separately. Arriving yachts will have to tie up at Barcadera harbor to
clear before they can go to an anchorage or to the marina. For those
yachts not using the eSeaClear system, forms can be found on the
website of the Renaissance marina: www.renaissancemarina.com/
clearance-procedures/


Dockwise Yacht ..
Transport Forms i .n'W
Partnership
DYT, an international D
maritime shipping firm,
has entered into a le-
gal partnership with
Global Boat Shipping of
Leer, Germany, the company with which Dockwise has had a suc-
cessful alliance since November 2008 for shipping yachts to the
Northwestern shores of Continental Europe. DYT's global routes
for its semi-submersibles in our part of the world include the Baha-
mas (Freeport), the Caribbean (St. Thomas and Martinique). Since
its maiden voyage in 1987, DYT has transported nearly 10,000 mo-
tor and sailing yachts to various destinations around the globe.
www.yacht-transport.com


DR's Marina ZarPar Now Offers 70 Ton Travelift
Marina ZarPar, S.A., Boca Chica, Dominican Republic, has commis-
sioned their 70 Ton Travelift Marine hoist. ZarPar President Rafael Baez
indicated that the 28' beam of the machine would allow the marina
to haul the many Catamarans that have not been able to find local
service. The design has hydraulically-operated slings that can be ad-
justed quickly to conform to the ideal lift center of any hauled craft.
The location of the new pit will allow boats with drafts of up to 10' to
be hauled. The working area of the marina has been constructed of
reinforced concrete with a rating of 150 tons capacity.


Marine Travelift
Promotes Chayer
and Pfeiffer
In March, Marine Travelift, Inc.,
U.S.-based manufacturer of mo-
bile boat hoists, announced the
promotion of Stephan Chayer to
Managing Director International
Sales/Business Development.
Chayer will be responsible for all
international marine, industrial
and government sales for the
Company. Erich Pfeifer has also
been promoted, to Vice Presi-
dent of Business Development
and Marketing.


12 ALLATSEA.NET









Bitter End Goes Green
for St. Patrick's Day
At Virgin Gorda, BVI, Irish eyes were shining
on marine environments in March when the
second annual "GO GREEN" St. Patrick's
Day Beach clean-up sponsored by the Bitter
End Yacht Club brought in rusted pontoons,
discarded jerry jugs, torn fishing nets and
bags of various "boat detritus." Hotel guests
aboard Bitter End's Boston Whalers were
joined by crews of visiting private and char-
ter yachts in North Sound who combed the
shorelines and mangroves of Virgin Gorda
(surrounding North and Eustatia Sounds). A
party followed for participants, who ranged
in age from five to 75.


Mercury Racing
Releases 1300 and 1350
SternDrive Packages
Mercury Racing reports that the company is
poised to revolutionize the sport boat indus-
try once again with the release of two new
sterndrive engine packages. Engine air in-
duction determines the difference between
the 1300 h.p. model and the 1350: the 1300
breathes ambient air from the engine room
(as most sterndrive engines do); the 1350
breathes cooler, outside air (like the Verado
350 outboard) through a direct air induc-
tion system. Direct air induction requires
computer aided design integration with the
boat, resulting in an added 50 horsepower
per engine.


SAVE THE DATE

May 14:6th Annual Captain Oliver's Regatta, St. Martin. The three-day event
at Captain Oliver's Marina, Oyster Pond is preparing to host 40 50 boats this
month. Categories include Racing monohull, Bareboat, Performance monohull,
Cruising monohull, Racing multihull, Cruising multihull, Beachcat and Corporate
Challenge. www.coyc-sxm.com


GOLDEN
SI. TICKET IS
STILL OUT
r THERE






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ALLATSEA.NET 13











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How to: File a Float Plan
for Passages Between Grenada and Trinidad
Anita Sutton of Island Dreams in Grenada has supplied the follow-
ing helpful information for sailors planning a passage in either di-
rection: file your float plan with the Coastguard prior to departure;
they need to know boat name, number of persons on board, brief
description (monohull/catamaran, color, size), estimated departure
date and time, and arrival date and time. Contact the Coastguard
on arrival. If you decide not to stop or have to abandon your pas-
sage and turn back, please contact the coastguard as soon as pos-
sible to avoid unnecessary concern and search operations. Trinidad
Coastguard telephone: 868 634 1476 or email to ttcgops@gmail.
com. Grenada Coastguard: visit the Coastguard in Prickly Bay, or
call them on 473 444 1931/2.



PASSAGES



















The flag of the British Virgin Islands was lowered to
half-staff and assembled sailors offered a moment of
silence at this year's International Rolex Regatta. Guy
Eldridge died on Friday, March 26 after a day of racing
his Luxury Girl, following a fall down the companionway
of another boat. "He died doing what he loved best,"
said fellow BVI sailor, Colin Rathbun. Eldridge's passing
is a loss for the Caribbean sailing community, especially
in the BVI where he was captain of sailing at the Royal
BVI Yacht Club. An avid racer, Eldridge was known for
making racing fun, such as adding a scavenger hunt
to a regatta and hosting a pirate-themed awards par-
ty. When not sailing, Eldridge worked as a partner in
the BVI office of Conyers Dill & Pearman and moved
to the territory in 1996 to open the firm's BVI office.
Carol Bareuther


14 ALLATSEA.NET









EVENT CALENDAR


Please send future events for our calendar to editor@allatsea.net.
This month and next month's events are currently published here and at www.allatsea.net.
Your specific area may or may not be shown based on identified activities for these months.


SANGUILLA
5/7-9
2010 Anguilla Regatta I Sailing
sailanguilla.com I regatta@sailanguilla.com
R ANTIGUA
SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS
Free Antiguan Youth Sailing Program
"All Comers" Competitive Keelboat Sailing
Dinghy Sailing, Pleasure & Practice
Dinghy Sailing Instruction for Adults &Jrs.
Dinghy Racing with Beach BBQ
JHYC I jhmarina.com
5/22-24
AYC Green Island Weekend I Sailing
antiguayachtclub.com I yachtclub@candw.ag
H1 BARBADOS
S5/15-16
25th Annual Mount Gay Boatyard Regatta
S Sailing I sailbarbados.com I info@sailbarbados.com
U BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
5/2
Atlantic Cup from Tortola to Bermuda
Cruising Rally I carib1500.com
5/6
ARC Europe 2010 (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers)
SCruising Rally I worldcruising.com/arc
mail@worldcruising.com
5/28-30
36th Annual Foxy's Wooden Boat Regatta
Q Sailing I weyc.net I mcmechanics@surfbvi.com
SCUBA
5/24-29
60th "Ernest Hemingway" Billfish Tournament
Deep Sea Fishing I yachtclub@cnih.mh.cyt.cu


X DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
6/1-5
International Billfish Shootout I Deep Sea Fishing
intlbillfishtourns.com I 305.213.5521
r PALMA DE MALLORCA, SPAIN
6/21-22
5th Annual Future of Superyachts Conference
Industry Conference I quaynote.com
alison@quaynote.com
6/23-26
The Horus Superyacht Cup Palma
Superyacht Regatta I thesuperyachtcup.com
info@thesuperyachtcup.com
SPLYMOUTH, DEVON, U.K.
5/30
Raly Portugal 2010 1 Cruising Rally
worldcruising.com I mail@worldcruising.com
I PROVIDENCIALES, TURKS AND CAICOS
6/19-24
The Caicos Classic Release Tournament
Deep Sea Fishing I caicosclassic.com
info@caicosclassic.com
- PUERTO RICO
5/1
Optimist, Laser (4.7, Radial & Standard),
Sunfish & Snipe
Sailing I nauticodesanjuan.com
vela@nauticodesanjuan.com
5/28-30
Club Nautico de Fajardo Puerto Rico Vela Cup
Sailing I puertoricovelacup.com I cndfpr@gmail.com


SST. EUSTATIUS (STATIA)
6/25-27
Statia / Nevis Offshore Regatta I Sailing I smyc.com
S ST. MAARTEN / ST. MARTIN
5/14-15
6th Annual Captain Oliver's Regatta I Sailing
5/20, 22 & 6/12
SMYC Stuyvesant Series -(LSR Boats,
Lasers and Optimists) I Sailing I www.smyc.com
6/5-6
Heineken Light Caribbean Laser Championships
Sailing I smyc.com
6/19-20
North Sails Regatta Caribbean Keelboat
Championships I Sailing I smyc.com
6/20
SMYC Keelboat Race I Sailing I smyc.com
6/23-27
The Fishing Event I Deep Sea Fishing
the-fishing-event.com I fishingevent@orange.fr
STRINIDAD
6/19-20
The Kingfish Tournament I Deep Sea Fishing
ttgfa.com I info@ttgfa.com
Vr, UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS
5/28-30
Yacht Haven Grande Memorial Day Music Festival
Music Festival I yachthavengrande.com


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ALLATSEA.NET 15











YACHT CLUB NEWS

SHARE YOUR HAPPENINGS WITH THE CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY


Jolly Harbour
Yacht Club, Antigua
The Budget Marine Valentines Regatta 2010 was
a huge success despite the clouds and challeng-
ing sea's Saturday, report club members John and
Heather "We were able to have four races Satur-
day and two on Sunday. We would like to thank
ABSAR for making sure we had a safe regatta. We
had a good time at Foredeck Friday and Sunday
... and a fantastic dinner at Alporto's Saturday with
music, dancing and a raffle that raised money for
the JHYC youth sailing program.
The club has a new sailing schedule for Sat-
urday sailing with eight races per series (win-
ter, spring, summer and autumn). The schedule -,
works around other sailing regattas and events
throughout the Caribbean. "We will also have .
several weekend getaways planned by JHYC and
AYC but all are welcome."
JHYC youth sailing program is going strong on
Saturday and with free lessons available to all Antiguan kids from age
8 to 18. "We also have sailing lessons available for all others and adults
on Sunday for a fee of $50 EC." www.jhycantigua.com


Hemingway International Yacht Club of Cuba
Commodore Escrich will be writing a blog and answering any ques-
tions on a new web site www.CubaSeas.com. The site has a wealth
of additional information to help sailors keep abreast of the nautical
activities in Cuba and to ask any question concerning this sector


Club Nautico de Fajardo, Puerto Rico
The club's Puerto Rico Vela Cup will be held on May 28 to 30 this year.
The regatta, which inaugurated in the Yacht Club in Palmas del Mar,
Humacao, returns with its new slogan "Celebrate the Wind." This year,
the club has included two additional classes, Beach Cat and Snipe, to
J-24, IC-24, CSA Jib & Main, CSA Performance Cruising and CSA Spin-
naker Racing, for a total of seven categories.
The event will also offer navigation courses, near the marina for
spectators to enjoy the competition, according to Race Director David
Kerr. International boats will be challenging the BVI's Rushin Rowlette,
winner of the Racing Cup 2009. There will be an additional attraction
for participating boats: dockage will free a week before and during the
event. "This strategy will attract international boats so they can enjoy
our shores," said Agustin Rodriguez, CNF Commodore. For more in-
formation and registration, visit www.puertoricovelacup.com.


.q ~-- :
...


,. -i "- -- -



St. Lucia Yacht Club
Lily Bergasse, administrator of the SLYC Junior Sailing Programme
gave an interesting update on recent activities. The St. Lucia Yacht
club Junior Dinghy Sailing Programme started its new season in the
fall and the club welcomed two instructors; one, Callum McArdell
from the U.K, is a fully qualified RYA instructor holding a senior in-
structor title at the young age of 20. The other, Benjamin Todd, is
well known to most of the membership. His main job is to oversee
and guide the beginners program managed by Callum and to take
the youth team to several regattas with the highlight being the Youth
Olympic Games in Singapore in August 2010. St. Lucia has received
a wild card for this event and Stephanie Lovell has been chosen to
represent St. Lucia at these Games. Ben Todd, as Head Coach for
the youth sailing program, went with junior sailors Stephanie Lovel
and Thomas Meixner to the Cayman Islands for the Cayman Islands
Olympic Games Qualifying.
Alexandra Prowse is helping the two instructors with the Opti-
mist kids training programme. She as well is a qualified instructor
volunteering her time and effort. The club's junior membership at
the moment is 40 youths ranging in age from 7-18. Rodney Bay is
a beautiful sight on Saturdays with all the white sails flitting across
the water.


To contribute news from your local yacht club or sailing association,
please write to editor@allatsea.net. Deadlines are six weeks prior to
the publication date.


16 ALLATSEA.NET








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THE NITTY GRITTY


ON THE RED SEA

COPYRIGHT 2010 BY CAP'N FATTY GOODLANDER


teeth" gritty. Deserts, I know now from horrifying personal
experience, are made up of small bits of sand, both fine
and coarse. Even a gentle breeze hazes the air with the fine
particles and once the wind is up (it's always up here in Sudan) the
coarse particles take wing as well.
On a clear day, you can see for meters. I recently was within
three miles of an uncharted oil rig and could not see it through


the murk. Then suddenly
I was sailing under the
Golden Gate Bridge.
Let's say you're an-
chored in Tortola, Antigua
or Bequia and want to
fully appreciate what I'm
saying. Just anchor really
close to the beach and set
up a powerful snow blow-
er to blow sand on your
vessel's foredeck. (Yes,
you have to keep your
hatches open or you'll die
of heat stroke.)
In addition, grab a shov-
el and toss a few spadefuls


it appeared towering above me-as if

"Everything you buy will
come with an extra free
helping of sand. We even
drink our water with gritted
teeth to strain out the larger
granules. Bread is another
daily conveyor belt of sand
into our body. (Good news:
health freaks don't need
to eat any oat bran-not
with all that sand scouring
your lower intestines!)"


of sand onto each solar cell. (You don't have to do anything to your
wind generator-the finest sand will immediately start getting into its
bearings and will ruin them within days.)
Since you won't be able to electrically power your vessel with
wind or sun, you'll have to crank up your diesel engine. Before you
do so, toss a bucket or two of additional sand on your beloved
auxiliary. Listen to the horrible 'grating' sound your starter motor
makes-and, worse, observe how your fan belt keeps the sand sus-
pended in the air ... to wear out your alternator, pump seals, crank-
shaft bearings, etc.
Yes, this is sand-as-in-sandpaper-which is what mankind has used
for centuries to wear away stuff.
Every line on your boat-your entire running rigging-will be thor-
oughly impregnated with sand. When you use any piece of cordage, it
will become tubular sandpaper and wear away anything it touches. In
addition, it will merrily "fling" sand into your blocks, tracks, cam cleats
and mast & sheet winches. (Yes, I keep regreasing my winches-but
there is so much sand residue in the bearings that it is like smearing
thin asphalt on them.)
Everything you buy will come with an extra free helping of sand. We
even drink our water with gritted teeth to strain out the larger gran-
ules. Bread is another daily conveyor belt of sand into our body. (Good


news: health freaks don't need to eat any oat bran-not with all that
sand scouring your lower intestines!)
We have a Monitor windvane, which steers us strictly by the wind
without any additional electrical or mechanical power. It is (or was) an
amazing device which reacts (or did) to the faintest breeze. Now it's
delicate bearings are caked with sand.
This sand is insidious. It is evil. And it is everywhere.
First, the fine sand sands the Monitor's plastic bearings bigger-
which allows the rougher, coarser sand to get in ... which then imbeds
itself into the relatively soft walls of the plastic bearing ... and, hence,
sands the hardened stainless steel bits as well.
Both bearings and shafts wear out in different ways.
Damn!
I got 70,000 ocean miles on my last Monitor rebuild-and about
seven miles into the Red Sea ... needed another one.
As important as my vessel is-it isn't my entire life. I have other in-
terests, too. Sex for instance. Let me make one thing perfectly clear:
sex and sand are not a good combo. Moisture is a like a sand-magnet.
The very air is laden with sand. Woe is us!
Sand is accumulating around our mouth, our nostrils ... and even
worse places.
... having a spouse tell you she is "completely worn out" is no laugh-
ing matter.
The carburetor of our 2 hp outboard also truly is "over-achiev-
ing" when it comes to sand collection. Some of the sand comes,
of course, from the unwanted "sand-additive" that is included with
every gallon of gasoline we purchase in Africa and Arabia but most
of it is just sucked into the unfiltered air intake where each sharp-
edged grain has a great time scoring the cylinder walls. (I figure
we're losing about a pound of compression each time we run the
damn thing.)
As sailors we've had to completely retrain ourselves. Don't
even think about looking aloft to see if your halyard is clear-
it will rain sand into your eyes until they bleed. Ditto, sail trim.
Our mainsail has become one big, flapping sand trap-we would
never think to look directly at it. (I'm not sure how other yachties
cope: we attempt sail trim while looking downward through a
cracked make-up mirror-but this has, alas, resulted in some
spectacular gybes.)
Our roller furlers look like sand-sprinklers when we unroll our head-
sails and we don't use our whisker pole much anymore because a sand
dune is forming on its upper crust.
The marine head isn't immune: sand filters down from its hatch into
the bowl and after it scrapes through us humans too.
How much sand is there surrounding the Red Sea? I don't know. An
accurate count is hard to come by. But it is fair to say: lots.
We have been in anchorages where the air-especially around


18 ALLATSEA.NET










beaches-glows orange from all the suspended sand (which refuses
to stay suspended once it spies your boat).
Recently I got so frustrated with the sand that I just flopped back in
my cockpit and wept. Bad move. The suddenly-compressed cockpit
cushions exploded sand in all directions and the moisture in my eyes
must have been positively-charged. My cornea may be scared forever
(Sobbing is worse-the sand gets in your mouth.)
Is there an 'upside' to any of this? I'm not sure. I guess my
boat is getting lighter as it wears away itself and my bank ac-
count. And it sure is fun to watch a desert nomad frolic on the
beach for the first time. (They go temporarily insane in a most
delightful way.)
Traveling inland can be a trip. We were in one dusty, nearly de-
serted Sudan desert town at a cafe drinking coffee-and told the
desert dude who'd just parked his camel out front we had a daugh-
ter. Proud parents that we are, we showed him a picture of her Our
daughter Roma was standing on the beach of St. John, USVI. His jaw
dropped and he began sputtering ... is that ... ? Is that ... ?" At first,
I thought his shock was because he was a Muslim and she was in a
skimpy bathing suit-and he was religiously offended. But he hadn't
even noticed her exposed flesh ... he was so amazed at the sight of
all that lovely water.
Not only is the sand wearing my boat away-it is hell on my body
as well. I usually get my feet wet going ashore (the locals use the
shoreline as a convenient garbage dump) and then stuff them, com-
pletely sand-coated, into my shoes-which soon makes walking blis-
teringly painful.
Plus, now that I'm going bald I'm combing my precious hairs more
often-which, in this case, is really just raking the sand off the top of
my head. (Thanks gosh my bushy, barbed-wire eyebrows can now hold
about a pound of sand each.)
And our western clothes aren't designed for it. I put my shore pass
(they take your passports here in Port Suakin) into my empty shirt
pocket-and a walk through town caught enough sand to almost wear
away its photo ID.
The next time you see a picture of a Sudanese fella dressed in a
long white flowing dress and turban-remember he's ten times smart
than I for having the proper attire for the job.
Needless to say, the Sudanese aren't terribly sympathetic to my pa-
thetic whining. Recently I was ashore buying yet-another dust broom
for my wife and one sand-hugger got annoyed. I told my wife about it
later. "... he got aggressive?" she asked.
"Well, no," I had to admit. "He just got ... let's say ... abrasive!"
What does it take to be a Red Sea sailor these days-besides a thick
skin and a sense of humor?
"... true grit!" cackles my darling wife-as the sand collects between
her sweating cleavage, and her dark Italian hair halos orange. -&



Cap'n Fatty Goodlander lives aboard Wild Card and is the author of
"Chasing the Horizon" by American Paradise Publishing, "Seadogs,
Clowns and Gypsies," "The Collected Fat" and his newest, "All at
Sea Yarns." The Goodlanders have sincerely and solemnly promised
to never, ever transit the Red Sea again. "The Cape of Good Hope is
duck-soup compared to this sand-choked misery," Fatty moans. For
more Fat-flashes, see fattygoodlandercom.


