Title: All at sea
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095558/00019
 Material Information
Title: All at sea
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Kennan Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: St. Thomas, USVI
Publication Date: October 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095558
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Great Service!


The world's best sails are backed by the world's best service. Contact your nearest
North Sails Caribbean representative today and let us design the perfect soil solution
for your boat and budget.

Covering the Caribbean...
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Andrew Dove. Tel :+(590) 590 90 80 44,
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ST. THOMAS, USVI
YACHT HAVEN GRANDE
18020' N 64 55'W VHF 16/10 C+1 340-774-9500
AMERICAN YACHT HARBOR
180 19'N64 51'W VHF 16/6 C+1 340-775-6454

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SIMPSON BAY MARINA
18 02' N 63 05' W VHF 79A/16 C +599-544-2309 ^
PORTOFINO MARINA
18 20' N 63 05' W VHF 78A/16 C +599-544-2408
THE YACHT CLUB AT ISLE DE SOL
18 02' N 63 05' W VHF 78A/16 C +599-544-2408

VIRGIN GORDA, BVI
VIRGIN GORDA YACHT HARBOUR
18 27' N 640 26'W VHF 16 C +1284-495-5500 ^

TORTOLA, BVI
VILLAGE CAY MARINA
18 25' N 64 37'W VHF 16 C+1 284-494-2771

ST. LUCIA, WI
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18 20' N 640 55'W VHF 16 C +1758-452-0324

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22 53' N 1090 54'W VHF 88A C +52-624-173-9140

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THIS ISSUE
THE CARIBBEAN'S WATERFRONT MAGAZINE


FEATURES
42 CHARTERING IN THE
SPANISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
Cruising Culebra's Surrounding
Islands & Cays
44 A CRUISE ON A CASTLE
46 GEMS OF THE CARIBBEAN
Leaving the Crowds for Solitude
48 ARAGORN'S WORLD
A Provocative Gesture:
Putting Caribbean Artists
into the Spotlight

SPECIAL SECTION
51 SPOTLIGHT: TOP YACHT BROKERS


COVER SHOT:
PHOTO BY YACHT SHOTS BVI
WWW.YACHTSHOTSBVI.COM
Yacht charterers and crew celebrate
the Caribbean way of life in
Sir Francis Drake Channel, BVI


DEPARTMENTS
10 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
WHERE IN THE WORLD?
12 CARIBBEAN NEWS
15 EVENT CALENDAR
16 YACHT CLUB NEWS
18 SAILING HUMOR
The Hard Truth about my Stiff Pole
Shop 'til you Drop
22 FISHING
VI: Global Hot Spot for Blue Marlin

24 TIPS &TRICKS
Electronic Modifications for
Hearing-Impaired Sailor
Lessons in Self-Sufficiency
28 OUR NATURAL WORLD
Laughing Tattletales
30 CHARTERING 101
Using a Mooring Buoy
34 CHARTERING
Charter Trends: Adding Value
Yacht Shows Spotlight Crewed Charters
40 BENEFICENT BOATERS
Small Acts of Kindness

89 CARIBBEAN DINING
It's Fall!


92
108
110
112


CARIBBEAN BROKERAGE
MARKETPLACE
SPONSOR DIRECTORY
TALES FROM CHARTER COCKPIT
How Not to End a Charter


ISLAND EVENTS & INTERESTS
60 MAP
62 DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Fourth Cabarete Classic
65 PUERTO RICO
Reguero Wins U.S. Competition
66 u.s.v.i.
Reviving Harbor Racing on St. Thomas
68 B.V.I.
Intl YC. Challenge for Spring Regatta
Caribbean 1500 Going Strong
Tortola's New Power Cat

75 ANGUILLA
August Regatta: SonicWins Boat of Year
77 ST. MAARTEN / ST. MARTIN
Island Water World Develops Website
Classic Yacht Regatta Program

80 ST. BARTH
Antoine Questel -A True Champion
81 GUADELOUPE
Triskell Cup Returns

82 ST. LUCIA
Upgrades Lure Megas to Rodney Bay
83 GRENADA
Kids' Education Fund Tops $100,000
85 TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
Youth Sailing Team Wins
Dinghy Championship
86 CURACAO
Stranded Pilot Whale Sustained

RESOURCE
90 CARIBBEAN MARINAS


8 ALLATSEA.NET






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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

ALL AT SEA WANTS TO HEAR FROM YOU

SEND YOUR CORRESPONDENCE BY EMAIL TO EDITOR@ALLATSEA.NET, OR MAIL LETTERS TO:
ALL AT SEA, PO BOX 7277, ST. THOMAS, VI 00801


In October, we're gearing
up all over the Caribbean for
"the season." Yes, we still
keep a weather eye out for
autumn storms, but ouratten-
tion has turned to the busy
winter ahead. This month,
the All at Sea team is packing
to attend the Annapolis Sail-
boat Show, now in its 40th
year as one of America's key
boating events. We'll hand
out thousands of copies of
the issue you are holding to
some of the 50,000+ people
who attend-and help them
decide to head our way as
the weather gets cold.


The 2008 Annapolis
Sailboat Show


l00


10


Meanwhile, preparations are underway for a series of charter yacht shows in November
and December designed to introduce international brokers to this winter's crop of fantas-
tic vessels-large and small, sail and power, brand new and classic-available for charter.
Those brokers will go home and entice their clients to visit with glowing descriptions of
all they have seen.
Old friends-and hundreds of sailors we haven't met yet-are readying their boats,
buying gear and provisioning in anticipation of passages from Europe, the United States
or elsewhere to the Caribbean. Some will set out on their own, but many will arrive with
rallies that depart in November. And get this: the two largest, the Atlantic Rally for Cruis-
ers from Europe and the Caribbean 1500 from the U.S., filled up in early summer with far
more participants than organizers expected.
They're coming. Are you ready?


ALL AT SEAs


Publisher:
CHRIS KENNAN
publisher@allatsea.net

Editorial Director:
CHRIS GOODIER
chrisgoodier@allatsea.net

Creative Director:
NICOLE KENNAN
nicole@allatsea.net

Art Director:
AMY KLINEDINST
amyk@allatsea.net

Graphic Designer:
NEVA HURLEY

Advertising:
International
CHRIS KENNAN
chris@allatsea.net

Caribbean
ANDREA BAILEY
andrea@allatsea.net

Accounting,
Subscriptions:
publisher@allatsea.net

Owned and Published
by Kennan Holdings, LLC
PO. Box 7277
St. Thomas, USVI 00801
phone (443)321-3797
fax (340)715-2827


WHERE IN THE WORLD?

CONGRATULATIONS, ROBERTO,
AND THANKS FOR READING ALL AT SEA! -;

Through All at Sea, we keep track of all the marine activities around Puerto Rico and
the rest of the Caribbean, even during my 50th birthday celebration trip to Venice,
Italy last March. Thank you for your complete coverage of the sailing news.
Roberto and Maria Fortuno

Win a Free Subscription!
Send us a picture of you reading AllAt Sea and you may be the lucky winner. We will select one winner a month.
Please send images & your information to: subscribe@allatsea.net or mail to: P.O. Box 7277, St. Thomas, VI 00801


10 ALLATSEA.NET


1








Port Louis Marina another


great reason to visit Grenada


GRENADA
WEST INDIES


Grenada remains one of the most unspoilt and welcoming cruising
destinations in the Caribbean.
Now, with Port Louis, visiting yachts can enjoy the security and
convenience of a beautifully appointed, fully serviced marina -
located in the lagoon adjacent to the islands capital, St George's.
Grenada's southern location allows for year-round cruising,
including the summer months, and with an international airport
just five miles away, Port Louis is the ideal base for exploring
the wonderful islands of the Grenadines.
As a Port of Entry, its easy to clear in and out through Port Louis,
and our 24-hour security, dockside facilities and marina-wide wi-fi
all contribute to making your stay safe and relaxed.


Port Louis is owned and operated by Camper & Nicholsons
Marinas, and our friendly and knowledgeable staff are on hand
24 hours a day to welcome yachts of all sizes from 20ft to 300ft.
For more information about securing a berth at Port Louis,
including the opportunity to purchase on a 30-year licence, please
contact our Sales and Marketing Co-ordinator, Danny Donelan on
+1 (473) 435 7432 or email danny.donelan@cnportlouismarina.com
Port Louis Marina just one more reason to visit the 'Spice Island'.


Camper &
Nicholsons
YACHTING SINCE 1782
MARINAS
www.cnportlouismarina.com


ITALY I MALTA I TURKEY I WEST INDIES











CARIBBEAN NEWS

A BRIEF LOOK INTO THE HAPPENINGS OF OUR WORLD


The 138-ft
(42 m) Trumpy
sailing yacht








$ U

.
S 0 0* S


Trumpy/Classic Yacht
Partners to Build Two Yachts
On August 5, 2009 a contract was signed between Alex Suarez, Man-
aging Partner of Classic Yacht Partners, and Trumpy Yachts, LLC, to
build two new dramatic Trumpy Yachts, inspired by John Trumpy's
classic pre-war designs, to be sold through fractional ownership. The
group will offer each partner 25 days per year (plus five conditional
bonus days) at a cost of approximately $1 million. Retro designs will
showcase Trumpy's history during the golden era of the 1920s and 30s,
according to designer/developer Jim Ewing. For more information on
Classic Yacht Partners, contact Jock West, (401) 640-3416 orjockwest@
cox.net; for Trumpy Yachts, visit www.trumpyyachts.net.


Resort Lots
with Boat Slips
Still Selling in
Any Economy
Recession? What re-
cession? On quiet St-
aniel Cay in the Exu-
mas 75 miles south of


St. Thomas Welcomes
Major Drydock
Subbase Drydock, Inc. on St. Thomas, USVI, has
a new drydock designed by Sterling Marine of
Florida; engineering and capacities were calcu-
lated by Hager Drydock of Massachusetts. The
physical dimensions are 125 feet long with two
aprons, 12 feet long each, making the dock able
to haul vessels 150 feet long. The drydock can
lift approximately 1100 long tons, but a vessel
on the drydock with a safety factor would be
around 750 long tons. For more information,
contact Gene Kral, Sr., Tel: (340) 776-2078 ext. 1,
or Fax: (340) 779-8426. www.subbasedrydock.vi


Movie star
Yacht Club
Palmas del Mar


,"r
I

>-I-a qW*a
N~r 0)
waft%-


Nassau, a dock-front
cottage is going up
while on the neigh-
boring lot, land is be-
ing cleared. Prices of
five remaining lots at
Ocean Ridge range from $1.75 million to $2 million. Included in the
purchase price of s lot is a dock slip at the private marina.
"Despite the downturn in the economy, I'm happy to report that
we're still attracting qualified prospective buyers," said Jim Ellis, Presi-
dent of Florida-based Ellis Diversified, Inc.


Megayacht Marina Makes Movie Magic
Twice recently, the new Yacht Club Palmas Del Mar was used as a back-
drop for film crews capturing Puerto Rico. The club hosted and staged
a Lifetime Network production titled, "One Hot Summer," planned
to air in the fall. The second was a series, "Angels and Diamonds,"
described as an Italian version of "Charlie's Angels." "I would say that
the 'Angels and Diamonds' production attracted the most amount of
attention from the Palmas Del Mar community," said Tim Keogh, the
club's general manager www.palmasdelmaryachtclub.com


12 ALLATSEA.NET









New St. Maarten Marina
Scheduled to Open Next Month
Developers will celebrate the completion of the new Porto Cupecoy
marina on the west end of Simpson Bay Lagoon in November 2009,
they announced in August. The marina will accommodate yachts from
30 to 300 feet in length in 54slips, 11 of which can accommodate mega
yachts. Pleasure craft slips are priced from USD $100,000 to $160,000,
with mega yacht slip pricing available upon request. The 181-resi-
dence village will feature restaurants designer boutiques, an onsite
grocery store, pharmacy, and banking services as well as a pool, fitness
center and tennis courts. Model homes are available for preview and
are listed from US $450,000 to $2.5 million, www.portocupecoy.com


New Web Site for Antigua
Barbuda Marine Association
The ABMA announced in August that their website has now been up-
graded; Immigration Forms 1 and 2 can be completed on screen at
www.abma.ag and printed off for presentation to Immigration upon
arrival. The new development will save time and stress for visiting
yachts and their crew/passengers. John Duffy, President of the ABMA,
said "The Government of Antigua and Barbuda, together with the
Immigration Service, have been steadily improving the entry and exit
procedures for visiting yachts, and this latest development brings us
closer to the day when everything will be available on line. Yachts with-
out access to online facilities will still be able to complete the forms at
the island's Immigration Offices, who will now have more time to deal
with arriving yachtsmen due to this improved facility."


Hunter Sailors Wanted
Puerto Rico's Capt Tony Miro, with the support of Capt Jim Veiga from
Atlas Yacht Sales & Charters, has just started HunterSailors.com to
encourage Hunter Marine sailboat owners and fans from throughout
the Caribbean to join, and sail more often while making new friends
and discovering new anchorages. "We are planning our first long
distance cruise/flotilla from Fajardo to Salinas, then Ponce in south-
ern Puerto Rico as part of the 2009 Discover the Caribbean Series,"
said Miro. The cruise begins on November 7, 2009. Email via a link on
www.hunterSailors.com or join HunterSailors.com in Facebook.


Ask the Exerig.1


Best practices

when selecting

a High Gloss

Finish


Jay Smida
Jay Smida


First of all, a key rule to remember is Technical Sen
that the finished result will only ever be
as good as what it is going over! X .Iltu rlu
Typically 80% of the time spent on any yachtpaint.c
paint job is the time spent preparing the
surface to be ableto apply the finish.
You will truly be rewarded for that effort when you gaze into a super
glossy reflection of your own image a few days later.

For the refinishing project, or indeed the first application on gelcoat,
ensure you choose a product that will provide ease of application,
with long wet edge time for maximum flow and ability to correct
any accidental sag. A workable finish is the most forgiving for any
applicator.


XI..,


rice

m
:om


Perfection is the premium, high performance
polyurethane topcoat that delivers results for those
that are seeking the highest possible gloss, a
flawless finish, professional quality and superior
abrasion resistance to avoid fender wear.


-I Interlux recommends that you do not use anything
but marine quality finish. These are finishes that have
been developed especially for the yachting environment hence they go
through far stringent testing criteria to ensure color stability and
durability in the harsh, marine environment. After all, most people
seek a return on that investment of both time and money invested
and that return should yield several years' worth of service life without
significant down- glossing or any other issues. Perfection, developed
for passionate boaters and perfectionists is certainly one of the top
performing products out there.


For instructions on surface preparation, product guide and a video
presentation on how to get the perfect paint job using Perfection;
the answers are only a click away......


AkzoNobel


X Interlux, the AkzoNobel bgo and all product names
mentioned in this publication are trademarks of, or licensed to,
AkzoNobel OAlzo Nobel N V 2009


7


ALLATSEA.NET 13


Find more answers at
yachtpaint.com








Cuban Commodore
Appointed to Marina Group
Jose Miguel Diaz Escrich, Commodore of the
Hemingway International Yacht Club of Cuba
since 1992, was recently appointed President of
the Business Group Marinas y Nauticas MARLIN
S.A., better known as Marlin Marinas Business
Group, the biggest marina company in Cuba.


The company owns entry ports Marina San-
tiago de Cuba, Marina Cienfuegos and Marina
Cayo Largo, and no-entry port Marina Trinidad,
all on the south coast of Cuba. On the north
coast, the group also owns entry ports Marina
Hemingway, Marina Darsena Varadero and Ma-
rina Cayo Guillermo and no-entry port Marina
Tarara. Marina Hemingway and Marina Tarara


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are located in Havana city Escrich will continue
working as Commodore of the Hemingway In-
ternational Yacht Club of Cuba as well.


Nanny Cay Expands
Chandlery by Almost 60%
Nanny Cay, the largest full-service marina and
boatyard in the British Virgin Islands, is expand-
ing its chandlery operation. The 1800 square
foot shop is going to be enlarged to 2800
square feet. The expansion will enable Nanny
Cay to stock and display more products includ-
ing inflatable dinghies and outboard engines;
Nanny Cay is the BVI dealer for AB Inflatables
and Tohatsu outboards. www.nannycay.com


New Internet Site
for Cruising the DR
Marina ZarPar in Boca Chica has funded an
internet site for the Cruising Guide to the
Dominican Republic written by Frank Vir-
gintino, which will soon be interactive, al-
lowing users to post pictures and blogs:
www.dominicanrepubliccruisingguide.com-0'



PASSAGES
Ron Wahl
Ron Wahl, who founded Sea School in
1977, died on August 30. Born in 1934
in New York, Wahl is survived by his
wife of 54 years, Jean Wahl, sons Ken
and Len, three grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. Jean, Ken and
Len Wahl, all of St. Petersburg, Florida,
will assume additional roles at Sea
School along other senior staff already
in key positions.



SAVE THE DATE
NOVEMBER 7, 2009:
Feeder Race Fajardo to Salinas
This year the Ponce Yacht and
Fishing Club celebrates the 20th
anniversary of the Discover the
Caribbean Series with increased
activities and events starting in early
November. For details: www.ponce
yachtandfishingclub.com


14 ALLATSEA.NET


__W __ _1~1~~1


L.. K__ q ~ l _


II








Please send future events for our calendar to editor@allatsea.net.
This month and next month's events are currently published here and at www.allatsea.net.
V N C N D Your specific area may or may not be shown based on identified activities for these months.


H ANTIGUA
SATURDAYS
Free Antiguan Youth Sailing Program
"All Comers" Competitive
Keelboat Sailing
Dinghy Sailing, Pleasure & Practice
JHYC I jollyharbouryachtclub.com
SUNDAYS
Dinghy Sailing Instruction for Adults &Jrs.
Dinghy Racing with Beach BBQ
JHYC I jollyharbouryachtclub.com
11/28-29
S JHR Caribbean Annual Regatta
Sailing I jollyharbouryachtclub.com
o
SANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND
10/8-12
0 40th Annual United States Sailboat Show
Boat Show I usboat.com
10/15-18
38th Annual United States Powerboat Show
Boat Show I usboat.com
E BONAIRE
10/3
"Aanbrengrace" Bonaire Regatta
Sailing
10/5-9
Bonaire Regatta I Sailing
bonaireregatta.org


U BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
10/30-31
12th Annual Foxy's Cat Fight I Sailing
weyc.net I mcmechanics@surfbvi.com
10/31-11/7
2009 Pro Am Regatta I Sailing
beyc.com I binfo@beyc.com
11/5-8
28th Annual BVI Charter Yacht Show I Boat Show
beyc.com I binfo@beyc.com
= CURACAO
11/5
"Aanbrengrace" Heineken Regatta Curacao
(Pre regatta race) I Sailing
11/7-9
Heineken Curacao Regatta I Sailing
heinekenregattacuracao.com
S FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
10/29-11/2
49th Fort Lauderdale Intl Boat Show I Boat Show
showmanagement.com I info@showmanagement.com
II GUADELOUPE
10/30-11/1
9th Triskell Cup I Sailing I triskellcup.com
organisation@triskellcup.com
- PUERTO RICO
10/29-11/29
Discover the Caribbean Series
Sailing I ponceyachtandfishingclub.com


SST. MAARTEN / ST. MARTIN
11/14
St. Maarten Optimist Championship
Youth Sailing I smyc.com
11/27-29
Course de LAlliance
Sailing I coursedelalliance.com
hdorvil.mfl@wanadoo.fr
. w.' UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS
10/9-10
St Thomas/St John Day Sail Show
Boat Show I vicl.org I erik@vicl.org
11/10-12
St Thomas Fall Yacht Show
Boat Show I vicl.org I erik@vicl.org


FISHING TOURNAMENTS
10/2-5
Lecheria International Billfish Tournament
Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela
intlbillfishtourns.com
rick@intlbillfishtourns.com
11/1
VIGFCWahoo Windup
St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.
vigfc.com I vigfc@islands.vi
11/21
Funfish Tournament
Trinidad I ttgfa.com I info@ttgfa.com


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ALLATSEA.NET 15











YACHT CLUB NEWS

SHARE YOUR HAPPENINGS WITH THE CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY


Antigua's Jolly Harbour Yacht Club
Carol Smith sent Joly Harbcur
details on the club's Yacht Club s
regatta, scheduled annual regatta
for November 28 set for Nov
28 & 29
& 29 this year Par-
ties, BBQs, a live | I
band, dancing and A
amusing prize giv-
ing celebrations, .
are all promised by --
the club. Sailing will
be outside Jolly Harbour and in Five Islands Harbour There will be
four classes, and all boats with a draft of 10 feet or less are eligible
to enter. Fees are EC$150 per boat, when registering online (www.
jhycantigua.com/jhyc_form) or EC$175 per boat when registering at
Skipper's Briefing.
Prizes will be awarded to at least the first three boats in each class.
Berths will be available free of charge on the days of racing excluding
water, electricity, etc. Notify the Marina Office on arrival in Jolly Har-
bour (VHF Ch 68). The website, www.jhycantigua.com, has a schedule
of events or contact Tanner Jones 268-764-5910, email tannerdjones@


hotmail.com. Everyone is welcome
even if you are not sailing.



