Title: All at sea
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095558/00017
 Material Information
Title: All at sea
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Kennan Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: St. Thomas, USVI
Publication Date: August 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095558
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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PARiADS FOU:S A A


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AUGUST 2009


Foxy's Wooden
BOAT REGATTA

Martinique's
COMBAT DU
COQUES


...AND


A Sinking
A RESCUE


PROFILE:
Tommy Paterson


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ITALY I MALTA I TURKEY I WEST INDIES









THIS ISSUE
THE CARIBBEAN'S WATERFRONT MAGAZINE


FEATURES
30 KUNA JUAN WHO?
Paradise Found on the San Bias Islands
32 TOMMY PATERSON
Weeks & Weeks of Sailing in Antigua
34 VISITING SAINT EUSTATIUS
Moving to a Slower Rhythm on Statia


29


COVER SHOT:
PHOTO BY DEAN BARNES
Big kids search for blue marlin while
junior anglers rule at the USVI Open's
Handline Tournament, Sunday,
August 2 at American Yacht Harbor


DEPARTMENTS
10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
WHERE IN THE WORLD?
12 CARIBBEAN NEWS
14 YACHT CLUB NEWS
16 SAILING HUMOR
Charles Thomas: Retired Charterer
Sailing with Charlie: Swine Flu
20 RACING CIRCUIT
Florida Sailor Wins Scotiabank
Caribbean Collegiate Sailors
24 FISHING
Profile: Jimmy Loveland
Cuba's 59th Hemingway Tournament
26 TIPS &TRICKS
Anchoring Under Sail
29 OUR NATURAL WORLD
Royalty in the Anchorage
65 CARIBBEAN DINING
Simple Ingredients for Meals
67 CARIBBEAN BROKERAGE
77 MARKETPLACE


SPONSOR DIRECTORY
TALES FROM THE
CHARTER COCKPIT
What do Charter Crew do
on Vacation?


ISLAND EVENTS & INTERESTS
36 MAP
39 DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
New Laws for Yachtsmen
41 PUERTO RICO
The Life of a Book Exchange
43 u.s.v.i.
Open/Atlantic Blue Marlin Tournament
44 B.V.I.
Foxy's Wooden Boat Regatta
Sailors for the Sea Certify Spring Regatta
Sea Hawk Wins IC 24 Worlds
48 ST. MAARTEN / ST. MARTIN
North Sails Regatta
Aguayo Sweeps Laser Championships
Gulf Rascal Wins The Fishing Event
51 ST. BARTH
November 2009 CataCup
53 ANTIGUA
Rescue on the High Seas
Why Not Wins Antigua & Barbuda
Fishing Tournament
56 GUADELOUPE
The Transcaraibes Rally
57 MARTINIQUE
Martinique's Combat du Coque
58 ST. LUCIA
SLYC Holds 2nd Opti Championships
59 TRINIDAD &TOBAGO
Country's Top Dinghy Sailors
60 CURACAO
Klein Curacao Challenge

RESOURCES
62 CARIBBEAN MARINAS
63 EVENT CALENDAR


8 ALLATSEA.NET


44


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ALL AT SEA WANTS TO HEAR FROM YOU

SEND YOUR CORRESPONDENCE BY EMAIL TO EDITOR@ALLATSEA.NET OR MAIL LETTERS TO: ALL AT SEA, PO BOX 7277, ST. THOMAS, VI 00801


Dear Sir,
We have been living aboard our 45' sailing yacht for the last 8 years.
I read with interest Chris Fletcher's article on water makers (All at
Sea, June 2009). We use on average about 10 gal/day, and use a
Spectra water maker which produces about 12 15 gal/hr. We have
found our water maker to be very reliable and the service backup
from Spectra to be exceptional, offsetting the increased cost of
purchase. Maintenance of the water maker is extremely straightfor-
ward. Overall in eight years we have spent about $1100 in mainte-
nance, or just under $.04/gal. We can produce about 500 gallons of
water from one gallon of diesel. Also, we have been many places
where there is no dockside, and no water to buy at any price.
Our unit operates from 24v dc (12 v models are available), and
only uses about one Amp Hour per gallon. We would not be with-
out our water maker, and I recommend them to any live-aboard
cruiser. The running cost that I indicated did not include the capi-
tal cost of the water maker ($6000) but with a recently rebuilt
system, we effectively have a "new" unit.

Mike Dorsett
s/y White Princess
Grenada
Dear Sir,
I would like to complain in the strongest possible terms about
the article "Tales from the charter cockpit" (May 2009). I am quite
frankly appalled that you would publish an article condoning
behavior which is not only environmentally unsound but also com-
pletely illegal. Jeannie Kuich's article was about collecting food
from the sea, a practice which I do not disagree with, but the
method by which it was done is completely unacceptable.


TALES FROM THE CHARTERCOCKPIT

W GHTS...