ALLATSEA.NET 19











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SAILING WITH CHARLIE
NEW SAFETY REGS

BY JULIAN PUTLEY
One of the nice things about the Caribbean way of
life is that it is relatively free of tiresome rules and
regulations. I mean how many times have you been
stopped while driving (either a boat or a car) and been asked
to breathe into a tube to test your blood alcohol level? Where
else can you toast the cops while drinking psychedelic magic
mushroom tea in the street? Where else can you stop on a
busy dual carriageway to drop off or pick up passengers or
even stop for a chat (perhaps a rule is needed here)?
Now, though, the reverse has happened. For charter boat
operators, there is nothing more likely to get your knees
wobbling and your intestines grinding than the headline:
"New Regulations for the Yachting Industry."
It was almost six years ago when the Merchant Shipping
(Safety of Commercial Sailing and Motor Vessels) Regula-
tions 2004 came into being. Compiled by an agency in the
UK, the regs were made to apply to weather and sea con-
ditions in international waters; that means high latitudes
as well as benign tropical waters. When the regs were first
introduced into the British Virgin Islands, they were met
with shocked derision by charter yacht operators. Charter
yachts plying local waters would have to have expensive
stability tests, life rafts would be mandatory, survival suits
would be obligatory, rigid hull inspections would be en-
forced and on and on.
Now here's the crux of the matter: How many charter yachts
have ever capsized in the BVI? Answer: One that I know of
and that was gross operator error. How many times have pas-
sengers on BVI charter yachts abandoned a sinking vessel
and been saved by life rafts? Answer: None. And here's the
reason: who would rather step into a life raft (with no means
of propulsion) than into a rigid inflatable with outboard? How
many passengers have been saved from our frigid tropical
waters by survival suits? Answer: None.
Six years ago when the "new regulations" announcement
was made, diligent skippers and operators hurried to meet
the requirements; others opted for a wait-and- see approach.
As it happened, the procrastinators won out, which proves
the following words of wisdom: "the early bird may get the
worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese."
Clearly the regs were fastidiots ... ummm, I mean fastidi-
ous ... far too fastidious, and very un-Caribbean. Happily the
regulations have now been put through the mill and sensible
compromises have been reached. After all, six years is not
long. Hey, we're in the Caribbean, remember? -@


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MAINTAINING YOUR BRIGHTWORK:

GOOD OLD SPAR VARNISH


ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY ANDY SCHELL


bought our boat al-
most exactly two years
ago. She's called Arc-
turus, after a 1930s-era John Alden
schooner I sailed on in New Zealand.
Arcturus is a 1966 yawl, 35 feet long,
built of fiberglass in an era when they
still built fiberglass hulls according
to wood scantlings. She's beautiful-
eleven total feet of overhangs bow
and stern-and bulletproof.
The previous owner had just com-
pleted a remarkable four-year restora-
tion when we bought her. We've since
re-designed a few things and upgrad-
ed her some more. We ripped apart
and re-designed the interior in order
to build our "library," replaced all the
standing rigging, and resurrected a
fifty year-old dinghy that just happens
to fit perfectly on the coachroof.
But the one upgrade that we yet hadn't completed was the most
obvious. Like many older boats, ours had a lot of wood that needed
refinishing. There was a lot of old Cetol and a lot of scraping ahead.
I'd worked on a 74-foot schooner in Annapolis, sailing on the
Chesapeake Bay. The Woodwind is built of wood, and keeping up


the brightwork on her I L4
was a full-time job.
We experimented with
myriad different prod-
ucts to keep it looking
good. We tried Cetol.
We tried staining the
wood first, then coat-
ing with varnish, essen-
tially creating our own
Cetol. We tried two-
part Bristol finish.
They all worked, with
varying degrees of success. But to me, the only real solution for the
Woodwind, and subsequently, the only solution for Arcturus, was clas-
sic spar varnish.
Mia had the unenviable task of removing all of the old Cetol. Just
like finishes, there are loads of methods for removing old stuff-
chemicals, sanders, scrapers, etc. But old-fashioned elbow grease
worked best. With a little help from a heat gun, Mia spent almost a
week scraping off two-by-two-inch sections of Cetol until golden yel-
low teak showed through.
She then sanded the bare wood in three stages, starting with 60-
grit, followed by 150, and finally using a sanding "sponge" coated
with 220 grit paper for the final once-over. The sponge worked great


22 ALLATSEA.NET



























on the rounded handrails and cockpit comings where a sanding block
would have left flat edges.
I chose Epifanes varnish. Again, it's proven and classy (and expen-
sive). You can do one coat per day, and that's it. And they recom-
mend up to 14 coats to make it shine. But we live aboard, so we had
the time.
After the final sanding, Mia went over all of the wood surfaces with
denatured alcohol, removing unseen dust, and finally one last time
with a tack cloth, just before applying the varnish.
Epifanes recommends thinning the first few coats in order to ensure
proper penetration into the wood grain. Mia went with a 50% mix for
coat #1, 25% for #2 and about 15% for coat #3. For the topcoats, our
goal was to create a mixture as thick as possible, but thin enough that
it would brush on smoothly. We accomplished this by adding minute
amounts of thinner, stirring with a tongue depressor, and ensuring that
the varnish "flowed" off the end of the stirrer. The percentage of thin-
ner varied based on the temperature, with the warmest days requiring
none at all.
"Professionals" claim to use expensive badger-hair brushes-which
is great if the yacht owner is footing the bill. We find a good quality
sponge brush works just fine. They key to applying the varnish is en-
suring you don't get any drips, which become painfully obvious when
it dries. We always keep a "wet edge," ensuring we don't miss any
spots and keeping the varnish 'flowing.'
Between coats, Mia used a small 3M scrubby pad to lightly rough
up the surface, followed again by the alcohol and tack cloth sequence.
We started early enough to ensure that no dew would form on the
fresh varnish in the evening. A good weather forecast is obviously im-
portant, though it did drizzle some rain only about three hours after
Arcturus' seventh coat, and we didn't see any problems.
The combination of lots of prep work, many coats, and lengthy wait
times between those coats has created an entire industry around try-
ing to discover a varnish alternative. However, as in life, there usually
aren't any shortcuts to success. With classic spar varnish, we found a
trusted solution that looks great and has few surprises. And with the
right attitude, we actually enjoy the work. &


Andy Schell is a professional captain and freelance writer, based in the
Caribbean, Annapolis and Stockholm who lives aboard his yawl Arcturus.
Contact him at andyschell125@gmail.com or www.fathersonsailing.com.


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ALLATSEA.NET 23










MAINTAINING YOUR BRIGHTWORK:

OILING YOUR TEAK

BY PETER PATTERSON


Each of us, at one time or another has heard someone say
"it's only cosmetic." Surely, safety comes first, but given
the fact that by definition a yacht is something used pure-
ly for pleasure, shouldn't cosmetics be regarded as an important
aspect of vessel maintenance? When it comes to cosmetics, a
vessel's woodwork can have a huge impact.
Most yacht woodwork tends to be teak, though mahogany and
other woods are sometimes used. Teak quality can vary enormous-
ly, but in medium to high grades it is a fabulous material capable of
outlasting most other parts of the boat, if cared for properly.
Care does not necessarily involve a lot of hard work but, like all
other parts of your vessel, neglect it for too long, and bringing
it back to order will become a cumbersome chore. The teak on
Wired had been neglected for too long, but given the immediate
visual impact, I elected to tackle it as my first order of business.
Teak can be "finished" in a number of ways. It can be top
coated with varnish-this is common on rails and other trim
work. It can be oiled. Or it can be left natural without oil. Each
option has advantages and produces a unique appearance.
None of these options are maintenance free. Just letting your
teak go is not considered "natural." This finish, if it is to comple-
ment your boat, is at least as labor-intensive as the others and
involves regular maintenance to avoid acquiring a fuzzy, barn-
board appearance.
Wired has minimal teak, but any finish that had been ap-
plied had long since worn away and the wood had taken on a
gray soiled appearance. A survey of the deck boxes yielded a


variety of old, partially-filled bottles and cans of almost every
popular brand of teak oil and cleaner.
I decided to chuck the lot and start fresh, with a trip to the chan-
dlery and an opportunity to check out the boatyards to see what
other skippers were using and to inspect their results. Two inter-
esting observations: that the advice of the chandlery staff is often
more influenced by what they have on their shelves than personal
experience, and that teak is organic. Like leather, it is full of "fea-
tures" or "character." Even among the "superyachts" I inspected,
the teak often exhibited irregularities or inconsistencies.
In the end I opted for the common combination of oiled and
sealed decks and varnished handrails. I decided to start with
the decks.

Step one: cleaning. Before twisting the top off of that expensive
"teak cleaner," go to the galley and grab the dish soap. Using a
stiff deck brush and lots of water, thoroughly scrub off as much
soil as possible. Diligence will pay rewards here. Get down on
your knees and get into the corners. Use a sharp scraper or putty
knife to loosen the crud that collects in crannies and carefully
scrape off any paint or varnish drips. When you are finished with
the soap and water, do it all again. This step is fast, cheap and
very effective. Scrub hard and rinse generously.

Step two: now it is time for the teak cleaner. A bit of ad-
vice here: despite what the directions might say, it is safest
to mix your cleaner with water in a bucket. Avoid the tempta-


24 ALLATSEA.NET





























tion to spread the product directly onto the wet deck. This
approach can result in a blotchy appearance and in extreme
cases it can result in chemical burns to the teak. Whether to
use a one-part or a two-part formulation is largely a matter of
personal preference. I've used both and see little difference
in the results. Except for premixing, follow the directions on
the bottle and use care to be even and consistent, covering
the whole surface evenly.
Many of the systems come as a "kit." If not, then you need
to buy brightener separately. This is where you begin to see
results. For some, this is the end of the road, the last step. I
like to apply brightener even if I intend to allow the teak to
gray. The brightener helps to even out any discrepancies in the
cleaning, especially if the early stages involved scraping away
stains or drips. Once you have applied the brightener, take a
break. You want this product to dry thoroughly without being
trampled on.

Step three: oil. The main reason for applying oil is to extend
the amount of time before the golden brown hue begins to re-
turn to gray. If kept clean and well scrubbed, gray teak can be
very attractive, but I am partial to the look of fresh oil. Besides,
applying oil is easy compared to the preceding steps. I prefer
to use a clean white rag instead of a brush. Using a rag allows
you to get oil into every recess of the grain without excessive
flooding. Your oil will go further, and with a bit of elbow grease
you can arrive at a very uniform coating. As with paints and
varnishes, there is merit to multiple thin coats. For longer last-
ing results allow the oil to dry and recoat several times over
the next few days.
I applied three coats to Wired and the results are super. The
cockpit on Wired looks great. The job took about 12 hours over
four days. -


Peter Patterson is a Canadian Coast Guard certificated Master
and an ABYC certified marine technician. He is a former Canadian
Yachting Association Instructor/Evaluator and powerboat instruc-
tor Currently he is on trickle charge while he re-invents himself.


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ALLATSEA.NET 25


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DR. IT'S TECH SOLUTIONS FOR BOATERS
SHARING PHOTOS


Dear Dr. IT,
I need an easy way of sharing our pictures with our friends and
family. Let me restate EASY-I am horrible on the computer! I
end up with a mess of pictures not knowing who got what or
even what photos I have myself. Is there a way we can let every-
one have access to our pictures on our laptop?

Summer Bouvier
m/v Good To Go (via email)



Summer, having traveled quite a bit, I have experienced the same
problems as you. I was also constantly running into email file size
limitations and slow connection delays from my boat, as modern
digital pictures are generally large files. Here are a few ideas for
you; all are pretty easy and have good visual help if needed.


IROwK (A MAPS EOMMLJ(4ITV

1P== l---an


SAILEM"a


The first option I would recommend is developing your own
personal web page. Yes, I know this sounds complicated and
expensive, but many providers are offering generic web pages
that would allow basic posting of ships' logs and photos. These
"canned" sites offer the reader a simplistic system which can be
customized for your look and feel, all while delivering basic web
site functionality. To address your need exactly, most of these sites
will offer a picture upload feature where you select the photo on
your laptop then upload it to the site.
Non maritime-specific examples of free sites that will provide this
functionality include Facebook, MySpace, and other mainstream social
networking sites. For a maritime version of social networking try sail-
blogs.com, customized for the mobile mariner with many marine-spe-
cific features such as location and track mapping via Google earth.
If you just want to stick with basic photo sharing there is a
second plan. Quite a few sites such as Flickr, iPhoto and various


.a.I. ii.


- MlU .J


r
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-- --- -- --~--
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LUILI
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cameras manufactures provide online photo albums to their us-
ers for various fees. All of these services allow you to select what
photos to publish and then automate the upload and organiza-
tional process. Once you have uploaded, your friends or family
can simply access your album's URL in their web browser to see
your current and past photos.
I have used quite a few of these services but keep return-
ing to my favorite, Google Picasa. Picasa allows you to select
which local photos are shared to your web albums, then takes
care of the details, uploading and organizing your photos in
the background. Picasa also includes some neat features al-
lowing you to edit photos and select the quality of photos up-
loaded, thus reducing your bandwidth needs if you are on a
slow connection.
A second benefit of maintaining your albums in Picasa or a like
solution is their integration with many of the major photo print-
ing providers. This allows you to send hard copies of photos very
easily, usually in a click or two. My favorite print shop is Shutterfly,
but I have also used Snapfish, Zazzle and Walmart photo printing
with great results.
Summer, the choice is yours; a web site offers more functional-
ity in many ways but may be more costly and more complicated
to use. On the other hand, a dedicated photo sharing site may
offer better photo-only functionality and could be easier to use
for those looking only to share photos and send prints.

GOT PROBLEMS? -send you questions to editor@allatsea.net



Dustin Norlund has lived aboard his Hylas 49 sailing exten-
sively in the Caribbean and Central America. He has been in-
volved in IT and software solutions and has also worked in the
marine electric and electronics trade. Contact Dustin via email
at hylas49@gmail.com.


26 ALLATSEA.NET


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* A DAY ON THE WILD COAST

BY PETER MUILENBURG


Life is like a dry gully in the desert. Nothing happens for long
dull periods of drought. Then suddenly alarm bells are ring-
ing the sky is falling and a torrent comes barreling down
the gully-everything at once.
Take, for instance, the day on the coast of Venezuela. This area used
to be known as The Wild Coast" in the 16th and 17th centuries, and
sometimes you wonder ...
By midnight, the last heat of the day had finally leached out of
the coastal massif. Cool air fell from the heights and flowed into
the wide open hatches, soothing the sleepers til, in the early hours
before dawn, they fumbled for a sheet and sank gratefully back
into oblivion.
I, on the other hand, slept only fitfully because nearby a radio blared
from another boat. It had been on all night, playing manic salsa and,
after midnight, love songs of loss sung by lugubrious fishermen. In the
wee hours, patriotic music, marches and worse. As I tossed and turned,


I vowed to deal with that,
firmly, before another night
passed. When I rose it was
still night but overhead in
the sky the changing of the
celestial guard had begun.
The coastline here is pre-
cipitous, from Carenero to
Puerto Cabello, a hundred
mile wall of mountains form-
ing a bulwark against the
sea. This outermost spur of
theAndes towers upwards to


"She wore a button pop-
ping blouse and toreador
pants that looked like she'd
been dipped naked in a vat
of spandex. Her face was
thick with white chalk, her
lipstick like fire-engine red
gelcoat, her eyes as black
as obsidian-and as hard."


9000 feet and from far out at sea it appears as a stunning wall of jungle,
still the realm of jaguars and anacondas, untouched save for clusters of
tiny high rises at its base and white cumulus crowning its peaks.
In a few places, rivers tumbling down from the heights have
scoured out a channel and over the millennia have deposited a nar-
row shelf of sand where boats can find good holding for their an-
chors. There is where towns have sprung up, traffic in old days being
mostly conducted on the sea. La Guaira is the chiefest of these, and
the port for Caracas.
La Guaira is an attractive town, with much of its colonial heritage
intact, but it is best visited early in the day. The heat that has been
absorbed by roofs and thick masonry walls starts radiating it back.
Then La Guaira's populace broils between the fire in the sky and the
smoldering lip of land. Elsewhere mountains offer shelter for part of
the day but not at La Guaira. There, the mountains hold the town's
feet to the fire.
After taking my wife and child to the airport, I had business in the
shipping office. Yachts were treated like big ships, subject to numer-


ous forms to be filled
out in triplicate. Nei-
ther computers nor
the Reduction of Pa-
perwork Act held any
sway here in the bow-
els of bureaucracy.
The bureaucrat was
pleasant enough as
he produced a form
that had to be filled
out in triplicate and
stamped by a sepa-
rate office that had
sole charge of such
forms. He told me it
would cost five dol-
lars for the typist.
She wore a button
popping blouse and
toreador pants that looked like she'd been dipped naked in a vat
of spandex. Her face was thick with white chalk, her lipstick like fire-
engine red gelcoat, her eyes as black as obsidian-and as hard.
When she finished typing, she gave the carriage a flourish so that
it banged its return. She tapped the three copies with carbons on
the desk to get them exactly aligned. I noticed the rest of the office
staff watching intently. Bold as brass, she handed me the papers
and demanded her fee: "Cinquenta dolares," $50 US, and quickly
grew testy when I looked over the copies and asked if there were
some mistake in the price.
"Cinquento dolares, cinquento, cinquento ... She kept repeat-
ing, eyes darting about furiously, clearly impatient with this cheap
gringo. So I ostentatiously returned the forms to her desk and said
I had been told "cinco dolares." She tossed her head in disbelief
and brusquely scrawled on a piece of paper in large bold charac-
ters, FIFTY DOLLARS!, so that even such illiterates as myself could
read it.
When I opened the door a wave of heat hit me. I once more worked
my way through the streets to the office of the previous authority, who
didn't appear surprised to see me, and when I made my complaint he
wasted no time getting on the phone and poured a torrent of Spanish
into the receiver.
A thunder cloud rode her brow when next I entered the room. She
slapped the paperwork loudly on her desk scraped her chair and dis-
appeared into the bano. I retrieved my forms, put down the equivalent
of $5 in Bolivars, and left.
Continued on page 30


28 ALLATSEA.NET






QUANTUM
SAIL DESIGN GROUP
C CARIBBEAN
Where soilmaking is a performing art




I "









Continued from page 28

By now siesta was in full swing and all the shops closed save for
restaurants and bars which were bustling. One establishment had an
attractive display of ripe melons resting on beds of crushed ice. That
crushed ice called to me of cold fruit and cold beer. Beyond the mel-
ons was a narrow room, a full-length counter to one side and the other
lined with a row of booths. Coming in off the street, the door opened
on a stairway behind which was the first booth. It was the one seat
available that wasn't a bar stool. So I ordered a smoothie and hearts
of palm salad.
I was just digging in to my lunch when a hubbub erupted just outside
the door, a tide of shouts and curses and stomping feet moving into the
restaurant. It was a fight! Soon I could see the two protagonists, one
a tough, old black guy dressed in shabby torn clothes that revealed a
physique that was wiry and still well cut. His face was seamed and bat-
tered and spoke of fights and penury-a few of his teeth were missing.
He was cursing a streak and straining violently against the arms of his
friends who were pulling him back and yelling at him to stop.
His opponent, a white boy, about 30, looked like a fop who'd
never gotten his hands dirty. He was unusually pasty looking with
rosy cheeks and an elaborate pompadour. He was holding up his
fists but dubiously, as if he knew that the old man would carve him a
new orifice given half a chance. Perhaps a long-standing grievance,
or as little as an accidental bump on the street and an exchange of
words, had set the old guy off. He clearly had been drinking and was
perhaps not all there.
Gradually the two groups separated with much bad-mouthing, and
the old guy's threats rang. The white guy returned to his place behind
the long counter at the cash register, picked up the phone and started
an aggrieved recital of the wrongs done him, presumably to the police
because it wasn't long before an officer walked into the long narrow
room, took out a notebook and started writing things down.
All returned to normal;
a buzz of satisfaction "Patrons crowded around the
emanated from custom- window display, the melons
ers eating their lunch lay on the sidewalk, split
Then a shot rang out-
loud-and shattered open. People stood around
glass tinkled on the floor gazing at the carnage with
Instantly, every soul in the the same somber look one
crowded establishment sees in newspaper photos of
disappeared, as if tele- bystanders around a corpse
ported, through the door
ported, through the door left in the street. Spilt canta-
at the back of the room.
Everybody, that is, ex- loupe seeds eerily resembled a
cept me. cracked head oozing brains."
I was sitting frozen in
my booth under the staircase, wondering what I should do. I was abso-
lutely dumbfounded that people could move that fast. It was like an athletic
event they had trained for.
The gunman couldn't see me, but if he came into the room and saw
me crouched in the shadows he might spook. Maybe I should call out
to let him know I was there? Another shot dissuaded me, and there
was the sound of a thud, a sickening wet thud, like a man collapsing
and striking his head on the hard tile.


If I ran for the door
would those within open
it up for me? They might
think I was the shootist.
A third shot pumped out,
followed by a shouted
curse I couldn't under-
stand and a cackle of tri-
umphant laughter. I held
my breath.
Then silence.
A minute passed so
quietly I could hear the


"All returned to normal; a
buzz of satisfaction emanated
from customers eating their
lunch. Then a shot rang out-
loud-and shattered glass
tinkled on the floor. Instantly,
every soul in the crowded
establishment disappeared,
as if teleported, through the
door at the back of the room."


clock ticking. A truck backfired and someone was calling from the
street. I stayed put until finally the door at the back of the room
opened a cautious crack, an eye appeared in the crack, followed by a
head with a uniformed hat. It was the cop. He carefully reconnoitered
before he opened the door wide and the people flooded out of the
storeroom. It must have been hot in there.
Patrons crowded around the window display, the melons lay on the
sidewalk, split open. People stood around gazing at the carnage with
the same somber look one sees in newspaper photos of bystanders
around a corpse left in the street. Spilt cantaloupe seeds eerily re-
sembled a cracked head oozing brains.
Yet the day wasn't over yet. While waiting for the bus I noticed the
wind had radically changed direction. Local knowledge did warn that
two or three days in a year the wind might come out of the west. It was
an anomaly, nonetheless one that might sink my dinghy.
The wind was increasing steadily. Where it had just barely moved
the flags on a nearby pole, now the flags were crackling. I had just
bought a new outboard for the dinghy, and it was securely attached.
However the dinghy, held by a stern anchor, could quite easily be
swamped by a west wind.
The closer the bus came down the coastal highway the clearer it
became that my dinghy was doomed. I ran the rest of the way from the
bus to the dinghy dock, dreading what I'd find.
A scene of industry and triumph ruled on that dock. Boat boys had
hauled most of the dinghies up on the dock, and their outboards had
been placed upside down in a barrel of fresh water to flush out the salt.
My own outboard was running smooth. The scene was self-
explanatory.
"Who do I have to thank?" I asked. "It's me, sir, Jesus Carlos Ayala,"
spoke up a young man. "I'm your neighbor ... on the boat," he pointed.
"The one with the radio that plays all night?"
"Yes!" he beamed. "Do you like our Latin music?"
"Of course I do ... Wilfredo ... Tito Puente."
"Can you hear it good? I think it is low on batteries. Very expensive,
the good batteries ..."
To my credit, I hesitated only slightly before handing him a $20 bill.
"This'll buy you some Duracells."
"Yes ... Duracell. They last a long time!" He pocketed the note hap-
pily and waved to me as I shoved off, "Tonight! Mucha Musica!" -


After spending most of his life in, on and by the sea, Peter Muilenburg
wrote "Adrift on a Sea of Blue Light." www.SailBreath.com


30 ALLATSEA.NET








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EXPRESS TICKET TO EXTINCTION


FOR THE BLUEFIN TUNA


BY BECKY DAYHUFF-BAUER


I was excited when I saw a brief report on TV about the burgeon-
ing industry of Bluefin tuna aqua culture in Japan. The scientist
interviewed in the report touted the benefits of fish farming: sus-
tainable, conservation friendly, employment, and less expensive
than sending huge fleets out to sea. Finally! I could report a change
in Japan's attitude toward the world's seas and marine life. I began an
article, happy to have something positive to write.
As I reported in "Showdown for the Bluefin" in the March 2010,
issue of All at Sea, 80-90% of wild Bluefin stocks vanished during
ICCAT's (International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic
Tunas) 40-year reign as the managing authority for Atlantic Bluefin
tuna. Consistently ignoring scientific data, including that developed
by its own scientists, ICCAT failed miserably in regulating commer-
cial Bluefin fishing.
Because ICCAT failed in its 1969 mandate to "maintaining the pop-
ulations of these fishes at levels which will permit the maximum sus-
tainable catch for food and other purposes ..." a proposal to ban com-
mercial international trade in wild caught Bluefin was put on the table
at the annual CITES convention this year (CITES is the Convention on
International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.)
On March 18, 2010, in Doha, Qatar, the proposal to ban was de-
feated, leaving the world's decimated Bluefin stocks once again at the
mercy of ICCAT's habitual failures. The vote was 20 in favor and 68
against with 30 abstentions. Thus the voting members of CITES issued
the Bluefin Tuna's express ticket to extinction.
Expecting that Japan supported the proposal as indicated in the
many PR articles on its Bluefin farming industry, the reality was much
different. According to Michael Casey, an AP reporter observing the
CITES convention, Japan took the lead in assuring the proposal was
disastrously defeated. "Japan won over scores of poorer nations with
a campaign that played on fears that a ban would devastate their
economies." Once again, Japan's "winning" means marine life loses.
If Japan were truly passionate about its growing Bluefin tuna
farming, why would the country vehemently oppose a ban on the
international trade of wild caught Bluefin? It seemed incredibly
counter intuitive.
Wouldn't banning international trade in wild caught Bluefin be an
economic boon to a country farming Bluefin? Wouldn't it be easier,
faster, and much less costly for a Japanese sushi bar to purchase a
Bluefin from a fish farm down the road rather than sail from Japan to
the North Atlantic for the same fish?
Therefore, I started digging and, not surprisingly, I discovered, yet
again, Japan's adeptness at putting a spin on its fishing activities. Ban-
ning international trade in Bluefin would have a devastating effect on
Japan's Bluefin aquaculture. How can that be?
Having lived for many years at a fish hatchery and rearing station,
I assumed the Bluefin in the Japanese fish farms were reared from


roe (eggs) from captive brood stock. Japan failed to mention their
aqua culture stocks come directly from the wild while leading read-
ers and viewers to believe their stocks came from years of culturing
at research facilities.
Because the 80-90% of wild Atlantic Bluefin was lost since 1969,
most of the remaining stock is immature. Japan now sails the Atlantic
taking millions of tons of immature Bluefin. They are kept alive in tow
nets behind ships sailing back to Japan. Bluefin aqua culture in Japan
does nothing to reduce the pressure on wild stocks and, in fact, fur-
ther decimates the wild stocks because the immature Bluefin taken to
populate fish farms never have a chance to mature and reproduce.
In addition, wealthy Japanese diners, who consume 80% of the
entire world's catch of Bluefin, allegedly complain that the farmed
Bluefin do not have the same flavor. It would be interesting to know if
blind taste tests were conducted or, if this is another spin put forth by
those who recently sold a wild caught Bluefin at a Tokyo fish market
for over $200,000 and the chefs who sold small pieces of that fish for
$25 and up?
Money talks. The $200,000 Bluefin and its brethren did not feed the
poor as they used to before Japanese sushi became popular When
Bluefin became a rich man's delicacy, the pennies per pound price that
fed the poor increased to as much as $150 per pound.
The world has lost 80-90% of the wild Bluefin stocks over the past 40
years. The defeat of the trade ban and ICCAT's lack of management
means the Bluefin will be added to the list of extinct species very soon.
According to the science, Bluefin will be "functionally extinct" by 2012
because there will not be enough spawning fish left to reproduce. -


Becky Dayhuff-Bauer became a scuba instructor and award-winning
journalist covering the marine environment in the Caribbean after 30
years as a wild and domestic animal rescuer, rehabber, and educator in
the states. She is a contributing photographer to NOAA.