St Lucia s youth
team captured
the silver on 0
Tortola -._ -


to the festivities, Carol reports,




St Lucia Yacht Club
Danielle De Rouck, SLYC's Social
Secretary, forwarded a report
by Coach Fredric Sweeney on
the Premier's Cup International
Youth Regatta held July 10 to
12: A youth team from the St.
Lucia Yacht Club, representing
the St. Lucia Sailing Association,
traveled to Tortola to compete.
"The competition was tough
but our young team managed


to capture the silver medal, our best-ever result there. The Premiers'
Cup is an annual fund raising event held by Kids and the Sea (KATS)
for sailors age 17 and under It is hosted by the Nanny Cay marina in
Tortola and sponsored, as always, by the Rotary Clubs of the BVI. Each
year the cup is sailed in IC24 sail boats, modified J24s with a more
open cockpit initially designed for cruising. The number of entries in
this years' regatta was about average at eleven though, disappoint-
ingly, only four teams attended-from St. Lucia, the United States,
Anguilla and the BVI.


"Our young team performed exceptionally well compared to previ-
ous years and considering their experience level. They have shown
that there is some true potential for youth keelboat sailing in St. Lucia.
Thanks go out to the St. Lucia Yacht Club and all the parents who
supported the team and to the owners of Unbridled, the J24 used
for training, and Danielle, Social Secretary SLYC for chaperoning.
www.stluciayachtclub.com


St. Thomas Yacht Club
Manager Bill Canfield reports on strong summer performances from the
club's young sailors. Taylor Canfield and Cy Thompson won the match
race hosted by Chicago Match Race Center in July; they competed
against a strong international field and lost only one match, winning 10.
Taylor Canfield also won his third straight Garde 3 match race sailing
with Bret Clark and going undefeated in 11 races, qualified for the US
Sailing National Match Racing Championship this November with just
nine other sailors. Taylor Canfield is now ranked 57th in the ISAF World
rankings. Canfield also won the 420 North Americans in August and
congratulations also went out from the club to Olin Davis and Alec
Taylor for their 10th place finish.
William Bailey finished third at the US Laser Radial National Champi-
onship with another club member, Max Nickbarg, finishing 20th; Tyler
Rice finished third at Buzzards Bay Regatta, third at Hyannis Regatta
and second at the National Team Racing Championship in the 420. lan
Barrows and Olin Davis finished 20th in 420 at Buzzards Bay.
Thomas Barrows finished second at Laser National Championship
in full rig and was preparing along with Cy Thompson for the Laser
Worlds in Nova Scotia. In Europe sailing at the 1420 Worlds, Alec Coyle
made the Gold Fleet and Nikki Barnes, one of only four female skip-
pers, had a solid performance in the Silver Fleet. Thomas Walden had
a strong summer in Optimist with many top 10 finishes and a 12th in
Blue fleet at the New Englands with over 300 sailors. Congratulations
on an outstanding summer to all!


Virgin Islands Sailing Association
VISA has issued a document on the association's qualifier system for
the upcoming Caribbean and Central American Games (August 2010,
Mayaguez, PR), the 2011 Pan Am Games (October 2011, Puerto Vallarta,
Mexico, and the 2012 Olympics (Summer 2012, Weymouth, England UK.)
Get information or send questions via email to visailing@gmail.com -&



To contribute news from your local yacht club or sailing association,
please write to editor@allatsea.net. Deadlines are six weeks prior to
the publication date.


16 ALLATSEA.NET

































UI. e .I










THE HARD TRUTH

ABOUT MY STIFF POLE

COPYRIGHT 2009 BY CAP'N FATTY GOODLANDER


The sad truth-I've been traumatized by my spinnaker poles.
Part of the problem is, of course, that I'm too cheap. I sail
around the world on the pocket change that Scotsmen
throw away. That's right, I squeeze my pennies so hard, Abe
Lincoln cries. My wife Carolyn puts it another way: "I've learned to
count my blessings because I sure can't count our cash!" That's true.
I'd call myself a miser-if it didn't sound so extravagant. Let's put it
in simple terms a frugal cruising sailor can understand: once I walked
into a public bathroom, noticed the pay toilets, and threw up in the
sink. Now that's cheap!
I mean, I could BUY the correct size spinnaker pole for Wild Card-
but what fun would that be?
I started out on my first circumnavigation with two HUGE poles. They
were free but I had to (almost) hire a crane to life them aboard-which
should have told me something. They were 17.5 feet long and four inch-
es in diameter with a wall thickness, say, oh-about the same as Fort
Knox. (On a 13,000 pound boat with a J measurement of 14 feet!)
They came off a 60+ South African racing boat. And you know what
they say about those Africans ... always swinging around oversized mem-
bers. Anyway, we dubbed the poles the Big Bamboo. I could pick up an
end and fondle it-but only for a few seconds and if it was flat calm. So
we had to keep the twin downwind poles attached to the mast-actually,
you could barely see the rest of the rig hiding behind 'em.
Needless to say, their combined weight made Wild Card a tad nose-
heavy ... so heavy, in fact, that we had to move our anchor chain to the
transom ... or our prop would just spin in the thin air ... yeah, she was
a "bit off her lines," as my wife noted dryly.
But they were impressive, I'll tell ya. Small, nervous Caucasian men
were in awe of their girth, rigidity and all-around prowess.
Okay, okay ... I'll admit it: I like being macho. Example: I went
into a computer store to buy a new drive for my computer. "Hard
or floppy?" asked the salesmen. Now, what would any red-blood-
ed American male say to such a question? I said, "Hard," and, just
so he'd know I was miffed at the question, "What do I look like ..
a heteroflexible?"
The point I'm attempting to make is that I would have kept my twin
downwind Big Bamboos just to honor the much-maligned Caribbean
Male-but the poles wanted to kill me.
I know that sounds harsh-but it is the truth.
Every time I'd get-it-up and have one pole flying, I'd have to eventu-
ally take my wary eyes off it to set the other one. The moment my back
was turned, the former would attempt to bash me senseless. This isn't
difficult-I'm fairly close to senseless anyway-but it isn't enjoyable
either. But I hung in there almost half-way across the Pacific by explain-
ing to my wife, "It's no problem, dear! I have my safety harness on. So
every time the pole knocks me unconscious, I land on deck! See-I've
thought of everything!"


... but one day while attempting to use my twin downwind jibs
in heavy weather off Moorea, I could not take it any more. Both
poles somehow got away from me-and started raking the en-
tire foredeck, smashing into the forestay, and twang-twanging my
forward lowers.
I didn't know what to do-the bow rail suddenly turned into a ball of
bent, broken tubing. Our forward lifeline stanchions were bent down,
up, down, up-and then sheared off completely.
I yelled aft to Carolyn (as captain, that's a major part of my job de-
scription-yelling at my wife) something completely useless like, "Git
the gun, honey!"


18 ALLATSEA.NET










But suddenly there was a moment where one pole was stationary-
and I boldly grabbed it, blew off the outboard clew end & detached it
from the mast bell-and threw it overboard like a giant spear while yelling
the old traditional Caribbean sailor's saying of "... mothers-a-runt!"
Oh, that felt sweet, me son!
That still left me with one giant, far-too-heavy pole attempting to kill
me-but, hey, I can handle that. And I did-for another five years and
30,000 ocean miles or so.
While in New Zealand I was lucky enough to find a small pole in
Opua which was adequate for booming out the staysail-and traded
some of my recent dumpster pickings for it. (I practically lived in the
dumpster at IBY during my STT dazes.)
But I still needed the correct-sized pole in order to get rid of
Mister Death, which is what I'd taken to calling my remaining huge-
mongus one.
What to do? Stealing one from an unoccupied vessel seemed unart-
ful. And every time Carolyn and I would leave a late-night boat party
and ask someone to hand us down the spin pole after we got into our
dinghy ... well, some too-sober person would always say, "... I don't
remember you bringing that, Fatty ... hey, what's going on?"
I thought for sure that sabotage would work-but super-gluing the
piston-pins in place, putting broken glass inside the tube, and coating
'em with itchy fiberglass dust just didn't do it. Sure, it made me a lot of
enemies but, alas, it also got me no poles.
Everywhere I went I put notices up at the marinas, "Cap'n Fatty
has Pole Envy" read one. Another said, "Flaccid Writer Desires Stout
Pole for Adult Watersports." Yes, they were clever, and no, they
didn't work.
Finally I sailed into Langkawi and anchored next to Solid Gold, a
Peterson 44 which had been sitting on its mooring since ... well, be-
fore the Flood and the tsunami. (We'd previously noticed her "hard
aground on her coffee grounds" during our first circumnavigation.) In
the cockpit was the same pie-eyed fellow drinking beer. I rowed over
and asked if he wanted to trade a cold six-pack for his spin pole. When
he asked, "... what kind of beer?" I knew I was in luck.
Now Wild Card has three spin poles-the old huge-mongus one,
the New Zealand skinny one-and the new perfectly-sized "Magnifi-
cent Malaysian" one. Whew! This process only took ... well, twenty
years in total. And I barely spent a penny.
Even Carolyn sees the wisdom of my step-by-stupid-step frugal ap-
proach now. "I didn't worry so much after I realized that the big poles
kept hitting you in the head, Fatty," she mused. (I'm never quite sure if
she's complimenting me or ...?)
In any event, that's the story. We're bristling with erect poles aboard
Wild Card! -'

Editor's note: Right now the $3,000Wild Card has cost Fatty about four
cents an ocean mile. He reckons if he circumnavigates just twice more,
he can get that down to a more reasonable two cents per mile. "I'm
goal-oriented," he says, "because, well, goals don't cost money!"



Cap'n Fatty Goodlander lives aboardWild Card with his wife Carolyn and
cruises throughout the world. He is the author of "Chasing the Horizon"
by American Paradise Publishing, "Seadogs, Clowns and Gypsies" and
"The Collected Fat." For more Fat-flashes, see fattygoodlandercom.


www.propspeedusa.com 877.987.7333


'AYA'Rsu dgetm a ri nuiehIIn


ALLATSEA.NET 19










SHOP'TIL YOU DROP

ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY JAN HEIN

Y ears ago, when we sailed a small Antigua sloop, we fre-

quented the island of Dominica where bananas ruled the
country and the Geest Company was king. Occasionally a
ship would encounter a delay and the bananas, stacked sky high on
shore, couldn't wait because refrigeration wasn't part of their jour-
ney The workers, wanting to avoid rodents and insects, solved the
problem by launching the cases into the sea. Those of us anchored
in the bay had our pick of boxes, as literally hundreds floated by, pro-
viding the most convenient provisioning we've ever encountered.
Provisions, however, don't always come to you.
If you're making a passage, perhaps hooking up this fall with
the Caribbean 1500 (from the U.S.) or Atlantic Rally for Cruisers
(from Europe), you've probably purchased a ton of gear, backed
it up with a supply of spares and filled lockers with beach gear,
bikinis and books. The last layer to tank down your crisp waterline
will be food (fresh and preserved), beer (expensive and cheap)
and everything you know you just can't live without.
Cruisers take provisioning so seriously that they've turned it
into a science. Many believe they'll never again find European
cheese or American peanut butter, not to mention rice without
weevils. They've heard that canned beer is currency for lobster
and a bottle of scotch makes an indispensable bribe. How much
is too much has yet to be determined.


As cruising sailors, we're not immune to this overzealous shop-
ping frenzy. On a recent stop in San Diego we rowed around
swapping discoveries with new best friends who in turn reported
news flashes of do-not-miss stores. On the final day we boarded
six buses to hit seven stores in an effort to place the last stratum
of food on a boat already laden low.
Some may view it as gluttony, but we call it safety insurance
because, no doubt, tinned lychees swimming in heavy syrup
would come in handy on a westward drift. When we finally hoist-
ed anchor and waddled away we easily had over two hundred


cans on board. After a month at sea, we'd
opened maybe ten. Apparently during the
provisioning runs, it looked appealing, but
after years of high seas adventuring, we've
burned almost every bridge that leads to a
can of food.
Finding tinned meat has always been
the greatest challenge. Man cannot live on
Spam alone ... and if he can, he shouldn't.
S We've tried it all: beef, poultry and an ocean
of protein selections from the sea. Once we
bought a large can labeled, "Whole Chicken in Natural Juices."
My husband opened it on the 18th day of a miserable west to east
crossing of the Caribbean Sea. Our young son and I watched as a
scrawny, white, naked bird plopped out along with the liquid it'd
been swimming in. I couldn't stand to look at it, let alone eat it,
but Bruce reported, "It's not too bad."
Another time, we purchased two cans of a British meat sub-
stitute with a delectable description. Ceremoniously it was
opened mid ocean but we didn't get beyond the first bite. It
was a bad combination of green dish scrubbers and mildewed


20 ALLATSEA.NET









cardboard. Oddly enough, no one remembers what happened
to the second can.
Then there was the tedious trip from Panama to Washington
State when Bruce, who loves a bit of surprise, purchased numer-
ous cans of pulpo, aka octopus. Still intact after the voyage, they
doubled as souvenirs when he snuck them into friend's pantries.
Those joke cans were around for years until they began to grow
dangerously large.
Along with the losers, we've actually tasted some decent
canned fare: British pudding, French crab bisque, Cougar Gold
cheese and Central American tamales. I swear, if someone could
figure out a way to get Caribbean barbequed ribs in a can, more
people would sail off shore.
A reoccurring food issue happened recently on our seventh
day south of the US border when almost every fresh item was
ready to be eaten yesterday. Most noticeably ripe were the ba-
nanas, which we smashed into faux milkshakes, pancake sauce
and sandwich glue. It wasn't a problem, however ... we go way
back with ripe bananas.
Whether you find yourself frenetically shopping for many days
at sea or you're simply trying to decide whether to buy a provi-
sioning package for a seven-day charter, remember the wonder-
ful surprises ahead. No, you might not find marinara sauce every-
where, but you can buy football-sized avocados, papayas that will
serve eight and fish "caught today." And if you hanker for a can
... well, you can find them in the Caribbean, too.


Jan Hein divides her time between Washington State and a
small wooden boat in the Caribbean. She records her adventures
on the Bahama Breeze Restaurants-sponsored website at
www.brucesmithsvoyage.com.


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VIRGIN ISLANDS STILL A GLOBAL

HOT SPOT FOR BLUE MARLIN

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


the "good old days" in St. Thomas.

A sk long-time sports fishermen about
They'll regale you with stories about
the thirteen world-record blue mar- -
lin catches-including the long standing all-
tackle catch of a 1282-pounder by Larry Martin
on August 6, 1977-that put the Virgin Islands on
the map as one of the best billfishing destina-
tions in the world.
Now, turn around and ask today's titans of in-
dustry, self-made entrepreneurs and those born
with a few extra dollars why they continue to put
the Virgin Islands on their annual international
fishing calendar
"It's the number of marlin, sheersize of the fish
and aggressiveness of the bite," says Florida an-
gler Robert Baker who, aboard the Reel Pushy,
was one of nearly 100 anglers that fished the 37th
Annual USVI Open/Atlantic Blue Marlin (ABMT)
or "Boy Scout" tournament, August 3 to 7.
Miami, Florida angler Rob Ruwitch, owner of Sharky's Revenge, fishes
the sailfish circuit in south Florida, for billfish in other Caribbean islands
such as Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, and has been travel-
ing to the Virgin Islands to fish for a long time.


"One of my best fishing days was the lay day of the 1999 Boy Scout
Tournament," Ruwitch says. "We left the dock about 11 a.m. and ul-
timately saw 11 and released six for nine. It was the best day of the
tournament for us."
This year, Sharky's Revenge angler Albert Castro kicked off the
ABMT by catching the first of what were ultimately 159 blue marlin
releases for the tournament.
Don Schmidt, from Houston, Texas, had never fished the Virgin Is-
lands' waters until this year.
"What I look for in a destination is: where are the most fish closest to
the shore to really make it worth the effort," he says, adding that this
run is some 160 miles for him off Texas.
Schmidt adds, "When I had the boat (Omi Gosh) built, we started
a three year plan. That is, while the kids are still young enough to
travel with us, to fish the Pacific, in Costa Rica and Panama, then
over to the Atlantic, and see what ocean we like best and where
we'll ultimately stay. We heard the Virgin Islands had the best blue
marlin bite in the Atlantic. It's good, but it's been slower than we
expected. We're seeing five or six fish a day and catching two or
three of them."
Robbie Browning, from Winter Park, Florida, is another angler who
brought his boat, Mr B II, to the Virgin Islands for the first time.
"We spent a year and a half in Panama and the last six months in
Venezuela. Before that I've fished all the hot spots like Costa Rica and
Panama," says Browning. "I'd read about the bite in the Virgin Islands
and our captain, Rick Ogle, had been here before and suggested we
come. I'll tell you, eight fish in four days of tournament fishing isn't bad -


22 ALLATSEA.NET









and we saw two more the last day of the tournament we didn't catch."
Mr. B I/took runner up honors to Sam Jennings' Revenge in the Best
Boat category at this year's ABMT
Jennings, from Juno Beach, Florida, and his son Jon, with veteran
crew, Capt. Mike Lemon, Dean Dunham, Ryan Mertens and Tommy
Lynskey, released 12 blue marlin to win the tournament. Jon Jennings
captured Top Angler and pocketed a $10,000 cash prize by releasing
seven of these marlin.
"Virgin Islands' waters have one of the most predictable blue marlin
bites," says Lemon, "especially ten days before the full moon. The
August moon is usually really good."
Lemon should know. He was at the helm while the father-and-son team
released over 1000 blue marlin-90 percent of these in Virgin Islands'
waters-over the last dozen years since owning the 58' Revenge.
Perhaps the best way to sum up where the Virgin Islands currently
ranks on the global sports fishing scene is to quote veteran photog-
rapher, and former Revenge crew member, Scott Kerrigan. "It's the
best spot to find the largest concentration of serious tournament
anglers chasing glamorous blue marlin. And, as a photographer, it's
a numbers game to me. Dawn till disk, for every hour of effort, the
numbers of blue marlin in the Virgin Islands are great and consistent.
If I miss a shot, all I have to do is standby and another opportunity
will come along."
For more information about this tournament, contact Jimmy
Loveland, tournament director by phone at 1-888-2-FISHVI (1-888-
234-7484) or 340-775-9500; or by email: loveto@islands.vi; Results:
www.abmt.vi. '


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J









ELECTRONICS FOR THE HEARING-

IMPAIRED SINGLE-HANDED SAILOR
BVI TECHNICIAN'S MODIFICATIONS MAKE PASSAGES POSSIBLE
BY RON ROWE


r : r I ,I, ;I

I I I -I ,ri,,,r I I:
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Then I awoke from my "overboard" nightmare.
The improvements in electronic sailing equipment over the last
few decades have made it possible for people who would never have
considered a lengthy singlehanded voyage to embrace the challenge.
Autopilot, radar, chart plotters combined with GPS navigation, single
sideband and VHF radios with DSC, and satellite telephone interfac-
ing with the Internet have transformed what was once an arduous,
dangerous adventure into a relatively tame experience.
Waking up every 20 minutes to check the horizon has given way to
alarm systems for depth, radar guard zones, and DSC alerts. These
advances have made it relatively safe for the single handler to get
some adequate sleep, confident they will be alerted in the case of
impending threats.
That is, of course, if you can hear high-pitched digital sounds.


Somewhere along the way to my present age (70), I
lost just about all my ability to hear any sounds above
mid-range. Perhaps it was hunting pheasant in Michigan
or listening to loud music with earphones, but suffice it
to say I can place either ear in direct contact with any
digital alarm and hear absolutely nothing. While this
kind of hearing condition is not widespread, various de-
grees of hearing impairment are common.
My boat, Autumn Passage, a 1982 Mason 43 Sloop,
has a complete installation of Raymarine@ equipment
including depth, wind, speed, radar chart plotter, Auto-
helm@, and LifeTagTM, all connected with the Raymarine
SeaTalk crossover system. The entire array was installed
by a top notch company located in the British Virgin
Islands, where I have lived since retiring in 1999. Grant
Ware from Cay Elec-
tronics installed the
original system and
has since made nu-
merous modifications LieTag interflac
to Autohelm
based on my individu- n control
al requirements
Whenever I sailed
down island from the
BVI or up to Bermuda
with crew members
who had good hear-
ing, digital alarm
systems were a great


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24 ALLATSEA.NET


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addition. But relying on alarm systems with a crew on board is a lot
different than when sailing alone.
In early 2008, as I dealt with a rather complicated illness, I
dreamed about getting well and sailing singlehanded. I thought,
"If I ever get out of this, I want to sail my little boat by myself."
I thought about my hearing problem ... I had made my share of
offshore passages with crews and understood the issue of sleep
deprivation and fatigue.
But for me it was not just a matter of making the digital alarms loud-
er, since no matter what the volume, I could not hear them. We had
to find a way to make the alarms "analog," say from a "tweet tweet"
to a "whoop whoop," if you will, or from a high frequency to a low
frequency. I went to Grant with my problem.
Grant came up with the solution. He built conversion boxes for the
various alarm systems. These boxes take the digital signals and con-
vert them to analog, with different patterns for the different alarms.
For example, the depth alarm produces a fast pattern, while the ra-
dar zone alarm produces a slower pattern. These signals are then
sent to an amplified speaker which hangs above the aft cabin bunk,
adjacent to the cockpit porthole. Even without this porthole open,
when turned to high volume this speaker alarm will wake anyone
anywhere on the boat.
On a recent singlehanded sail from the BVI to Bermuda, it worked
flawlessly and using the chart plotter's countdown feature I set the
alarm for every two hours, even if nothing else happened, which al-
lowed me a confident, secure two hours' sleep at a time. On my next
trip I'll set it for three to four hours, based on the experience of this
trip. The radar guard zone alarm also alerted me (from my sleep) to
three freighters crossing nearby and numerous rain squalls.
For those not familiar with it, the LifeTag system consists of a
small tag that attaches to your life vest (or wrist or arm) with a Velcro
strap. Should the tag become separated from the boat, an alarm
goes off in the boat, alerting the crew that a person has fallen over-
board. The Raymarine system's SeaTalk device marks the boat's po-
sition as an MOB on the chart plotter when the alarm goes off and
calculates a return course based on speed and drift. Pretty slick,
actually, except it is of no real use for the singlehanded sailor. A
couple of years ago I sent a suggestion to Raymarine that future
software upgrades might somehow allow the system to send a
signal to the Autopilot to disengage and go to "standby," forcing
the boat to come into the wind. There was no response, but Grant
came to the rescue again.
The new interface box that Grant built is perfect. When armed,
it forces the Autopilot to immediately switch to standby should the
alarm be triggered. While it certainly would be a struggle to get back
aboard a boat bobbing in the waves at sea, at least with a line over the
side the single handler might have a fighting chance-as opposed to
watching the vessel sail away on her pre-set course.
Thanks to Grant, this is one hearing impaired sailor who, having com-
pleted his first single handed sail, is looking forward to many more trips.
Perhaps my next "overboard" dream will have a much better ending. -


Raymarine is Registered to Raymarine, Inc.
LifeTagTM is a Trademark of the Raymarine, Inc.
Autohelm is Registered to Raymarine, Inc.


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ALLATSEA.NET 25











LESSONS FOR BOATERS IN SELF-SUFFICIENCY
A TEENAGE CREW SOLVES PROBLEMS AT SEA

BY ANDY SCHELL


It was about Day 22 of the sail-training program I was run-
ning this past summer, and the boatload full of eager
high-schoolers from around the world all were anticipat-
ing our next landfall in the Grenadines. Then the boat started
falling apart.
I should have known this was going to happen. Only a few
days prior, my first mate/fiancee boasted about how well the
boat was holding up. The gods of the sea do not take kindly to
this sort of gloating.
The kids by now had learned to sail the boat independently,
which resulted in the captain and his mate becoming rather redun-
dant-we enjoyed playing the part of passengers. They were sail-
ing a course from the back of Union Island, at Chatham Bay, over
to Mayreau.
About three miles
downwind of Mayreau, The- 'AR -
coming through a tack,
an explosive 'BANG!' "
erupted from the helm. /
I knew what had hap- w -
pened immediately,
but it took the young
helmsman several turns-
of the wheel before he
realized it was no longer
attached to anything-
our steering was gone.
I waited, a curious
passenger, to see how
the kids would react. They all knew that Mia and I would not interfere,
so long as they weren't going to damage the boat or themselves.
Someone remembered where the emergency tiller was stowed--
had shown them this in passing, over three weeks before the inci-
dent, way back in St. Martin-and they dropped the sails, rigged the
tiller and steered us, slowly, toward the anchorage at Mayreau.
Once safely anchored the kids dove headfirst, literally, into the
troubleshooting stage of the repair. I remained a silent witness, as
spare lines, lifejackets, harnesses, dive lights and a life raft came
piling out of the cockpit locker in an effort to discover what, ex-
actly, had made that gunshot sound and left us disabled.
Onceempowered to makedecisions and solveproblems ontheir
own, it's incredible howquickly and efficiently groupwill getthings
done. The kids impressed me more with each passing minute and
ultimately discovered that the master link connecting the wheel
chain to the steering cables had sheared. Armed with new knowl-
edge of a not-so-scary-anymore problem, they set to work devis-
ing a plan for the following day. They were faced with their big-
gest challenge yet: getting to Grenada under jury-rig where we'd
more easily be able to make a permanent repair.


For the previous three weeks, we'd been hand steering during
the short 15-mile hops between the Leewards, right through to
the 80+ mile night sails we enjoyed further south. I mentioned in
passing that the boat had an autopilot, but lied to the kids and
said it was broken, just to keep them practicing at the helm. In
Mayreau, I finally 'fessed up, and gave them a hint that would
lead them toward success-I told them our autopilot did, in fact
work, and since it was connected directly to the quadrant, it could
safely steer us to Grenada. The catch was they had to figure out
how to make that happen.
That evening was perhaps the most productive of the 32-day
program. The kids gathered round the saloon table, rifling
through the Raymarine manuals looking for the solution that


Captain Andy at
the helm with
the emergency
tiller lust west of
Mayreau in the
Grenadines


26 ALLATSEA.NET















































would get them safely south, all the while learning something
new, and the best way possible-they were teaching themselves
and each other.
We did make it to Grenada, using the autohelm the whole
way, only resorting to the emergency tiller to anchor again in
St. Georges Lagoon, where Budget Marine lay only a few miles
down the road. Fixing the steering was child's play for my newly
salty crew, especially after what they'd endured just to get there.
We were back in action with a working steering system within a
few hours of our arrival to the "Spice Island."
We encountered a myriad other
problems along the way as well: a
blown mainsail, parting jib-sheets
in the middle of the night, an adrift
dinghy. Our encounters all ended
the same way, successfully, but only
after a well-thought out plan was
put into action.
Being self-sufficient is one of the
laws of being a real sailor. An entire
industry exists around sailing and
the water, which is very convenient
when you really need it. But next /1 ,
time something goes wrong on
your boat, take a minute and try to
solve the problem on your own. A


little patience and ingenuity goes a long way, even in the direst
situations. It may save your life at sea some day-but it will defi-
nitely leave you with a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment
that only the true seaman can enjoy. -&



Andy Schell is a professional captain and freelance writer, based in
the Caribbean, Annapolis and Stockholm, depending on the sea-
son. He lives aboard his yawlArcturus with Mia, his fiancee. Contact
him at andyschelll25@gmail.com or www.fathersonsailing.com.


ALLATSEA.NET 27











LAUGHING TATTLETALES


IN THE ANCHORAGE

BY DEVI SHARP, PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHUCK SHIPLEY


t is dinner time and I am preparing the beautiful tuna that we
caught today. I notice a bit of skin and fin that I don't want for the
grill and certainly would rather not deposit in our trash, so I qui-
etly slip it overboard. It is just fish going back to sea, right? And
then, BUSTED! Three gulls are cackling and fighting over the tidbit
and announcing to the anchorage that I tossed something overboard.
Who are these noisy tattletales in the anchorage?
Laughing Gulls are native to North and South America. They breed on
the Atlantic coast of North America, the Caribbean, and northern South
America. The northernmost populations migrate further south in winter
The populations of Laughing Gull in the West Indies, Central America
and Florida are largely resident. They are the most common gulls in the
Caribbean and the only breeding gulls in the Lesser Antilles.
Adult Laughing Gulls don a dapper suit in the breeding season.
They have black heads and snow white necks and it appears that their
heads have been dipped in dark chocolate. Their dark bills are tipped
with red and they have lightly applied white eyeliner above and below
their dark eyes. The breeding adult's back and wings are dark gray;
trailing edge of wing is white, and wing tip is black, without white
spots. In winter they loose their dark hood and red beak.
Laughing Gulls take three years to reach adult plumage. Immature
birds are dark brown with contrasting rump and broad black tail band.


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e other medium sized, black headed gull that might be confused
h a Laughing Gull is a Franklin's Gull and they are very uncommon
in the Caribbean. Laughing gulls have earned
their name from their call which sounds a bit like
S a high pitched human laugh ha ha ha ha.
Laughing gulls are not picky eaters-they
L... ..... feed on fish, shrimp, crabs and scraps from fish-
ing boats and all manner of food trash. They do
forage for themselves, but can often seen follow-
ing fishing boats, as the fisherman toss out the
~ -- fish offal, or scavenging at garbage dumps and
S j dumpsters. They are very agile flyers and easily
catch bits of food tossed into the air They also
S steal fish from other seabirds. Unlike many larger
gulls, Laughing Gulls seldom steal the eggs or
chicks of other birds.
Laughing Gulls breed in coastal marshes and
ponds in large colonies. The nest is made largely
jf from grasses and is constructed on the ground.
r The three or four greenish eggs are incubated
for about three weeks. This gull is susceptible
to human disturbance and predation through-
out its breeding cycle. They avoid mammalian
predators by selecting small islands exposed to
winter washovers which prevent establishment
k a of permanent mammal populations. Colony and
nest-site selection is a compromise between
-.dM i~;


28 ALLATSEA.NET





















h to ad p n a c w l g H-
























S ,.. Laughing Gulls present interesting conservation concerns. These
Gulls were extirpated (locally extinct) from many coastal colonies in
the late 1800s and early 1900s by egg collectors and the millinery (hat)
trade. They, like many other seabirds, gulls and terns, have suffered a
.....- -e. ......




........ ..... .... .











loss of nesting habitat due to destruction and development of wet
lands. On the other hand, the flexible or "plastic" behavior of both
lowdiet enough nesting habitat of these gulls has facial the expansion
cering Gulls prey on the eggs L laughing Gull is no exception s.
Today the Laughing Gulls presents increasing in much of its ranges for


Sexampgulls we re extirpated (locally nested in Newt) from mS tate for the firsties inme








S aircraft because they have adapted to feeding on landfills and mowed
fields surrounding airports -'









Devi Sharp is a retired wildlife biologist and is exploring the birds of
of their Caribbeange. Mosth her husband, Hunefiter o n their sailboat Arctic cities in this
TodayChuck Shipley Laugh is a former professor ing in much of computer science ange;d an avidfor







amateur photographer Chuck and his wife Barbara live aboard their
Strawler Tusen Takk II in the Caribbean.


ALLATSEA.NET 29










USING MOORING BUOYS

BY FRAN AND DEE WELK


Editor's note: this is the first in a new series for people considering
chartering a boat in the Caribbean. Send your suggestions and ques-
tions about chartering to: editor@allatsea.net. This month: Worried
about your anchor dragging overnight in unfamiliar waters? One sim-
ple solution: look for mooring buoys.

W e have been sailing and chartering for over 20 years
and welcome the sight of an available mooring buoy;
we can anchor if we have to, of course, but prefer
the convenience and assurance that our boat will
stay where we put it and not collide with neighboring boats that are
also on buoys.


To pick up a buoy, begin by
shortening the painter on the
dinghy and watching it so that it
won't get fouled in the propeller.
Send one of your crew to the bow
with an extended boat hook. The
helmsman and this person should
have some pre-determined hand
signals about forward, reverse,


"As you come into the
anchorage, note the
direction of the bows
of the other boats since
this is the direction
from which you should
approach the ball."


neutral, and "on the hook."
(Shouting only gives other boaters more entertainment.)
As you come into the anchorage, note the direction of the bows
of the other boats since this is the direction from which you should
approach the ball. Do so under very low speed with the bow person


HOW CAN THAT LITTLE
BALL HOLD MY 50-FOOT
SAILBOAT IN PLACE?

Several factors relate to properly functioning mooring
systems: boat length, anchor weight, length and diam-
eter of the chains, length and diameter of the pennant
(part you pick up and connect to), and water depth.
Buoys transmit the strain of the boat's activity through
the ball, with the lower part of the mooring system hold-
ing the boat vertically and the pennant holding the boat
horizontally. In most instances, the wind is sufficient so
that all boats on the moorings point into the wind and
therefore swing in the same general pattern, each within
the limited maximum excursion allowed by the system. In
effect, there is an invisible circle around each boat with
safe spacing no matter which direction the boat is in at
the time.-F. & D. Welk



pointing at the ball. Agree to a planned side to pick up the ball-
but those on the bow should be ready to adjust quickly as needed.
Come up to the ball, shifting gears
slowly through neutral to reverse
to stop the boat, and then return
to neutral.
Meanwhile, the person on the
bow leans over the lifeline and
grabs the pennant, sliding the
boat hook up the line until it can
be caught in the hand. Pass the
pennant line under the lifeline. If
there is a permanent loop, secure
it over the cleat and you're done. If
the end of the pennant has a hard
plastic loop (less chafing), you need
to be prepared with a bow line that
has been secured on one cleat so
that the bitter end can be passed
through the plastic eye, around the
bow of the boat, under the lifeline,
and secured to the opposite side
cleat to create a "V" bridle off the
bow towards the ball.
An alternative attachment ap-
proach is to run a separate line


30 ALLATSEA.NET









under the lifeline from each side of the hull from
the cleat, through the pennant hole and back to the
cleat on same side of the boat. Alan Mallory, Com-
modore of the St. Croix Yacht Club, US Virgin Is-
lands and charter captain on the catamaran Kindred
Spirit, notes that catamarans should always use port
and starboard lines to the mooring, and "be very
aware not to significantly extend the length of the
pennant with your bow lines! This increases your
swing radius to a point where you may contact near-
by boats. Midnight acquaintances rarely respect you
in the morning!"
Keep the engine in neutral for a few minutes and
watch your surroundings to be sure you are secured,
just as you would do with anchoring. Remember,
too, that once the boat is secured in some way,
you have time to tweak the lines. Do not attempt
to hold onto the pennant and be pulled overboard
if your boat is not adequately stopped or you can-


ARE MOORINGS FREE?

Mooring buoys for public use are found in cruising lo-
cations throughout the Caribbean, installed and main-
tained by local authorities or private entities to make
money, protect vulnerable reefs and encourage tourism
by boaters. Check to be sure overnight mooring is al-
lowed-some are for day use only. Though some places
have a few free moorings, per-night fees usually range
from US$10 to $25-less expensive than a marina, but
more than a (free) anchorage. A fee collector may come
to your boat or you may pay ashore if in doubt, ask
other boaters in the mooring field what to expect. And
watch out for unauthorized "entrepreneurs" who may at-
tempt to pocket your fee. In popular areas during peak
charter months, plan to arrive at your destination by ear-
ly or mid-afternoon before all the moorings have been
claimed.-Editor


not safely secure it. Just
try again!
To drop the buoy when you are
leaving, shorten the dinghy paint-
er and don't foul it, as you will be
initially going in reverse. Point
the boat into the wind and drift
back, using the engine in reverse
only as needed to travel away
from the ball. Have someone on
the bow let the ball off the line or
just free the permanent loop and
point out where the released ball


"Keep the engine in
neutral for a few minutes
and watch your sur-
roundings to be sure you
are secured, just as you
would do with anchor-
ing. Remember ... that
once that boat is secured
in some way, you have
time to tweak the lines."


is so that the helmsman knows where not to steer The bow person signals
"all free" to the helmsman when the full pennant is clear of the boat.


ALLATSEA.NET 31









A primary safety issue after properly securing the mooring ball re-
lates to integrity of the lines used in that process. Both the pennant
and your lines should be reasonably free of fraying or cuts which make
them vulnerable to not holding.
Remember that even well-honed teams of helmsman and crew will
occasionally miss picking up the ball on the first try. Drive clear of all
boats and their lines and come back to try again. Then settle back with
your favorite beverage and watch the next boat crew come in with
their eyes on that last available buoy.


Fran and Dee Welk are longtime boat owners and charterers who
divide their time each year between Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania and
St. Croix, USVI.


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CHARTER

ADDING VALUE TO A CHARTER YACHT VACATION
IN A DOWN ECONOMY

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD















....1









hat strategies are Caribbean-based charter yachts and
charter yacht companies using to entice bookings during
this global economic downturn?
The key to keeping repeat customers and attracting new ones, says
Josephine Tucci, global product manager for Sunsail, based in Clearwa-
ter, FL, with six bases in the Caribbean, "is providing added value."
Ed Hamilton, of Ed Hamilton & Company, a charter yacht brokerage
based in Wiscasset, ME, which specializes in Caribbean charters, agrees.
"We have tried hard to concentrate on selling value over price, because
in the long run, cutting prices just hurts the industry We have seen this
happen in the bareboat industry, which sadly has lowered prices without
adding value (no more cruising guides sent in advance or free taxi trans-
fers, additional charge for fuel, etc). Whatever special offers or schemes
crewed yachts use, we feel it is important that they maintain a list price,
as it is much easier to return to this when things improve."
Many crewed yachts are maintaining prices while offering more value.
An example, says Hamilton, "is charging the same price but giving an
eighth day free day. Or, offering flexibility with pricing options, such as
half board. Or, discounting for younger children based on the fact that
kids don't expect quality wines or high-end service. They, of course, cost
the crew in other ways (special menus, time spent entertaining, etc), but
the image of quality for the adults is not compromised."
Some yachts are adding value via offering unique services. For
example, Captain Mark Saia, aboard the U.S. Virgin Islands-based -
crewed yacht, Freedom, a 60' multihull, is a veteran Tai Chi Master


34 ALLATSEA.NET










"These days, people want to 'better' themselves," says Freedom's
chef, Alison Chesley "So, offering easy and interesting exercise op-
tions from experienced instructors is a desirable option. Mark offers a
20 to 30 minute routine that packs a surprising workout."
On Three Moons, a crewed 72' Irwin also based out of the USVI, chef
Shelly Tucker, says, "We have always offered our 'Sea Spa' services of
manicures and pedicures. I've been a licensed technician since 1984
and a master tech since 1989. We do charge a fee for spa services on
board the yacht; but
Sit is less expensive for
a the client than hav-
ing a spa treatment at
a resort.
Charter companies
are adding value in
distinctive ways too.
Sunsail's Tucci says,
"We have recently
SI surveyed our cus-
-
tomers and there is
definitely interest for
themed or specialist
0 activities. In fact we
I are launching several
new events."
One of these is a
"Sailing With Railey" Fun Flotilla set for November. Charter guests will
learn sailing tips and tricks from Olympic Medalist Zach Railey while
sailing the BVI for a week.
Similarly, Horizon Yacht Charters has teamed up with America's Cup
helmsman Peter Holmberg to offer Racing Master Classes. "We are


PRICE DISCOUNT
&

Price reductions are enticing charter guests to St. Vincent
& The Grenadines, says Narendra 'Seth' Sethia, base
manager for Barefoot Yacht Charters, headquartered in
Blue Lagoon. "In the current economy our view is that
additional amenities on the yacht, special packages and
the like are insignificant when compared to price reduc-
tions. The clients we are seeing simply want to pay less.
Thus, we are being more flexible with pricing and offer-
ing more deals to make the vacation more affordable."
However, Sethia adds, "One very important fact to
bear in mind is our location. Were we in the BVI or St.
Martin, our responses may perhaps have been different.
But the huge disadvantage of St. Vincent & The Grena-
dines is the difficulty and high cost of air access. Because
of this, everything in the Grenadines is about pricing.
"We have to provide a financial palliative to the astro-
nomical air costs and that simply means cutting rates."
Dick Schoonover, who manages the clearinghouse Char-
terPort BVI in Tortola, British Virgin Islands, is against price
reductions. "The punters shop, arm-twist, negotiate and
whine, but in the end, once you've agreed they can have
the week aboard for free, they complain that we didn't
buy 'em the plane tickets too, so they don't do the trip."
With prices for provisions and goods up perhaps 30
percent over last year in the islands, says Schoonover,
"in my opinion, 'no discounts apply', nor should apply.
I have been extremely resistant toward discounting and
:lowering rate-, but of course each and every individual
:operat.:.r has hi .:.r her own agenda and priorities."



currently holding a competition where
two lucky people will win a seven-night
charter with Horizon and a day with Pe-
ter on board," says marketing manager,
Nicola Massey
There will always be the bargain hunt-
ers, but there are far fewer boats giving
large concessions for the next season
and the inquiries are certainly coming in,
says Hamilton. "With a few exceptions,
we never did see the sensational mass
discounts other tourist industries had to
resort to and it looks like business will
gradually continue to improve."



Carol M. Bareuther, RD, is a St. Thomas,
U.S. Virgin Islands based marine writer
and registered dietitian.


ALLATSEA.NET 35










YACHT SHOWS CARIBBEAN'S

CREWED CHARTER INDUSTRY

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


oat shows in November and December in the British Vir-
gin Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, St. Maarten and Antigua
will showcase over 100 luxury sailing and motor yachts-
and their professional crew members-to brokers who hail from
destinations as diverse as the Caribbean, U.S. mainland, Europe
and even Asia.
The flavor of these events, as well as the opportunities for work
and play, is summed up by Janet Oliver, administrator at the Char-
ter Yacht Society (CYS) of the BVI which will kick off the show sea-
son with its 28th Annual BVI Charter Yacht Show on November 5
to 8 at Village Cay Marina in Tortola. "From the fun and fast paced
Broker Scrabble Yacht Hop to the relaxing and more glamorous
Governor's Reception, the show provides unique opportunities
for the development of relationships. Brokers meet crew. Crew
meet crew, and brokers and crew meet with local supporting busi-
nesses. It is a rare opportunity for the entire industry to be togeth-
er in one place at
one time. The show
finishes with another
rare opportunity: al-
lowing brokers to be


charter guests for a day; after all,
personal experience sells."
The numbers are up: some 65
to 70 yachts are expected to show
in the BVI, says Oliver. "A variety
of yachts have registered to date,
but we do have an increase in
power yachts this year."
Oliver adds, "We tend to get
the newcomers to the crewed
S yacht industry; whether the yacht
has just recently been manufac-
tured or it, and the crew, are sim-
ply being introduced for the first time to the industry. Participants
include those that operate throughout the Caribbean but are not
in the mega-yacht category. In other words, they are luxurious
and full service, yet affordable."
Over 30 yachts were registered for the St. Thom-
as Fall Yacht Show, formerly the Virgin Islands
Charteryacht League (VICL) Annual Fall Show, by
___ the end of July, said VICL executive director, Erik


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Continued from page 34

Ackerson. "We're expecting more megayachts this year." The
show will be held November 10 to 12 at Yacht Haven Grande in
St. Thomas.
In St. Maarten, Lucille Frye, an organizer of the MYBA St.
Maarten Charter Show, set for December 4 to 7 at Port de Plai-
sance, says, "We anticipate an attendance of between 40 to 50
yachts this year. We tend to attract predominantly power vessels
ranging in size from 65 to 210 feet, but with the majority of vessels
being over 130 feet."