32 ALLATSEA.NET





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LEISURE LADY WINS 17TH ANNUAL

GOLDEN HOOK CHALLENGE
ANGLER CATCHES HIS FIRST BLUE MARLIN

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


T he combination of an experienced cap-
tain, novice angler and one blue marlin
was what it took to win the 17th Annual
Golden Hook Challenge, held out of
St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands on March 27
and 28.
"The weather had really been peculiar lead-.
ing up to the tournament," explained Capt. Bob s .
Mackay, aboard the winning boat, Leisure Lady,. -
an Egg Harbor 41. "The marlin usually run north ....
of us along the South Drop in the spring, but the -
fishing was slow. That's why I decided to head to
a FAD (fish attracting device) about 12 miles to
the northeast."
Eight boats fished in the two-day tournament.
Only a handful saw a few small marlin come up in
the spreaders, but the fish were disinterested in
biting. "The first day we pulled the hook on one
marlin," Mackay said.
The second day, the Leisure Lady headed back
to the FAD and Mackay worked it for a good four
hours before hooking up about half mile due
west of the device.




"The marlin came up on the flat line about 50 feet in back of the
boat," Mackay describes. "It grabbed the lure, shook its head and
took off. I backed down like crazy, but it still nearly spooled me.
There was only 20 feet of line left. It was really aggressive and I'd
I ,say it weighed a good 650 pounds or more."
In the fighting chair was Dan Kurty, a local physical education teach-
er who had never caught a blue marlin in his life.
"We caught the fish in about an hour," Mackay says. "Anyone else
r would have taken twice as long. Even though Dan had never caught a
.. marlin, he was in good shape."
By lines out on the last day, the fleet had been skunked as far as
catching blue marlin except for the one tag and release by Leisure
Lady. Therefore, second and third places in the tournament were
.. awarded to boats that had caught marlin during the Golden Hook
Fishing Club's Dolphin Tournament in February. Flower Powerfinished
second with a white marlin caught in the morning and Oh Suzanna
third with a blue marlin caught in the afternoon.
The Club will host a handline tournament for kids in August. The
Guy/Gal 'Reel Challenge' is set for September 25-26. For more infor-
mation: www.fishstx.com rn


34 ALLATSEA.NET






,4..


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Southern Trades
Yacht Sales, Charters & Management
southerntrades@surfbvi.com
www.southerntrades.com
284-494-8003


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Charter acht Swvkm
and Cruta Agency












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284-494-7955
www.charterportbvi.com
yachting@charterportbvi.com


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284-494-2938
www.rescuerl.com
Marine Depot Chandlery
(284) 494-0098


Commercial Dive Services
located at Village Cay Marina
Road Town, Tortola
Tel: (284) 494 8261
Fax (284) 494 5172
Email: commercialdivebvi@surfbvi.com
Website: www.commercialdivebvi.com


For information or reservations


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TO CHARTER


ON THE JOB TRAINING

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY JAN HEIN



f you're thinking about launching into your first
charter, by now you've perused websites, viewed
application forms and given some thought to the
sections marked, "Sailing History." There, you were
asked to check boxes and fill in blanks, in an effort to con-
vince a charter company that enough miles have slipped
under your keel to make you an acceptable match for one
of their yachts.
Once you've filled out a sailing resume with CLEAR
and HONEST answers, the company will run your data
based on an unwritten equation that takes in the number
of days or years you've sailed, your position onboard,
what size boat and where you logged your miles. They'll
ask about formal training, the ability to throw out a hook
and plot a position. Some ask about boat ownership and
yacht club affiliation.
You might look good on paper, holding a certificate or
two. but according to James Pascall, Director of Grenada's
Horizon Yachts Charters, "A ticket and no experience? We
want more." Years in the business have taught charter
companies that sailing across a chart in a classroom has
little to do with trade winds and ocean-sized seas.
Pascall explains, "After we receive a sailing resume,
we might ask for more information." Specific details on
time spent at the helm as captain or crew, experience
anchoring, docking and picking up mooring buoys, and
proficiency with charts and navigation equipment all help


Dcn t overextend yourself to
avoid a bad experience


' bring the picture of your boat handling and seamanship ability into
greater focus.
If this sounds like "Sailors Wanted, Only Experienced Need Ap-
ply," don't be discouraged. "We never give a straight refusal,"
Pascall says. The charter companies want to get you on the water
S and they're more than willing to work out a plan in order to make
that happen.
For those who know their limitations or just want a more leisurely
cruise, the fully crewed option is a good one. You can opt for a certi-
fied captain or captain/crew combo, depending on the offerings of
the company Professional, full-time crew will sail you around and cus-
tomize a trip to suit your needs, allowing you to take part in as much
or as little of the work as you want.


36 ALLATSEA.NET


A';
4.t


& lionz~ ----~








If you have some skill and prefer a more do-it-yourself getaway, you
might ask about taking a training captain along on the first day or half
day. It's a perfect way to get to know the boat, its systems and the lay
of the land and sea.
There are full training courses available in the Caribbean that offer a
week in the tropics plus a boat load of learning and experience. One
of them, the Rob Swain Sailing School, based in Tortola, runs tailored,
hands-on programs on the water. According to Swain, "Charter com-
panies want to see some sort of big boat experience. When we teach
sailing we look at what the clients have done before and then we put
them into lessons they need."
To insure hand-on training, investigate the student-to-instructor ra-
tio. "We never teach more than four people per boat," says Swain.
Most of these learning charters last five or six days. "Our instructors
are not captains," he added. "You don't learn as much if you don't
have lots of opportunity to handle the boat."
At the helm with an instructor, students can learn docking, boat
systems, navigation and sail techniques for a charter-size boat. In-
structors teach students performance; how to trim the sails to look
good and go fast.
Lessons on how to handle a boat correctly are followed by the other
side of yachting. "We pepper them with things that could go wrong,
things that have gone wrong. I always ask my students, 'What keeps
sailors up at night?" Laughing, he answered, "Anchoring, anchoring,
anchoring."
Some folks have vast experience with monohulls but want to ven-
ture into the world of cats. Again, charter companies will work with
you, providing as much support as you need, or you can sign up for
special instruction. "Companies are more stringent in their require-
ments with catamarans," explained Swain.
Pascall advises potential clients to not overextend themselves. "You
might have a bad experience," he says. Pushing beyond skill level and
comfort zone can lead to a bad day at sea and who needs that? In-
stead, let the next chapter of your sailing history be written with a bit
of help. -


Authorized dealers
Horizon Yacht Management (est. 2000) Authorized deer
Port Louis Marina, St George's, Grenada 11 1111
T: (+1 473) 439 1002 BAVARIA
E: horizonyachts@spiceisle.com www.horizon-yacht-sales.com





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ALLATSEA.NET 37


j;


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the



ARC Path



'St. lucia


ONE SAILOR'S STORY OF THE
2009 ATLANTIC RALLY FOR CRUISERS


S hall we do the ARC?" Pete, my neighbour and
w s dinghy race skipper for the winter series in
our local sailing club at Hythe, thought about
my question for a few seconds and then said,
"I'd have to check with Lyn" (his partner).


It was a cold February day in 2005 and we were surfing in his Merlin
Rocket at 12 knots with the spinnaker set and leading the race fleet
by 100 yards. Southampton water at that time of the year is a pretty
inhospitable place, wet suits are mandatory, when it rains it feels like
a shower of ice crystals hitting your face, and getting knocked down
or capsized (a not-uncommon occurrence in a Merlin Rocket) means
getting very cold in places you really don't want to get that cold (even
in a wet suit). My yacht at that time was a Hanse 301 named Dancing
Demon, a very seaworthy design but a little small to live aboard in
comfort, so my thoughts had already moved on to a boat with a long
keel, heavy displacement, standing headroom and a good galley, in
short a proper blue-water cruiser.
Three years later, I'd sold Dancing Demon, searched for and found
Sephina, Pete was now the proud father of Daniel (3), and Lyn was
expecting Daniel's sibling (soon to enter the world as Jamie). Lyn had
agreed that Pete could join the boat for the Atlantic crossing with the
ARC, so the entry forms were filled in, the fees paid and our ARC 2009
had begun.
Sephina is one of those boats that people in the know stand : I:I
and say, "she's a proper yacht." Designed by Holman & Pye in the late
sixties, she's a Super Sovereign, built in 1972, 35 ft on deck, nearly ,nr-
tons displacement, 3/4 length keel, ketch rigged-in short, a go-any-
where yacht. (www.sovereign35.com for more information.) AI I had to
do was turn her from a coastal cruiser into an ocean passage-maker.
The next year was spent in a whirlwind of refitting the boat, offshore
training courses, closing my business and preparing myself for my first
ocean crossing.
The passage south from Southampton to Las Palmas to join the
ARC was not without problems, and I learnt some valuable lessons.


LESSON #1: check the things you can see before setting sail!
Crossing from St Peter Port (Guernsey) to L'Aberwrach (France), the
spinnaker halyard freed itself from the deck, streamed out astern and
wrapped itself around the wind generator at the top of the mizzen
mast. Fortunately, the refit had included fitting mast steps, so climbing
the mast and recovering the halyard proved an easy ten minute job.

LESSON #2: check the things you can't see before setting sail!
We were running south at night from La Coruna (Spain) in 30 knot winds
and 12 15 foot seas when I noticed a faint clonk from the steering
whenever the rudder took up the weather helm. The next day, having
made it to Bayona, inspection of the rudder stock provided a shock.
The nut on the link rod universal joint was loose and hanging on by a
couple of threads. If we'd sailed much further it would probably have let
go completely.

LESSON #3: beware the weather forecast!
Having reached Lagos (Portugal), we waited, calm-bound for ten days.
We'd motor-sailed most of the way from La Rochelle (France) with little
or no wind, but for the next passage to Las Palmas, motoring wasn't
an option as our range of 300 miles would get us less than half way,
so a good sailing wind was essential. Finally the wind forecast looked
promising so we checked out and set sail. The predicted NE 15 knot
wind quickly veered south, so we had the choice of sailing SE toward
i-.lraltar or SW toward Madeira, not a difficult decision as Madeira
.. only 450 miles away and would only add around 150 miles to the
trip Then the wind died, so on with the engine again, hoping to find
:,:,, wind further south. Would we ever start sailing?

LESSON #4: listen to the boat.
If she isn't happy, she'll let you know!
During that first night out from Lagos, having succumbed to a bout
of seasickness, I woke for my watch feeling pretty rough, and noticed
the exhaust note of the engine had changed a little. The noise slowly
worsened to the point that I decided to stop the engine. We took
stock. The sky was overcast, so no power from the solar panels; there


38 ALLATSEA.NET







wasn't much wind so no power from the wind generator; and without
the engine, no power from the alternator. The nearest island was Porto
Santo still 350 miles away, we had plenty of food and water and the
batteries were fully charged. Not much choice but to make the best
course and sail very slowly. Now Porto Santo is a delightful island, but
the options to repair a 37 year-old diesel engine are zero, but at least
we could plug in to shore power and recharge the batteries. My diag-
nosis was a blown head gasket. Ok, not a good idea to run the engine
for long but it would get us out of one harbour, and into the next. My
third crew member was flying to join us in a week, so with emails and
phone calls, spares were ordered and tools from home organised. At
last the promised trade winds started to blow, so with fully-charged
I: rr,,-. we left the marina and set sail for Gran Canaria. With NE
-:1. : 15 20 knots, it took just 58 hours to sail 300 miles. We mo-
r: :I ,ir Las Palmas at midnight, with the engine popping and bang-
ii :i i :1 woundingg very sick indeed.
Tl-,- ,-xt two weeks flew by in a whirlwind of ARC seminars & events,
engine repairs, entertaining friends & family visiting from home, shop-
ping for stores for the Atlantic crossing and making final preparations to
the boat. Departure day finally arrived. The atmosphere in Las Palmas
was party time, a wonderful send-off for a big adventure. Twenty-two
days, one hour and twenty-three minutes and thirty-six seconds later, we
crossed the finish line in Rodney Bay, lowered the sails and motored into
the Marina. We were met with greetings from friends as we moored,
and rum punch and fresh fruit waiting for us. Wind-down time at last.

LESSON #5: beware the innocent squash bottle.
Extract from our ARC log: The Mystery of the exploding apple juice,
Thursday afternoon (day 11). There was I, just before lunch, innocently
typing an email when a loud BANG came from the galley (o.k., it's only
three feet from the chart table), suddenly followed by a cold shower
of something wet and sticky. Our cook, Robin, had saved half of the
contents of a carton of apple juice (at least that's what he told us it was)
in a squash bottle and hadn't noticed it had started to ferment (we
assume). Everything in the galley, companionway and nav-station was
dripping and smelling of rough cider, and I'd only just changed into a
new snowy white tee-shirt!


LESSON #6: fatigue can fuddle the brain.
Extract from our ARC log: 0330UTC Wednesday 9th December 2009.
"Skipper, there's a ship coming up astern, very fast." I was off watch,
sound asleep for a change, when Pete shook me awake wanting to call
the ship on VHF to establish its intentions. Now to set the scene, since
the fleet separated south of Gran Canaria, we'd seen two ships within
the first few days, and then two yachts (neither in the ARC) and the top
of another mast at some distance, so other vessels had been a bit of a
rarity. It was a clear starlit morning, dark enough to see the Milky Way
"It looks like a cruise liner, lots of lights along the side, but I can't
make out the nav lights yet," says Pete. I climbed out of my bunk,
carefully negotiating over Robin's bunk so as to try and not wake him
unnecessarily, and made my way to the companionway, thinking, if it's
coming fast enough to worry Pete, then it must be the Queen Mary 2.
"If you can see all along the side, how is it coming toward us then,"
asked I. On closer inspection, it appeared (to my sleep-fuddled brain)
to be becoming airborne. Just then, the cloud bank shifted -,,: I:
and behold, there's a pale white crescent slowly ascending ir: rl,-
heavens. "Which VHF channel do you think we should use the,- IF -r-
16 or 77?"
My crew were due to fly home after Christmas, which for a -- d .
looked unlikely with the threatened British Airways strike, but rli r -
quickly resolved and we finally relaxed and started to enjoy life in St
Lucia. The first few days were filled with ARC parties, a sightseeing trip
around the island, lots of rum and getting used to a world that had
stopped rocking and rolling.
Having read about it, on Christmas Eve we finally visited the St. Lucia
Yacht Club, and a warmer welcome would be difficult to find. Sadly, we'd
missed the Christmas Carols Afloat event as we'd been south to explore
the coast for a few days, but would we like to join in with the Christmas
Day on the beach barbecue ? I'd been told that St Lucia was a paradise
island, and a paradise it's proved to be. Within a few days, I'd made
some new friends, enjoyed my first New Year on the beach, joined the
Yacht Club, and been talked into joining the World ARC flotilla.

LESSON #7: seize the day!
For ten years, I'd been dreaming of escape from the rat race and of
blue water sailing, but always found reasons to not take the plunge.
Remember, life isn't a rehearsal and sometimes opportunity only
knocks once.
What an adventure it's been. Since leaving Southampton, I'd seen
stunning sunsets and sunrises, glorious star filled night skies, dolphins,
whales, flying fish, squalls, thunderstorms, flat calms, big waves. At
times I'd felt elation, frustration, depression, boredom, trepidation but
never once was I frightened. I'd learnt to trust my boat and know that if
I looked after her, she'd look after me and my crew. The weather gods
had been kind, and through good fortune and careful preparation, my
first : :- -i passage was now part of ARC history. Our handicapped fin-
ish position was 118th from 158 starters in our cruising class, very credit-
it: I- for the second oldest yacht in the fleet (and third slowest rated).
I'd started the journey as a relatively inexperienced coastal sailor,
taken on old boat, refitted it myself and nursed it through all of the
problems, crossed an ocean to fulfill a dream, and proved that you
don't need megabucks to sail successfully on blue water. -4



Submitted by Duncan Gray, skipper of SEPHINA, ARC-2009 entry
number 230


ALLATSEA.NET 39














































grenada's chocolate man
and his precious cargo


tri-colored sail ap-
pears on the horizon
and folks on shore
take notice. "It's
Chocolate Man!"
The boat tacks into Tyrell Bay,
shrinking in size until I realize it's a
mere 14 feet. Perched on the trampo-
line of the Hobie Wave are Mott Green
and crew Kyron McDonald who have
just completed a passage that origi-
nated from the beach in Sauteurs on
the north coast of Grenada.
They're salted and soaked from
the 18.3 mile sail across an inter
island channel known for strong
current and butt-kicking seas. They
look beat, but even the brim of Green's
straw hat can't hide his big grin, a sign
of pleasure for reaching shore with
precious cargo.


Strapped to the trampoline is a big, heavy, gray Pelican case. The
two work to free it and Green hoists it up, packing it across the road to
a store. Does the very-important-case hold an FBI dossier or a wad of
cash? The contents, I'm told, are even sweeter
Inside, clerks and customers gather around as the case is hefted
onto a table. The lid is thrown open and inside is the treasure; sweet,


40 ALLATSEA.NET
MWl


















































dark, organic chocolate. Grocery owner Beverly Alexis appears, smil-
ing, to claim the product her customers know and love.
The bars, beautifully stamped and wrapped were made at the Gre-
nada Chocolate Company, a growing enterprise Green has had his
hands on since its inception in the 1990s.
"Back then," he explained, "I was in Grenada, living like Henry Da-
vid Thoreau. I built a shelter, grew food. People thought I was crazy."
Living in the forested area of Hermitage, he formed an attachment
with the cocoa tree. "I got to know cocoa, made cocoa balls, carried
beans with me. I became a cocoa hobbyist."
The pastime spawned a dream of starting a chocolate factory, so
he found two partners and began researching old time methods of
making small scale chocolate. Knowledge gleaned was coupled with
Green's passion for environmentally friendly technology. "We set out
to make all our own equipment," he said. "We built some solar, low
energy machines that we still use today."
In 2001 the first specialty chocolate rolled out into stores and restau-
rants. "The first six years all the cocoa came from the Belmont Estate.
By partnering with them, we were able to help them certify organi-
cally." Three years ago the company had grown, creating a need for
more cocoa so Green started the Grenada Organic Chocolate Farm-
ers Cooperative, helping to certify more farms.
Green's plate held plenty but there was another dream, of having
a boat that could sail the chocolate to new markets. He found an old,
worn woodie and used every spare moment and dollar to bring her back


to life until a hurricane hit. "When Ivan came,
I had to focus on the chocolate factory and
the damage we had there. I lost interest in the
boat. Finally it was too much so I sold it."
The desire to sail resurfaced years later
when he met the folks at Petite Anse Hotel
on the north tip of Grenada. "I realized I
could get a little boat, like a Hobie, and keep
Sit on the beach." So he did, sailing it around
Sauteurs, then further to lie De Ronde. "I fig-
ured out it doesn't matter how much I get hit
by wind. This boat just pops back up."
"As a stunt, I decided to go to Carria-
cou." Smartly, he took crew and safety gear.
.- "After two trips there I realized I could do
a delivery."
Over the years, shipping chocolate to the
US and UK had become relatively effort-
less for the folks at the Grenada Chocolate
Company but getting the bars next door,
inter-island, was difficult due to cost and the
melting factor.
Green only sails chocolate to Carriacou
in the right conditions. "I don't even think
about coming here unless the wind is a bit
..':. south." Each of several stores needs a choc-
:,, late fix every two weeks. "Now," he added,
"I'm getting ready for a big stunt, to take
chocolate to PSV"
A full case holds about 75 bars, a bit of
weight on such a small boat. To balance
things on the way home, they drag a line and
usually haul in dinner "Last time we caught a
rainbow jack, 10 pounds. That's the
latest thrill."
If Kyron isn't along, his brother
Marlon is. Green, their mentor,
explained, "Neither of them has
a sailing background but they
both have wise knowledge."
The boat, aptly named Theo
Broma, food of the Gods, is
fast. "We made it here in two
hours, 16 minutes, averaging
7 1/2 knots." But the record re-
turn trip of two hours, four min-
utes saw plenty of 12-knot wave
jumping. Each trip is a lesson.
Enthusiastically, Green an-
nounced, "Next, we're getting
ski goggles!" _&



Jan Hein and her husband, art-
ist Bruce Smith, divide their time
between the Caribbean the Pa-
cific Northwest with a boat and a
life at each end.


MAY 200 ALLATSEA.NET 41
tiI












PETER SWANSON Y


tlUBA ACTS UN BELIEF THAT

YANKEE BOATS ARE COMING


he 60th Ernest Hemingway International Billfishing
Tournament happens this month at the Hemingway
Marina in Havana, Cuba, but this milestone event
will be sparsely attended, if at all, by the late author's
own countrymen. With any luck, however, measures
that prohibit U.S. boats from visiting Cuba will be
gone in time for the next big party, when the Hem-
ingway International Yacht Club
celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2012.
Cuban state enterprises responsible for marine
infrastructure have begun an unprecedented push
to ready the island nation for American boaters. If
you are a yachtsman of a nationality unaffected by
the longstanding U.S. travel ban, you may be think-
ing, "So what?" The answer to that depends on your
style of boating.
If you are the self-reliant type who likes to anchor
out for weeks on end, say no more. But if you prefer
to spend some time at local marinas and appreciate .,i"
the services available from a well developed marine
infrastructure, you should hope for the normalization H i,;
of relations between Cuba and the U.S. Numerous
proposals to expand existing marinas and build new "
ones need Yankees in topsiders to be viable. There i ,
just aren't enough Canadian and European vessels.


According to one estimate, 60,000 U.S. vessels over 25 feet LOA will
visit Cuba in the first year after the end of the travel ban. Though the
number may seem high, the possibility is worrisome to business and
government leaders in the Bahamas and throughout the Caribbean,
who fear losing marine revenue to a revitalized Cuba.
But as of now, Cuba has only 789 transient slips, most concentrated
in the three marinas closest to Florida-Marina Hemingway in Havana,








II


42 ALLATSEA.NET


BY PE







Marina Gaviota Varadero and Marina Darsena Varadero. As the epicen-
ter of the classic cars, cigars and Cuban music, Havana needs little ex-
planation. Varadero, about 80 miles east of the capital, is Cuba's version
of Cape Cod, the Jersey Shore and Florida Keys all rolled into one.
Just 12 additional marinas serve the remaining 3,000 nautical miles
of coast-vast areas of beachfront, mangrove, pasture, wooded shores
and undeveloped pocket bays. (And here's an amazing statistic: Cuba
has 4,195 islands and cays.)
The "corporate" structure of Cuba's marina system is twofold. All
marinas in Cuba are operated by either the Marlin Group or Gaviota.
Marlin's director reports to the Ministry of Tourism, whose development
of that sector has sustained the Cuban nation since Soviet subsidies
ended in 1989. Gaviota's pedigree guarantees that it, too, will be a pow-
erful player; it is a subsidiary of a subsidiary of the Castro military.
Gaviota and Marlin share a belief in the future of "nautical tourism"
from the United States as a profit center. Evidence of that came last year
when Cuba's minister of tourism appointed Jose Miguel Diaz Escrich


l


,II, ~~d.,~


as director of the Marlin Group. Escrich, 62, enjoys excellent relations
with U.S. yachtsmen and marine industry figures who know him as the
avuncular commodore of the Hemingway International Yacht Club in
Havana, which he founded with Fidel Castro's blessing in 1992.
While keeping his post at the club, Escrich is now responsible for Mar-
lin's 2,000 employees, 400 tourist excursion vessels and hodge-podge
of docking facilities around the country, including Marina Hemingway at
Havana and seven other transient marinas. His job is to bring the facili-
ties up to snuff as best he can with limited resources, while courting for-
eign investors. European moneymen, Escrich says, have been holding
back, waiting for a thaw in relations between Havana and Washington.
Cuba's other decision was even weightier-as in concrete. With
little fanfare, Gaviota has been working on an ambitious expansion of
its Varadero marina. When finished, Gaviota Varadero will accommo-
date more boats than Marina Puerto del Rey in Puerto Rico, currently
the biggest in the Caribbean. Gaviota Varadero will have 1,200 slips,
including berths for six megayachts over 195 feet LOA.


There are probably berths for fewer than 20 megayachts in all of
Cuba, excluding shipyards and commercial docks. Of those Marina
Hemingway can accept several 200-footers, a length limitation im-
posed by a turn after the entrance channel. Once docked along one
of the four canals (a total of four miles of side-tie dockage), a big yacht
will have to back out until it reaches the turning basin. Once again,
plans to redevelop the entire facility into a hotel-marina destination
are on hold awaiting political change. Part of that project would make
it easier for big yachts to enter and exit the facility, which was originally
designed as a 1950s residential development, not a marina.
The expansion of Marina Gaviota at Varadero, 90 miles from the Flor-
ida Keys, is intended to help augment facilities for big recreational ves-
sels. Escrich says the Gaviota project was being done without foreign in-
vestment, though the accompanying five-star villa hotel development is
the work of the same French company that has built several other luxury
hotels at Varadero. Plans show a marina complex more akin to Atlantis
at Nassau in the Bahamas or St. Tropez in France, only larger
By year's end, Gaviota hopes to have 400
Slips available for foreign vessels. By Stage
three of the project in 2012, the complex
r,,, ,, .,, will have more than 1,200 slips at state-of-
Sthe-art floating, concrete docks, including
berths for six 200-foot megayachts. Also
,. open for business is the marina's new wa-
terfront restaurant, Kike-Keho, already one
of Cuba's finest.
At the other extreme of the Varadero wa-
terfront is the Marina Darsena, operated by
Escrich's Marlin Group. Escrich and Marlin
managers also have developed plans to in-
crease Darsena's capacity from 104 to 500
slips in three phases. Escrich says he is seek-
ing $11 million in foreign investment for the
Project. Although the resort lacks some of
Havana's cachet, Escrich argued that un-
like the capital, Varadero is a staging area
for cruising Cardenas and Santa Clara bays,
which form a protected basin.
Cuba has numerous plans for 23 new
marinas with about 5,000 additional berths,
including a marina with 55 slips at Baracoa,
the easternmost city on the North Coast of Cuba, and the oldest. Bara-
coa, with a small but lively music and arts scene, used to be a port of en-
try but no longer Escrich says the establishment of facilities in Baracoa
and nearby harbors would mean restoring Baracoa as an entry port.
They real prize, of course, is Havana Harbor itself. Today, it is closed
to recreational vessels. Slowly, the Cuban government has been trans-
ferring the port infrastructure to the harbor at nearby Mariel. With an-
ticipation of cruise ship lines and U.S. tourists, much of Havana Harbor
would be rededicated to recreational uses, including yacht facilities,
all just a short walk from one of the most spectacular colonial cities in
the world.



Peter Swanson is a marine journalist who usually writes about the
Greater Antilles. He operates a website www.cubacruising.net, antici-
pating that the ban that prevents U.S. citizens and their yachts from
visiting Cuba will soon end.


ALLATSEA.NET 43








2010
BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD



























The spring, summer and fall are peak season for billfish and May 4-8: Guadeloupe International Billfish Tournament (GIBT).
gamefish tournaments throughout the Caribbean. Here are F:,,, r: 1: : r. expectedto competein theGIBT's "Land Rover
previews of just some of the many tournaments happening Ie .l ,, -.r, I any registered angler who catches a blue marlin
this season with web site contact information so you can join rli r : I r,- I I record of 489-pounds will win a Land Rover valued
the angling fun: r : eii i's can also win cash and prizes for sailfish, tuna,
spearfish and wahoo. From Pointe A Pitre
.. Marina, the prime fishing grounds lie east
"'of Guadeloupe and south near Dominica
and Marie Galante. "Layday festivities will
be a trip to Gosier Island where there will
V,. be games, music, drinks and lunch," says
S Jean Michael Jacobin, treasurer of the
host Guadeloupe Fishing Club. http://lan-
.- droverfishingfestival.com
., .. _


May 21-23: 44th Antigua and Barbuda
Sport Fishing Tournament. This year's
event will be held in Nelson's Dockyard,
...says organizer Alison Sly-Adams, "with
-. tasty food, cheap drinks and the lime
of the year!" At least 45 vessels are ex-
pected with anglers fishing for blue mar-
lin, white marlin, dolphin, wahoo, tuna
Sand kingfish. "There's great fishing off
Antigua," says Sly-Adams. "Each fisher-
men has their favorite spot-for example
0 South Bank between Antigua and Gua-
0 deloupe 13 miles south of Antigua and


44 ALLATSEA.NET





























still in Antiguan waters." Winners earn trophies and over $20,000 in
cash prizes. Charter boats are available. Register by May 7th and enter
to win a suite for the weekend at the Copper and Lumber Hotel, right
at the dock. www.antiguabarbudasportfishing.com

June 1-6: International Cap Cana Billfish Shootout. Formerly held in
Venezuela, this popular event's new home is the Dominican Republic
at Cap Cana's brand new marina with five star accommodations. "We
expect 25 to 30 boats and around 90 anglers," says tournament direc-
tor RickAlvarez. "This is a blue and white marlin only tournament." The
nearby fishing grounds feature a series of mounds and underwater for-
mations. Awards include trophies and prizes from
sponsors such as Presidente Beer and Maui Jim
Sunglasses. Charter boats, both local and from
the U.S., are available for charter www.intlbillfish-
tourns.cor

June 23-27: The Fishing Event (St. Martin). This
year's entry fee has been lowered to $2500 per
boat so that anglers can enter different Calcuttas
and add to the fun. Billfish and gamefish will earn
anglers over $100,000 in cash and prizes. "You can
fish the famous "Marlin Boulevard," says Bertrand
Lacotte, CEO of The Fishing Event Foundation.
Some 30 to 40 boats are expected to compete.
For information, visit: www.the-fishing-event.com

July 23-25: July Open Billfish Tournament (St.
Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands). It's first come, first
serve for the first 25 boats that register "The full
moon in late July offers a great blue marlin bite,"
says co-director Jeff Kreiner. This is a 100 percent
release tournament. First prize for the most fish
released per boat by boats is $10,000 and an original hand-carved
Marlin head trophy by artist David A. Wirth. Nightly dock parties and a
sit-down fine-dining awards dinner cap the fun. www.vigfc.com

August 16-22: 57th Club Nautico de San Juan International
Billfish Tournament. The longest consecutively-held Internation-
al billfish tournament in the world will welcome over 50 boats from
the Caribbean and world this year. "Visiting anglers are assigned


to the best yachts with VIP attention," says tournament chairman,
Frankie Mirandes. "Just show up at the Club, have breakfast and
fish." Anglers will fish for blue marlin only a mile and a half off-
shore on the Puerto Rico Trench. Winners receive cash and sculp-
tures by celebrated artists like Boda Muche. The "Fiesta Tipica"
is one of most anticipated shoreside activities. www.sanjuaninter-
national.com

August 21-25: USVI Open/Atlantic Blue Marlin Tournament. Fish-
ing is always hot for blue marlin at this "Superbowl of Sportsfishing"
angled over the month's full moon. The cream of the crop of interna-
tional billfishermen attends. "We expect 30 boats or more this year,"
says tournament director Jimmy Loveland. Conservation is key; there
hasn't been a blue marlin boated in over 20 years. Prizes, which in-
clude $10,000 to the top angler, are all based on points for the number
of blue marlin released. For information, visit: www.abmt.vi

October 9-16: 46th Port Antonio International Marlin Tourna-
ment (Jamaica). Twenty-four boats with 124 anglers fished in the
2009 event that saw Jamaica's Reel Teaser win with four blue marlin
released. The fishing grounds lie three miles offshore where there is
both a drop-off and deep undersea canals. The tournament, based
out of Port Antonio Marina, is a qualifier for the annual IGFA World
Offshore Championships, held in Cabo San Lucas each May. www
jamaicasportfishing.com

October 28-31: 20th Annual St. Lucia International Billfish Tourna-
ment. Over 40 boats and 150 anglers from the U.S. Mainland, Europe


and Caribbean are expected to compete in this anniversary event,
held out of the Rodney Bay Marina. Top cash prizes await anglers who
catch big fish or release lots of fish. The island record is a 708-pound
blue marlin. www.stluciabillfish.com -



Carol M. Bareuther, RD, is a St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands based ma-
rine writer and registered dietitian.


ALLATSEA.NET 45








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CASA DE CAMPO MARINA

CELEBRATES 4TH PRESIDENT CUP
CELTIC X WINS IN RACING A CATEGORY





A t Casa de Campo Marina February 27 and 28, the fourth
President Cup was celebrated with participation by
more than 22 sailboats. Once again sponsored by .*
the Cerveceria Nacional Dominicana, with its brand
President, and under the organization of Casa de Campo Yacht Club,
this regatta officially became international due to the participation of
three Spanish sailboats, Acrobat, Selene Ill/ and Niob Sexto Cheyenne.
This was possible thanks to the invitation from the Association of
Sailboats of Oceanic Competition (ADVELCO) after comprising in the
Atlantic Grand Prix.
Sailors competed in four categories to race a circuit around marked
buoys in front of the Casa de Campo Marina and a final regatta around
Catalina Island. T
The winner was the sailboat CelticXowned by Jose Manuel Rodriguez
in category A Racing. Other winners in the same category were the J24


The Presidente Cup also had the sponsorship of Central Romana
Corporation, Costa Sur Dominicana, Hotel Casa de Campo, Casa de
Campo Yacht Club's Sailing School and others. Notable also was the
work of the Dominican Sailboats Federation, which took charge of the
technical direction with Mr. Andres Santana, as well as the support of
the ADVELCO with its president, Architect Hector Duval.
Located at latitude 18 degrees 23.9 north and longitude 68 degrees,
54.2 west, the Casa de Campo Marina is at the mouth of the Chav6n
River. The Casa de Campo Yacht Club (CCYC) features a new sailing
school with four J/24 boats.


Report submitted by Casa de Campo Yacht Club


Black Sheep by Joan Rodriguez, second, and the J24 Bombacha by
Alberto Abreu, third. In category B Spinnaker Cruising, first place went .. l.
to the Acrobat by Amador Magrave (Spain), second to PRioter One from ..
Josue Mart[ and third to Niob Sexto Cheyenne from Alex Quer (Spain). AY
In category C Non-Spinnaker Cruising, the winner was Cecile by
Ram6n Prieto, with Shiraz by Hector Duval second and Elizabeth by
Mario Ariza third. Finally, in category D Catamarans, first prize was -
earned by the catamaran Cuco from Ernesto Armenteros and second
by the Correcaminos from Nicolas Droulers.
Two of the participating teams have been selected as national
representatives in the XXI Centro American and Caribbean Olympics to
take place from July 17 to August 1, 2010 in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.
The Presidente Cup is available at www.t2p.tv, where you can watch
the event that kick starts the beginning of the "II Catalina Santo
Domingo Circuit 2010" organized by the ADVELCO.


ALLATSEA.NET 47



















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a" HE-











TAKES P.R. HEINEKEN


INTERNATIONAL REGATTA

FORTY-TWO BOATS PARTICIPATE IN 6 CLASSES, 38 COMPETE IN DINGHIES


ailors from throughout the northern
Caribbean converged at the Palmas del One-design
Puerto Rico
Mar Yacht Club & Marina in Humacao cP art, ner
class winner
March 19to21 forthe Puerto Rico Heineken
International Regatta and Puerto Rico International
Dinghy Regatta. "The attendance has exceeded our
expectations for an international regatta in Palmas,"
said regatta director Angel Ayala. D OM ,
Forty-two racing boats, with skippers hailing from aJ
Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands of St. Thomas
and St. Croix, the Dominican Republic, British Virgin .
Islands, and St. Maarten, sailed in six classes in the
Puerto Rico Heineken International Regatta,formerly
the Culebra Heineken International Regatta. In
addition, there were 38 sailors competing in the
Puerto Rico International Dinghy Regatta aboard
Optimists, Lasers and Hobie cats and 30 entries in
the first time kite-boarding class.
Winds gusting to near 20 knots on the last day-
which followed two days of sunny skies, moderate chop and winds that
rarely dipped below 10 knots-made a fitting finale to the regatta and
allowed several boats to shore up and solidify class wins.
The St. Croix based J/100, Bad Girl, finished with a string of first
place finishes over the three days of racing, only conceding that
position a few times to second place finisher, St. Maarten's Frits Bus
on his Melges 24, Coors Light, and third place, Soca, a Henderson 30
skippered by Puerto Rico's Luis Juarbe.
In Spinnaker Racing B,John Foster from St. Thomas, aboard his Kirby
25, The Good, The Bad & The Ugly, maintained his lead throughout
the regatta, racking up nothing but bullets on the first and last day.
"The upwind sea was hard to read. There were big waves and a lot of
swell. Downwind it worked to our advantage as we glided off the waves.
That's when we pumped everything we had," said Foster However, fellow
St. Thomian, Paul Davis, helming his J/27, Magnificent 7, wasn't far behind
and in fact won two of 11 races in the class. Puerto Rico's Kike Gonzalez,
aboard his J/80, Otrakosa, rounded out third place in the class.
The Performance Cruising class saw Puerto Rico's Carlos Camacho, on
his J/105, Abracadabra, finish in first with nothing lower than a first place.
"Light winds are tough, but today we saw gusts to 18 knots and they ran
us on windward-leeward courses, which is what we like," said Camacho.
St. Croix's Tony Sanpere, driving his J/36, Cayennita Grande, finished
in second place. Rounding out third in class were Puerto Rico's Jim
and Heather Baus aboard their J/46, Miss Majik.
In Jib & Main, Puerto Rico's Edwin Cruz, on his Hunter Legend 43,
Nemesis, handily won with all first place finishes, while St. Croix's Jeff
Fangman's Thomas 35, El Presidente, ended second and fellow Crucian
skipper, Stan Joines, on his Alberg 35, Windflower, took third.


J 24 class competes at the
Heineken International Regatta
Orionl third from left

A4


Finally, this regatta saw competition in two one-design classes. In
the IC-24 Class, the BVI's LIME, sailed by Colin Rathbun, ended with
nothing lower than a first place finish. An outstanding performance
by Puerto Rico's Sal Pa Fuera, sailed by Willie Olivo, landed the boat
in second, while Puerto Rico's Artimana, driven by Rafael Martinez,
rounded out third.
The J/24 class was one of the most competitive of the regatta. Puerto
Rico's Fraito Lugo, who will compete for his island in this summer's
Central American and Caribbean Games (CAC), won. Two boats from
the Dominican Republic, also practicing for the CAC games, entered
the regatta and one, Colibri driven by Eduardo Ortiz, took second in
class. Gilberto Rivera from Puerto Rico finished third aboard his Urayo.
"It was great to have the two Dominican teams sail with us," said
Orion's Lugo.
The Puerto Rico International Dinghy Regatta ran concurrently
with the big boat event. Puerto Rico's Eric Torres won the Advanced
Optimist Class, Kyle Fink placed first in Optimist Green, Ramon
Gonzalez led Laser Radial, Rogelio Fernandez won Laser 4.7 and Kike
Figueroa won the Hobie 16 class.
Kite boarding was a new addition to this year's event. Alex Soto
and Robinson Hilario, two professional freestyle riders from Cabarete,
Dominican Republic, joined the near 30-competitor fleet from Puerto
Rico. The kite boarders put on an exhibition in front of the host Palmas del
Mar Yacht Club on the final day of competition that whetted everyone's
appetite to see more of this sport. For complete results, visit result.vg-


Report submitted by Puerto Rico International Heineken Regatta


ALLATSEA.NET 49











PROFILE: JAMES"CC" KREGLO

NEW V.I. DIVISION COMMANDER OF COAST GUARD AUXILIARY


BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


Many people take life for granted. Not Jim "CC" Kreglo.
Saving lives is both a vocation and avocation for Kreglo,
who spends his days working as an EMT (emergency
medical technician) and now as the U.S. Virgin Islands'
Division Commander of the Coast Guard Auxiliary.
Born in Huntington in the land-locked state of West Virginia, Kreglo
learned how to swim and scuba dive, skills he still uses today, at the
local YMCA. He also was taught to fence, a sport that would ultimately
take him to the Summer Olympics in 1984 where he represented the
Virgin Islands. A love of marine life and the outdoors followed Kreglo to
college where he graduated from the University of Florida at Gainesville
with a degree in wildlife ecology and a minor in African studies.
After college, Kreglo says, "I worked in the field as a tour guide to
East and Central Africa. That's when I recognized that first aid and CPR
skills would be important to know." Back in Gainesville, Kreglo took an
EMT course and became certified. Shortly thereafter, a college friend
invited him to visit her family in St. John.
"I came for a short stay and ended up staying," he says. "St. John
seemed like a great place to live."
That was 1981. Kreglo got his feet wet in his new home immediately.
The first weekend, he took 27 Boy Scouts on a camping trip to Stevens
Cay This experience, plus his years of being a scout leader in Florida,
inspired him to start the first Sea Explorer post on St. John. Soon after,
he landed a job as an EMT in the clinic on St. John and taught Red Cross
swimming to kids enrolled in the Virgin Islands' National Park summer
camp program and Red Cross first aid and CPR to adults. He also found


time to coach young


people in fencing-an i .
activity that he would
follow up by taking the ..
kids out for a fishing trip
afterward on his 21-foot
Tortola-built boat.
In the aftermath of
the September 11th
attacks, Kreglo decided
he wanted to get more involved in patriotic volunteerism.
"One of my favorite TV shows was "Sea Hunt," since I loved to fish
and scuba dive," says Kreglo, of the early 1960s program. "I was visiting
up in Florida at the time and got a hold of some of the old episodes on
video. The main character, played by Lloyd Bridges, was a member of the
Coast Guard Auxiliary What he did always seemed so exciting. So when I
returned, I found there was a flotilla in St. Thomas and signed up."
Kreglo has served in the Auxiliary in a variety of missions. One of
these is using his EMT skills at regatta time. In 2007, he medically
assisted three sailors injured in the International Rolex Regatta: one
who took a foredeck fall, another with a head injury and yet another
who dislocated a shoulder The next year, he was on hand to help get
medical attention to a racing sailor who suffered a heart attack.
On the fishing front, Kreglo spearheaded a program that provides
commercial fishermen with kits full of survival equipment. The
2009-formed St. John flotilla is currently making a DVD where members
demonstrate the use of the individual survival items in
the kit. This DVD will then be handed out as a self-
study training aid when kits are disbursed.
While Kreglo enjoys working in many of the
Auxiliary's missions, including teaching boating safety
courses, marine dealer visits where informational
brochures on boating safety are handed out, and
patrols as an EMT with active duty Coast Guardsmen.
One of the areas he's come to really relish in recent
years is aviation patrol.
"I started out flying logistics, such as bringing parts
to repair a helicopter from Air Station Borinquen
in Puerto Rico, to flying multi-mission patrols, like
looking for boats in trouble or suspicious activities."
Last December, Kreglo, also with Auxiliarist
et. Lee Elvins and Auxiliary pilot Chuck Fischer,
successfully found a missing fisherman adrift in a
27-foot boat off the coast of Tortola after a more
than nine-hour search.
"That's what it's all about," says Kreglo, "helping
people and saving lives."


50 ALLATSEA.NET









ST. THOMAS SAIL &
POWER SQUADRON
HOLDS CHANGE
OF WATCH
GROUP CELEBRATES
20 YEARS OF SERVICE


S sponsored by the St. Croix Power Squadron and chartered
in 1990, the St. Thomas Power Squadron (now the St.
Thomas Sail & Power Squadron) celebrated its 20th year
of existence by holding its "Change of Watch" Ceremony on
March 14, 2010 on Honeymoon Beach, Water Island.
The St. Thomas Power Squadron is one of 450 Squadrons
that make up the United States Power Squadron (USPS),
with a membership of 45,000. Founded in 1914, the USPS in
the world's largest non-profit boating organization.
Officers from the St. Croix Power Squadron as well as
from District 33, San Juan PR., attended and took part in the
ceremony The new Bridge Officers are Commander, Lawrence
O. Benjamin; Executive Officer, Claudette Olive; Administrative
Officer, Victoria Bernett; Educational Officer, Thomas McCoy;
Treasurer, Christian Boschulte; Secretary, Lloyd Romeo. The
Immediate Past Commander is Roxanne Lettsome.