Frye adds, "We hope that the economic problems will not re-
duce yacht attendance too significantly. As was seen last year,
due to the decline in charters, owners are more prone to want
to show their boat with the aim of attracting more bookings. We
expect broker attendance, while slightly reduced in numbers, to
still reflect a quality representation of all the industry key profes-
sionals. Likewise, we anticipate the same quality of media, vendor
and sponsor attendance."
The Antigua Charter Yacht Show will take place from De-
cember 7 to 11 at Nelson's Dockyard Marina in English Har-
bour, the Falmouth Harbour Marina and the Antigua Yacht
Club Marina.
Sarah Sebastian, show coordinator, says, "We expect between
80 and 100 yachts as normal. Some are a little late in registering
but that's just because they are busy on charter at the moment.
We get everything from a Swan 53 right up to a 270-foot Oceanco
vessel and all yachts in between-cats, monohulls, power yachts-
you name it, we have it exhibiting, if it's a properly-qualified char-
ter yacht." There are many new launches, Sebastian adds, that
debut in Antigua.
There's a new twist to each of these shows this year. In the BVI,
Oliver says, "We are attempting to host a 'green' event. At this
point we are exploring the requirements necessary for certifica-
tion from a recognized authority."
A name change is new for the St. Thomas Fall Yacht Show.
Ackerson explains, "We've been working with Yacht Haven
Grande and the Department of Tourism. Our goal is that in
the next 10 years, the show will develop into a destination
show marketed to a wider audience similar to the Ft. Lauder-
dale Show."


FALL CREWED CHARTER
SHOW



NO)VEMIBER 5-
BVI Charter Yacht Show
Charteryacht Society of the BVI
P.O. Box 3252
Road Town, Tortola
Tel: 284-494-6017
www.bvicrewedyachts.com


NOVEMBER 10-12
St. Thomas Fall Yacht Show
Virgin Islands Charteryacht League
5304 Yacht Haven Grande, Ste. 104
St. Thomas, VI 00802
Tel: 800-424-2061 or 340-774-3944
Email: info@vicl.org
www.vicl.org


DECEMBERI 4-7
MYBA St. Maarten Charter Show
Super Yacht Services
Tel: + 599.544.2436
Cell: + 599.554.8918
Fax + 599.544.2496
Email: info@mybacaribbeanshow.com
www.mybacaribbeanshow.com


DECEMBER 7-10
Antigua Charter Yacht Show
Tel: 1 268 460 1059
Cell: 1 268 764 5951
Email: info@antiguayachtshow.com
www.antiguayachtshow.com





There's been a date change to the MYBA St. Maarten Char-
ter Show. Frye says, "The dates this year have been changed
to enable brokers to attend both the St Maarten and the An-
tigua shows.
Finally, the show in Antigua will now be five days rather than
six, says Sebastian. "This is so agents can be out of their offices
for a shorter amount of time and it saves them a day or two on
expenses for hotels, etc, as well." Other new additions to the An-
tigua show include special seminars about marketing and com-
puter marketing, which are specifically designed to help brokers
in light of the current global economic downturn.


38 ALLATSEA.NET






ID T 5











SMALL ACTS OF KINDNESS


MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE

U.S. CHARTER YACHT BROKER FINDS BOOKS FOR CARIBBEAN KIDS

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


t's the detours in life that can be much more rewarding than the
well-planned route. Such was the case for one charter skipper
who invited broker Ann Wallis-White to a fancy lunch after the
Antigua Charter Yacht Show and instead found himself hand-
ing out books to needy schoolchildren. Today, there are a number of
yachts and yacht crews who are giving back to the islands they love
thanks to Wallis-White's inspiration and example.
Yachting is something Wallis-White has known all of her life and so
is a love of reading. "I was a charter child," she says. "I was reading
books before I could walk."
Wallis-White booked her first charter while still in college. She was
one of the first charter brokers, opening an office in Annapolis, Mary-
land, in 1976. "I was 23 years old and living on someone else's boat so I
could pay the rent for a waterfront office," she explains. "Even then, I'd
budget enough money to buy something each week to give away and it
was usually a book."
Trips to the Carib-
beanwouldinevitably
bring Wallis-White to
places where chil-
dren owned few pos-
sessions. "I don't like
the idea of handing
out money. That only
solves the problem
for a day," she says.
Instead, like seeds
that can be planted
to grow a garden full of food, Wallis-White started handing out books
that she hoped would foster a love of reading and education.
Over the past 30-plus years, Wallis-White says she has "begged,
borrowed and got donated" thousands of books that have been dis-
tributed to Antigua and other Caribbean islands such as Dominica,
Bequia, Grenada, St. Vincent and Union Island. Libraries, which an-
nually discard used books, have been a key source of donations. A
dozen years ago, Wallis-White partnered with a nonprofit group called
B.I.G. Books (Books for International Goodwill), which works to recycle
books for the benefit of people as well as the environment.
Books boxed, there's then the transportation. Yacht skippers who
sail through Annapolis en route to the Caribbean will often be asked
to transport a box or two of books and gladly do so. Over the past
several years, Karen Kelly at Nicholson Yachts Newport has worked
with Wallis-White and enlisted the help of skippers in her neck of the
woods who are undertaking their annual north to south migration.
"Several yachts have really helped us over the years," says Kelly.
She has been on the other end of the transport too, that is, driving
around Antigua in a rental car after the annual December charter show


and looking for the
smallest, poorest
school where she
could drop in and
donate books.
"The children
just love the
books," says Kelly.
"It's so incredible
to see how happy i
it makes them."
The ripple effect
of Wallis-White's
good works is evi-
dent in the tales
she tells. "I remem-
ber being out for
my annual swim in Antigua and this little boy comes paddling out to me
to tell me he loves books," Wallis-White says.
Then, there was the Caribbean airport ticket manager who rescued
Wallis-White from tears and a canceled flight home by producing a free
first class ticket after recognizing her name. "He told me he never read
a book as a child that didn't have my name in the front," she says. "I
always write my name inside and something like 'we love your island'."
Last year, Wallis White was delivering needed items to an elderly
shut-in friend in a bad neighborhood in Antigua. Three teenage boys
walked up to her car and started tapping on the window. "I rolled
down the window, not knowing what to expect, and they asked me if I
had anything to read," says Wallis-White.
Her generosity hasn't been limited to books. She's skipped more
than one expensive lunch at show time and used the money to spon-
sor three boys into the Antigua Yacht Club's sailing program. She
used a $300 speaking honorarium to buy small toys and her annual
show cocktail party to enlist friends to wrap the toys as Christmas
presents for kids in Montserrat after the volcano erupted. And she
took up a collection among the luxury yacht crews to get a dog
that had been maimed in a machete attack to a local vet. "Lucky"
ultimately survived.
The real story, says Wallis-White, isn't about her or her book drive
or what she's done; it's about how easy it is for anyone to perform a
small act of kindness.
"I tell crews to take $100 and go to the dollar store and stock up on
small items. I've been to schools where the kids are sharing pencils,"
says Wallis-White. "Asmall amount of money or an hour or two of time
is all it takes to make a huge difference in someone's life."
For more information or to contribute, contact Wallis-White at
awwyc@comcast.net -&


40 ALLATSEA.NET








rj~


I *A.-


L~7


Southern Trades
Yacht Sales, Charters & Management
southerntrades@surfbvi.com
www.southerntrades.com
284-494-8003


Pmfiwional Crwed
Charter YCtal A=nce
mWd Central Agencyy


CharterPort BVI
Professional Crewed Charter Yacht Services
284-494-7955
www.charterportbvi.com
yachting@charterportbvi.com


Marine Depot
Marine Chandlery
Your #1 choice for marine supplies
(284) 494-0098 www.rescuerl.com
B.V.I. Marine Management 284-494-2938


C. COMMERCIAL
WUE SERUICES

Nor rmA S A--"


Commercial Dive Services
located at Village Cay Marina
Road Town, Tortola
Tel: (284) 494 8261
Fax (284) 494 5172
Email: commercialdivebvi@surfbvi.com
Website: www.commercialdivebvi.com


'! tt


For information or reservations


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1.888.IGY.MARINAS















































When people talk about the Spanish Virgins, most of us think about
Culebra and Vieques. In reality, there are many islands and cays worth
exploring. Over the last two years we have sailed to Culebra almost
once a month, tried many anchorages and met many wonderful peo-
ple there and in the surrounding islands.
If you don't have your own sailboat in the Caribbean and wish to
explore the SVls you can now charter crewed yachts or bareboats out
of Puerto Rico, St Thomas and/or Tortola.




Planning Your Disit
If you take a look at Culebra's chart you will notice more than 20 other
smaller islands and cays including Culebrita, Cayo Luis Pena, Cayo
Norte, and Cayo Pirata, among others. All are uninhabited, except for
Culebra, and some offer quiet, secluded anchorages and/or spectacu-
lar beaches.
Culebra, Culebrita and Cayo Luis Pena combined have many beau-
tiful beaches but we recommend the following ones because of the
quality and safety of the anchorage, the great snorkeling and the
beautiful sands. All these anchorages can be accessed by boat but
Bahia Flamenco is better visited by car:

Culebrita: Punta Arenas and Bahia Tortugas-make sure to
hike up to the old lighthouse.
Cayo Luis Pefia: Punta Cruz and Punta Rociada
Culebra: Carlos Rosario, Tamarindo, Punta Melones and
of course Bahia Flamenco


The PR government has
installed free moorings


.- ....


42 ALLATSEA.NET







Culebrita s lighthouse a arinas s( Ioorings
calls fr There are no marinas on any
of the SVls, but the Puerto
Rico Natural Resources De-
partment has installed free
moorings on many anchor-
ages and beaches. The clos-
est marinas are Puerto del Rey
den, BMarina in Fajardo and Crown
Bay Marina in St Thomas. In
Culebra, water, fuel and ice
will all have to be carried by
dinghy so plan ahead and
bring portable approved con-
tainers on board.

Overnight anchorages
Even though there are many
anchorages around Culebra,
not all are protected all the
time due to wind and sea
conditions, so we recom-
mend the following for a
great night sleep no matter
where the wind is blowing
from: Dakity, Las Pelas, Cayo
Pirata, Melones and many
coves inside Ensenada Hon-
da. We don't recommend
overnights at Bahia Sardinas
in Culebra, or anywhere in Culebrita or Cayo Luis Pena.

Provisions
There are no large supermarket chains, Walmarts or Costcos in Cule-
bra, so we recommend doing your provisioning in Puerto Rico or St
Thomas before heading to Culebra. Once on Culebra you can buy last
minute items and ice at Colmado Milka, Superette Mayra, Colmado
Genesis and El Eden.

Dining 8( entertainmentt
Great places to eat come and go on the islands. At this time, some
wonderful places to go enjoy an exquisite meal include Susie's, El
Eden, Mamacita's, Juanita Bananas and Dinghy Dock. A must-see is
Saturday night's WIKI Sound Machine-conga players at Mamacita's.
Wiki and Jorge will make your whole body move to their great Carib-
bean renditions while playing five conga drums between them.




USEFUL WEB SITES FOR
PLANNING YOUR CRUISE


www.islaculebra.com
www.enchanted-isle.com/culebra/cfyi.htm
www.culebrablog.com
www.topuertorico.org/city/culebra.shtml


Sailing to (Culebra
Getting from Puerto Rico up to Culebra is relatively easy, once you
clear Cayo Largo to port. Sailing down from St Thomas you must stay
way off eastern Culebrita to avoid Arrecife Culebrita (Culebrita Reef).
These are some of the distances between the islands and the sailing
angles you'll get based on wind direction:

From To Miles Sailing Angle
Based on Wind
PR Luis Pena 17 N/NE=CR, E=UW,
S/SE=CR
PR Culebra- Carlos 17 N/NE=CR, E=UW,
Rosario Beach S/SE=CR
PR Culebrita- 24 N/NE=CR, E=UW,
Lighthouse Beach S/SE=CR
PR Culebrita- Bahia 28 N/NE=CR, E=UW,
Tortuga Beach S/SE=CR
PR Culebra- 19 N/NE=CR, E=UW,
Bahia de Sardinas S/SE=CR
STT Culebra- 19 N/NE=BR, E=DW,
Punta Soldado S/SE=BR

PR = Sailing from Marina Puerto del Rey in Fajardo; STT=St Thom-
as Bay Entrance; N/NE = North/Northeast; E = East; S/SE = South/
Southeast; CR = Close Reach; UW = Upwind; DW = Downwind; BR =
Broad Reach

The SVIs are the Spanish Virgin Islands or perhaps the "Slow" Virgin
Islands. Days on the SVIs seem to last forever where the pace is slow,
very slow. The SVIs are a special place, the type of place where you
either "get it" or you don't. I got 'em more than 30 years ago. While
things have changed a bit, I keep coming back every chance I get ...
and each time it gets harder to leave. Come visit us, have a Bushwack-
er at Mamacita's and you'll see why. -


Capt. Tony Miro is a life-long sailor, photographer and web developer
who currently lives in Puerto Rico with his family, where they sail aboard
their Hunter 376, i Nada Mas! He runs various sailing web sites including
sailboatspecs.com, caribesailingadventures.com & huntersailors.com,
and can be reached at tonymiro@gmail.com.













CRUISE

on a


2i ikM
t-

3~~;-1*ri**.* .


RTERING OPTIONS SPAN FROM
E TO ABUNDANT WITH A BOATLOAD
CHOICES IN BETWEEN. YOU CAN
IT-YOURSELF FOR SEVEN DAYS OR
AY TO BE PAMPERED FOR AS LONG AS
YOUR WALLET CAN SUPPORT. YOU CAN
CHASE FISH, RACE OR RELAX. YOU CAN
EVEN EXPERIENCE A YEAR-LONG, LIFE-
ALTERING ADVENTURE.
) T I, .:1 i i II- :1 barque Picton Castle
i,:r :,,, ., :I-,; rer boat- and typical is
,:r :, I rl r :I-. :I bes those who sign on
: rl, I -,,rl : ;:is the ship undertakes.
I I r :,,, il :be-trotting, year long
Sr. rl, r I r- rl,- :: rseof allonboard. The
.I,,: : .r : ,r ....;e took 36 Sail Trainees
.1:: i i rli I -.:I- .hip staff from Canada
r : : :, i-,.,, :i:e, Africa, through the
,. ii, : I rl- : an and to Bermuda be-
tie :. -r., I r: Nova Scotia.
on -Irl, : : ri -, --. 1: -ydearlytojoin theship,
,ar
,: :i- :-r. r: :i: 1: ng just for the ride. All
I ~1 :1. :1'.I- :I : i -, :leckto raise sails unless
ri.- I, 1|: : .-' r: I: .- i: in the rig lowering them
S:- rl-,- I :1. I'-, not helping to set or
rr :I, rl,- I l : e feet of cotton canvas,
SrlI-I 1, :leck to scrub, the galley
r: :i: ,r- -,: -r-ending list of chores.
Ii:1 I- ,,,, ri- i :pes can be an arduous
r I. .I ,: I'i l,,i 1 lines descend from the
I,:;l : : ..--r. I rds, braces and down-
.. i -,:1 : : '- has to coil them.
-Irl ,: 1.:l, rl- I '- :Dt vessel looks like a
1: - :r r: ll .1l,,: ,r :I :ln't start out that way.
I-, .,r ,ii- I:" : .nsea fishing trawler, it
:I : rl,- r-, : /t Nales until drafted into
,i :- : :1 -i II minesweeper. After
i i' : 1:., I .. ..i : that ordeal, it went on
r: I1, .I h, :i ,r Ii, I':':, Picton Castle caught
rl,- rr-,,r,:, : :i: :rin Dan Moreland who
I:'.i :I, -: r irl, 1: In to turn it into a square
1:1 I-I- -i l : .,,,;ll crew motored from
I I:, i r: II- ,:,I -id finallyto Lunenburg,
I : ::-, I-,- rlie vessel underwent a
t : rIll.: :. I :1 Il: ,,,-r m orphosis.
I'.-I.-1.I, : I- : i I :-:- with clipper bow and
.. r.. l i,,,.r. ir -. 1: ced into service as an
lr-,, r, r: .r ,,:,i short-term sail pro-
:ii I, I:,i1-,: I i:lained, "It provides a
S- 1:: i- ,r : l,,: : I the sea. It's sail train-
II : -, I: -i ,, nation. Our agenda is
I : :i :i :i to interesting places.
S ,, r r: 1 :.,, rrainees get a perspec-

:- 11:1 : :- rl'i ship was completely
S aJ-- .-I: :.,ir- :I four times.
S.Ir :1.-. ,,:i :.ed ship in the purest
:r r : .nse," said Moreland.
BIej...--- ..








eveyn "Everyone has a pirate fantasy but the ship
is work. If they still have stars in their eyes
after that, fine. My job is to try to talk people
out of it." Luckily, for those onboard, he isn't
always successful.
Trainees vary in age from 18 up. "We like
to take younger people," said Moreland, but
one of their most enthusiastic trainees on-
board was 73 years young. "There's a very
distinct divide in motivation for being here.
SFor the more mature folks, it's a check in a
box, something they've always wanted to do.
For the younger ones, it's more defining. It
can set the rest of their lives. It will forever
color and shade all they will do. With every-
one, you see them become very strong peo-
ple. They are not consumers but citizens of
the world."
More world citizens will be joining More-
land in May 2010 for yet another trip. You
can, too. Visit www.picton-castle.com.

"We have full on participation in deep sea."
Underway, everyone stands two daily watch-
es and in between partakes in a myriad of
educational opportunities that include navi-
gation, seamanship, weather, meteorology
and oceanography Perhaps the most indel-
ible lessons occur day to day, as individuals
grow confidant in new found skills and form
lasting friendships.
"We go to real places so our crew can have
a rich experience. We love the South Pacific
because it's so extraordinary." In the first
four circumnavigations, all under the com-
mand of Moreland, the ship and crew visited
an impressive list of ports that included the
Galapagos, Pitcairn,, Suva, Reunion and St.
Helena. The ship teamed with UNESCO and
NOAA to provide medical and educational
supplies to numerous island nations.
It was in Antigua that I joined Picton Cas-
tle for a few eye-opening hours where I was
greeted by a handful of satisfied customers
and their Captain. Amidships sat the lat-
est hands-on project, the construction of a I
small island boat, using grown frames gath-
ered in Grenada. Occupying the foredeck
was a mammoth, man-powered capstan.
Down below, the focsle and main salon
were lined with double tiered bunks. The
salon held dining tables and an impressive
group of sea chests and artwork collected
on journeys.
Moreland revealed the secret to the suc-
cess of this unusual venture. "Applicants to
the program are requested to first spend
a long weekend aboard," he explained.


ALLATSEA.NET 45










ems of rle Caribbean

SI IG G ED F ER LITU E
BY JIM EWING, PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANN FREDERICK


In AntIgua with tnin
Red-Bied Trmpic Birds


Ihe eastern Caribbean is a wonderful place tor your charter, with
amazing volcanic landscapes, the friendliest people around, and
warm, steady trade winds for great sails up and down island. Those
attractions bring in the crowds and the more famous anchorages can
get a bit tight. Of course you're going to want to visit those places-
they're popular for good reason.
But where do you go when you want a break, a great place to de-
compress, or just to get away from it all? Here are some places you can
leave the crowd behind, relax under the stars, and be off the beaten
track-but still close by.
The southern Windward Islands offer plenty of anchoring possibili-
ties if your charter is based out of St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG)
or Grenada. Many of the southern bays of Grenada are popular with
cruisers. But a little away from the crowds is the great get-away spot


just behind Calivigny Island in Clarke's Court Bay Enjoy the beautiful
surroundings, clean water, and no surge. Dinghy over to the sleepy vil-
lage of Lower Woburn and lime away the afternoon at Nimrod's Rum
Shop or enjoy great local cooking at the Little Dipper Restaurant.