Report submitted by St. Thomas Sail & Power Squadron


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NEW OWNER, SERVICES AT THE CAPTAIN SCHOOL
JOHN HOLMBERG TAKES THE HELM


N ative Virgin Islander Capt. John Holmberg bought The
Captain School from Capt. Patrick Casey on January
1, 2010 bringing new classes and new services along
with the new ownership for The Captain School, located on
the second floor of American Yacht Harbor in St. Thomas, U.S.
Virgin Islands.
Most recently employed as the business manager of Ondeck
Ocean Racing's St. Thomas office, Holmberg has over 35 years
of international sailing, diving, entertaining and chartering
under his belt. He has also participated in a number of
marine rescues.
"I want people to enjoy our waters and they can do this
safely if they are better educated," said Holmberg. He and
Captain Russ Charette, along with Casey, teach The Captain
School's basic courses on a monthly basis year round. Casey,


who opened the school in the
1990s and shifted his base
of operations to Cape Coral,
Florida a few years ago, still
serves as a visiting instructor.
Basic courses include the
Operator of Uninspected
Passenger Vessels (OUPV) or 'six
pack' captain's license, which


"'I want people to
enjoy our waters
and they can do this
safely if they are
better educated,'
said Holmberg."


allows the transport of up to six
passengers on an uninspected vessel in U.S. waters. This is a two-
week course taught at night and on weekends ($550). There's the
three-day Masters course, which is an upgrade from the OUPV
license to cover inspected vessels in the 25- to 100-ton range and
operation in foreign as well as domestic waters ($250).
Two additional four-hour courses include an Auxiliary Sail
Endorsement, required to operate multi-passenger sailing
vessels, and the Commercial Assistance Towing Endorsement,
which enables the holder to be paid for commercial towing
services ($95 each). All the preceding courses are also taught
twice yearly in St. Croix, usually in June and December, in a
compact seven-day format.
The Captain School also offers four STCW-95 (Standards of
Training and Certification of Watchkeeping) courses taught
six times annually. Instructors are Capt. Casey and Capt.
Jeff Mahl, who formerly was in charge of STCW training for
Carnival Cruise Lines. The STCW-Basic Safety Training Course
certification is required of all personnel operating passenger
vessels on international voyages. For those operating aboard
vessels up to 199 tons, the school offers this three-day
certification required of most mariners, including immersion
suit use ($395).
Three additional STCW courses taught include: Crowd
Control ($200), Crisis Management & Human Behavior ($245)


and Security Officer Training ($750). The latter is a course
unique to The Captain School that includes Vessel, Company
and Facility Security Officer training in a comprehensive three
day format.
"Liability today has shifted from the company and the owner to
now include the Master and the Security Officer aboard the vessel,
therefore certification as a Facility Security Officer is invaluable
training to have for compliance concerns," said Holmberg. "This
U.S. Coast Guard approved training is also available to personnel
working in or near Port Facilities such as cruise ship piers and
ferry terminals."
Private classes are available for those who need training
sooner than the regularly scheduled dates or have employee
group training needs. Holmberg may add a short version of
Silver Service training class for stewards and stewardesses
next season.
In addition to instruction, the school now offers services such
as drug testing, FCC marine operator permits testing, USCG
approved CPR & First Aid, a network of area physicians to
expedite physical exams and notary services.
Holmberg brings his personal skills to the offering of hands-
on learn-to-sail classes aboard an IC-24 and learn-to-powerboat
classes on a 25-foot powercat. He also offers race committee
training and in-depth instruction in sailboat racing. U.S. Sailing
certifications are available and private lessons on your own vessel
are offered as well.
"Many of our students come for the valuable information
and training so they feel comfortable operating their own
vessels, not to mention the discounts given by their insurance
company," says Holmberg. "This can be substantial and can
pay for itself in first year's savings." For more information,
call 340-775-2278.


Information submitted by The Captain School


ALLATSEA.NET 53









SUBBASE DRYDOCK, INC.


54 ALLATSEA.NET


II s~










HOT RACING & GOOD FUN AT 29TH ROLEX REGATTA
FRAITO LUGO WINS IC 24 CLASS

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD



out of the St. Thomas Yacht Club from March V
26 to 28, bears three important distinctions.
First, it's the longest uninterrupted event in any sport
that Rolex sponsors worldwide and the regatta will
celebrate 38 years next year Second, it's a class act
that attracts some of the best racing boats in the "
world the Southern Cross 52, Vela Veloce; Judel/
Vrolik 52, Interlodge; and Summit 40, White Heat,
to name a few. Third, add to this that many come to
race for the sheer fun, the tradition, and the friend
and family time. What you end up with is one exciting
weekend on the water.

Match of the Melges
There were 11 boats competing in the Spinnaker Racing
2 Class. However, St. Croix's Chris Stanton, sailing with
his twin brothers, Peter and Scott, aboard their Melges
24, Devil 3, and the BVI's Dave West, helming his Melges
32, Jurakan, only had eyes for each other
In spite of being the same model, eight extra
feet on Jurakan translated into an over six minute ..
handicap for every hour of racing. "Basically, if we
could see them, they were beating us," said West.
West did concede that in the last race, when only
one point separated the two boats, the Stanton boys
showed their prowess on the current in Pillsbury Sound. .
"We couldn't see their finish in the last race," said




1-0 LE X ROLLE Chris Stanton of Jurakan. "It was real quiet


Devil 3 is up for sale. The brothers plan to
buy a new hull and campaign it in the U.S.
as well as Caribbean. "It's time to expand
our horizons," said Stanton.
The brothers would ideally like to team up
with fellow Crucian racing team, Bad Girl, a
J/100, and travel together throughout the
U.S. to race in some of the same events.

What's up with the IC-24s?
I This Rolex marks nine years since the IC-24,
o a J/24 design modified by two St. Thomas
sailors-Chris Rosenberg and Morgan
The Orion team from P *Avery-debuted.
Rico wins the IC 24 Cla
Continued on page 57


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Continued from page 55


"The Puerto Rico class is still growing," said Rosenberg, who
raced this year with his brother, Suki, aboard Ice Cubed. "Tortola
is now where St. Thomas is, a little slow. There need to be events
other than Rolex for us to all come out and sail. It would be great
to get a sponsor for the class."
The BVI's Colin Rathbun, who sailed his IC-24, Lime, said, "The
numbers are down a bit, but it's all a cycle and it's a great class, so
I think the enthusiasm is coming back." The IC-24 class is finding
some of its new life in the next generation.
Puerto Rico's Fraito Lugo, who won the class aboard his Orion
and who converted all nine IC-24s currently on the island, agrees
and adds, "We're hearing interest and eventually would like to
make the IC-24s part of the junior sailing programs in San Juan
and Ponce."

The IRC Fleet
The International Rolex Regatta is now one of the few Caribbean
sailing events to include an IRC class. Doing so attracts some
highly competitive racers. "We wouldn't have come without it,"
says Bill Alcott, from Detroit, Michigan, who races his Andrews 68,
Equation. "We felt like it gave us a fair chance at winning."
Last year five IRC yachts raced; this year there were eight. John
Sweeney, regatta director, said, "We had a good fleet this year
and last, but they were different boats. What we're hoping is that
they all come back to race with us next year."

It's a Family Affair in the Beach Cats
St. Thomas' John Holmberg traded sailing his IC-24 this year for
skippering a Hobie 16, Time Out, with his 11-year-old son Kai. "I
love sailing beach cats, it's a really great class," said Holmberg,
who won the class.
Similarly, newcomer to the class, St. Thomas' Michael Williams
raced his Hobie 16, Chancletero, with his 13-year-old daughter,
Marie. "She loves hanging out on the trap wire," Williams said.
"People just don't know how fun it is."
St. Croix's Chris Schreiber, aboard his Hobie 16, Auto Maniac,
who formerly sailed with his son, Chris Jr., before he left for


college, agreed. "It's fun. Cheap,
and this is one of the best placed
to sail because the water and wind
are warm.

Kids Rule
They'd never sailed before, let
along raced, but that didn't stop the
students in the Introduction to the
Marine Industry class at St. Thomas
Ivanna Eudora Kean High School
I from having a great time-and
h even beating two boats and scoring
a Third in one race-in the eight
boat Non-Spinnaker Racing Class.
SInstructor, Stan Lorbach, said, "I was
really proud of them."
Eleventh grade students, Kennedy
Henry and Chad Crooke, worked together as grinders and to
control the mainsail. "It was a rush," said Henry "I got the hang of
it right away." In spite of a little seasickness the first day, Crook said,
"It was really fun, especially when we heeled over and you actually
had to climb up the side of the cockpit." Both boys said they would
like to race again.




TOP BOATS BY CLASS
(Full results: www.rolexcupregatta.com)

IC 24 (ONE DESIGN 14 BOATS)
Orion, IC 24, Fraito Lugo, Ponce, Puerto Rico


SPINNAKER RACING 1 (CSA 2 BOATS)
Spirit of Isis, Farr 65, Elizabeth Brookes, Antigua

SPINNAKER RACING 2 (CSA 11 BOATS)
Devil 3, Melges 24, Chris Stanton, St. Croix, USVI

NON-SPINNAKER RACING (CSA 9 BOATS)
Cayennita Grande, J 36 Antonio Sanpere,
St. Croix, USVI

SPINNAKER RACING/CRUISING
(CSA 17 BOATS)
Lost Horizon, James Dobbs, Antigua

IRC (IRC 8 BOATS)
Vela Veloce, Southern Cross 52',
Richard Oland, Canada

BEACH CATS (5 BOATS)
Time Out, Hobie 16, John Holmberg, USVI


ALLATSEA.NET 57










SCRUB ISLAND RESORT

& MARINA OPENS
FIFTY BOAT SLIPS NOW IN OPERATION
ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY TODD VANSICKLE
















..... --













ailors and visitors will now have a new place to call home
in the British Virgin Islands with the recent opening of
Scrub Island Resort and Marina, a $100-million project
headed by Mainsail Development International and the
Scrub Island Development Group that has been more than 10
years in the making.
In February, the five-star resort held its soft opening, marking
completion of phase one, which includes the marina and resort.
Resort Host Manager Jan Critchley said "Construction is still ongoing
and some facilities are still not available," including the spa and a
beach bar/restaurant on the north side of the island which should be
completed this spring.
In March, ongoing work was evident with contractors putting the
finishing touches on the resort while guests relaxed in lawn chairs
poolside. While some areas still needed a little attention, other
facilities were fully functional. Power had been approved for the
docks and "everything was up and running," according to Critchley
who added that water was also available at each dock. "As we are
now, we are a fully functional marina," she said.


58 ALLATSEA.NET









The 50-slip marina consists of three piers and can accommodate
boats up to 150 feet. The biggest boat so far has been a 120 foot
yacht, according to Critchley. The resort plans to host an annual boat
show, a regatta and a sport fishing event.
The marina has a provisioning store, a deli, a boutique and a dive
shop. It also offers a unique amenity: if a boater wants to watch
something on television like a sports event, the marina staff can put a
large, flat-screen television on their vessel.
"We are really excited about the marina, because there is nothing
like it in the territory," Resort General Manager Bill Lee said. "There
are so many boaters in the territory and it is a challenge to find a place
to tie up. We fit that need."
He added that docking fees are "very reasonable" and comparable
to other marinas in the territory at $2.50 per foot.
The resort and marina staff were preparing for Easter weekend in
late March. Ms. Critchley said Puerto Rico visitors had already fully
booked up the marina and resort.
"That is going to be a good test for us," Ms. Critchley said. "I think
it is going to be great for us to have a full marina. There are some
logistics to be sorted out, but we are there."
On an average, the marina has had two or three boats per day since
its soft opening. Lee said the opening doesn't come at season's peak
but they are still trying to capture some of the potential business.
However, they are moving ahead cautiously by not over-hiring staff.
"We have come in very small and are waiting to see what the demand
is and will continue to hire from there," Lee said.
Outside of the marina, the reception area is located on the lower
level of the pavilion. Adjacent are two swimming pools and a Jacuzzi.
The infinity pool on the upper level cascades into another pool,
which has a swim-up bar and a waterslide. The swim-up bar was not
operational in March, but Mr Lee said the waterslide has been getting
plenty of use.
"I think more adults have gone down that thing than kids,"
Lee said.
The pavilion has two restaurants including Tierra-Tierra, a casual
poolside restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, and
Caravela that Lee describes as "more high-end dining." A large,
curved bar is made from petrified wood, which cost about $85,000,
and has an expansive ocean view.
"We have beautiful restrooms facilities where someone can come in
and get a hot shower and pull out the slacks from the duffel bag and
come up here and have a nice meal," Lee said.
Just above the pavilion complex sits an unfinished villa. Now that
phase one is completed, phase two will continue-the villas. The initial
plan was to build everything up at the same time, but the economic
turndown changed the development strategy.
"Midstream of the development, the whole financial world changed
and it had its ripple effect. Everyone had to stop and reassess the
development plan. There was a six-month work stoppage out here,"
Lee said. The villas were pushed back, and an emphasis then was
placed on completing the pools, the frontage and marina. Lee said
the completion of phase two will not affect the services that the resort
currently has to offer.


Todd VanSickle is a journalist living and working in the Virgin Islands.


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BVI KITE JAM 2010 CELEBRATES
PRO BOARDERS AND AMATEURS FLY OVER BVI WATERS



international kiteboarders and pro ,
athletes came out to celebrate
the first ever BVI Kite Jam, a pro-
am kiteboarding event in the British
Virgin Islands that took place February
28 March 5. BVI Kite Jam brought
together pros and amateurs with
visual competitions, demonstrations,
technique clinics and festivities in
locations throughout the British Vir-
gin Islands.
Pro riders that attended the 2010 event
included nine-time world champion
Kristin Boese,the legendaryAndre Phillip,
Susi Mai, Tuva Jansen, Tom Court, Chris
Burke, Gretta Kruesi, Madison Van Heurck and Jason Slezak. in conjunction wi
The event kicked off with an opening party at Necker Island for Sunsail 394 catarr
pros and participants along with sponsors, members of the BVI Billabong, an i
Tourism Board and local officials. The Honorable Ralph T O'Neal, their involvement
Premier and Minister of Tourism, addressed attendees, and Sir Billabong BVI KitE
Richard Branson reminisced about coming up with the idea for 5. www.bvikitejarr
Kite Jam with event partner Charlie Smith.
The BVI Kite Jam Team presented $5,000 checks to charity
partners Virgin Islands Search and Rescue (VISAR) and Tortola's Report submitted
Kids and The Sea (KATS). Party goers
danced the night away to live music
by local act Last Resort on the sands
of Necker Island under a full moon.
"BVI Kite Jam 2010 was a
tremendous hit, so much so we are
already booking jammers for next
year and have amazing support from .'-
Billabong as the presenting sponsor," -
said Charlie Smith, Founder & Partner
Kite Jam (BVI) Ltd.
Highlights of the week included .-
an unforgettable downwinder
to Pomato Point on Anegada
followed by a BBQ lunch at Cow
Wreck Beach and an afternoon of
freestyle action on Wednesday,
March 3. Pro boarders Kristin
Boese, Tom Court, Chris Burke
and others carved up the waters
along side Sir Richard Branson and
participating kite jammers. Other
activities took place off of Bitter
End Yacht Club's North Beach
where pros and amateurs grinded


EVENT


on sliders and water obstacles on a
sand spit in the Eustasia Sound.
The event closed with a party on
a remote beach on Mosquito Island,
complete with an award ceremony,
fire dancers, and a DJ getting the
crowd pumped and dancing.
BVI Kite Jam sponsors included
presenting sponsors BVI Tourist
Board and Necker Island, venue
partner Bitter End Yacht Club, Cape
Air, Sunsail, Digicel and others.
"Sailors for the Sea" also gave the
event a Clean Regatta Certification,
an eco-friendly stamp of approval,
th Sunsail's participation and use of their new
arans.
international surfwear apparel brand, confirmed
as the presenting sponsor for next year's event.
e Jam 2011 will take place February 26 March
.com -I


I by BVI Kite Jam


ALLATSEA.NET 61











2010 ST. MAARTEN HEINEKEN REGATTA

THREE EVENTS, 237 BOATS, 20 CLASSES & 30 OUTSTANDING YEARS

BY NICK MARSHALL


young competitors command a special affection. In the
case of the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, there was
also something to celebrate: a 30th anniversary year that
assembled 237 boats in 20 classes for some tough, eclectic sailing.
Organizers kept with the popular format of previewing the big three
days with two warm-up events-the Budget Marine match racing
championship and the Gill Commodore's Cup-and closing out the
regatta with a beachfront concert after prize giving, this year from
Maxi Priest. From America's Cup "rock stars" to Caribbean reggae,
this format hits all the right notes.
The Budget Marine Match Racing Cup on Tuesday, March 2 put
eight formidable sailors in a fleet of one-design Jeanneau Sunfast
20s on a course near the yacht club. With the winds on the lagoon
predictably unpredictable, it was a chance for America's Cup/
Olympic veterans such as Peter Holmberg, Peter Isler and Gavin
Brady (among others) to go manoo a mano' on the kind of scale
where it all began. On this occasion, as in 2009, Holmberg took first
place and the $5,000 first prize.
The Sixth Gill Commodore's Cup, a tune-up on Wednesday, March
3 involving short windward/leeward courses attracted 47 entries across
four classes and was won by Calvin Reed's Elandra, a Beneteau 40.7
from Racing B class, one of five other 40.7s. The winner for the cup is


the one that, according to judges, wins most decisively in the most
competitive class.
The St. Maarten Heineken Regatta proper was unleashed on
Friday, March 5. If the hot and sluggish conditions didn't already have
spectators/crews panting, the magnificent annual sight of some two
hundred yachts writhing around the waters off Simpson Bay is always
breathtaking. Packs of bareboats here, some 99 in total, dwarfed by the
prowling, strutting racing boats in the Spinnaker classes; a symphony
of cracking sails, creaking sheets and controlled but tense calls.


62 ALLATSEA.NET

































All the buzz this year would be about Irvine Laidlaw's fearsome-
looking Wally 82 Highland Fling, black and grey but flying a Spinnaker
adorned with a thistle; Tom Hill's new Reichel/Pugh 75 Titan 15, a
sleek, stripped, light racer; and George David's Reichel/Pugh 90
Rambler. The beauty of the Heineken, though, and to some extent
what it has always really been about, is the myriad of sub-plots that
unravel away from the headline acts: the three-way battle in Spinnaker
3 between Peake Yacht Services, Oystercatcher XXVI from the UK and
Blackberry Enzyme; the face-off of the four Melges 32 in Spinnaker 7;
the epic tussle between Kick 'em Jenny, Pocket Rocket and Luxury
Girl in 21-strong Spinnaker 6. These classes revisit rivalries that have
run for years.


With winds light and from the south, Friday's Round the Island Race
was free from any major dramatic equipment failures and collisions. A
total of 19 boats were unable to finish (six in the Open Class), with many
taking over six hours to complete the 32nm course. The lightweight
racing boats of Spinnaker 1 took roughly three hours: Rambler the first
over the line in 2:59:05, but second on handicap to Titan 15, who was
able to power away from Highland Fling on the downwind stretch. In
Spinnaker 5 two boats were caught OCS, including Jamie Dobbs' Lost
Horizon, an uncharacteristically bad start to a regatta that would finish
with three superb bullets on Saturday/Sunday Non-Spinnaker 1 proved

Continued on page 65


ALLATSEA.NET 63








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Continued from page 63


to be a cumbersome affair; Sir Bobby Velasquez's L'Esperance first round
in 6:12:14, but six of the 17 boats taking over seven hours.
Saturday's racing from Simpson Bay to Marigot threw up a fresh
scenario: breezy, lively conditions in which the Spinnaker classes sailed
three short courses in the day, with everyone else relaxing after Friday's
exertions with a single race. For the Spinnaker classes, then, it's all
about Saturday. Titan 15proved to have the more efficient unit, winning
the morning's two races and always a threat downwind. In the second
race, Highland Fling, who had suffered a broken halyard in race one,
and Rambler found themselves tied on corrected time and separated


by just 30 seconds on
elapsed time-a frustrating
occurrence for the Wally
who would have been
aching to beat the clock.
In Spinnaker 3 Blackberry
Enzyme took the first two,
but by the end of the
day's racing only one point
separated the top three.


"'In 30 years, we've created
tremendous friendships in
the Caribbean and beyond;
we've created a camaraderie
in these wonderful waters.
It's been a wonderful 30
years,' said Ferron."


In Bareboat 6, KH+P-Let
Me Go capitalized on an inspiring Round the Island win to secure the
second of three straight wins. Pushed hard all the way, this performance
rightly won the coveted "Columbus Cup" for best bareboat.
Sunday produced yet another set of conditions: wet and breezy with
scattered squalls. All eyes back to Spinnaker 3 for one final winner-
takes-all showdown that quickly developed into a two-horse race as
Oystercatcherand Peake pulled away from the fleet. The former would
take line honors and the win on corrected time, but this class was one
by a minute. Non Spinnaker 1 also required a score to be settled:
Rapajam choosing the final race to post a win, and hand overall victory
to third-place Safara in the process.
Spinnaker 6 ultimately went to Luxury Girl. lan Hope Ross, skipper
of second place Kick 'em Jenny remained sanguine. "It was a very
tight group but the boat that beat us was really well sailed," he said.
"We've raced against them many times before. They had the edge on


us every time downwind." Overall he decided, "This was an excellent
regatta. The tightness of the racing. There are just seconds between
first and eighth."
The final race over, sails furled, Heinekens popping, the scoreboards
were thronging with tanned, long-voweled Southern Caribbean
campaigners, sunburnt skippers more used to weekends on the Solent,
big bawdy Dutch crews in fluorescent polos and the odd sighting of
a Hall of Famer This moment as much as any start line split-second
is part of the magic of the Heineken, when professional sailors with
a roster of epic campaigns behind them rub shoulders with weekend
romantics and first-time ringers.
A typical story was told by the skipper of Acele Et, a crew from
a northern Germany more used to sailing on a lake. In their first
Heineken, they walked away with first place in Bareboat 1. Having
previously sailed at Antigua Sailing Week, they were smitten with St.
Maarten. "It is more competitive," came their verdict.
At the awards ceremony on Kim Sha beach, Titan 15 rightly won
the most Worthy Performance Overall, the regatta's Holy Grail. A
succession of other crews from as far and wide as Russia added showers
of champagne to the falling drizzle, but nothing could dampen the
spirits of the assembled spectators who had enjoyed a long weekend
of impeccably organized, tough racing.
Credit as always must go to race director Heather Tackling and SMYC
Commodore Robbie Ferron whose blend of technical excellence and
infectious enthusiasm are largely responsible for bringing the boats
here in the first place.
"In 30 years, we've created tremendous friendship in the Caribbean
and beyond; we've created a camaraderie in these wonderful waters.
It's been a wonderful 30 years," said Ferron.
As Olympic sailor Robbie Haines later commented on Yachtblast,
this was "the best regatta I've ever sailed in ... the best regatta in
the world." "



Nick Marshall is an English journalist living on St. Maarten who was
consultant editor of All At Sea from 2003 to 2005.


ALLATSEA.NET 65











ANGUILLA REGATTA


RETURNS MAY 7 -9

EVENT BENEFITS ANGUILLA YOUTH SAILING CLUB




weekend of racing for sailors throughout the Caribbean. Lone Fox and

T heAnguilla Regatta this month promises to be another great
Exciting yacht courses, a racing schedule that ensures that Reilei at 2009 s
Anguilla Regatta
participants can reach their home ports earlier on the last
day of racing and great evening entertainment all guarantee another
successful event. Spectators get to see the fleet of yachts under full
sail as they round marks near Meads Bay on the island's west end.
Once again, the Regatta will include the 12 meter yachts formerly
used in America's Cup Racing. Stars and Stripes and True North will
be the battleground for the "Battle of the Banks" and the "Resort
Race," both highly competitive challenges between two prominent
local banks in the morning and two of our most popular resorts in
the afternoon. On Sunday, for $100 per person, the 12 Meter Yachts
go public and anyone who wants to feel the excitement of racing can
become part of the crew for the day.
Anguilla Regatta has found its place in the Caribbean regatta
circuit and has attracted sailors from all over the world. Many
participants attend for the opportunity to sail in the local Anguilla


SKY LIGHTS BYJEANNIEKUICH


May Spotlights
* Venus glides between the
star horns of Taurus while
Mars, although dimming,
voyages close to the star
Regulus in Leo. This year
the Eta Aquarid meteors
are spoiled by bright
moonlight.

May Planet Particulars
* The bright planet Venus
is always an attraction, this
month gliding through the
forehead of Taurus near
the Pleiades star sisters
and later not far from the
Gemini Twins. Saturn,
the prettiest planet in
telescopes begins to dim
in relation to its position to
Earth, while Jupiter sizzles
the dawn sky.


The Moon Sails Near
Sun 9th: Jupiter before dawn
Wed. 12th: Mercury before dawn
Sun. 16th: Venus in evening
Tue. 18th: the star Pollux in
Gemini in late evening
Thu. 20th: Mars and later
the star Regulus in Leo
in late evening
Sat. 22nd: Saturn in evening
Mon. 24th: the star Spica in
Virgo in evening

Moon Phases
Thu. 6th: Last Quarter
Fri. 14th: New
Thu. 20th: First Quarter
Thu. 27th: Full

May Brightest
Navigation Stars
Dusk: Alpha Centauri,
Vega, Arcturus, Procyon
Dawn: Vega, Fomalhaut,
Altair, Capella


boats while others use the regatta as an excuse to spend a few days
in beautiful Anguilla.
The Regatta is being hosted by the Anguilla Sailing Association
(ASA) and the Anguilla Tourist Board, along with administrative
support provided by St. Maarten Yacht Club. The ASA was created
in 2003 when the founders of the regatta determined that the event
would grow from year to year and an organization was needed to take
it to the next level.
The ASA is also the parent organization of the Anguilla Youth Sailing
Club.Theirmandate isto provideallAnguillachildrenwiththeopportunity
to sail while learning seamanship, boat safety, environmentalism, and
leadership skills. The children of Anguilla today are growing up in an
environment that offers a limited number of wholesome activities that
foster confidence and self-worth. Having an opportunity to participate
in what is an international sport as well as embracing the national sport
of Anguilla is vital to the future of our youth.
The Anguilla Regatta is a major fund-raising event in support of
the AYSC. The ASA welcomes donations in support of the Regatta
or directly to the Anguilla Youth Sailing Club. Arrangements have
been made through the Anguilla Progressive Association of New
York (APANY) that will allow contributions from US citizens to be
tax deductible in the United States. For more information on this
procedure, please contact regatta@sailanguilla.com.
For regatta registration information: www.anguillaregatta.com, or
contact ASA: Tel: (264) 584-SAIL (7245), Fax: (801) 705-3877.


Preview submitted by Anguilla Sailing Association


66 ALLATSEA.NET










RANGER WINS THE

2010 ST. BARTH BUCKET

SIZE OF FLEET BREAKS RECORDS AT 39

BY ELLEN LAMPERT-GREAUX


anger, the magnificent 137' replica of the historicAmerica's
Cup J-Class yacht, took top honors in the 15th anniversary
edition of the St. Barth Bucket after three days of racing
on March 26, 27, and 28 under sunny skies and slightly
unpredictable winds that kept the sailors on their toes. Second place
and third place went to two of the seven outstanding Perini Navi
yachts in the Bucket this year, with the 154' Andromeda la Dea coming
in second, and the 125' P2 in third place overall.
Ranger and Andromeda la Dea also won their individual classes:
Ranger for Les Gazelles or racing class boats, and Andromeda for Les
Grandes Dames or cruising yachts. The two classes were added in
2005 when the Bucket fleet was deemed too large and the committee
decided to divide the fleet. This year, the size of the Bucket fleet once
again broke all records, with 39 yachts ranging from 76' (Donald Tofias'
White Wings) to 184' (Perini Navi's Salute).
With winds of eight to 15 knots over the weekend and incredibly
good weather, the Bucket proved itself to be an undisputed
highpoint on the Caribbean sailing calendar, erasing memories of
years with so little race the regattas were cancelled or high-sea alerts
what caused the fleet to anchor in the harbor rather than at the dock.
Major shipyards such as Alloy, Vitters, Royal Huisman, Perini Navi and
Holland Jachtbouw are the main sponsors of the event, with entries


in the race, making the Bucket a great showcase for the world's
top yachts. Hundreds of people flock to St. Barth the week of the
races, from owners with their crew and guests to tourists who host
Bucket parties in villas high atop the island's hills where the nautical
extravaganza of so many beautiful boats in one place at one time
unfolds before their eyes.
New this year was Peter Craig of Premiere Racing Inc. as the
Bucket's first PRO (professional race officer), in what race organizer
Hank Halsted called "a very exciting move forward for the Bucket.
Peter is responsible for all on-water activities of the Bucket; courses,
buoys, start/finish, all chase and safety boats." New safety regulations
were also instituted this year, which combined with good seamanship
on the part of the competitors, allowed for some fantastic racing.
For a full list of St. Barth Bucket 2010 winners: http://www.
bucketregattas.com/Stbarths/awards.html -


Ellen Lampert-Greaux lives in Saint Barthelemy where she is editor-in-
chief of Harbour Magazine, and has been a regular contributor to All at
Sea since 2000. She also writes regularly about entertainment design
and technology for Live Design magazine, and about Caribbean
architecture for MACO, a Trinidad-based lifestyle magazine.


ALLATSEA.NET 67














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68 ALLATSEA.NET










A HOLIDAY WEEKEND IN BARBUDA

BY DR. NICHOLAS FULLER


Sam not a big fan of carnival; I've gotten a bit older and seek out
more serene ways to spend my free time. That's why I quietly
slip over to Barbuda on long holiday weekends in my boat,
accompanied by one or two other boats with close friends: PK., a
surgeon, Richard and Maurice, both pilots for many years, and Shawn
Mac, a businessman with a Go-Fast boat.
For last year's carnival, we went over for the usual six days, first
to the furthest, most northern beach near the lagoon entrance,
and then back to Spanish Point on the southeastern tip of the
island for the last two days ... peace and quiet with lots of fishing
and diving.
Not far away from our chosen anchorage, a group of Barbudans,
some 15 to 20 adults and children, were camping. It was a calm and
protected beach, shallow with clear water One afternoon, while lazing
in the water near the boat, we noticed one of the men running up
the beach toward us. They know us and our boats quite well over
there; I worked there for several years, part time. As he approached,
he shouted that a child had drowned, was dead; could we come? I
immediately jumped into our small whaler and took off to the camp,
shouting to the others to get PK. to meet me down there.


"As he approached, he
shouted that a child had
drowned, was dead; could
we come? I immediately
jumped into our small
whaler and took off to
the camp, shouting to
the others to get P.K. to
meet me down there."


Within two to three minutes I
arrived at the campsite to find a
young woman performing CPR
on an apparently lifeless child
some three to four years old.
He appeared limp, cyanotic
and unmoving, naked and
covered with sand. PK. arrived
with Shawn Mac. We took over
from the caregiver; amazingly


we could feel a thready, faint
pulse and before long a
spontaneous, gasping, frothy respiration began; it was a positive
sign. He was able to maintain his shallow breathing on his own; still
no physical response whatsoever, still blue and unresponsive. An ear
to his chest revealed heavy congestion, signs of fluid-filled lungs.
We quickly lifted him to Shawn Mac's Go-Fast boat and got the
father to come with us. As we raced along at 50 mph through the
winding, shallow lagoon's entrance and then toward the village some
seven miles away, I looked at Shawn at the helm, determined and


ALLATSEA.NET 69








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ambulance, with its badly
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Once in the ambulance
and on the oxygen, the
child's colour once again
became pink and the
pulse a little stronger, but
still no movement at all,
just the shallow, gasping
breathing. On the way to
the Hannah Thomas Hospital, I privately expressed my concern to RK.
that if the child survived, he would probably have suffered some brain
damage and be handicapped, a dreaded scenario too often seen in
near-drowning cases. PK. was optimistic; youthful resilience was on
his side.
The resident Cuban doctor met us on arrival at the hospital; as
it turned out, he worked as PK.'s registrar in surgery at Holberton
two years before. He and his nurses were efficient; we all were.
Everything that needed to be done, was done. Once stabilized,
arrangements were made by the council to air-ambulance the boy
over to MSJMC at once.
Approximately an hour later, our young patient made a few
groans; he was still limp and not moving, but his pupils were
brisk and responsive, a good sign. His father shook our hands


and thanked us as we got into
the Police pickup, still clad only
in swimsuits, with sandy feet.
Shawn was waiting at the wharf
and we made our way back to
the boats. The sun was setting
and hardly a word was spoken
during the trip.
We stopped at the Barbudans'
camp to pick up the small


"'You-and you alone-
saved his life; you got
his heart and breath-
ing going again; you
remember that for the
rest of your life.'"


boat I had left there; the young lady who had given CPR to the
child came up to meet us and asked, in a most insecure manner,
if I thought her attempts at resuscitating the child had made
a difference.
My first thought was, how she could ask such a silly question; how
could she not realize what she had done! I looked at her and said
quietly, "You-and you alone-saved his life; you got his heart and
breathing going again; you remember that for the rest of your life." I
never got her name.
I called the Intensive Care Unit at MSJMC early the next
morning ... he had improved significantly overnight and looked as
though he would make a full recovery. Although he was still short
of breath, he could now sit up and was talking, apparently fully
oriented, and had no residual effects. It was a happy ending to a
frightening story.
Perhaps the Big Man above made this happen as a warning to us
all: "Pay more attention to the little ones; if not, next time I may just
keep him." -(&


70 ALLATSEA.NET


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SOUTH GRENADA:A

TWENTY-ONE BOATS MIX IT UP ON TWO COURSES

BY JAN HEIN


REGATTA


he South Grenada Regatta held February
26 to 28 had the look and feel of a carnival
that no one wanted to stop. Sailors had
plenty to keep them busy with two days
of racing and an ample amount of dock time to
rerun, review and rehash the action. The island's
juniors spent hours buzzing around a course in
their aptly named Mosquitoes, while those who felt
the need to run, swim, laugh and act silly joined
the Disney-esque Pirate's Trail that was open for
business for kids 8 to 88. And just to keep things
moving, attendees with a need-for-speed had the
chance to bomb around buoys during the 15 HP
Dinghy Time Trials.
Conditions for the first day of the regatta were as
perfect as the hosting venue, Le Phare Bleu Marina
and Resort. Light winds, flat seas and 21 boats mixed
it up on two courses well set to test every boat and
crew. The starting line for race one, set east of Petite
Calivigny Island, funneled boats downwind through
the shallow waters of the south coast. After rounding
Glover Island, the upwind leg was a tacking duel
between racers, reefs and rocks.
With four distinct classes-cruising, racing, fun
and multihull-the action was well paced until .
the finish line where most of the drama unfolded.
Several of the big boats had small crews, making it
difficult for the quick succession of moves needed
to cross the tight line. One two-handed crew with a
four-legged friend lost control of their Genoa sheet u
causing them to blow a tack and stall just feet from
the line. A literal traffic jam ensued, forcing one
vessel to jibe around, another to tack away. Finally, I
the dog's people fired up the engine and motored
out of the way.
Although the docks had been filled with fuel jugs, anchors and
other heavy gear that has no place on a race boat, there were still
elements of home on the course. Some folks flew solar panels
and sun awnings. Several entrants sailed the course with wind


Westerhall Cup Category 5
Le Phare Bleu Cup Rasmus


Overall Winner Diehard
Junior Sailors Kwesi Paul


Diehard


generators spinning, causing some to wonder if that constituted an
assist or a handicap.
The second contest of the day took the fleet on a more rugged
course, upwind to Westerhall Bay where the rum and the day's biggest
trophy originated.
While that battle was under way, another group of highly competitive
sailors put on a show for spectators at Le Phare Bleu. Fourteen Grenadian
Junior Sailors aged 11 to 17 sped around the protected bay, occasionally
swamping and bailing like champs. Prizes, handed out after a hearty
lunch, were gift certificates donated by Budget Marine. Nick George,
liaison between the kids and the company explained, "We love this

Continued on page 75


ALLATSEA.NET 73


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Continued from page 73


Raindaiicer


The offshore triangle configuration meant less
reef dodging but more seas to dive in and out of
before a spectacular finish inside the bay.
Somewhere between the end of the race and
the beginning of the final ceremony, a line of
competitors took turns in a high speed inflatable,
hoping to best all times. Onshore a clock ticked
as wanna-be pirates swam to a sunken ship and
a dock full of challenges. Exhausted sailors limed
in the pool.
For the finale, a wheelbarrow of trophies
handcrafted by sculptor Renee of Act Art&Design
rolled in. Speeches were made, sponsors thanked
and winners announced.
Jana Caniga, race organizer and owner of Le Phare
Bleu with Dieter Burkhalter, spoke of the success of
this two year-young event. "It doesn't need to grow
too fast; as long as everyone is happy." So far, so
good. Full results & images are available at www.
southgrenadaregatta.com.


program. These prizes
let the kids choose
something that's right
for them."
The first round
of prize giving for to
the big boats took
place that even-ing
in the elegant pool
bar with musi-cal
entertainment pro-
vided by The Rocking Pontoons. Lucky first, second and
third place finishers took home generous prizes: binoculars,
certificates for bottom cleaning, meals, rope, even an
outboard engine.
Organizers invented clever ways to make certain no
one went home empty handed. Categories like "most
pre-race effort," "being consistently 5th," and "the
least amount of hands per square meter" insured that
everyone left with a win and a bottle of vintage rum.
The 68-foot schooner Raindancer walked away with
the prize for "happiest crew with the most varnish on,"
no surprise since she was the biggest and flashiest in
the fleet.
Only one race was scheduled for Sunday but since the
wind had increased substantially, it provided a day's worth
of challenge. There were some tense seconds on the start
line when several boats got sandwiched together and one
took a bite, literally, out of Raindancer's stern. Owner John
Whitsett recounted, "Everyone was trying. Another few
inches, we would'a missed."


ALLATSEA.NET 75














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SPICE ISLAND'S SERVICES FOR BOATERS: PART ONE

BY JAN HEIN


renada is an island of natural abundance and for yachties
rl, ;r means more services for boaters than you can count,
including these protected marinas.

Port Louis
The biggest and most bodacious of the lot is the highly-publicized
Camper and Nicholson's Port Louis, headquarters and sponsor for the
Grenada Sailing Festival's regatta in 2010. Situated in the midst of the
capital city of St. Georges, this state-of-the-art facility offers everything
a captain and crew could want along with a rich, historic view.
Being one of the newest of Grenada's tie up and chill-ax
options, it's not quite finished but already boasts 50 fully-serviced
berths. Additional floating pontoons and docks are on their way.
Throughout the lush, manicured campus, shell-lined paths lead
everywhere, from the popular Victory Bar & Grill to a growing
collection of brightly colored West Indian cottages housing a
boutique, art gallery, water sports, marine services and mini
market. Horizon Yacht Charters and Management opened an
office and yacht services location here (in addition to their 10-year-
old location at True Blue Bay resort on the south coast).
Their well staffed office will jump at the chance to make any
and all arrangements for boats and crew and since Port Louis
can handle vessels up to 300 feet, that's sometimes a big and
complicated job. This marina's goal is to provide clients quality,
luxury service equivalent to a five-star hotel and already they've


been able to deliver that over-the-top pampering to some of the
world's largest yachts including the sailing vessel, Maltese Falcon.
www.cnportlouismarina.com

Grenada Yacht Club
Across the lagoon is the old Yacht Club offering docking and re-
fueling facilities for 44 boats up to 75 feet. They have a restaurant,
bar and customs and immigration, and Island Water World is right
across the street.

Clarkes Court Bay Marina
A world away from the bustle of the city lies the charming Clarkes
Court Bay Marina, owned and operated by Grenadian Bob
Blanc. Situated on the south coast, it's an easy voyage through
well marked reefs and islets that lead into a mangrove lined bay
known for the village of Woburn.
Bob and his wife Leslie own a Canadian dock manufacturing
business making them natural proprietors of a place to tie your
boat to. In 2001 they launched the marina with 52 easy-access,
floating slips along with shore side amenities. Reinforced and
reconfigured after Hurricane Ivan, the slips can accommodate a
couple of the big girls. "We've had a 150' mega yacht here," said
Bob. But primarily they best handle vessels up to 80'.

Continued on page 79


ALLATSEA.NET 77










GRENADA MARINEl












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Casino, it iltrectwe over mt fIi ~ln lu ilrtn


nm.l.. Illll~~i Ii I -- se .1 1 j-1-- --l' II I. J thL "iil
Mj.. j I. ..r. I L I l le I ..p 'I ~
nc MA-M,) 14pkE: Sjjj ln ".A U 1i A,4 ivy 0d~u t-pil
electincily. Salelplile TV With Struritf Susrd& ori duty 4 hourt aday.


78 ALLATSEA.NET


Tel:(+297) 58a-om ax:(4297 589OZ61 I www~utenaiisancematrina. com j~hannell6 ~.~...ijl.rplr lI.lr,










Continued from page 77


The twelve-sided Oasis Waterfront
Bar is the heart of the business
where food and drinks are served.
On Saturday, they supply the
barbeque and live music as hosts
for a cruisers' potluck. Sports fans
flock to the bar's big screen, and
there's a pool table, book exchange .,..
and high speed internet, www.
clarkescourtbaymarina.com

Whisper Cove Marina
On the north side of Clarkes Court
Bay is a picturesque, minute marina
accommodating 12 boats, 30 to 60
feet. New owners are infusing energy
and money into the business that
includes a restaurant, bar, grocery-
ette, laundry and butcher shop
featuring Grenadian grown, organic
meats. Fresh baguettes come out of
the oven daily.
Partner Gilles Yergeau, butcher and chef, works wonders in
the galley for daily breakfasts and lunches along with special
weekend dinners and Sunday brunch. Gerard Groux takes care of
waterside needs providing extensive technical and maintenance
services. www.whispercovemarina.com

Le Phare Bleu
This enchanting compound gracing Petite Calivigny Bay is now
in its second year and accommodates 50 yachts. The Poolbar
Restaurant greets yachtsmen as they come ashore with excellent,
locally inspired food and a daily happy hour (and a half) with
snacks like Callaloo Fritters and Phulouri.
Swiss owners and sailors Dieter Burkhalter and Jana Caniga
worked a miracle when they directed the building of the entire


complex in only 22 months. Jana explained their philosophy,
"We want an open concept here. We like it when it mixes: locals,
boaters, tourists." Their 30 employees keep the flower clad
grounds in bloom, run a well-stocked market and keep two busy
restaurants up and running.
Customs and Immigration have an office on site along with
car rental, shops for canvas work, a chiropractor, and diesel and
electrical engineers.
Their flagship is a 100 year old lightship refurbished and shipped
from Stockholm, Vastra Banken, which graces the outside slip of
the main dock, serving gourmet two and three course dinners and
other delights. Below, the lounge doubles as a lightship museum
and library loaning books and DVDs. On the upper deck is a blue
and white lighthouse, the symbol and beacon of Le Phare Bleu.
www.lepharebleu.com

Martin's Marina
This in-transition marina located in Secret Harbor is the
former Moorings base, a victim of Hurricane Ivan. The docks
are operational but no power or water is currently available,
and shore side amenities are simple at best. A restaurant/bar
is open for business hosting occasional specials.

Prickly Bay Marine
With only 10 slips, this is one of Grenada's smallest yacht
hosting spots, but now that it's part of Prickly Bay Waterside
Development, all of that may change, economy willing.
This season you can count on water, fuel, the Tiki Bar and
Essentials market.

Coming next, Part Two: Grenada's Boatyards


ALLATSEA.NET 79












CARIBBEAN MARINAS

ALL ATSEA'S CARIBBEAN MARINA GUIDE


0 0
i (U^


bZ


0 0 0
< --


Antigua Jolly Harbour Marina 268-462-6042 10' 250' 158 110/220 Cable 68 *

Aruba Renaissance Marina Aruba 297-588-0260 13' 200' 50 110/220 16/69

Curacao Seru Boca 599-767-9042 14' 150' 140 127/220 67
110/220
Dominican Republic Marina Zar Par 809-523-5858 12' 120' 110 308 220 5 FREE

Dominican Republic Ocean World Marina 809-970-3373 12' + 250' 104 110/220 16/68

Grenada Clarkes Court Bay Marina 473-439-2593 13' 60' 52 110/220 16/74 USB
access
Grenada Grenada Marine 473-443-1667 15' 70' 4 110/220 16 FREE

Grenada Le Phare Bleu Marina 473-444-2400 15' 120' 60 110/220/480 16 FREE
110/208/220/
Grenada Port Louis Marina 473-435-7431 14.76' 90m 170 230/240/400/ 14 FREE
480/630V
Grenada Prickly Bay Marina 473-439-5265 17' 200' 10 11220 16 *

Guadeloupe Marina Bas-du-Fort 590590936620 15.5' 210' 1,100 110/220/380 9 FREE
110/220/480
Jamaica Errol Flynn Marina & Shipyard 876-715-6044 32' 600' 33 abe 16/9 FREE

Jost Van Dyke North Latitude Marina 248-495-9930 12' 50' N/A N/A 16

Puerto Rico Puerto del Rey Marina 787-860-1000 15' 260' 1,000 120/208 Cable 16/71 *

Puerto Rico Sunbay Marina 787-863-0313 12' 75' 287 110/220 Cable 16/12 *

St. Croix St. Croix Marine 340-773-0289 11' 150' 44 110/220 16/18

St. Lucia Rodney BayMarina 758-452-0324 15' 220' 232 110/220 16/17 *

St. Lucia The Marina at Marigot Bay 758-451-4275 16' 250' 40 0/2080 able 16/12 *

St. Maarten Island Water World Marina 599-544-5310 8' 90' 54 Available Cable 74

St. Maarten Lagoon Marina Cole Bay Wtrft 599-544-2611 9' 100' 45 110/220 16 FREE
St. Maalen Simpson Bay Marina 110/220/
St. Maarten Si on GYdestination- 599-544-2309 14' 200' 126 480 16/79

St. Martin Captain Oliver's 590-59087 10' 150' 160 110/240 16/67
33-47
American Yacht Harbor
St. Thomas American Yac abor 340-775-6454 9.5' 110' 106 110/240 16/11 *

Tortola, BVI Nanny Cay Marina 284-494-2512 12' 125' 200 110/220 16 *

Tortola, BVI Soper's Hole 284-495-4589 25' 170' 50 110/240 Cable 16 Cafe
Hard-
Tortola, BVI Village Cay Marina 284-494-2771 12' 200' 106 110/220/ Cable 16/71 line
S IGY aernlor 308 __at Slip

Trinidad Power Boats Ltd 868-634-4346 13' 65' 40 115/220 72 *


Virgin Gorda


Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbour


284-495-550


10' 1180' 94 1


110/220


* *


* 116/111 *


80 ALLATSEA.NET


i
a~
P










Your bottom is our concern


R,


-n


IF.~la


S -p -


* Yacht storage maintenance and repair
* Teakworks. stainless and aluminum fabrication
* AWL grip application and many other services


email curacaomnarneiin lei needs.nel


curacao


websire www.curacaomorine.com


~z-~-;LgprE;
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call: + (5999) 4658936





























rive cabin. apolless.
$149K










1982 ENDURANCE
KETCH
BLUEWATER READY
$69K


%tolumma %,% sloop.
Great condition
Budget Blue water cruiser.
$49K


zuuo Lagoon 41u .
Awesome condition
with clean survey
$275K


1uInuM; car.
Very clean and ready to go.
$159K OFFERS!