46 ALLATSEA.NET







Sailing north from Grenada or south from the charter bases in SVG southeast coast to the very French town of Sainte Anne. It's a popular
will get you to the Tobago Cays. Just east of the popular Horseshoe tourist destination but not too many boats call here. Sit at one of the
Reef anchorage are two spots that should not be missed. These are great on-the-beach restaurants sipping your ti' punch with your toes
fair-weather anchorages, so if the wind or seas are up, use them only in the sand, grab a baguette at one of the boulangeries or catch a bus
as day stops. Try the small anchorage at Petit Tabac. This is the island and visit the rest of the island.
made famous in the first "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie. Now that There are, of course, many others like Mero, on Dominica's west
the island is completely recovered from being "burned down" by the coast, with its black-sand beach, rum factory and one of the best hikes
film team, you will most likely have the island, reef and beach all to in the Caribbean. There's Salt Island in the British Virgins-sit and
yourself. Sadly, the rum is gone. watch the crowds rush back and forth in the Drake Passage while you


Another half-mile east is arguably the most beautiful location in the
eastern Caribbean-End of the World Reef. It's a beautiful white sand
embayment completely protected by the reef. No island, no beach,
nothing except crystal clear water and complete solitude.
Close to the charter bases in Guadeloupe are two great places to
spend some time. The north side of the island boasts a cruising ground
that has it all-back-reef anchorages, deserted islands, the quaint town
of Sainte Rose, and excellent gunkholing up the Grand Riviere de Goy-
aves. The Grand Cul de Sac de Marin is about 30 square miles of every-
thing the Caribbean has to offer It's a popular spot on the weekends
but during the week you might be the only boat in the bay
Getting there is an easy day sail around from Deshaies on the west
coast or, if you want the adventure of a night transit of the Riviere
Salee, a short trip north from Pointe a Pitre. Sail down Guadeloupe's


have the whole island to yourself. Or visit Great Bird Island in Antigua
for the rush of a Red-Billed Tropic Bird gliding by a few feet away.
When you sail off the beaten path there are some things to check before
you go. Make sure your charter operator allows you to go to these places.
Have a favorable weather forecast-some out-of-the-way harbors can get
uncomfortable if the wrong sea is running. You should be comfortable read-
ing the water-you may have to tuck up close behind a reef to find the per-
fect patch of sand. Beyond that, be careful: these are places where you can
happily sit for weeks ... and sooner or later you'll have to return the boat.-&



Jim Ewing is a freelance writer, sailor and avid cook. He and partner
Ann Frederick are currently cruising in the Caribbean aboard their sail-
boat, Bees Knees, with no particular destination in mind.


ALLATSEA.NET 47





I: -I -I H 11 I


9


Ira or

d A PROVI
PUTTING
ARTISTS
SPOTLIC


Aragcrn Dick-Read with
one Mf his metal If r!.lzfpIjculptures
Wr
1f AS


S


OCATIVE GESTURE:
G CARIBBEAN
INTO THE
3HT


r--,li-i Di l-Read and the Caribbean islands have a
I- :i. r I,, :In, : partnership, each giving generously to
ri-h :rl-,I Ir 1:>egan in his homeland of Tortola where,
l I ,- :.r 1: .y kids, he spent time digging clay in the
I: i:I l :I :I1, awing and making stuff. Encouraged by
I: i-,,r. :-, :I teachers who recognized an exceptional
r:il-,r ir I: -came a world he pursued. At England's
1U, -1.ir 1 East Anglia, he studied a rich combina-
r, l-: ;I r :,, :1 1-,,glish country pottery techniques. W hen-
I-- r-, -I- :I r: 1,nd and meet indigenous craftsmen. One
,, ,I :i rl',: : ssionable years stimulated an interest in
I- r ,-,-r1 -, i.-dium Aragorn found accepting of larger
images, a perfect way to expand
his intricate drawings.
After graduation he returned to
Tortola's Beef Island. "I decided to
make my living in art," he said. "I got
a commission to do metal pieces for
new rooms at Long Bay. I got old
fridges and cars, cut them up. That's
what I used before I had enough
money to buy copper." For eight
years he lived in the bush growing
food, making art and a living by
selling t-shirts and screened prints
to bareboaters and local stores.
Business and his dream grew into a
tiny studio building on the beach, a
monumental step that turned out to
be phase one. In 2001, it expanded
into what is now Aragorn's Studio
and the Local Arts Centre.
z Walking through the area that
houses the Local Arts Centre is like
peeking into Alice's looking glass or
o stepping into Pee Wee's Playhouse.
Colorful, zany signs point the way,


?,-4




































while sculpted giants keep a lookout.
"We've created a little bubble here,"
Aragorn explained. "It's attractive to
folks coming in from regimented soci-
ety who are looking for the myth of a
laid back lie-in-the-hammock lifestyle.
People who come through say they
love the inspiration, junk and trash."
Looking around at the myriad of cre-
ations, he added, "We're lucky we can
do what we want aesthetically "
After he built a Carib Indian ca-
noe, Gli Gli, and first sailed her from
Dominica through the Caribbean
in 1997, Aragorn decided to bring
a collection of down-island art and
artists to his studio from St. Vincent,
Trinidad, Dominica, Bequia, and An-
tigua. "The Gli Gli trip was really the
foundation of linking everyone to-
gether," he explained.
Creations
That collection of Caribbean arti- '" y the sea
sans not only breathed life into the
centre, it was also the fortuitous be-
ginning for Aragorn's current zeal, the C;1: I: I :, -r I-.r, i
annual event stretches through a week ,i, I -i:1 rr, : .
thousand patrons and, last year, 55 artisan. Ir ,. :.: :, :i :i r : -
a "Big mash up of people. It started six ) 5 : I: iI i.r
friends up." This past year the BVI Tourist I- : ; : :I : r : ,, : I
The Moorings, one of the most import .,,r -.,:I I- :'.' .: :
lends several catamarans that are used as I : : ':- : :I : .tr.
pie, tied stern-to the beach. People flow be r I r ,, : I: -r r,-
creating what Aragorn describes as, "a fesr, I t--,1- :I
Indigenous crafts and their makers are k r: -; :,: i i h :
word craft, means power," he explained. itr. :-:- .- r
power by making all the instruments." At th- :-,r,- :,. -, : r:l-,
creating baskets, pottery, jewelry and othei- r,, :,i1: I- i-n :'-


J 'f take with them. "People have to see it
being made, especially in a tourist econ-
A, omy It's about story telling." He held up a
", carved bowl adding, "They want to say, 'I
met the person who made this.'"
'I Speaking with pride about the centre's
I i artisans he said, "It's a provocative gesture
to put people who've been out of sight into
the spotlight, saying they're important."
....a-- Certainly they are, especially when you
consider that, "The fewer craft people in
the world, the more valuable their wares."
A list ofAragorn Dick-Read's talent and
skill with all things art easily fills pages.
Add his ability to organize such whop-
ping projects as Gli Gli, and you'll be
running to grab more paper Then there
are the Trellis Bay Fireball Full Moon Par-
ties to include, enchantingly illuminated
Aragorn's signature style by Aragorn's signature steel sculptures.
The ever-expanding Local Art Centre is a
t-r" in itf- lf 3nd if "- r r-_iit-r 311 hi =ff rt f r th C`-rib-
S1: -, I r 5 .I tr. I -.r i1 :.; II :1 .l: rl ; I [r :1-
: 5 :I,t ,, -,r t : :t ,, 1.: l r -1: ,-r ---i ,, rl, r
T : r II rl -, 5:1:,, : i,, :ll~r :l-r rl,- I:1- ; rl,;r I _.
i. .r .r r :l : .i r 5 :1 ,- 1 5 rl ,, ,: t r : :I: rl, r I I .
T I,. I 1 11 :1 rl,- rl, - r,. [[ rl,- h I: ;11. 5; I
I;, .:.- I il:r,.,- 1 It ,: t ,r rl, r 1, 1,5. rl ,- I ,- I I 14 -
I : : r T : r .1: : I : ; ,,:1 ; I :I ll : t I:, I h r :- ,
rl,- 1:- :- I 1 : :I:- .I: r I III








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Jim & Deborah Veiga



ATLAS YACHTS


Fajardo, Puerto Rico


at Marina Puerto del Rey in Fajardo Puerto Rico is
the most well established sailboat and catamaran
dealership and brokerage on the Island of Puerto
Rico. Atlas Yachts is a full service stocking dealership with new
model Hunter sailboats and Lagoon Catamarans in inventory and
on display, the only Caribbean based stocking dealership. In ad-
dition Atlas offers full service technical and mechanical support
for the lines they carry and can see to warranty issues on transient
yachts. At Marina Puerto Del Rey in Fajardo, on the east coast of
Puerto Rico, Atlas Yachts enjoys the conveniences and the multi-
tude of services provided by the Marina. Puerto Del Rey has the
most complete boat yard in the Caribbean, as well as marine sup-
ply shops, restaurants and great service. Our office is in Suite 106
in the main building of the Marina and we have our own private
dock space on dock 10 right along the main dock. Jim & Deborah
Veiga own and operate Atlas Yacht Sales & Sailcaribe Charters,
which has been a corporate member of the Yacht Brokers Asso-
ciation of America since 1998, the only YBAA member in Puerto
Rico to date.
Sailcaribe Yacht Charters is the charter division of Alas
Yachts, www.sailcaribe.com and offers several options for those
looking to sail in the beautiful Spanish Virgin Islands. Sail-
caribe operates the Sailtime Puerto Rico base which allows
people to sail regularly through out the year on a new Hunter
for a fraction of what ownership or chartering costs. Folks can
learn to sail trough our ASA sailing school and receive sail-
ing certification up to the ASA Catamaran chartering certifica-
tion. Sailcaribe answers the demand from those looking to
bareboat charter a sailboat or Lagoon catamaran throughout
the Spanish Virgin Islands of Culebra and Vieques. These Is-
lands have the same quality of sailing and anchorages but not
the crowds.
Atlas Yacht Sales and Sailcaribe Yacht Charters has grown sig-
nificantly since its founding in the mid 1990's. We've dedicated
ourselves to the sailing lifestyle and offering the best in cus-
tomer service and sailing products. Through our excellent staff
of instructors, captains, brokers and technicians we anticipate to
maintain the highest quality standards and grow with our cus-
tomers needs.


&-&HUN U N I. R'


lii~WICD4,u~.cu


I


L A OON
-4LIM
42; 0


Atlas Yacht Sales / Sailtime Puerto Rico
PO 70005 ste 119 Fajardo PR 00738
787-889-1978 or 787-439-2275
captjim@coqui.net
www.sailatlas.com
www.SAILCARIBE.com
www.sailtime.com/puertorico


1


























Clive Allen

Chris Simpson

Todd Duff, Brian Duff



B,V,I,YACHT SALES


Tortola, British Virgin Islands


B VI Yacht Sales is located at Nanny Cay Resort and Ma-
rina, the premier marine service location in the British
Virgin Islands that includes a 200-slip marina and full
service yard, comfortable hotel and good restaurants,
all set on a tropical island offering our clients the most enjoyable
Caribbean yacht purchase experience possible.
With a staff of up to four Brokers, an Office/Closing Manager
and a Marketing Manager, we are amply staffed to thoroughly
cover all aspects of each purchase and sale that we broker
Our Brokers include Todd Duff, with us for 5 years now after 24
years Yacht Brokering in the Annapolis area. Having personally owned
over 50 yachts during his career, Todd's "hands on" maintenance ex-
perience is invaluable to clients requiring repairs or upgrades to their
yachts. Todd is a 100 Ton US Coast Guard Captain who has cruised
on his many boats from Maine to Guatemala as well as the central
and eastern Caribbean, clocking around 40,000 miles along the way,
making him a great source of cruising information also.
Chris Simpson has been a Broker and co-owner of BVI Yacht
Sales since 1997. Chris has spent his entire working life in the
yachting industry, including 10 years teaching offshore sailing, 5 as
the RYA sailing school owner, 7 years managing a 50 boat charter
operation and much of his childhood years cruising offshore, ac-


cruing around 40,000 miles of offshore experience. Chris is an RYA
Yachtmaster Instructor who has a well rounded knowledge of most
things nautical and is always happy to share this with clients.
Clive Allen started his nautical career in the diving industry two
decades ago, leading him to work in Australia and Asia. Clive
spent 4 years live-aboard cruising from Hong Kong to Madagas-
car and, more recently, two years cruising the length of the Carib-
bean with his family Clive's well rounded outlook allows him to
quickly tune into any client's requirements, he is fluent in French,
holds the French Ocean Captain qualification and has a strong
background in diesel mechanics.
Our latest broker, Brian Duff, has 12 years of experience work-
ing in the yachting industry from Boston to Tortola and many
points in between. After a lifetime of cruising under sail, Brian
has spent the past 4 years building a rigging business in An-
napolis that become one of the most respected in America. His
hands on experience gained from owning 5 sailboats, repairing
and upgrading many more and working with boat owners at
the service/sales level brings valuable experience helping sell-
ers and buyers alike get the most from their transaction. Brian
is following in his father's footsteps and we are very excited to
have him join our team.


B.V.I. YACHT SALES
Est. 1___ 1_ Ltd


BVI Yacht Sales Ltd.
Nanny Cay Marina
Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Tel: 284-494-3260 Fax: 284-494-3535
Email: info@bviyachtsales.com
www.bviyachtsales.com













Serge Dauvillier


DAUVILLIER YACHTING

Curacao









Due to our Southern location, we are located below
the Hurricane belt, this makes ABC Islands a very
pleasant and safe location. Our word is "service."

Yacht Sales:
With our knowledge of boating and our familiarity with the Ca-
ribbean yachting market we are specialized in advising people
in the sale and purchase of used or new boats. From the new 21
ft for our local customer to the 65 ft cruiser for the European or
American sailor The Caribbean market differs from other mar-
kets in many ways, when selling or buying a yacht it is of crucial
importance to be aware of all aspects involved.

Yacht Provisioning:
You order, we deliver. From culinary choices and the finest foods
to an impressive selection of wines, beers and other beverages.
Our help with all of your yacht provisioning to ensure an easy and
enjoyable stay. You can order in advance and have your groceries
delivered to your vessel. Our professional and courteous staff is
on-hand to meet the provisioning needs of even the finest luxury
yachts. Our caterer can create a delicious finger-food lunch or
live cooking dinner. If you need any information please do not
hesitate to contact us.

Yacht Management:
Providing information to yacht owners or crew. This could be su-
pervision of basic maintenance, providing information about our
local authoritities, storage, marina, slip or travel support in the
Southern Caribbean. The ABC Island are a new home port and
destination. You can travel the Caribbean during the season and
be safe during the hurricane season.


A'
.9


Pletterijweg w/n Boatyard
(first floor), Willemstad
Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, Caribbean
www.dauvillieryachting.com
dyc@dauvillieryachting.com
+5999 670 10 70


~































I'm the one on the left.


Tony Brewer


THE LITTLE SHIP CO.


St.Maarten


Probably the thing I love best about what I do ... is be-
ing at the cusp of change in people's lives. I facilitate
people moving on to The Next Big Thing ... buyers and
sellers alike.
Having spent three years trying to get my own head around
selling up everything to go sailing (I ended up on a therapists
couch at one stage!) and having spent almost two years trying to
sell another boat through brokers a decade later, I am well placed
to know what buyers and sellers want.
Essentially I give my clients what I expect a broker to give to
me ... and I am picky.
It's that simple.
A background in the design, and sales of big ticket communi-
cation systems, where a knowledge based, proactive service was
imperative, a lifetime spent tinkering with things mechanical, to-
gether with time spent as an apprentice aircraft mechanic before
I came away, certainly helps.


So too does the twenty seven years I have been messing about
with boats of all sizes, the 40,000 odd sea miles and two Atlantic
crossings, the first in 1981 with a sextant and a lead line. (and Yes
... we got lost.)
In the fifteen years we have been in the Caribbean, we have
run charter boats, run charter boat bases, rebuilt 'sunk to the bot-
tom" hurricane destroyed vessels and project managed teams of
workers refurbishing private and charter vessels... and bought
and sold boats for our own account.
The brokerage was the next logical step ... and we under-
stand silver service! Ask around ... you will probably like what
you hear.




Cte2 UitPl INO C ~i i


The Little Ship Company
Tel: +599 553 4475
tony@littleships.com,
BP 4115 97065
St Martin Cedex, FWI
www.littleships.com











Richard Vass

John Welch

Giles Wood


THE MOORINGS

YACHT BROKERAGE

Tortola, British Virgin Islands


resources at their disposal to aid you in every aspect
of the purchasing and selling process. Items such as
transportation, accommodations, dockage, insurance,
financing, and delivery, are examples of the areas where Richard,
John and Giles can be invaluable assets to both buyers and sell-
ers. When purchasing or selling a yacht through one of our bro-
kers, you will not only be dealing with professional and licensed
brokers on site, but also have the security of dealing with a pub-
licly traded and bonded company.
Come meet Richard Vass. He has 13 years of experience in
the yachting industry. Most of these years were spent working
with The Moorings and Sunsail between the Mediterranean and
the Caribbean. He has lived in the Virgin Islands for the past
eleven years. In 2004 Richard joined the Moorings Brokerage
Team and has been an asset not only to his many buyers and
sellers, but also to the whole Moorings Team. Richard can be
reached at rvass@mooringsbrokerage.com or on his cell phone
at (284) 542-2016.
Equally as knowledgeable and helpful is John Welch. With 15
years of brokerage experience, John is a real asset in any deal.
He is an accomplished big boat sailor with several Bermuda races
under his belt. With this kind of knowledge, and his track record
of going the extra mile for all of his clients, you will find work-
ing with John an enjoyable experience. John can be reached at
jwelch@mooringsbrokerage.com or on his cell phone at (284)
542-6138.
Giles Wood is the newest addition to the team. Studying engi-
neering at university, he worked as a sales manager selling clas-
sic and sports automobiles. Now a Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor,
he has been around the world skippering, racing, teaching and
brings his enthusiasm for sailing to the brokerage. Giles can be
reached at gwood@mooringsbrokerage.com or on his cell phone
at (284) 541-0252.


The Moorings Yacht Brokerage is the exclusive sales office for
the charter yachts coming out of the Moorings, Sunsail, Moorings
Power and Footloose fleets. We specialize in pre-owned catama-
rans, monohulls and power catamarans, all recent model produc-
tion yachts from world renowned manufacturers. The Moorings
holds a trade license to do business in the British Virgin Islands
and Richard, John and Giles hold permits as Yacht Brokers in the
territory. The Tortola office is open 7 days a week to better serve
our clients.


Yacht Brokerage


The Moorings Yacht Brokerage
Wickham's Cay II
Road Town, Tortola, BVI
(284)494-1000
www.mooringsbrokerage.com


01 09::






























The Team

SOUTHERN TRADES

Caribbean Yacht Sales
Management & Charters

Village Cay Marina
Tortola, BVI


Established in 1977, Southern Trades has been the
main driving force of the Caribbean charter yacht
industry. We assist in all aspects of USVI and BVI
Government licensing, yacht registration, company
formation, banking, insurance, parts procurement and profes-
sional crew staffing for the yachts. We have four full-time staff
devoted solely to our yacht management division for off island
owners who require intensive, day to day management of their
yacht, crew and charter business.


Our competent staff includes, charter consultants, accoun-
tants, yacht managers, crew liaison personnel, charter broker li-
aison personnel, yacht sales staff and government liaison staff.
We are confident in our abilities to identify, locate and make suc-
cessful almost any yacht that an owner may wish to place into the
charter industry.
Please contact us for information on specific charter yacht busi-
nesses we are currently offering. We can supply budgetary infor-
mation as well as prospective income stream reports and other
pertinent information on the crewed charter yacht industry.


out n Trades n

Caribbean Yacht Sales


Christopher Building, Box 3252,
Village Cay Marina,
Road Town, Tortola, BVI
(284) 494-8003 / Fax: (284) 494-8009
E: southerntrades@surfbvi.com
US Toll Free Fax: (888) 546-9672












Reg Bates



THE WEATHER EYE

St. Maarten



Why Choose Weather Eye Yachts as your Yacht
Broker? Industry Experience. The founder and
Principal Broker at Weather Eye Yachts Reg
Bates, a Career Yacht Broker of 28 years stand-
ing, "practices what he preaches" living aboard comfortably with
his young family at one of St Maarten's many exclusive, world
class Marinas.
His personal experience and commitment to the Yachting
Lifestyle is your gain. As a Skippered Charter Vessel Captain in
the late seventies, Reg earned his sailing stripes and learned what
really matters in Caribbean cruising boat selection. His background
includes sales awards with a major sailboat manufacturer, and 28
years Yacht Brokerage direct sales experience. Hundreds of suc-
cessful transactions later, new and former clients seek his advice
on realistic selling prices and vessel selection. To former clients to
whom he has sold smaller vessels while located in North America,
for 22 years, he represents graduation to world class sailing vessels
in the Caribbean, and a familiar, reliable service.
His philosophy of business: ... be relied upon ... Yacht
Brokers are most valuable recommending cruising lifestyle
choices, vessels and local quality services that might otherwise
be overlooked.
Marketing Strategy. Weather Eye represents Caribbean based
boats. We "Shorten the leap of faith" for a purchaser to buy a
boat thousands of miles away, introducing Surveyors, Insurance
agents and recommending needed yachting support services.
Personal Selling. In addition to the expected proper Marina
office premises, internet, and print media presence, Weather Eye
Staff travel with our message of "its easier than you think" to ma-
jor seasonal boat shows in affluent regions of the boating world.
"Already here, keep her here" is our catchphrase ... that is, we
ask, isn't it easier and far more sensible to move sailors to their
boats in the Caribbean on scheduled flights, than to take a boat
back and forth between the mainland and the Islands?
Think avoiding wear and tear on the boat and it's systems not
to mention the wear and tear on the crew!!
Location ... St Maarten ... the Marine Trades Capital of the
Caribbean. We are located on Simpson Bay Lagoon in undoubt-
edly the most accessible Island by Air in the Caribbean ... ease of
travel for personal viewing is key.


Thinking of selling? Bear this in mind ... We don't earn our
fee until we present an acceptable offer and deliver your funds!!
Thinking of buying? Put 28 years valuation, negotiation and
pre-purchase survey interpretation skills to work for you!
Need a home for your boat? Our local vessel registration
services to clients allows year round "home port" access to
St Maarten Marine Trades Services and amenities.