Aluminium Deck Saloon
Gorgeous Beast
$499K


2004 Sun Odyssey 37.
Spotless and pristine
with many upgrades
One owner $119K


Owners version
Offers! $235K


Blue water sloop.
Clean and ready to go
$34K




'-4'


o Jeanneau aunKIS
Lots of new gear.
$99K


I ll~i I I


Very clean
$249K
Dropped $100K!


1990 42 ft Carver.
Spotless and pristine
$175K


i/o lmlanatr oo.
Serious Blue Water
Cruiser.
$24K


2003 48 ft Sea Ray
Motor Yacht
Excellent condition
$299K


-lr, r.o M.qulez
Amphitrite. Bullet proof
Blue water cruiser. New
engine and rigging.
$109K


1995 Roberts 45
Charter Version
$109K


:oo -. mal-lI Ivngsnum.
Clean racer Cruiser.
$134K


2003 Lion 46 Power Cat.
LUXURY!!!
$249K


111o 1no1UEinn O0 JDOut.
QUINTESSENCE
Stunning performance
and old world charm.
Refitted 2009. $295K


Dynamique 62.
One careful owner
since new.
Quite Magnificent
$595K Reduced!








SUN ODYSSEY 44
AWESOME MACHINE!!-
139k


1992 Dudley Dix Caribbea 30
Blue water Pocket Rocket
loaded $35K


-l 1 i 1 uolpnln lioop
Solid English
classic 4 tonner
$29K


1992 Reinke Super 10
Aluminium 38 ft
$99K


JI 11 It li551C oDurircm
Flybridge Sportsfish.
Immaculate throughout!
Offers entertained.


Beneteau 473
Clean with New sails
and new hatches.
New Listing


1981 36 ft Maxi Sloop.
Clean. Swedish Pedigree
Liveaboard
$59K


1985 Dynamique 50
Express. Blue water
ready BARGAIN!!!
90K Euro


1094 Aloha 34 ft Sloop.
Good clean
Budget priced liveaboard.
$39K


2003 Jeanneau Sun
Odyssey 45.5. Owner version,
all the extras, never
chartered $240k


it. 404r,-

























-YKt"ra
Ciriov Aid
LaMrd irn Iyti2J IJ
Asking 549,000


t11d"U1 ir
4 Cabins/4 He&d&
Loapid in rotkt 8.I.
Asking $524.9W0


I DLcid in IamIb.J BYI
Akin S I100.000


17U -I


Th69mim-
7 cabins 1 Kead&
LQLde irr ronIoa 8V I
Uukngf I155.000


IMgc 5liiimy
1 ) L tns. 1 HP4'1%
lLekJ in loInw B111
asng195.00


4 Udhin-o i-irdi
LI.,(,i, n ii Iil4j 8 V I
Askn'g 115.000


Tortola


Yacht Showcase


Looking for a Beneteau, Jeanneau,
Dufour, or Leopard Catamaran?

Come visit us in the British Virgin Islands to
tour the world's largest collection of pre-owned
yachts. Over 30 late model, well maintained
yachts from the world's foremost boat builders
are currently showcased on our docks in Tortola;
cleaned, prepared and priced for a quick sale.

What better place to end your yacht search than
the beautiful British Virgin Islands! Our expert
staff is available on-site to assist you.

The yachts featured on this page are just some
of whats currently in Tortola ready to be sailed
home!


Don't miss out on this great opportunity.


www.MOORINGSBROKERAGE.com


'Di
Ii Cabaiv Wadi
LOulld ini Toi.ula kVI
Asking 51 25,M









Le" Of Fabw
I CabiniV5 Heads
Locask in gT 514.0
Asking $1 40A


17IJ =..%/6


PINIMIS
SC1n141 I Keads
Lof.Jed in rwaoIla. By I
Asking 5290000


La" U Law
1 4 Cabi rii he id;
Ltxaltdri Tuvioir lVI
Aiklr.R $75AM


100d GK
4 Cjb;ri! I HW.jd
I rormi in TnrrMia. EVI
A-,kig 1245.000


""ia I
2Clbbrl' 2 HeI.
10(asd winC 515. B %,I
Asking $11.5.00o


Mulardodi' "Moon W
3 CObinsi' 2 Meads 2 CObins I Weads
LWcaned s 1ovWal. EMJ Ucxated in Totia. 01.1
ASkIg 595,000 Asking 570,0









/ -........... / _


' -.,' L -' 1j "i- 1 r
'J~v/IL /~~ ~
I 1 \~'k I- ~ _r____ ~5l~j


UL uulOur Naiuttech 19WA
Tienirindous Opporluniry
SGieal Condilion Asking S?95K


Bluev.aier Cruiser OWell
Equipped As.king 'ilb9F.





46'Bavaria 2006
Well Equipped and Maintainc
A!l Ing S-l9K


44 Lagoon 440 2006
OC)ner sVirsion Loadied
Asking 5575K.
iu J. I


Jusl Rc-duicLd' Sold V.'siel
Ailing 465Kh


5B'Voyage Yachts 580 2005
Luxury Caribbean Cal
Aki iq SW0WOK


L rtdr


I -L_
C.K-
C


Sr-n.v' iii i".zI i
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52'Endeavour 1990
Very Clean Comfrc.jrlble
Gleal Colndition. Ashk ng 5149K




-Eii


Neruv a:nmar Nice Condliion


54' Hylas Deck Salon *991'00 I
I I Slandard D ek III Dec(
Salon Sldrri 56 $615K


i9 JuistIdr ylY %o Pounltaine rajot oDnid U1
Great Price and Value E.epiiplanally Clean Manny
Aikling 589K Upqrades Asklinq 5349K
.-

M*~f^--hai


45' Beneteau 445 1994 45'Downeaster 1979
Far Carnitrain Ciu -uri Hir.:- Schoonr Price Heduc,'?'
Asking '99h I A:kinrg S99K
.' -, ..... II. I. "-' h -"


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S: .. : ... .,.. -,:['








51'Beneteau Frers Idylle
15.5 1986 Cruse Equipped
Gir:a P.ice' A.king 1 719K


Loaded ImrriaculaTe
A'kinq 21;K


45' Robertson and Caine '99 44 FountainePajot
Just Reduced G(jicr Price' ImrTdidulace LumuriouS and
Asirny,9 5260K Econo:.i-ial A, inqg S ( i0
Ii a


. -:.'- r' .,

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-:. .. .- -.



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~t~l1 'l,,j e. l ,"~ i


44' Lagoon 440 2006
W'll r.PpT and Piced (Grear
, A. ralable Saln ing-. 5 525K 2


I'Gulfstar 43 MKII 19
Lol ol Ge r Spacious
Alk Ing S69K


43' Benteau Idylle 13.5'84 42' Endeavour 1990
NJl(tly Up r'.acill d Gleal Clren We II Ma nl.inetJ Lols of
OPfhore De;Lgn Asking Sb9K G) ea Asking S 119

. -. flff


42 Island Packet 200 1
Immaculale and Loaded
Askirg $2iJ K


S--i
42" Lagoon 420 2008
KtI n Pic e. Nr.*' .tnm. r
Asking 51475K


42' Bruce Roberts Spray'84
JulsI Redui'.e' ilmmacullal
in Every Wa' Asking 99'.'K


Ornei sV' r Slcn Lo, Gi-al Oie~jgn Snjyrnmfnu. LOe*, Hunl, Nt-Aue Chlriered
Price' A'tInq S349K Upgrades Asking 595K Asking 51.S5K


'Jeanneau Sun Ody 191
Gitrl VAlu- Fdai Crua.wr
Asking 565K


*, ru.ll..llll- rJul a
Well Kept ard Spa ious
Prc. ri (at Aiking iS5K


36' Moody 36CC 1997 36'Dufour 36CC 2000 33" Nauticat 1986 32'Bavaria 2003
. Qualilt Build Never- Chartered .C nitr Crtlpit NvvCi E rl melv Well iKepl Spaiious Peifect Caiibbelan. Cuit.ei
A iring SIO9K 4 Chartlered Asking 565 As king I 12C K Asking 559W.

". ,


Gleat PoC.eri LrTuiers
2 AMailableStalning 45S, .













THE MULTIHULL COMPANY


PHILLIP BERMAN


FEATURED CATAMARAN LISTINGS
Please visit our website for our extensive catamaran listings.

I--1 -I-


1.500.000


President,
Multihull Company
World Champion
Catamaran Sailor
* Author of Six
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S$199,000
$199,000


$575,000 300,000

7MW 1T


52,400,000


$199,000





$395,ontou
$395,000


825.000
IIII M MM M


$229,000

ti *"I- I


$320,000


$259,000


$539,000

* fr ^ _


470,000 5550,000





1992 48' Privilege 2001 50' Horizon
$399,000 405,000


$580,000

M)


$1,299,000


$245,000


L r-ountaine
159,500


575,000





1999 60' Fountaine Pajot
$665,000


FT. LAV SC A PA PA S E W T
Phne 21.0820 Fax 21.58.76. E-Mil eno mlthlcmpn.c


u Ju Jo uau
$295,000

R"


$399.000


$549,000


5 41 Lagoon
$255,000









New Catamaran Inventory from



LAGOON


COflST


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INNOVATIVE DESIGNS QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP


Come See Them at Our Docks Today.


ATLAS YACHT SALES
Marina Puerto del Rey
Fajardo, Puerto Rico
'"


sailatlas.com 787-439-2275


St. Croix, USVI 340.778.1004 I www.goldcoostyachts.com


MARITIME YACHT SALES
Located in Independent Boatyard, St. Thomas, USVI
Member of The Yacht Brokers Association of America
C: 340-513-3147 T: 340-774-3175 F: 340-774-3509 yachts@viaccess.net






55 Baltic, 1984 40 Tiara Hardtop Express, 1999 38 Voyage, 2002
Powerful & beautiful, equipped to race, Cat 3208's, genset, Ash interior, One owner boat, never chartered
cruise and live aboard, rare offering $400,000 Huge cockpit and swim platform $239,000 Live aboard equipped, well maintained $225,000


ou iVlane .at, 1-7o
Quality composite cat, 07 engines
Perfect Caribbean boat, great price! $90,000


37 Endeavor Ketch, 1979
Open A-plan layout, huge cockpit
very clean and well equipped $46,500


53 1968 Gallant Ketch -Heaviybult passage maker, rare offenng...$149,500
49 1995 HylasSemiCusbm-One Owner, neerchatered, mustsee..$335,000
48 1974 Maple Leaf- Vintage Canadian built CC cruiser, pnce to sel.$89,000
48 1970 HuesYawl-ClasscS&Sperforrmacerterecclkpcruser...$110,000
45 1992 Catalina/Morgan-CCSop, hugeaftcabin, baded, dinghy..$145,000
45 1978 Endurance Wndboas- Rblhouse ketch, stongandeleant..$125,000
44 1993 BeneEau445-RecertYannar, ctas, sdar,rndgenbaded..$129,000
42 1989 Endeavour- CC Sop, spaccus aft cabin, wellequipped..$119,000
41 1982 Morgan 01 CC cruising ketch, Perkns, dinghy & more.. $69,000
39 1974 South Sea -Steel passage maker, original owner, bnng offers.$55,000
38 1978 Van de Stadt Steel passage maker, ketch ng, new sails. $69,000
36 1982 Pearson 365 -Cutter, recentengine and nagging, 12voltfng..$59,000


ou nyurocat .ouu
Twin Yanmar diesel engines
cuddy cabin, flybridge, swim platform $59,000


35 1977 Pears -Claesicenterboardslop,Yamar,newbottm pairt...$25,000
27 1988 J-Boat Stored on trailer, quality gear, race ready, offers.. $19,000
POWER
57 2002 Carer- byagerPblhouse, luurymoloryachtt nVols....$495,000
55 1986 Angel- Cockpit nmooryacht wthflybndge, de, fish, cruise..$265,000
48 1982 Hateras- Codptin ryadtmanycusf mfeaure, mLstsee..$25,000
42 1999 Crusers-Twncals,genset ful baed,greatshape,reduced...$175,000
38 1967 Camcraft -Auminum crew boat in excellent shape after reft...$50,000
37 2005 Fourtaine Pat- PowerCatYamarsone owner, greatshape.$350,000
31 1998 SearaySundancer-Twn Mercruisers, genset, a/c, offers....$59,000
30 1993 Luhrs tournament Twn kos, tower, cabin, swim platform...$69,00


Visit us online at www.maritimeyachtsales.com


SAIL


86 ALLATSEA.NET


I r'12tilS~f Ych Sales~i


Buvattl''in or [eltlOin-"d





Nlotot or S-.fll






fmllfil %Ouir tIICCI &
exceed~ Iyourl









inforpl 2m iti~lls~o


M \ll









Lot#5 Western Main Road
G Clguararm. s. Trinidad WI
T 868 634 442014427 (ext 106)
Fa 868 634 4387
YACHT SERVICES mall pysi cLJblrIcelt nel
AND BROKERAGE websile peakeyaclts.corn


24' 2007 Tes 720 ....................................................................... US$55,000
30' 1984 Carter 30....................................................................... US$35,000
32' 1978 Rival MDC.................................................................... US$35,000
34' 1978 Steel Sloop (ROB) ....................................................... US$30,000
36' 1977 Roberts Home Built (located in Barbados)............... US$40,000
37.6' 1987 Topaz .......................................................................... US$85,000
38' 1997 Beneteau .................................................................. US$100,000
39' 1968 Cheoy Lee Off Shore 40 .......................reduced to US$70,000
40' 1981 Divorne Steel ............................................................ US$50,000
40' 1986 TaShing Tashiba (excellent condition) .reduced to US$179,500
40' 2002 Hermine DI (launched 2008)....................................... EU264,000
41' 1982 Sigma Marine Project ...................................... US$60,000
41' 1985 Irwin Ketch .................................................................. US$85,000
42' 1986 Endeavour.................................................................... US$98,000
43' 1999 Wauquiez Pilot Saloon................................................ EU247,500
43' 1985 Gitana .......................................... ................ ............. US$115,000
45' 1998 Peterson cutter....................................... US$189,999
45' 1999 Passport a/c 44.......................................................... US$365,000
46' 1988 Comet 460.................................................................. US$136,000


46' 1998 Bavaria ......................................................................... US$60,000
46' 2001 Tayana (Vancouver pilot house) ........................... US$329,000
48' 1971 Motor Sailer................................................................. US$90,000
50' 1974 Motor Yacht (locally built) .......................................... US$80,000
50' 1991 Celestial Pilothouse.................................................. US$268,000
50' 2001 Beneteau ...................................... EU188,000
51' 1986 Beneteau ................................................................. US$225,000
51' 1990 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey ............................reduced to EU99,000
53' 1984 Amel Custom Mango ................................................ US$269,000
55' 1979 Herreshoff Marco Polo ......................................... US$170,000
55' 1998 Zerft Motor Sailer (must sell!!!) ................................ US$40,000
56' 1973 Visch Motor Yacht .................................................... US$175,000
75' 1976 Murry Peterson Coaster (Schooner)......................... US$40,000

33' 1988 Dean Ocean Comber................................................ US$145,000
40' 1999 Woods Catamaran.................................... US$247,500
54' 1980 Norman Cross Trimaran ......................................... US$350,000
34' 1980 W harram Tangaroa...................................................... US$35,000
60' 1994 Bueller Powered Cat................................................. US$160,000


TOHATSU
outboards


NJSt. Thomas, USVI across from Independent Boatyard
Contact us at (340) 779-2717/775-0860 Fax: (340) 779-7119 pgxmax@rvitelcom.net


ALLATSEA.NET 87


IJ


,


-sic












rn[W Rff Rf[EVN&i]C[i|


WE BUILD ONE OF THE MOST FUEL EFFICIENT
PASSENGER VESSELS IN THE WORLD


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YACHTS
International Yacht Brokers
Located at Simpson Bay Marina,
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NEW LISTING





1992 Beneteau First 45f5
$148,000 US
SWEDISH STEEL





1987 Anso 42
$159,000 US
ST. MAARTEN: +599 544 2798
ST. MARTIN: + 590 690 47 71 45
TRINIDAD: 1 868 634 4868
CALIFORNIA 1 510 814 0400
www.bayislandyachts.com


88 ALLATSEA.NET














Compass Point Marina 6300 Est. Frydenhoj, Suite 28, St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00802
Phone: (340) 779-1660 Fax: (340) 775-4803 yachts@islands.vi










42' 1971 Grand Banks MY 60' 1982 Nautical 40' 2001 Jeannea
$99,000 199,900 109,1


38 1967 Le Comle
80,000

SAIL
28' '78 Cape Dory, Classic, Refit 6/07....$35K
33' '73 Pearson 10M sloop, refit....... $25K
34' '83 Hunter, Yanmar, Radar................ $32K
35' '86 Canadian SC, '98 Westerbeke...$29K
36' '80 Albin Stratus 75K w/business.....$45K
38' '67 LeComte, classic, great cond......$80K
40' '84 Endeavour, ready to cruise......$79.9K
40' '01 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey, 3 strms.$109K
41' '80 Morgan Out Isl, Well maintained.$69K
43' '85 Morgan Catalina, stepped transom.$89K


37 Carve
135,000


44' '77 CSY Sloop, new rigging ..............$115K
46' '00 Jeanneau 3 strms,great cond.....$159.9K
50' '78 Gulfstar Ketch, Classic, 3 strms..$99.9K
50' '78 Nautor Motorsailer, refit, excellent cond.$370K
60 '82 Nautcal Ketch, 4 sms, charterorcruse.$219K

POWER
20' '05 Caribe Dinghy, 115 HPYamaha..$20K
26' '87 Whale Boat, Diesel, CG cert........ $28K
27' '88 Luhrs Alura, cabin, IB gas cabin.. $20K


Mainslip Irawler
129,900


31' '94 Tiara Pursuit, Twin Crusaders, low hrs. $70K
32' '03 Sea Ray, 350HP Mercruisers......$95K
34' '89 Sea Ray Express, diesels............ $55K
39' '98 Mainship Trawler, twin diesels... $129.9K
40' '97 Carver MY, Ckpt, great condition.$135K
42' '71 Grand Banks MY, CG Cert 42 pass.$99K
42' '84 Present Sundeck 135 HP Lehmans $79.9K
48' '99 Dyna Craft MY, 435HP diesels..$299.5K
48' '02 DynaCraftMY,3strms 450HPCats...$490K
53' "76 Unilite Utility, custom Navytransport..$99.9K


M' your umtrw I boat putn me
www.Industrialimrlinpr.oem


Call, fax or visit our website for a complete list of boats for sale


Strategically placed grab handles
Double heavy-duty rubbing strake,
Fiberglass-hulled inflatables PerformaxT tube design
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6 0 E tt.11 - o S uite2, St. Thomas, V100802


ALLATSEA.NET 89


M 10'















































IIII(II
$20,0 taeStaa
wihdigiehudjd fl


TWIN VEE 29 HP CATAMARAN
2008, 2 x Suzuki 250 Four Stroke, 300
h. Only used private, in first hand, the boat
floats on a cushion of air and is also in soft
waves into the waves, Queen size bed
and head, Located St. Vincent, 82.500 US
$, e-mail monikavenohr@ketch.de, call
Monika 001473-418 5571

LUHRS 2002 OPEN 29 SPORTS
FISHERMAN Twin 315hp Turbo
Yanmar Diesels Only 550 hours Tuna Tower
With Controls-Length 31' 10" Beam 11' 6"-
5kw Diesel Genorator GPS, FishFinder,
Auto Pilot- 4 berth Aircon etc. 3 axle brake
trailer-location Antigua-USD $90,000-UK
447801467583- tornefarm@yahoo.co.uk

BERTRAM 38 SPORT FISH FLY
BRIDGE CRUISER, 1973, 2 xCum-
mins V903 Marine, 2 Cabins, Fly bridge
with pilot chair and pilot station, Lot of
new parts, in good condition, Located in
Grenada, Price: 56000 US. e-mail juer-
genfaulenbach@web.de

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO-OFFSHORE
50' CUSTOM DAY CRUISER AND
PARTY BOAT, twin outboards, bath-
room, shower, galley and more ? Ok 70
Passengers- Serious Inquires $ 200,000
(868) 485-2456

WHARRAM TANGAROA, 34', 4
Berths, GPS, Fishfinder, Autopilot, Epirb,
Liferaft, Windpilot, ready to go, info@
tlkaroa.ch, www.tlkaroa.ch, Located in
Trinidad Asking 35,000 US$


COTAT


-gah8gmi~o
34-63-25


LUHRS 36 SX TOURNAMENT,
2000, Yanmar 420's, Northern lights
gen, Garmin plotter, Furuno sound-
er, 6pp liferaft, marlin tower, swim
platform, only 250 hrs on engines,
Beautiful, fast and fuel efficient. asking
$145,000 787 370 0030 or bucanero@
prw.net will deliver anywhere!

1954, 52 FT, BARNETT CLASS
LIFEBOAT/MOTOR/SAILER with
liveaboard conversion & sailing rig.
Rugged wood / ally construction .
Large cabins & deck space with good
charter possibilies, Antigua Flag, ask-
ing 125,000 usd. (1268) 770 4935 or
seaterror@yahoo.com

2000 38' TIARA OPEN, 3208 Cats,
8kw Onan Gen, Marlin Tower, Watermaker,
cockpit freezer, etc. Contact: qulquito17@
aol.com

1976 CHEOY LEE 39 LRC TRAWL-
ER. Must Sell. Good condition. Twin Ford-
Lehman 120hp diesels. 8Kw generator.
Three 16K BTU a/c units. Located in
Salinas, Puerto Rico with 6-month docking
remaining. Asking $49,000.00. (787) 529-
5606 or maricarmensantinl@yahoo.com.