The Weather Eye
Phone +++ 599 580 5809
Toll free number: 1 877 811 0197
E-mail: moreinfo@weathereyeyachts.com
Website: www.weathereyeyachts.com
Skype: weather_eye
Fax: 1 905 248 3841 (Toronto Office)
Unit 4 Plaza De Lago
Simpson Bay Marina,
St Maarten, Netherlands Antilles


4i


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ALLATSEA.NET 59


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Nopoom-











ISLAND EVENTS & INTERESTS
ALL AT SEA'S CARIBBEAN COVERAGE
PAGE 65
Reguero Wins
U.S. Competition
,. " .'.... y




PAGE 86
Stranded Pilot Whale
Sustained in Curacao
Curapao


60 ALLATSEA.NET


~bS







British
Virgin (B.V.I.)
Islands


PAGE 77
Island Water World
Develops Website
PAGE 78
Classic Yacht
Regatta Program


Anguilla
St.Maarten/St. Martin
St. Barthelemy


U.S. Virgin
Islands
(U.S.V.I.)


Guadeloupe


PAGE 66
Reviving Harbor
Racing on St. Thomas


' St Lucia


PAGE 83
Kids' Education
Fund Tops $100,000


Carriacou
7


I

Grenada




Tobago


Trinidad


ALLATSEA.NET 61


[7Pujerto7Ric]o


.two











WINDSURFERS COME FOR 4TH

REVIVAL OF THE CABARETE CLASSIC


ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY ELS KROON


- -o
-~
.........
WL41ilt~~~~:* l~~~


... ... ..... .. ~


t all started in 2006. Native Cabarete windsurfer Pablito Guzman
wanted to keep the spirit of windsurfing alive in his home town
on the north coast of the Dominican Republic, so he reunited
water sports fanatics from many parts of the world to enjoy
the famous winds and waves of Cabarete Bay. This year, from July 22
through 26, it happened for the fourth time, as Pablito succeeded in
attracting windsurfers from abroad to compete with his very talented
Cabarete youngsters.
Among other foreign participants, twelve windsurfers and their
supporters from the Dutch islands of Aruba and Bonaire chartered
their own plane to attend the event. Raul Marquez from Argentina was
there to defend his formula title, and Steven Max from Aruba, now
living in Curacao, represented the Windsurfing Curacao group.
The competition started with a new event called the Butterfly
Effect, which brings women together for noncompetitive ocean
sports gatherings in coastal cities all over the world. The aim is to
instill self-confidence and a love for the ocean in women of all skill
levels. The Butterfly Effect began in Hawaii in 2007. Since then, the


event has been organized in
Brazil, New Zealand, France,
Oregon, Germany, Australia, the
Dominican Republic and Tahiti
by initiator and organizerTatiana
Howard, assisted by Juliana
Shelef, both from Hawaii.
In Cabarete, Michelle
Bourdeau was the local Butterfly
Effect host. The main sports
have been windsurfing, stand-
up paddle, and kiting but are
not limited to other water sports
such as wake boarding, surf,
and kayak. Each gathering also
includes safety and stretching
sessions, as well as food and gear
from local sponsors and fund


62 ALLATSEA.NET










At the 12th Butterfly event
right. initiator Tatioan Howard
left Cabarete host Michelle
Bourdeau _j


I; iko 1W


raising for local charities. Hundreds of women around the world have
already participated in these fun and non-competitive gatherings.
The 12th event in Cabarete added 30 women to the score. It started
with a beach clean-up led by the Dream Project Girls Summer Camp
group. The day full of water sports fun was concluded by a raffle to
benefit the event and the local Dream Project. This celebration, in
LAX restaurant, led the way to the official opening of the windsurfing
competition, which started the next afternoon,
when winds were sufficient for formula sailing and all
categories of slalom.
Throughout the weekend, wind-forces stayed
Below normal and only enabled the freestylers to
show their tricks on the last day, whereas slalom
competitions were sailed every day. During the 14-
mile long distance race from The Hermitage back
to Cabarete Bay, the windsurfers raced against
kitesurfers for an overall win.
The Cabarete Classic once again was a relaxing,
fun-filled event that stimulated the brotherhood of
Caribbeanwindsurfers. Initiatorand organizer Pablito
Guzman, supported by many local businesses, once
again showcased Cabarete's beautiful and perfect
wind-and kitesurfing facilities and its heartwarming
hospitality. The crew of Hotel Villa Taina, situated on
the beach in the middle of the action, once again
displayed great involvement by sponsoring a dinner
for all and offering rooms for officials.
Many participants promised to be back for the
fifth anniversary edition at the end of July 2010.
Cabarete Classic maintains a website where results
and photos can be found. www.cabarete-classic.
com. Silvan Wick's photo, which inspired the
event's logo, is worthy of a visit. -_


.-


0

A' ~h1I


e4n


NICOLE VAN DER VELDEN


Aruban sailor Nicole van der Velden, 14, was one of the
remarkable participants of the Cabarete Classic. Her
name appeared before in All At Sea when she, teaming
up with her father Martin, participated in the Aruba
Heineken catamaran Regatta in November last year and
won the small class category.
In Cabarete she showed that she's able to reach highs
on her own. Nicole only started windsurfing three years
ago when her father's colleague convinced her to try
out the sport at Wim Eelen's Aruba Active Vacations
(AAV). World champion Freestyle Sarah-Quita Offringa
took Nicole under her wing, resulting in a second place
in women's slalom in Cabarete. The Collegio Arubano
student will focus on slalom and wave windsurfing and
will surely be heard from more in the near future.


ALLATSEA.NET 63


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64 ALLATSEA.NET











PUERTO RICO'S REGUERO

WINS U.S. COMPETITION

PARALYMPIAN SCORES 2.4 METRE CLASS & BEST OVERALL TROPHIES



Julio Reguero, from Guyanbo, Puerto Rico,
placed first in six of ten races at the C.
Thomas Clagett, Jr. Memorial Regatta held
the last week of August, taking home the
2.4 Metre class with 12 points. He also received the
C. Thomas Clagett Jr Memorial Trophy, awarded
by organizers for the best overall performance by a
competitor in the championship.
Charles Rosenfield (Woodstock, Conn.) took
second place in the fleet with 14 points, and Timothy
Ripley (Randolph, N.J.) took third on 28 points.
Reguero, who competed in Beijing at last year's
Paralympics (the only sailor to represent Puerto


Rico in that event or the 2008 Olympics), led his class through
three racing days on Narragansett Bay out of Sail Newport, Rh
Island's public sailing center Four fleets of sailors with disabil
competed at the event which incorporated the 2009 Blind Sai
National Championship.
As the competitors left the dock for the third and final day of ra
on August 27, they did so in a beautiful crisp 12 knot northerly
unfortunately died off over the course of the morning. While the t
absence of breeze ultimately forced the last races to be abando
for the SKUD-18 and J/22 classes, all the competing fleets (2.4 Me
Sonar, SKUD-18 and J/22s) sailed a ten-race series, except for
J/22s who sailed 11, and the day ended with the standings unchan
as the fleet leaders prevailed to claim the top prizes.
Racing in Sail Newport's fleet of J/22s, 2008 champion Se
Inkiala (Waltham, Mass.) won his sixth Blind Sailing National 1
in Newport.


2008 Paralympian Rick Doerr (Clifton, N.J.), Hugh Freund (S.
Freeport, Maine) and Josh Saltmarsh (Wayland, Mass.) won their three
races on the last day in the Sonar to win the class with nine points.
The SKUD-18 class saw Scott Whitman (Brick, N.J.) and Julia Dorsett
(West Chester, Penn.), successfully defend their title by ending the
series with 12 points.
"For me sailing in Newport is the best training you can get
anywhere," said Dorsett. "The tide, the current, the wind shifts, you've
got big breeze and little breeze. It's the ultimate training camp. You've
got every type of variable you can imagine, so if you can sail here, you
can sail anywhere. We love to come here. Scott and I have been sailing
a lot, all over, and The Clagett trumps any regatta in provisions, race
out committee and the way they are so inclusive of everyone."
ode Whitman and Dorsett planned to head to Europe to race in Sail For
cities Gold in Weymouth, England, before the IFDS World Disabled Sailing
ling Championship in Athens, Greece.
From the massage therapists who volunteered their time to work on
cing the competitors' tired muscles each day after racing, to the donated


that
otal
ned
etre,
the
ged

ngil
Title


fruit from an area farm, to the clam boil sponsored and prepared by a
local family, the local support for the regatta was remarkable, organizers
reported. "It's a community effort," said event founder Judy McLennan.
"In this economy, to have businesses and individuals on Aquidneck
Island coming together in this way is really, really wonderful."
For full results & additional event information: www.ussailing.net/
Clagett


Report and photos submitted by Claggett Regatta


ALLATSEA.NET 65


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RACING REVIVED
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BACK 1980S TRADITION

T he evening rush hour traffic that crawled along Charlotte
Amalie's waterfront on Wednesday night, August 26,
enjoyed a little entertainment. Three sleek sailboats raced
windward and leeward just off the bulkhead vying to see
who would be first around the buoys. This scene, reminiscent of the
late 1980s, when Honeymoon Bay liveaboards and Gregorie East-
docked racers would square off against each other in the same
locale, is something sailor and restaurateur Rick Kingsland wanted
to bring back.
"John Holmberg and I were having a conversation a few months
ago," says Kingsland, who manages Wikked at Yacht Haven Grande.
"We were reminiscing about the Wednesday night racing out of
Barnacle Bills. John said, 'I've got the boats,' and I answered, 'I've
got a big mouth.'" Thus was born the OnDeck-Wikked Wednesday
Night Sailboat Racing.
The idea kicked off with a nine-week race series held in July and
August. Sailors who want to race sign up a week in advance and about
45 to 50 people come out each week. Racing starts at 5:30 pm and


66 ALLATSEA.NET











The two OnDeck boats
turned out along with
other boats, such as Jerry
Cliford's Atlantic Raider
a J 27 for a summer
revival of harbor racing
on St Thomas


lasts until sunset. This gives enough "In the late 1980s
time for two or three races. ... Honeymoon Bay
"The first two weeks, we liveaboards and
liveaboards and
calculated finishes on a PHRF
handicap," says Kingsland. "It Gregorie East-docked
showed we could be serious if we racers would square
needed. The third week, we held off against each other
the results upside down and read in the same locale."
off the winners."
The sailors, whether they be aboard OnDeck's Farr 40s or aboard
a handful of private boats everything from J-boats to cutters are
motivated to race by the sheer enjoyment.
"There's not really any opportunities to race in the harbor It's
incredible," says Sandy Symkens, who handled one of the Farr 40's
mainsheet. Still, prizes are a part of sailing and Kingsland secured
prize sponsorship for the series from a local beverage distributor.
There's always a post race party ashore. An OnDeck employee
films the races and Kingsland plays them back on the video screen
at Wikked. In the future, he says, "We're going to set up other series,
change it up a bit. Maybe bar wars with teams from different bars
competing or maybe the Police versus the Fire Department. We want
to get the community out and have fun."


THE NETHERLANDS
Sevenstar Yacht Transport
Phone:
+31 (0)20 4488 590
E-mail:
info@sevenstar.nl
Internet:
www.sevenstar.nl


ALLATSEA.NET 67










WARM WATER, HOT RACING, AND

A NEW INTL YACHT CLUB CHALLENGE

ROYAL BVI YACHT CLUB ANNOUNCES 2010 REGATTA PLANS


Simon Wood, the Commodore of the Royal British Virgin
Islands Yacht Club, is inviting yacht clubs from around the
world to send teams to compete in the inaugural International
Yacht Club Challenge (IYCC), part of the BVI Spring Regatta
and Sailing Festival, March 29-April 4, 2010.
To sweeten the pot, Sunsail Yacht Charters is providing up to a 10%
discount for all those booking bareboats for the IYCC, a free charter to
the winning team and a perpetual trophy. Although this is the inaugural
year for the IYCC, it will be the 39th for the BVI Spring Regatta. As in
the past eleven years, the 2010 edition will be hosted and presented
by the Nanny Cay Marina and Resort, Tortola.
Regatta organizers, with the BVI Tourist Board and Sunsail, launched
the event in the U.K. the first week of August at one of the world's
largest regattas, Cowes Race Week.
Wood says he plans to skipper a boat and be part of the BVI team.
"While there is no doubt I'll be rooting for the home team, I'm keen
to mix it up."
Josie Tucci, the Sunsail Brand Manager expects a lot of interest.
"The IYCC opens up racing to a lot of people who don't have their
own boats in the BVI. Our Beneteau 39, the boat of choice to race, has
performed well in past regattas."
Judy Petz, Director of the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival, took
time out from planning to talk to All at Sea last month:

AAS: How did the idea come about to add an intl yacht
club challenge?
JP: The Spring Regatta has always had international reach. About
three years ago we wanted to make it more interesting, to have more
international teams come and race the regatta. We thought with a
competitive one-design charter fleet, it would allow sailors to come
to the Caribbean and compete against other sailors-but even better
if they represented their yacht club. The key is from the BVI Tourist
Board with their marketing reach to yacht clubs around the world.

AAS: Have other regatta organizers done this elsewhere?
JP: There are large clubs with one design fleets who have done this.
New York Yacht Club has started a challenge this year. But we are the
first that I know of in the Caribbean.

AAS: You are already targeting German and UK sailors. Will you
be marketing to clubs in any other regions?
JP: This is being marketed literally to the world. The U.S. has started
a campaign already; letters will be going out to all the RYA clubs in
September We'll have a big push at the Newport and Annapolis boats
shows for the east coast and letters to the West Coast Yacht clubs. The
Challenge doesn't want to prevent anyone from bringing their own
boat to race in the regatta; we have 17 classes they can join in for that;


this is an additional way sailors from around the world can come and
have a race-worthy boat to compete in.

AAS: Where will the challenge racing take place?
J P: The boats will race on the bareboat course. Actually, a yacht club team
could win in the bareboat fleet as well as the Challenge.

AAS: Will you be adding any extra volunteers?
JP: Every year the number of volunteers increases. It's usually
because they have so much fun they tell their friends to come and
help. Last year we had people taking vacations just to come down
and be a part of this great event. As I tell all the volunteers, "you'll
work hard, but you have a lot of fun!"

AAS: Do you and Sunsail have specific goals in mind?
JP: We chose this design for its racing abilities, size to accommodate
crews and for the number in the fleet. We'd like to see their whole fleet
on the water (and I'm sure Sunsail would, too.)

AAS: And the winning challenge team takes home a free charter.
JP: I hope the winner will use it as an opportunity to return to the 2011
Spring Regatta to defend their championship ... 2011 is also the 40th
anniversary of the BVI Spring Regatta, so I would hope they would
want to come back for that, as well.

AAS: It sounds like 2010 will be the don't-miss year for the BVI
Spring Regatta.
JP: We welcome everyone who makes their way from whatever part
of the world, in their own boat, chartered, borrowed-or to just come
and enjoy the event.
For more details: www.bvispringregatta.org


68 ALLATSEA.NET










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70 ALLATSEA.NET










CARIBBEAN 1500 RALLY GOING STRONG THIS YEAR
MORE INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPANTS JOIN 2009 FLEET


Sam happy to report that the Caribbean 1500 is going strong
in 2009," Steve Black said in late August. "Like a fine wine,
rwe are improving with age and experience." America's oldest
and largest offshore cruising rally will depart from Hampton,
Virginia on November 2 and arrive in Tortola, British Virgin Islands
seven to 12 days later.
Black, the founder and president of the Cruising Rally
Association, is expecting more participants this year than anyone
might have expected with a soft U.S. economy. "Our increased
turnout this year is the result of some pent up demand from
those that put off the trip last year, improved recognition, a more
experienced group of volunteer crew members, and the return of
many past ralliers looking forward to the festivities supporting our
20th running of the event," said Black.
This year's fleet will sport an international flair. In addition to the
usual contingents from the US and Canada, sailors from Germany,
Japan, the UK, and Ireland will join the fleet.
"Five of our entries are scheduled to participate in the World


ARC, and a growing number of European skippers cruising in
the US have elected to join us this year," said Black. "The 20th
Anniversary fleet is shaping up to be an interesting group. We
have veterans of past rallies including several who participated
in the first Caribbean 1500 in 1990. The first-time participants
include four families with children. And it is always fun to have
sailors from other countries involved."
The boats will pull into a different destination this year. "Our
new BVI host marina, Nanny Cay, will help make this the most
festive arrival so far, with a hospitality center, daily parties, live
bands playing island music, and a beach barbecue following the
awards presentation," Black said.
Over 1000 yachts and 4000 sailors have participated in the
Caribbean 1500 since its inception. For more information:
www.caribl500.com


Report submitted by the Cruising Rally Association


ALLATSEA.NET 71




















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NEW BOAT BUILDING VENTURE IN THE BVI
WELCOME A NEW 29' POWER CAT

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


Some of the best ideas in boating are born over a beer
Such is the case with a new boat building venture in the
British Virgin Islands that will see commercial production of
a lightweight, fuel-efficient power catamaran starting this fall.
Richard Wooldridge of Island Yacht Management (IYM)
explains the vessels conception: "A few years ago, Bob Phillips
raced with designer O.H. Rodgers on Three Harkoms at the Rolex
Regatta. They were enjoying a beer or two in Christmas Cove
when Morgan Avery showed up on his Flying Carpet, a converted
Prindle 19. Bob was impressed with the efficiency of the craft,
speeding along with no wake and only a small outboard. He said
to O.H., 'design me a 26-foot version of that,' and that's how it all
got started."
There hasn't been any production boat building on Tortola
since the early 1990s when construction of the popular "Tortola
Dinghy" cease, as charter companies started to use inflatable
dinghies in their place.


"The college and Jost Van Dyke do their best to keep wooden
boat building and restoration alive, but the BVls do not have a
production boat building operation," says Wooldridge, who has
worked with IYM over the last six years on the highly successful
conversion of 12 old J/24s into the popular IC24 design.
Construction of the "Rodgers 29" started last October when
a full sized hull model was created. This was used to create a
mold in which the hulls will be produced. Molds for the vessel's
structural beams and other sections are now being made. IYM
plans to have hull #1 launched in time for the "Interline" regatta
in mid-October. Hull #2, which will be available for sale, should
be finished mid-November The plan is to build one vessel per
month thereafter.
O.H. Rodgers is a renowned yacht designer who has a history
of success over the last 30 years with designs that include "A"
class cats, cruising multihulls and a range of racing monohulls.
The "Rodgers 29" is a high-tech build using composite materials
to make it strong while remaining as light as possible.
"The design brief was to produce a fuel-efficient boat
that is capable of taking the rough trade wind conditions we
experience here on the nose," Wooldridge says. "She should
be able to take six to eight adults around the islands at speeds
up to 28 knots using under six gallons of gas per hour. This
will be possible because we will only be using 50 or 60 HP
outboards, which are extremely fuel efficient and relatively
inexpensive. A conventional 30-foot powerboat would typically
be powered by twin 250 HP outboards that swallow up to 12
gallons per hour each. The vessel will have a 150 mile range
with full tanks, giving it true 'inter island' capability in moderate
sea conditions."
The build is all epoxy "It's all about strength for weight," says
Wooldridge. "You can't beat epoxy in that department and there
will never be an osmosis issue."


ALLATSEA.NET 73









Perhaps the best description
of this new power cat came when
veteran USVI multihull sailor,
John Holmberg, came for a look
at the hull.
"He said 'it's a 30-foot Tornado
with chines,' says Wooldridge.
"Add a bridge deck, a console,
two outboards and a hard top and
you've got it!" IYM sees a large
market for its new boat.
"We believe that this new power
cat will fill a void in the current
leisure and work boat markets,"
says Wooldridge. "There is simply
nothing like it being produced
anywhere; its uses are endless,
from dive boat to water taxi or
chase boat, or just having fun
around the islands with family and friends aboard.
"The intention is to keep the first boat here to promote the
product and to generally assess the performance under a full
range of conditions," Wooldridge says. "We plan to tour the
Caribbean with #1 to show her off. She will certainly be at all the
major regattas."


IYM's partners in the project are Doyle Sails BVI and
the Golden Hind Chandlery. The IYM build team includes
newcomer Miles Fossey, veteran IC24 builder Jamel Davies,
whose grandfather Claremont Davies built Tortola sloops, and
two young apprentices who will be getting their first taste of
boat building.


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ANGUILLA'S AUGUST

SONIC WINS 2009 BOAT OF THE YEAR

BY ANN L. PHELAN


n the 1950s and 60s when there was a labor shortage in the
Dominican Republic, men from Anguilla sailed there to cut
cane. When their work ended, the Anguillan sloops would race
back home. On the shores of Sandy Ground women, friends and
family would cheer from the shore as the first boat arrived.
So began the island's love for a sailing race. Today, communities
sponsor boats, creating a healthy competition among the villages.
Anguilla celebrated their annual August Regatta back to back with its
2009 Summer Carnival July 29 to August 9.
The August races featured 13 Class A boats, all 27 feet in length.
There were 11 Class B boats, 23 feet in length. One boat from St.
Maarten, Perfect Timing, was sailing in the Class B races. Each boat
has 11 to 18 crew members on board.
David Hodge from South Hill is the boat builder for two Class A
boats, Miss Anguilla and Sonic. Hodge states it takes eight to 10
weeks to craft and finish a boat. The cost is about US$28,000, mostly
funded by members of each village. Hodge was confident his boats
would prevail in the races; he said, "I made these two boats, so know
they can win. It's up to the captain now."
August Monday's race was plagued with some boat carnage. The
race starting out of Sandy Ground went out into open sea past the
island as winds were gusting, sometimes up to 18 knots. UFO and Real
Deal both broke their masts, creating great setbacks for each team.
Sonic won that race with a long lead. The after-party was quite the
scene on Sandy Ground, lasting well into the early morning hours.
On August Tuesday, the Island Harbour Race met 14 foot seas near
Shoal Bay East. During the race, De Shan tragically sank during an
accident, dashing their hopes for a win. De Tree took the lead, winning
the day's race.
August Thursday's race was the most anticipated. The boats met at
Meads Bay and sailed into open sea. Winds averaged 14 knots and seas
were flat, making for perfect race conditions. As the boats came close
to the finish near the spectator-lined beach it was a close race. Tactical
strategy brought Bluebird in first, then De Tree, and finally Sonic.
Rawles Hazell, the ballast on Bluebird said, "We had stiff competition,
but our captain Devon Daniel brought us to victory" Daniel is the grandson
of Egbert Connor, one of the first boat builders on island. Bluebird is from
South Hill and has seven crew members under the age of 16 years.
During the Thursday race, De Tree was disqualified because they did
not honor a "Hard Lee" call from Sonic, and Miss Anguilla moved up
to third place. In the Class B races Thursday, Legal Rights from Island
Harbour broke their tiller. Derni Gomes, the captain, was exhausted
from the races but proud of his team. "We worked hard and will keep
trying to come up on top," he said.
The Boat of the Year for 2009 was Sonic. Crew member Bryan
Richardson was confident beforehand that his team could outlast the
rest and prevail: "We have been training hard and are ready to win the


races. There are some good boats here but we hope to win." Sonic
went on to place in the top three for each August race and earned
their well deserved title of Boat of the Year, based on points earned
the entire sailing season from March to August.
Racing came to a close and Carnival winded down after a week
of music, sailing and celebration. The local pride in Anguilla's sailing
culture is strong and filled with competition, determination and honor.
This sailing community embraces a multigenerational sport that
brings the entire island-sons, fathers and grandfathers-together to
celebrate their passion, the sea. -


Ann Phelan, owner of Caribbean Wind & Sun Vacations, specializes in
Caribbean dive and windsurf vacations, ann@antiguacaribbean.com


Sonic took home
Boat of the Year
in August


LAS


ALLATSEA.NET 75













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76 ALLATSEA.NET










ISLAND WATER WORLD

DEVELOPS SHOP

RETAIL WEB SITE NOW OFFERS E-COMMERCE, A FIRST FOR CARIBBEAN


e are always looking for ways to enhance the value
equation for our customers," said Sean Kennelly,
Managing Director of St. Maarten's Island Water
World, in July. To further that goal, a "new" Island
Water World has been born with online shopping, a renovated logo
and a new tagline, "Island Water World-keeps you sailing."
The company says that sailors anywhere in the Caribbean now can
just connect their laptops and go to www.islandwaterworld.com, a full-
fledged e-commerce website. To further sweeten the deal, Island Water
World is offering an online shopping reward with an extra 10% discount.
The company has managed to overcome some standard hurdles
often encountered by online shoppers at many sites: Island Water World
accepts credit cards where shipping and billing addresses do not match.
Kennelly said this is a vital feature for a business dealing with a regional
as well as international customer base. The retailer also took into account
the sometimes-spotty Internet connections available here.
"We didn'twanta site overburdened with huge pictures and distracting
adverts," Kennelly said. "We developed a fast loading site, easy to use.
It has a well organized index, pictures that tell the story at a glance, as
well as text and links that provide relevant information. The goal is to
give the customer the tools to making an informed decision."
The marine retailer teamed up with Fedex and regional air carrier
LIAT to secure highly competitive air freight prices, and provides
reasonable sea freight rates. A shipping map on the website gives an
easy overview about available shipping options and destinations.
"With St. Maarten being duty free and having excellent sea and air
connections with mostthe other islands in the region, we knew there must
be a way to get products cost effectively and quickly to our customers
on islands where we didn't have a store," Kennelly explained.


wo e
^r"


Water^S


V,11


Island Water World's new home page

Online payments are secured by a Thwarte certificate, a premier
international organization policing online stores. Payments can be
made via Paypal, Visa or MasterCard.
Large US-based marine retailers and wholesalers, utilizing both
printed catalogues and the Internet, have been selling into the
Caribbean for years. "It has always been an issue for us and other
Caribbean-based businesses, dealing with large US corporations
trading in our back yard," said Kennelly "But this made us more
competitive over the years. Our prices are much the same or even
better as in the US, which is tough when trading in the Caribbean
where you don't have the volumes of the large US giants."
"We have nevertheless been able to grow a loyal following in the
Caribbean because we are physically present. We not only have the
goods, we are sailors-we know how our products work, we can help,
we can advise and you know that in the unlikely event a product fails-
we are here, nearby-just bring it back."
Island Water World is the first marine business to introduce an
e-commerce website in the Caribbean and one of very few fully-
featured online stores for any type of retailer in the region.
The virtual store is the new website of Island Water World and links
to the various stores (check out the Google maps), contact numbers
and e-mails, marina and yard services in St. Maarten, warranty and
shipping polices, and so on.
"I am tremendously proud of our staff who have worked long and
hard to build this virtual store, and equally grateful to Litemoon, a
St. Maarten-based media company, who have conceptualized the
imagery, done the site makeover and ensured that we have been
able to deliver a strong product in the simplest way. I am continually
amazed at what can be achieved right here in the Caribbean,"
Kennelly concluded.
Based in St. Maarten, with additional stores in St. Lucia and Grenada,
the company has been a retailer and distributor of boats, motors and
marine goods in the Caribbean for over 40 years. -J


ALLATSEA.NET 77










CLASSIC YACHT REGATTA ORGANIZERS

2010 PROGRAM
FIFTH INVITATIONAL EVENT SET FOR JANUARY 21 24


est Indies Events and the St.
Maarten-St. Martin Classic l
Yacht Regatta Organization
announced in August the preliminary pro-
gram for the Fifth Invitational St.Maarten-
St.Martin Classic Yacht Regatta. The event
will again take place during the third
weekend of January, from Thursday the
21st until Sunday the 24th. The regatta will .
be sanctioned by the new St. Maarten-St.
Martin Classic Yacht Club, organizers said.
The regatta organization has teamed
up with Holland House Beach Hotel on
the boardwalk in Philipsburg where they
will have their headquarters. ES .
The first race day starts out of Great
Bay to Marigot, the second one is from
Marigot to Philipsburg and the final day
will see yachts leaving again out of Great
Bay to return there in the afternoon.
The event in the new year will feature the battle of two classic
yachts, Lone Fox and Charm III, for the perpetual trophy. Each
yacht has won the regatta twice already and next year's winner
will take home the trophy. Several yachts have already signed
up, and organizers expect another twenty or more yachts
to participate.


PRELIMINARY PROGRAM
Thursday January 21
Registration: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Skippers' Briefing: 6:30 p.m. followed by opening
ceremony and welcome cocktail party
Location: Holland House Beach Hotel on the
Philipsburg Boardwalk (Dutch side)
* Yachts can anchor in Great Bay and come by
dinghy to the beach.
* The regatta organization is working on the possibility to have
a floating dinghy dock in front of the hotel; otherwise dinghies
can be pulled up on the beach or go to the dinghy dock in
Bobby's Marina.

Friday January 22
* First race day with start not before 10 a.m. out of Great Bay
Philipsburg (Dutch side) to Marigot St. Martin (French side)
with finish in the bay.
* Free dockage for participants (subject to availability),
courtesy of Fort Louis Marina.
* Tall Ships will be on anchor in the bay.


Saturday January 23
* Second race day with start not before 9 a.m. in the bay of
Marigot and finish in Great Bay Philipsburg.
* Free Beach Buffet for all registered Captains, Crew, Owners,
and invited guests as from 1 p.m. (invitation only).
* Local, traditional and small classic dinghy boat races and
entertainment from 3 p.m.
* Special "STAR" regatta on board the 12 M America's Cup
Challenge yachts starts in the late afternoon with proceeds
going towards the Sint Maarten Diabetes Foundation and the
Sint Maarten Nature Foundation.
* Tall Ships will come to Great Bay for public visiting in the
afternoon and evening and eventual stay until Sunday.
* Saturday evening Classic Regatta party and "STAR" regatta
prize giving with Live band in front of Holland House Beach
Hotel on the Philipsburg Boardwalk (Dutch side).

Sunday January 24
* Third race day with start not before 10 a.m., again out of Great
Bay and finish again in Great Bay around 4 p.m.
* Sunday evening Award giving ceremony from 7 p.m. with live
band followed by the prize giving party in Holland House
Beach Hotel on the Philipsburg Boardwalk (Dutch side).

Holland House Beach Hotel will have a special Classic Regatta
menu available during all days of the event. For additional and
updated information: www.ClassicRegatta.com -


Article and photo submitted by West Indies Events


78 ALLATSEA.NET











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t may seem surprising for a small island like Saint Barth to have
a world championship windsurfer among its local athletes, but
when it comes to Antoine Questel there is nothing surprising
about his continued success. He is a very determined young
man who, at the age of 25, took his first big win on the international
circuit by placing third in the world slalom championships, which were
held June 8-12 in Texel, Holland. Then on June 21, he was the first
place winner in an event held in Quiberon, France.
"This was a great way to start the season on a national level,"
says Questel about the slalom event. "I confirmed my progress with
this first appearance on an international podium at the senior level.
The change of affiliation-to Loft Mistral-combined with rigorous
preparation has really paid off."
Over two days of racing, Questel's results varied but were strong
enough to earn him the third place win. "My choice of equipment
proved to be good, with Loft Sails Blade and Mistral boards. I am
happy with my results, offering a world-class podium to my sponsors
and to my island of Saint Barth."
His other sponsors, besides Loft Sails and Mistral, include Sooruz,
Jimmy Buffet, The Collectivity of Saint Barthelemy, and Hotel
Eden Rock.
Less than two weeks later, Questel won the "Raid des
Megalithes," in the Bay of Quiberon, France, before heading home
to Saint Barth for a two-week break, then heading back to France
for the second half of the season. And more intense training for our
young champion!


Ellen Lampert-Greaux lives in Saint Barthelemy, where she is editor-in-
chief of Harbour Magazine, and has been a regular contributor to All
At Sea since 2000.


80 ALLATSEA.NET


/









TRISKELL CUP

STARTS OCT. 30
SCOPE REDUCED DUE TO
ELUSIVE SPONSORSHIPS
he Ninth Triskell Cup will take place in Guadeloupe from Oc-
tober 30 to November 1 this year Last years outing drew 60
boats and more than 600 people to the island.
"Because of the global and local economic crisis, no sponsor so
far has dared to invest on us," said organizer Jean Michel Marziou
in August. "Local government's subventions are not yet voted and
therefore, due to the luck of visibility, we will go for a reduced format
of the event."
More details were pending as All at Sea went to press, but Marziou
announced that new racing formats would bring racing closer to
spectators, and promised "more technical for fans, more simple
circuits for regatta beginners."
Renowned skippers like Gildas Morvan, winner of the Belle lie en Mer/
Marie Galante single-handed transatlantic race, and Jacques Caraes,
current technical manager of the famous Figaro solo race, are expected
to come from France for the event, Marziou said. He is also looking for a
good representation from Caribbean sailors again this year
"It seems that sailors from Martinique are very motivated. Dates
have been modified to allow the younger ones on their Surprise
(boats) to compete against our First Class 8," he said.
More than one-fourth of the competitors in the 2008 Triskell Cup
came from either Martinique or Antigua, but the dates were later,
November eight to 10, last year.
"Dates are probably not ideal for our friends from Antigua but we hope
to see some of them too," said Marziou. "Nice fights ahead of us!"
For more information, email Organisation@triskellcup.com or visit
www.triskellcup.com.


Report prepared from information submitted by the Triskell Cup


ALLATSEA.NET 81


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82 ALLATSEA.NET





UPGRADES

LURE MEGAS TO

RODNEY BAY
EXPANSION WORK CONTINUES
More megayachts
are choosing to
make the Rodney
Bay their home
port and base as a result of the
recent expansion and upgrading
works undertaken there. Marina
General Manager Cuthbert
Didier said in August, "We have
seen a huge spike in the demand
for megayacht berthing over the '
last two weeks. We have one
vessel, The Grand Finale, which
will be berthed and stationed here for six months. We have several
others that are coming and we're finding out that even in this hurricane
season, these vessels are choosing our marina, and by extension St.
Lucia, to home port and base."
"It's an endorsement of what we have been saying all along," said
Didier. "If you build and you have a good rate, price structure and
good service and the facilitation of customs and immigration there,
the vessels will not only come but they will stay."
Didier said there were now five of these megayachts berthed at
the marina which was uncommon for this time of year. According to
Didier, St. Lucia and RBM continued to address the insurance issues
that in the past had chased a lot of yachts further south. "There is
no invisible line and no hurricane-free zone, so yachtsmen are now
choosing where they berth based upon the quality of facilities, even if
that means staying further north, and St Lucia is benefiting," he said.
Didier noted that, so far, this hurricane season had not shown any
strong signs of being active and, because of that, people were still in
their normal pattern of sailing and enjoying the Eastern Caribbean.
Meanwhile, expansion works at the Marina were continuing. "We are
in the midst of some significant projects," said Didier "We are about
a month away from finalizing the boatyard. We have a new dredger
that's been at work in the entrance of the lagoon and alongside by the
fuel dock. We're working with Sol to commission the new fuel tanks up
to a capacity of 10,000 and 20,000 gallons of diesel and gas with high
speed dispensers. The final set of work in landscaping and dredging
is being done."
Didier said there was no word yet on the commencement of the
second phase of the expansion. The company was still looking at
the slowdown in the world economy, assessing the developments in
St Lucia and making sure that the demand was there before going into
the second phase.


Report submitted by Ernie VG. Seon










CARRIACOU CHILDREN'S EDUCATION

BENEFIT TOPS $100,000
NINE-YEAR TRADITION BY CRUISERS-IT'S FOR THE KIDS


At what point does an event become a tradition? This
is the ninth consecutive year the Carriacou Children's
Education Fund (CCEF) has been an integral part of
the Carriacou Regatta activities. Conceived by a group
of cruisers in 2000, the CCEF activities bring together support from
cruisers and local individuals, businesses and organizations. This year,
the event raised $17,866, with donations still coming in, pushing the
accumulated nine year total over $100,000.
All, 100%, goes to supporting needy kids with uniforms, books,
supplies, hot lunches (Meals from Keels), technical upgrades to
support computer labs in the schools, and scholarships to the
community college; all in Carriacou and Petite Martinique. The CCEF
activities have become a part of the cruising landscape and helped
the Carriacou Regatta grow as well but, in the end, it's for the kids.
This year's activities began with the welcoming pot luck and barbeque
at the Carriacou Yacht Club (CYC) on the evening of July 29, hosted
by Judy and Gordon on SN Dreamcatcher Cruisers from 29 yachts,
sailing under a variety of North American, European and Caribbean
flags, gathered with a strong representation of local folks to share the
dishes they brought, renew old friendships and form some new ones.
Music for the evening was provided by DJs Kelly and Edwin.
The squalls marching through the bay did little to dampen the
enthusiasm of attendees anticipating the activities of the coming
days and the opportunity to repay this cruiser-friendly island for its
hospitality through CCEF Funds for CCEF were generated through
the modest admission fee and a raffle.
On the afternoon of 30 July, 15 cruisers joined hosts Nancy and John
of SN Silver Seas in a dominoes tournament. The afternoon of relaxed
fun provided a good way to avoid the still advancing squalls and the
modest entry fee provided another contribution to CCEF
On the afternoon of 31 July, for the ninth consecutive year, the
activity called "the auction" was held, again at CYC. The squalls gone,
hosts Melodye and John of S/V Second Millennium were grateful for
the break in the weather.
Throughout the year, visiting yachts to Carriacou drop off items to
be accumulated for sale at this auction boat parts (large and small),
clothing, crafts, books, DVD's, etc.. Additionally, many local businesses
donate certificates for meals or services. On event day, there are tables
set up, flea market style. At 15:00 hours, the actual auction of the near
130 larger items begins, a task comparable to herding cats.
John of SN Second Millennium and John of SN Drisana handled
this task in expert fashion. Great fun was had by all until after 18:00
hours, and the nine year goal of $100,000 was achieved.
In the midst of the auction, we were visited by the Honorable Senator
George Prime, Minister of Carriacou and Petite Martinique Affairs. He
thanked everyone for all that CCEF has done for the islands, past and
present, and supported future activities.


Amid the almost chaotic activity of the auction, some interesting
stories were woven. One local gentleman saw a three gallon fuel tank
and a five horsepower outboard among the items to be auctioned.
He stalked these until each came up for bid and, in the end, walked
away with equipment probably beyond his financial reach from any
other source.
A hand-made doll, complete with wardrobe and even a little sister
doll came up for bid. Two little girls sitting in the front row became


enchanted with this treasure. But suddenly the older of the two sisters
realized aloud, "But we have no money!" The auctioneer announced,
"We have a bid of $20 EC. The next bid we will entertain is $2000
EC. Once, twice, SOLD!" The $20 EC note had somehow appeared
in his hand and the smiles and applause of the crowd certified the
auctioneer's deft handling of the situation.
Melodye and John of S/V Second Millennium have been the driving
force of the CCEF since the concept was created and deserve the
thanks and admiration of the cruising community. There is not room
here to list all the people and yachts which, in one way or another
participated in this event.
As in the years before, cruisers have gathered in Carriacou and tales
have been told, races run and winners toasted. But left in their wake will
be the means for some children here in Carriacou and Petite Martinique
to also chase a dream, each their very own. It is for the kids!


Report by John Rowland, S/VSilver Seas, and photograph submitted
by CCEF


ALLATSEA.NET 83







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YOUTH SAILING

TEAM WINS DINGHY

CHAMPIONSHIPS
SAILORS ALL RECEIVE AWARDS


F or the second year in a row, the T&T Youth Sailing
Team managed to bring home the Caribbean Dinghy
Championship Team Trophy. The Youth Sailing Team out-
performed teams from Antigua, St. Maarten, Martinique and
the host country, Barbados, to claim back this prestigious challenge
trophy. This year's Caribbean Dinghy Championship was held August
15 and 16 on the waters of Carlisle Bay in front of the Barbados Yacht
Club and was organized by the Barbados Sailing Association and
sanctioned by the Caribbean Sailing Association.
The best result for team T&T came from 11-year-old Myles Kaufmann
who managed to win all nine races in the Optimist Junior class for
the eleven-and-under sailors. Following his lead was 12-year-old team
member Derek Poon Tip who took the top honours in the Optimist
Senior class for the twelve-to-fifteen year olds by winning seven out of
nine races in his class.
However the parade of trophies won by team T&T didn't stop there.
In the Laser Standard class, Stuart Leighton had his hands full against
Olympian sailor Karl James from Antigua who he finally managed
to beat in the last race after coming in second in most of the races
of the Championship. With these results Stuart Leighton took home
the second place trophy in this class, as did Vessigny Vikings former
Optimist sailors Daniel Briggs (skipper) and Dekife Charles (crew), who
competed for the first time in a two-man dinghy boat.
Former Optimist sailor Wesley Scott made his first appearance in
the Laser Radial class this year and, even though at times the gusty
wind on the first day of the Championships was rather strong, he still
came in third place overall.
In congratulating the team on their splendid showing, the President
of the Trinidad and Tobago Sailing Association, David Leighton,
also thanked the Sport Company of Trinidad and Tobago for their
tremendous support. For more information: www.ttsailing.org -


Report submitted by T&T Sailing Association


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ALLATSEA.NET 85











STRANDED PILOT WHALE


SUSTAINED IN CURACAO

SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN CETACEAN NETWORK RESPONDS TO EMERGENCY

ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY ELS KROON


On July 14, a young, emaciated and
dehydrated pilot whale stranded himself
on the south coast of Curacao. The reason
why this 10-foot long whale felt so bad as
to leave his group is still unknown.
The recently established Southern Caribbean
Cetacean Network (SCCN) immediately took care
of the marine mammal, which was too weak and
tired to swim on his own. With the help of an entire
emergency team, headed by the well known dolphin
trainer George Kieffer and supported by the staff of
the Curacao Sea Aquarium, the Dolphin Academy,
volunteers, vets and other specialists, the whale
became more active and healthier by the day during
the month following the stranding.
Because the whale chose the populated Jan
Thiel Beach for his forced stay, many tourists could
follow the progress and even participate in the 24/7
whale watching.
From the beginning, the goal was to get the wild
animal ready to join a passing group of his own kind,
bringing him back to where he belongs.


Pilot whales live in groups,.. ..
rubbing their skin against each
other To replace his mates for'
this purpose volunteers put a
buoy in the water every hour


- ~ .e
-,, ; .FI*.Q


With this in mind, the whale
was never officially given a name.
When it looked as though the
whale was really going to make
it, George Kieffer and his crew
trained the whale in following a
boat, with the purpose to guide
him out to sea when the time
has come.
When All At Sea went to
press, the whale was still in his
private pool in the sheltered
bay created by floating docks,
in between swimming and
sunbathing tourists from all
S over the world. Both seemed
to enjoy each other's presence.
The SCCN volunteers have
been assisted by local and
international sponsors and
.-- -- businesses that provided
the food (fluids, herring and
squid) and a helping hand.
After a month, the whale has gotten stronger,
responding well to all treatments and putting
on weight.
There was continuous contact with SCCN
members and experts Dr. John Reynolds and Dr.
Dana Wetzel in the US, who both work for Mote
Marine Laboratory in Florida and are well known
researchers of wild whales and dolphins.
The SCCN foundation has only been in
existence since April 2009 and coincidentally
is working on organizing a marine mammal
stranding response workshop for the Dutch
Caribbean islands. This workshop will likely take
place in the last week of October on Curacao.
Research and results will broaden our knowledge
of these extraordinary creatures, necessary
information to effectively protect them.
More information can be found on the SCCN
website: www.sccnetwork.org -&


Els Kroon is a Dutch former teacher who now
lives and works as an award-winning free-lance
photojournalist on Curacao.