2006 MONTEREY SUPER SPORT
CRUISER 32', full bath & cabin, 2-300hp
Volvo $79K and 2005 Azure Runabout
23', 150hp Yamaha $21K; includes trail-
ers; exec. cond. & maint.; seldom used;
see plcs & specs at www.SunSeekerVI.
cor, 340-643-5527, Make Offers


GLACIER BAY 26FT 2007, Yamaha
150hp 2008 only 100hrs, full electron-
ics deliver to USVI & BVI Ask $95k Call
Alex 1-787-642-4307




FOR SALE: FOLIE DOUCE (9M
SLOOP, 1971) Fully equipped (Incl. new
dinghi), ready for sailing. Comfortable
room for 3-4 crew. Available in Martinique
as of 11.4.2010 USD 13750 Plcs and
more information, contact: christoph
schwitter@bluewin.ch

TARTAN TEN 81, super nice and
clean, new bottom, keel bolts, dripless
sist, bateries, interiors, a/c, main blocks,
red topsides, shaft bushing, canvas and
more, 5 sails and spinn, rigging 06,
westerbeake 600 hours, complete ready
to go, 20,000 obo. marlosalltranquilein@
yahoo.com

POT D' OR GIBSEA 84, 28ft LOA,
10ft beam. 1986. Ideal day and weekend
cruiser for small family. New in the last 3
years: main and 130% genoa, standing
and running rigging, life lines, cutlass
bearing, engine mounts, VHF radio, tiller
autopilot ST2000, batteries, Plastimo
dinghy and 2.5 hp outboard. 18 hp Volvo
penta regularly maintained and runs
well. Also has genaker (seldom used)
and storm jib in good condition. Owner
has upgraded. On St Kitts. Try around
US$ 20 000. albatross.1@live.com


BREATH FOR SALE


Due to Parkinson's Disease owner is forced to sell this classic
heavy duty 42' gaff ketch. Constructed of fiberglass with an
Airex core this hull and deck is strong as steel without the rust.
Boat is currently doing charters in Coral Bay, and is a Coast
Guard inspected vessel with certificate for 18 passengers.
Both masts are solid and new. Sails are new. Her massive
construction, big Ford Lehman diesel; her 400 gal of fresh
water tankage, fully insulated and cavernous interior makes
her suitable for everything from family cruising to diving
expeditions, high latitude adventures.


90 ALLATSEA.NET


New bottom paint / automatic bilge
pump / 6HP 4 stroke aux. engine,
Achilles inflatable with 3.5 HP 4 stroke
engine under warranty, original Pacific
trailer etc. Regarding these Hall of Fame
Trimarans go to www.f-boat.com.









BALTIC 55 SAILBOAT CHARTER
BUSINESS FOR SALE in St. John,
VI. Multi passenger US Coast Guard
approval. Former Whitbread 2nd place.
Phenomenal Restoration. Email: info@
outlaw.com or call Vicki at 340-998-5406.
Boat only also considered. $400K.

OCEAN 60 SCHOONER, launched UK
1988. Completely equipped for tropical &
High latitude world cruising. Lying New
Zealand. Negotiate price around $USD
295K. Possible Trade or Part Trade small-
er yacht or property 00642123866901989
OPEN 60. Won first Vendee Globe.
Located in Curacao. Asking $149K OBO.
Will consider trade. If you want to do 28
knots contact me at ddyner@yahoo.com

ALDEN-DESIGNED CLASSIC
BRISTOL 35 SLOOP, 1974. New
standing rigging, dodger (2009). New '05:
sails (full-battened mainsail), Imron paint,
through-hulls, bottom job, head, Harken
RF, bilge pumps, and electronics. Shoal
draft. Lovingly cared for inside and out.
Proven bluewater cruiser. $26,000. email:
ybutt2002@yahoo.com

34FT NANTUCKET 1983, ALAN
PAPE DESIGN, grp hull, teak super-
structure, good condition, radar, autopl-
lot, windpilot, solarpanel, plotter, touch-
screen, radio/cd, dvd, new rigging, batter-
ies, saildriveseal, etc, volvo penta 2030
1997, asking $38.000 snoopyblke71@
hotmail.com or call 002975855961 locat-
ed on aruba.berth $130,00 month.
Continued on page 95


FREE:~





DOCKAGE


Westerbeke,
Great sailing vessel,
$29,000
St. Thomas Yacht Sales
340-779-1660
yachts@islands.vi





































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Tel: 340-779-1660 | Cell: 340-513-1660
E-mail: yachts@islands.vi
Compass Point Marina
6300 Estate Frydenhoj, Suite 28
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1411


ALLATSEA.NET 93












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Ph Int: 617 55981959
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123 Hulls Yacht Sales........................ 86
A & F Sails .............................................. 70
ABC Marine...................................... 37
ABI Insurance Co. Ltd........................... 74
Abordage............................................56
Admiral Marine Ltd.................................56
AeroTec Laboratories ..........................93
American Yacht Harbor ....................C2, 1
Antigua Rigging..................................... 68
Atlas Yachts / Charter......................37, 86
B.V.I. Yacht Sales ................................ ..... 84
Bay Island Yachts ...................................88
Ben's Yacht Services.............................. 76
Bitstorm Inc............................................. 72
Bradford Marine.....................................90
Budget Marine............. C4, 21, 23, 25, 71
Captain Oliver's Marina .......................64
Caribbean Battery ................................. 94
Caribbean Inflatable Boats and
Liferafts, Inc............................... .. 89
Caribbean Marine Surveyors Ltd.......60
Caribbean Yachts.....................................88
Clarke's Court Bay Marina..................... 60
Connections .............................................94
Cooper Marine, Inc. ...............................88
Curacao Marine................................. 81


Dockwise Yacht Transport ....................52
Doyle Sailm akers ..................................... 4
Echo Marine..................................... 54
Edward William Marine Services SL..70
Electec ........................................... .....64
FKG Marine Rigging & Fabricating NV..68
Forespar.........................................19
Gary's Marine Service...........................87
Gold Coast Yachts..................................86
Golden Hind Chandlery.....................60
Grenada Marine .......................................78
Heineken Regatta Curacao.................. 74
Horizon Yacht Management................37
Industrial & Marine Service, Inc..........89
Industrial Coatings and Construction
Supplies.............................. ............. 52
Island Dreams Yacht Services.............. 78
Island Global Yachting ............................. 7
Island Marine Outfitters ......................59
Island M arine, Inc. .................................. 48
Island Water World................................17
Jolly Harbour Marina / Boat Yard.......71
KM I SeaLift ....................... .............. 2
Le Shipchandler ....................... ...93
M arina Zar Par........................................ 46
MarineWarehouse........................... 72


Maritime Yacht Sales ........................... 86
Mercury Marine..................................... 3
Myett's ........................................................ 15
Nanny Cay Hotel and Marina.............. 60
North Latitude Marina ...........................56
North Sails..................................... ....20
Northern Lights...................................... 72
Offshore Marine ....................................... 14
Offshore Passage Opportunities........88
Offshore Risk Management................. 76
Peake Yacht Services ........................... 87
Peters and M ay....................................... 46
Port Louis M arina .................................... 5
Power Boats Mutual Facilities Ltd .....80
Prickly Bay Marina................................. 80
Puerto Del Rey Marina / BoatYard....48
Quantum Sails ........................................29
Ram Turbos Inc...................................... 94
Reefco Refrigeration, Air Conditioning,
Watermakers #1 .................................51
Renaissance Marina.............................. 78
Revere Supply Co., Inc.........................91
Rodney Bay Marina...............................C3
Savon de M er..........................................94
Seagull Inflatables................................. 70
Seahaw k............................................... 13


SeaSchool...........................................48
Secure Chain and Anchor .....................92
Smith's Ferry Service LTD.................... 54
Soper's Hole Wharf & Marina..............60
Southern Trades Yacht Sales................ 88
Spice Island Marine Services................. 9
StThomasYacht Sales/Charters..89,90,93
Subbase Drydock, Inc..........................54
The Little Ship Company.................... 82
The Moorings Yacht Brokerage ............83
The Multihull Company .....................85
Theodore Tunick & Co..........................51
Tickle's Dockside Pub...........................52
Tortola Yacht Services.......................... 56
Tropical Shipping .................................. 31
TurtlePac....................................... ......94
Velauno .................................. ............ 93
Venezuelan Marine Supply.................. 76
Village Cay Marina.................................35
Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbour .................33
W.E. Johnson Equipment Company.....91
YachtBlast....................... .............. 64
Yamaha Motor Co..........................27


94 ALLATSEA.NET


TURBOCHARGERS!!
Cat, Cummins, Yanmar,
Perkins, Det. Diesel, Volvo,
MTU, ABB, MAN, EMD,
IHI, KKK, MAN, Holset,
Rajay, Toyota, Garrett,
Mitsubishi, Schwitzer
and Water Cooled Elbos.
ramturbo@bellsouth.net
321-868-2920
Worldwide Service
& Exchange Program.


ORDER 0 NE or at DEALER



SavondeMer





I,,,.~h 1.,; 5


p' Call and Ask
the Experts
Since 1979

340-776-3780
8525 Lindberg Bay, #13 I"WII' START SUnmEr
St. Thomas, VI 00802


















Continued from page 90


30' 1963 ALLIED SEAWIND KETCH,
diesel, wind generator, fiberglass dinghy,
2 anchors on bowsprit. Almost new main,
drifter and mizzen. Roller furling jib.Propane
stove and grill. Pressure water.Located St
Thomas. $19,900.340-776-3373.

SAILBOAT FOR SALE 1973- 35'
CORONADO SLOOP good condition
lots of room In Puerto Rico. twindsl31@
yahoo.com45-foot 1976 Norman Cross
trl. Fun, fast, stable, spacious. Cruise 12
knots with legs to spare. Lots of sails,
30-horse outboard. Needs some TLC but
ready to sail. $39,000. St. Thomas. 340-
998-6548 or vjmccoy@hotmail.com

BALTIC 55 SAILBOAT CHARTER
BUSINESS FOR SALE IN ST. JOHN,
VI. Multi passenger US Coast Guard
approval. Former Whitbread 2nd place.
Phenomenal Restoration. Email: info@
outlaw.com or call Vicki at 340-998-5406.
Boat only also considered. $400K.




SURF KAYAKS: RIOT 'BOOGIE' &
'DISCO' with fins, spray skirts, life jacket,
and carbon offset paddle. Shred big/small
waves better than a surfboard, dowhitewa-
ter moves in the surf: cartwheels, enders,
pearl rolls. Reasonably priced form $350.
tomt@surfvi.com, (340) 776-3331

EPRIB FOR SALE! RapldFix 406 GPS
Interface EPIRB, Needs to be serviced!
Around 6 years old! Email: Zachar1234@
aol.com

FASTFENDER IS TRUE Dutch ingenu-
ity to help hang and adjust marine fenders
rapidly and easily. fastfender can be used
with railings, lifelines and many types of
cleats. For more information please visit
us atwww.fastfenderUSA.com


TACKTICK WIRELESS / SOLAR
INSTRUMENTS. DISCOUNT PRICES,
made in the UK, 2 Year Factory warranty,
waterproof to 10 meters, Easy Installation,
USA/Caribbean Dealer. We have upgraded
our own sailboat to Tacktick Instruments,
located in the SE Caribbean. www.north-
ernrockiesassociates.com




FOR SALE BECAUSE OF RETIRE-
MENT SHIP FOR 200 PASSENGERS
Very Well Equipped With Restaurant,
Dancing, 2 Floors, Good Reputation +
Business. Visible to Pointe a Pitre in
Guadeloupe (FWI) FAX 05 90 90 90 500R
MAIL: vente.bateau@hotmail.fr

HIGH INCOME YACHT CHARTER
BUSINESS, Could be run alongside
an existing business. Low overheads.
For full details and costs visit: www.
YachtCharterOpportunity.com

FIRST MATE MARINE SERVICES
DIRECTORY NEEDS A CARIBBEAN
REPRESENTATIVE. Network with
Captains and meet the yacht industry
service providers. Outgoing personal-
ity is a must. Strong relationship skills
and professional attitude needed. Detail
oriented people with yacht experience
please email chris@allatsea.net

SUSTAINABLE EARTH, THE
CARIBBEAN ALTERNATE ENERGY
COMPANY, is looking for distributors
of its line of solar panels, inverters, bat-
teries, wind generators of major brands.
Technical assistance and installation pro-
vided. Best products available Long
term commitment. call RV at (767) 440
4404 or email at solar@sustainableearth.
dm www.sustainableearth.dm



EXPLORE THE BEAUTIFUL ST.
JOHN RIVER IN NEW BRUNSWICK,
CANADA, aboard our Catalina 36,
"Rhlannon". After 5 years exploring the
Caribbean, she is now available for
charter in New Brunswick from June 15
to Sept. 15. Visit www.bluecharters.net
for information.


50 FOOT DOCK FOR LONG TERM
RENT at beautiful Jolly Harbour Marina
Antigua. Water and Power 220 V and
110 V.E-mail:bertsofiahensel@hotmail.
com, Phone 001 268 773 5005




ST THOMAS VILLA FOR RENT -
On the water's edge 4000sq ft 5br
luxury villa off the beaten path but ocean-
front sit on the veranda and watch
the boats go thru current cut float in
the pool and listen to the gentle surf -
close to groceries and restaurants www.
casa-b.com




ST. MAARTEN, SIMPSON BAY. 2
bedroom house overlooking SBYC reno-
vated in 2006. This is a turnkey beauty.
Perfect for yachtsman's family, rental prop-
erty or investment. Email for photos and full
details. ambercottage2010@gmail.com

BELIZE BAR & RESTAURANT, Caye
Caulker. On the beach, 1/2 mile from the
barrier reef! Asking: $350,000, Gross:
$488,250, Cash Flow: $137,688, Real
Estate: $400,000 (also for sale, not
included in price) Year Established:
1978. Contact: Bruce Cook, 1-512-415-
3033, brucealancook@gmail.com

DOMINICA RIVERSIDE. Pure
Caribbean still at very affordable pric-
es. Citrus Creek Plantation real estate
opportunity for homes, lands, or lots
with property management and build-
ing by a French team within a tropical
valley. Check www.citruscreekplantation.
com. taberl@citruscreekplantation.com
+ 1767 2754403




EXPERIENCED SKIPPER (50000+
NM) AVAILABLE for Sail/Power boat
deliveriesto Western Europe, Mediterranean
and beyond... Rates start 1.00 euro/nm +
expenses for Skipper plus 1 Crew. Extra
Crew can be supplied if required at 0.25
euro/nm/pp + expenses... Contact Phil on
+351-916482748, Skype PJahans http://
www.forcrew.com/Deepwaterdeliverles

CAPTAIN AVAILABLE FOR DAY,
DELIVERY OR LONG TERM. Mature,
experienced USCG licensed Master for 100
ton Power or Sail. Might relocate for the right
position. Email John atjrnickel@aol.com

CAPTAIN AVAILABLE FOR DAY,
DELIVERY OR LONG TERM. "Try my
MED"! Mature, Experienced, Dependable
USCG licensed Master up to 100 ton Power
or Sail. Would relocate for the right posi-
tion. Email Captain John at jrnickel@aol.
com or toll free 1 866 213 4826

ALAN NEBAUER WORLD WIDE
YACHT DELIVERY AND PROJECT
MANAGEMENT SERVICES. Circum-
navigator, boat builder, commercial skip-
per 30 years offshore, all oceans. RYA
MCA Yachtmaster Ocean. +61 402 443478
www.yachtdelivery.com.au email: alan@
yachtdelivery.com.au


I'VE GOT EXPERIENCE FAIRING
AND PAINTING YACHTS FOR 8
YEARS. I use to work for English com-
pany. I can be very useful for your com-
pany. If you are interested I can give
you more details. At the moment busy in
South Africa, gunboat company, my E-mail:
rubezhl975@rambler.ru

LOOKING FOR POSITION ABOARD
FOR 2010 "CLASSIC'S REGATTA"
Experienced with papers and referenc-
es. Based in Tortola, can help deliver to
Antigua. Contact: carrell06@fastmail.fm.
207 701 1803

DELIVERY CAPTAIN AVAILABLE.
>25,000 OCEAN MILES. Livelong
sailor. Certified United States Coast Guard
Masters license. Owner/operator of own
boat and meticulously careful with all craft
under my responsibility email: ybutt2002@
yahoo.com




WANTED: DESPERATE SAILOR
SEEKS UNUSED YACHT. Sold my
44' ketch last year; can't afford replace-
ment. Is there anyone not using their
yacht and would like me to get her
bottom wet again? Will pay for reason-
able maintenance etc. nigel@leavers
associates.com

TRADE, 2-FAMILY, 2-STORY, CON-
CRETE HOUSE FOR SAILBOAT.
8-B, 4-B in ground pool w-waterfall
jacuzzl, furnished, walk to schools, 5
mm. shopping. $195.K value, clear
title, no debt, owner P.O Box 1901,
Ponce, Puerto Rico 00733, cell# 787-
732-3767 in English.

SUSTAINABLE EARTH INC. The
Caribbean Alternate Energy com-
pany is looking for solar and wind
residential systems installers and
salesmen/promoters among the boat-
ing community. You live aboard and
look for a contract based job oppor-
tunity? You have experience install-
ing solar and wind systems? Stay on
your boat and travel to the islands
where and when we need installation.
Call or email us: solar@sustainable
earth.dm (767) 440 4404

CARRIACOU CHILDREN'S EDU-
CATION FUND NEEDS DONA-
TIONS of boat gear, household items,
clean used clothing for children and
adults, school supplies and cold hard
cash. Leave donations with the staff at
the Carriacou Yacht Club, Tyrrel Bay.
This will be our tenth year: to date,
over $106,000 has provided school uni-
forms, free lunch for hungry children,
scholarships to the Carriacou branch
of TA Marryshow Community College,
and grants for building computer labs at
three primary schools. We are making a
difference!! And you can help that effort.
Major fund raising activities July 27-
30, 2010, directly preceding Carriacou
Regatta Festival. For more info, contact
boatmillie@aol.com


ALLATSEA.NET 95


LOOKING FOR


DELIVERY CREW?





check out



FORCREW.COM











THE DISH

MOTHER'S DAY


BY CAPTAIN JAN ROBINSON





but the thing a mother loves most is spending time with
her family. Every Mum deserves her own special day, so
surprise yours by cooking a delicious meal and waiting on
her "hand and foot." Do the dishes, put everything away and give
Mum a free pass to do whatever she pleases for the rest of the day!


MENU:
SPINACH, FETA, AND PARMESAN QUICHE
BRIE SALAD WITH RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE
THE BEST AND EASIEST WHOLE BAKED CHICKEN WITH VEGGIES
LEMON NUT BREAD


SPINACH, FETA, AND PARMESAN QUICHE
Preparation time: 10 mins. Cooking time: ~ 35 mins. Serves: 4 6.
6 oz fresh spinach 3 eggs
6 oz crumbled feta cheese 3/4 cup Bisquick
with tomato and basil 1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 onion, finely chopped Fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tomato, chopped (optional) Shredded Parmesan cheese
1-1/3 cups milk
Preheat oven to 400F. Grease a 10-inch pie pan and set aside. Steam
the spinach. In a medium sized bowl combine milk, eggs, Bisquick,
salt and pepper. Set aside. Combine the spinach, onion, tomato and
feta and place in the bottom of the pie pan. Pour the Bisquick, milk
and egg mixture over the top and sprinkle with Parmesan. Bake for
25-35 minutes, until puffed and set.


BRIE SALAD WITH RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE
Preparation time: 10 minutes. Cooking time: 4 minutes. Serves: 4 -6.
1 (12 oz/336g) pkg frozen raspberries
1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
2/3 cup canola oil
2 Tbsp sugar
1/8 tsp salt
6 cups mesclun greens or attractive lettuce
1 medium size wheel of brie cheese
(or substitute a good mozzarella or goat cheese)
3/4 cup chopped walnuts
Preheat oven to 400F. Blend raspberries, vinegar, oil, sugar and
salt in the food processor Strain to remove seeds. Divide greens on
salad plates. Spray baking tray with liquid butter (e.g. Pam). Cut brie
into 16 wedges and place on baking tray and soften in oven, about
4 minutes. Watch closely. Remove brie on to plates with spatula and


place on center of greens. Drizzle dressing over and sprinkle with
chopped walnuts. Hints: For an entree add grilled chicken or salmon.
To save time, use good store bought raspberry balsamic dressing.


THE BEST & EASIEST WHOLE BAKED CHICKEN
WITH VEGGIES
Preparation time: 10 mins. Cooking time: 1-1/2 hours. Serves: ~ 6.
Whole chicken 3 5 Ibs
Fresh ground sea salt
Fresh ground black pepper
Good butter (like New Zealand) or a good olive oil
Rosemary
Optional:
Olive oil, onion, garlic, carrots, potatoes, Rosemary
Garnish: Orange slices and basil leaves
Pre-heat oven to 375F. Remove chicken giblets; rinse thoroughly; pat
semi-dry; sprinkle inside with salt and pepper and add sprig of rosemary
(optional). Cover with a generous amount of salt and pepper on the
outside; spread about 4 Tbsp. of butter over it (you can use your hand).
Smear a little butter or olive oil on the bottom of a baking dish and
place chicken breast side up. Roast in center of oven about 1 to 1-1/2
hours or until the skin is golden brown and the meat is cooked through.
While the chicken is cooking, chop vegetables and garlic cloves
(all roughly cut up). The last 1/2 hour of roasting time, add a little
water to the pan, mix all the veggies up, and scatter them around the
chicken. Drizzle a little olive oil over the veggies and sprinkle with a
good mixture of herbs (salt, pepper, basil, oregano, red pepper, etc.)
After 15 minutes give them a stir
Use an instant-read meat thermometer to check the chicken
near the end of cooking. When the internal temperature reaches
170 degrees for breast meat, 180 for thighs (measured in the
thickest part), the chicken is done. To test for doneness without a
thermometer: cut into the deepest part of the thigh. If the meat is no
longer pink and juices run clear, it's done. Let whole chicken rest for
10 minutes before carving and add garnishes.


LEMON NUT BREAD
Preparation time: 15 mins. Cooking time: 50 mins. Makes: 1 loaf.
1/4 cup butter, softened 1 cup yogurt
3 oz sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour
2 eggs 1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp vanilla 1/4 tsp salt
Preheat oven to 350F. Cream butter and sugar Sift together dry
ingredients. Combine all and mix well. Grease a 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf
pan. Bake in oven. Cool on rack. Hint: Can be served for breakfast,
snacks or dessert with cream cheese.


Capt. Jan Robinson holds certificates from the Culinary Institute of
America, The Ritz Cooking School, and the Cordon Bleu. Her Ship
to Shore Cookbook Collection is available at your local marine or
bookstore. Or visit www.shiptoshorelNC.com, email CapJan@aol.com
or call 1-800-338-6072 and mention All at Sea to receive a discount.


96 ALLATSEA.NET







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<____________


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