86 ALLATSEA.NET









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m .











THE DISH

IT'S FALL
BY CAPTAIN JAN ROBINSON


cool-well, on the mainland-and down here in the
Caribbean, when fall is getting underway, boating is special
during this quiet time. Celebrate the season with some of
my favorite easy-to-prepare recipes! Get more delicious easy ones by
checking out my cookbooks at www.shiptoshoreinc.com.
Please send your suggestions of what you would like me to write
about and any special easy recipes that you may like to share, to
Jan@allatsea.net. Happy cooking!


CHICKEN POT PIE WITH PUFF PASTRY
Preparation time: 15 mins. Cooking time: 35 mins. Servings: 6.


1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp melted butter
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped carrot
1 cup frozen small green peas
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp flour


1 cup half & half
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
4 cups diced cooked chicken
2 (17-1/4 oz) pkg frozen
puff pastry, thawed
1 egg yolk
1 Tbsp half & half


2 cups chicken broth
In a saucepan, heat butter and oil. Saute onion, garlic, celery, and
carrots for about 10 minutes. Stir in peas and flour, cook one minute,
stirring constantly. Gradually add broth and one cup half & half. Cook
over medium heat, stirring constantly until thick and bubbly. Stir in
salt and pepper. Mix in chicken. Spoon chicken mixture into a 9 x 13-
inch baking dish, filling to within 3/4 inch of rim. Set aside.
Roll pastry sheets out to 10 x 14-inches and 1/8 inch thickness.
Combine egg yolk and 1 Tbsp half & half. Brush one side of pastry.
Place brushed side down over baking dish, folding edges under and
pressing firmly to sides of dish. Brush top with remaining egg mixture.
Bake at 375F for about 35 minutes until top is puffed and browned.
Note: 1 (10 oz) frozen mixed vegetables can be used in place of
the carrots and peas, or any vegetables you choose can be used in
this recipe.


HOT CRAB BOATS
Preparation time: 30 mins. Cooking time: 15 mins. Serves: 6
1 Ib lump crab meat Mayonnaise


1 cup diced celery
1 cup cooked peas
1 cup grated Swiss cheese
1/4 cup chopped parsley


1/4 cup melted butter
6 long hero rolls or 10 small rolls,
or rolls of your choice


Combine crab, celery, peas, cheese, parsley, and mayo; mix well.
Slice tops from rolls and scoop out center to form a shell. Save tops.


Brush inside of each shell with butter and fill with crab mixture.
Replace tops. Brush outside with butter and wrap individually in foil.
(Crab Boats may be refrigerated at this point and baked later). Bake
at 400F for 15 minutes. Serve with a fruit salad and chips.


EASY STROGANOFF. ; "

15 minutes.
Cooking time:
2-1/2 hours.
Serves: 6
2-1/2 lbs round steak,
cubed
1 (10 oz) cans cream of
mushroom soup
2 cups of fresh
mushrooms, sliced
(or 1 can of mushrooms)
1 envelope of Lipton Onion Soup Mix
1-1/2 cups sour cream
2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
Preheat oven to 350F. Combine all ingredients except sour cream
in a large casserole dish. Bake covered; stir occasionally Just before
serving, stir in sour cream. Serve with buttered egg noodles and fresh
green beans.


CHOCOLATE ECLAIR PIE
Preparation time: 10 minutes. Cooking time: 15 minutes
Chilling time: 1-1/2 hours. Serves: 6
1 pie shell
1 box vanilla instant pudding
1 pkg chocolate frosting mix
Preheat oven to 350F. At breakfast, put your pie shell in the oven
and bake. Whip vanilla pudding mix until stiff, place in pie shell and
refrigerate until set. Mix chocolate frosting mix and spread over
pudding mix, refrigerate until chilled and ready to serve. Note:
This is a fast, easy and successful dessert, and very rich!


Capt. Jan Robinson holds certificates from the Culinary Institute
of America, The Ritz Cooking School, and the Cordon Bleu. Her
Ship to Shore Cookbook Collection is available at your local marine
or bookstore. Or visit wwwshiptoshorelNC.com, email CapJan@
aol.com or call 1-800-338-6072 and mention All at Sea to receive
a discount.


ALLATSEA.NET 89












CARIBBEAN MARINAS

ALL ATSEA'S CARIBBEAN MARINA GUIDE


0
() c
/ Yc?


A 0
0, o N 0
<^^ ,e<


Jolly Harbour Marina 268-462-6042 10' 250' 158 110/220 Cable 68 *

Renaissance Marina Aruba 297-588-0260 13' 200' 50 110/220 16/69


Seru Boca


599-767-9042 14' 150' 140


127/220


Dominican Marina Zar Par 809-523-5858 12' 120' 110 11020 5 FREE
Republic 308
Domiican Ocean World Marina 809-970-3373 12'+ 250' 104 110/220 16/68 *
Republic

Grenada Clarkes Court Bay Marina 473-439-2593 13' 60' 52 110/220 16/74 USB
access
Grenada Grenada Marine 473-443-1667 15' 70' 4 110/220 16 FREE

Grenada Le Phare Bleu Marina 473-444-2400 15' 120' 60 110/220/480 16 FREE

Grenada Port Louis Marina 473-435-7431 14.76' 90m 49 110/220 14 *

Grenada Prickly Bay Marina 473-439-5265 17' 200' 10 110/220/ 16

110/220/480
Jamaica Errol Flynn Marina & Shipyard 876-715-6044 32' 600' 33 &3PH 0/ Cable 16/9 FREE

Puerto Rico Puerto del Rey Marina 787-860-1000 15' 260' 1,000 120/208 Cable 16/71 *

Puerto Rico Sunbay Marina 787-863-0313 12' 75' 287 110/220 Cable 16/12 *

St. Croix St. Croix Marine 340-773-0289 11' 150' 44 110/220 16/18

St. Lucia Rodney Bay Marina 758-452-0324 15' 220' 232 110/220 16/17 *
San IGY Jea nahcn
110/220/380
St. Lucia The Marina at Marigot Bay 758-451-4275 16' 250' 40 150/0 Hz Cable 16/12 *

St. Maarten Island Water World Marina 599-544-5310 8' 90' 54 Available Cable 74

St. Maarten Lagoon Marina Cole Bay Wtrft 599-544-2611 9' 100' 45 110/220 16 FREE

St. Maarten Simpson Bay Marina 599-544-2309 14' 200' 126 110/220/ 16/79
anI IGY d" nation 480-
St. Martin Captain Oliver's 590-59087 10' 150' 160 110/240 16/67
33-47

St. Thomas American Yacht Harbor 340-775-6454 9.5' 110' 106 110/240 16/11 *
_an IGY die, nation
Tortola, BVI Nanny Cay Marina 284-494-2512 12' 125' 200 110/220 16 *

Tortola, BVI Soper's Hole 284-495-4589 25' 170' 50 110/240 Cable 16 Cafe
Hard-
Tortola, BVI Village Cay Marina 284-494-2771 12' 200' 106 110/20/ Cable 16/71 line
anQ IGYdestination" at Slip
Trinidad Power Boats Ltd 868-634-4346 13' 65' 40 115/220 72 *


Virgin Gorda


Virgin Gorda'


284-495-550 10' 180' 94


110/220


00
0~ ~


90 ALLATSEA.NET


i^~ "^







www.forcrew.com


Free online professional social networking
destination for yacht crew
Create and Maintain your Professional Profile
Find and Connect with Fellow Crew
Put the Power of the Community back
in your Hands

f linking captains & crew.

forcrew
Captains, Mates, Stews, Chefs, Engineers, Deckhands,
Delivery Crew, Day Workers, Ex-Crew,
ALL ARE WELCOME







DEAN CATAMARANS


. TEFNETN cATAMA'-













Style
Design
Quality
Strength
Innovation
Seaworthiness
Specifications
LOA .................................. 15.2m/49-8"ft Fresh water .................. .. 2 Y 104 gal
LWL .................................. 14.7m/48.21t Diesel .......................... 2 104 g l
Beam ................................. 8.0m/26.3ft CE cerlifed cat ............ A OC;-ar
Draft................. ..................... 1.3mn4.2fl Launch weight ........ 30800 Ibi iappra i
Mast height above WL ........... 24.0m/78.'ft Sail area main .............. 1022
Bridge deck clearance .........1..... m/37"ft Jib .. ... ............. .......... 4 5 if
Engines ......................... 2 x 55HPI 38.3KW Reacher ................................ 1560 I-

Features
*Absolutely unique design with ultra modem siyling
Luxury inrenor wilh craftsman furnishings.
Unbelievable owner's stateroom.
2 Spacious guest en-suite luxury cabins.
Unique and vast cockpit under solid bimini with alfresco inningg
Large panoramic saloon and cabin windows,
Original sailplan with self tacking jib.
Stainless steel handrails replace usual stations and wire,
Bulkhead mounted steering with 2 electric winches which control all standard
sail functions, A safe and protected position within the cockpit.
No ropes on deck all halyards, sheets, reefing lines, etc are led under deck
to steering position.
Anchor and windlass hidden under foredeck locker, -othing to trip over.


dean


Our passion is
boatbuilding
so we build to order only


All inquiries directly to Dean Catamarans factory only
ROTHMAN STREET ATLANTIS, CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA -
TEL: 0027 21 577 2222 E-MAIL: powercal@deancatamarans.com
FOR FURTHER DETAILS: www.deancatamarans.com
DESIGNING SINCE 1980 MANUFACTURING SINCE 1984 PROTOTYPE LAUNCHED 1982


(iii

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I J ell






DEAN CATAMARANS


A chance to get out of the rat race sell up live on board your brand new Dean 550 Powercat in fully private
luxury and profit from your own 65 Passenger sightseeing day charter business on the same vessel without
losing your privacy.


THE DEAN 550 DUO INCORPORATES THE FOLLOWING UNIQUE FEATURES-
*Totally private owners stateroom with lounge and en suite facilities.
*A private galley, laundry and crew or kids 3 berth cabin, also en suite.
*The above facilities are completely separate from the passenger areas.
* Passenger areas over 3 different levels featuring comfortable seating for 65 passengers,
his and hers toilets, a snacks and drinks bar and an open deck area for those who want to watch the
water go by, and casual seating is provided on the foredeck


YOUR MARKET
Yacht charter is big business in the Caribbean but many
more visitors stay in hotels. These visitors require
recreation and you can provide it. Visiting cruise liners
are also a good source of customers. The sleek 55Ft
superlooks of the Dean Powercat will "blow away" any
existing opposition.

ECONOMICS PER DAY
Assuming 2 day and 1 sunset cruise (3 total) per day
(2 Hrs each) averaging 40 Passengers per trip
120 Passengers @ $40 each $4800
120 Snack&drinks @ $6 each $ 720
Daily total income $5520
Costs at assumed service speed of 15 knots
Diesel fuel 0.61 us gal/nautical mile(per engine approx)
Total distance in 2 hours=30 Nautical miles/trip
Fuel=2 Engines x 0.61 x 30 = 36.6 us gal/trip
3 Trips @ 36.6 us gal x $4.80/gal $527
Cost of snacks&drinks (40%) $288
Daily operating cost $815
Daily operating profit $4705
PLUS YOU LIVE IN LUXURY FREE OF CHARGE


-7,~


ROMAR STREET ATMAe, CAPE TOe SOUTIAF
TE O0027 21 577 2222. E-ELI pSoc M" fltSnwo0M
FOR FURTHER DETALS wwdmunncubxiiruu


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1z Id m ....







i, --
PLUS t1 MOfRE ;SEATS ON THE UPPER SUNDECK

.. .... .
........m


DESIGNING SINCE 1980 MANUFACTURING SINCE 1984 PROTOTYPE LAUNCHED 1982











THE MULTIHULL COMPANY



ORION is a marvel to behold, unique
in every respect and represents
thousands of hours of design and
T construction technique from the
pre-eminent catamaran builder in
the world. She is unquestionably
the finest Catana ever built and
very likely the finest catamaran of
C : her size ever built.

I was in France to inspect Orion
before listing her for sale. What
is most striking when you first
approach her is that she looks
almost identical to smaller Catana
65's and 50's, but sits off the
water so high that. yes, she has
two floors in her tall hulls a first
in catamarans. The top floor of
the yacht hosts a massive salon,
owner's cabins, guest cabins,
galley, and crew quarters, while the
lower floor of the yacht is devoted
entirely to systems watermakers,
generators, inverters, wiring,
plumbing, etc. Every system on the
yacht is easily accessed for care
and repair. She is the most carefully
thought out large catamaran I have
ever had the pleasure to inspect

To learn more about Orion, please
contact Phillip Berman at The
Multihull Company. Orion is proudly
and exclusively listed for sale by
*.-l-,,C,," The Multihull Company. She is a
very special yacht for a special
catamaran sailor.

215-508-2704
www.mullihullcompany.com











THE MULTIHULL COMPANY


PHILLIP BERMAN


FEATURED CATAMARAN LISTINGS
Please visit our website for our extensive catamaran listings.


U[14 67 Lagoir
1.550.000


President,
Multihull Company
World Champioi
Catamaran Sailor
Author of Six
Catamaran Books





1991 45' Foutaine Pajot
C155.000


IaOU 3U rrO
S234,900


$345,000


$395,000


(230.000

I- -


bi9y,uuu


C825.000
uz ac


T.


$29,000
"1


rvay.I iagopn tAo 07r tdlkal
5145,000 S5.950.000


FI L]1


S349.000





1998 41' Lagoon410
$255000


(429.000
I ---- ---I


5549,000


$0.00ooo


5255,000 $929,000


1999 60' Fountaine PR]oc
$720,000


wwwmutihllompnyco
FT ADRAE L- YTC TNV COI0 HLDLHA PAi SETTE WATROA TRNIA








,* I -- -
2 ., J'----
,-'v--


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82'Dufour Nautitech 1995 54 Hylas Deck Salon 2000
Tr.rrnLv'ndcu. Oponrlur;n.r Lu, ury blue Walef Cruiser
Greal Condilior Alk.nq 5995Kk Akling ,64.1 K

-- -t_"'


.II n
'-' /'\ '. Vati-r
S a ,l ..


52'Endeavour 1990
very Clean C ornfortable,
'Gr l lCondilion Askinqg 5I .. ,


r/
JI~ L 1


51'CSY I Morgan 1988
Ch.jrli,. Morgan Cusi')ri 51
Mapor Refir Asking SS159:


S51'Van De Stadt Custom'99
Alum-num Hull E.:'jepronal
, sliding 3'791K


50' Benteau 1997
LuadiJd.,'.'ry Cledn GoLd Pit',
Asking S180K


49 Oyster 49PH 1992
RadJ PilJthjuse Immatulait
Ashino 5379gK


Bluewater / Vagabond'87' 47' Privilege 465 1999 47 Stevens 47 1982
All Furling Bc>l Valut Wolld Crur.snq a at Great .S& S D-sJgn Major Ref.t in 2004
6tling 5189K Pric'.Askinrj 5 I3 9 Super Valu. Atling 5$199


i46'FountainePajol Bahia'01 46'Morgan 461 1979 46'Hunter 4662002 45'Wauqulez Amphltrnte'90 45'Robertson&Caine'99
&'03 Man-, Ne* Upgrade Lotl or Goodits Sturdy Build Imrraculate and Well EquLp'd P ollhouse Orfshore Ciumier Well EquippedJ arid MIinrand
I A .iible jlartdll $ 330K Available S[artinqg $ 79 Clu.ser Aiking 1951 A lrniq 5175h Ao ir.g 5 309K


44 Moody 1993
L rrinely WelI Equipp-d
Greal Price' Askrng 51 qK


qt mwrgan ivoo
Gie.al Valiru For MoneP
Asin. 5. 119K


I1i i~ ii



II I - i j* i I
7 't' ~ .r'1 i





~ L


43' Young Sun 79184'
Gical OftshoreCruisci-, V -:- ':."
2 A.dildblc Strlirna .1 570K .* .-


a nU..lll -u lf
Lo s of Upgrades. Spacinou
A .n ;j $l SK


- naiil rry-nally 1-w
PMljui PeJt Juil Rt-Juced
Asking 5160K






42'Albin Nimbus 1981
Greal Sryle Swan Lool,
Aski ng 5 '5.r:
. iiii"""';;""' I' '\ _


42 Beneteau423 2004
Clean Well Mainlajn d
Aikini 5129K






42' Bruce Roberts Spray'84
lr lrnarull' r.E i'cplional
Asling 1 S 30K


-A DIenEriua j2U I i ..aUUIn u ru *r in rI uAIncar r. VnPrlaSI"
Immarulatl GCFal Design. Fa'l hKtn Peile.Nev. YanmT-i. vrry Well Ki.pl ond Pint-
A~i .ny 9IK Askmin. 525K 2 AvirUble S taning *-* 2201


42'Tayana 1985
Well [quipped Greai Teak
Decks Asking S119,


"e, uuri[ar l 1- iLo0
Well Mdainlainod L.,l ol
Llpgradps Asiihi.j 5;9

thl


qz Islana PacKet ZUol
rmmaculate and Solid Vessel
4'ki'y 5320K.


qi :cepire 1 Ov
Pilluthou World Cluieirr
Asking SI`91K


41 Lagoonit U u tulr ou J. Doar J u I w
WLvII M.,ininii-. d F li GrL'a[ Racer Cruise
2 Available ilar[nng 52 35K Ais ing 19S5F


40' Exe Marine C Farer 1182 40'Beneteau40CC'97100
Strong qWuildCruiSLr Well Equippeid. Sclai Wind
Asking 555K Available ald ngq --' S10511


A C* i~-~ tij iC
i 11--I a -6j.


-r







COME SEE US IN ANNAPOLIS AT BOOTH L 0 OR VISIT US AT WWW.BVIYACHTSALES.COM












2004 Fountaine Pajot Lavezzi 40 Super competitively 1987 Bayfield 36' Owned by particular, meticulous and
priced (S60K below the avg. market pricel.Well maintained, knowledgeable owners.Quest" has been maintained and
very clean with good revenue potential if required. 5235.000 upgraded to an extremely high level Asking 595K







4-4

....


40 Endeavour 19 1
Hievilvl Upgradred Grea
Condll r Asking $91*


140 Beneleau Oceanis 400'94
Lainglv M. nr.Tniin Well
Equiplped Asiing 5~9K


39'Tollycraft Fastpassage '3
ARdlLan Prie under Mdike?
As ring S994


39 Beneteau391 2005 18 Hallberg-Rassy 382 1987
Lglil Chi ilet Uiade Sail Avj'.l VWelr PrIne d r.l
Corndil.rr. A~slng S i'iK Alkir.g SI' K


Loti of Equipmenl Sp'icicus.
Air Con A'khirq $7k k


37' B nel au Oceani '04
3 cabin I hred.YWell r.ep
A, l. i n 1251'


I 51r-in 5 Afr lr. bull Cal
A, L 'inr' S1 'h


36'Beneteau Oceanis 361
rja N rtcr Ch(arrr.-d V,'ry
Clean Aisk.a 565K


36 Moody 36CC 1996
Lowttes Price on the rljnel
Askirig ir)K


35'0'Day 1987 33' Barana 2005
Why Ha- She Not Sold"' er', W'ell Priced and Kepi
Asklr.cl S2'hK A .ng 56 K.


Gieat Condiiorn Lol of 6loai
For Tle..? hMney AEkingq 49k


31' Formula 310 BR 2009
Nearly Neaj OnCi I;0 HRMi
A4 lng 129K.


10' A


26 Glader Bay 2680 1999
Ti.n Oulbcaid. Irmaculate
As1rinq SuS9l


1993 Freedom 45 CenterCockpit Renowned build quality abins 9uwaLleyr h2 anoner Uw.-sraller a1 tub.Su epr
cabins. 9 galley. 2 heads, 1 w. stall shower, 1 w' tub. Super
combined with ease-of-handling and a seakindly motion make comfortable world cruiser. Schooner race winner I of only 2 ever
'Dreamtlme the ideal liveaboard or cruiser Asking 5179000 built. Totally updated and offshore ready Reduced to S1 39K


~YrS -:


60








South n Trades

Southern Trades
Specializing in the sale of Caribbean Cribb Yacht S(ed'.v
crewed charteryacht businesses since 1977
LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE LEADING CHARTER YACHT LOCATION
AT VILLAGE CAY MARINA. TORTOLA, BVI
SouthernTrades@ u rfbvi co m www.SouthernTrades.com
Phone: 284.494.8003
Toll Free 877-279-9420


-- -82' Lagoon

82' Lagoon. 1991
refit 2006. New
engines and generator
February '09.
Up to 17 guests (best
for 12) and 4 crew.
s Massive charter yacht
which includes one
of the most active
c businesharter busineinesl
8 gusin the Caribbean.
Reduced to $2.25m





67' Lagoon

67' Lagoon catamaran
1999. One of the
best charter yacht
businesses is included.
8 guests in 4 double
suites + crew. Full\
air conditioned, galley
down. This yacht
should pass a very rigid
survey inspection...
Reduced to $1 25rnm




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