S.n LIHS.,-


The article begins with the crew trying
to hunt for lobster on the reef by Green
Cay BVI. For a start this is an illegal prac-
tice, only a belonger can catch lobster in
the BVI and the crew was from St. John
USVI. The piece then goes on to say they


found an octopus and used a speargun
to kill it. Spear fishing is also illegal in the
BVI. After they had killed the octopus a
moray eel swam past, probably attract-
ed by the blood from the kill (part of the
reason spear fishing is illegal) so they bashed it with the butt of the
spear gun and then when it wouldn't leave they shot it too.
In some places around the world and indeed in the Caribbe-
an these practices may be acceptable but here in the BVI they
are not. As all cruisers know local laws should be researched and
respected whether you agree with them or not.

Yours sincerely,
Gillan Simpson

Editor's response: We appreciated receiving this letter and apologize
to our readers for not making it clear that these episodes on a charter
yacht took place 38 years ago. All at Sea does not support actions con-
trary to today's very sound environmental laws. The writer responded
to Gillan Simpson: "I would surely agree with you today about catch-
ing seafood for consumption in these times, whether it be in the BVI or
USVI with or without a license. However, that incident occurred in 1971
when seafood was plentiful and when there were no restrictions, to our
knowledge, on collecting seafood in the BVI waters. Had there been,
we would most assuredly not have taken any."-Jeannie Kuich


WHERE IN THE WORLD?

CONGRATULATIONS, EILEEN,
AND THANKS FOR READING ALL AT SEA!

Greetings from the Panama Canal. What a nice change from the ice and snow vistas i
of Canada, and a fascinating place to read All At Sea while waiting to go through
the locks on this all-day trip.
-Eileen Powers

Win a Free Subscription!
Send us a picture of you reading AllAt Sea and you may be the lucky winner. We will select one winner a month.
Please send images & your information to: subscribe@allatsea.net or mail to: PO. Box 7277, St. Thomas, VI 00801


10 ALLATSEA.NET









ALL AT SEA


Publisher:
CHRIS KENNAN
publisher@a latsea.net

Editorial Director:
CHRIS GOODIER
chrisgoodier@allatsea.net

Creative Director:
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Art Director:
AMY KLINEDINST
amyk@allatsea.net

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NEVA HURLEY

Advertising:
International
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GILLY GOBINET
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Accounting, Subscriptions:
publisher@allatsea.net


Owned and Published
by Kennan Holdings, LLC
PO. Box 7277
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phone (443) 321-3797
fax (340)715-2827



The views and opinions of the contributors to
this publication are not necessarily those
of the publishers or editors. Accordingly, the
publishers and editors disclaim all responsibility
for such views and opinions.


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ALLATSEA.NET 11


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CARIBBEAN NEWS

A BRIEF LOOK INTO THE HAPPENINGS OF OUR WORLD


Didier Assumes New IGY Role
Island Global Yachting (IGY) announced a new role in June for St. Lu-
cia's Cuthbert Didier who will lead community and government rela-
tions in the Southern Caribbean region. "We would like to thank Cuth-
bert Didier for his many years of exemplary service at the Rodney Bay
Marina. He is practically an institution at the property, and was vital in
our recent redevelopment of the marina," said Charles Garner, presi-
dent of IGY The company acquired the Rodney Bay Marina in 2007
and recently completed a multi-million renovation at the property.


Junior Angler Hooks
First Place at Treasure Cay
Team Galati took top honors at the 26th Annual Treasure Cay Billfish Tour-
nament, Abaco, Bahamas with two blue marlin releases by 13 year old
Chris Galati, Jr of Anna Maria, FL. Held June 7-12 at Treasure Cay Hotel
Resort & Marina, the tournament awarded trophies to Galati for Top An-
gler, Top Release Angler and Top Junior Angler "It doesn't get much bet-
ter than this," said the young champion, www.treasurecayfishing.com.


Olympian will Host BVI Flotilla
Sunsail is sponsoring a "Sailing With Railey" Fun Flotilla, November
6 to 13, 2009 in the British Virgin Islands, featuring Olympic medalist
Zach Railey as host. Participants in up to 12 yachts are promised sail-
ing tips and tricks along with support from a lead boat and crew. The
company signed a sponsorship agreement recently with U.S. Sailing
Team member Railey who won a silver medal in Beijing last year and
plans to qualify for 2012 in Great Britain.


Energy-Saving Lights May
Interfere with Communications
On June 8, the United States Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert to
inform the maritime industry that energy saving Compact Fluorescent
Lights (CFL) or lighting, sometimes known as radio frequency (RF)
lighting, devices may interfere with certain communications equip-
ment. The Coast Guard has learned that CFLs have been installed
on the navigation bridges of vessels and in other places capable of
causing radio communications interference and advises that marine
inspectors, vessel owners and operators should be aware of this po-
tential safety hazard and take proper action as needed.


Aruba's Jansen Becomes Partner at East Wind
As of June 1, Xiomara Jansen became a partner in East Wind Marine
Services, the company that has been managing the Renaissance Marina
in Aruba since 2005. Well-known for 12 years as the face of the ma-
rina, she will be responsible for day to day operations of the marina and
chandlery, and will continue to assist guests as only she can. Located in
the center of Oranjestad, Aruba the Renaissance Marina welcomes all
yachts with drafts of up to 12-1/2 feet. www.renaissancemarina.com.


SLAC Fees Hurting St. Maarten Marine Trades
The Sint Maarten Marine Trades Association held its annual general
meeting May 28, 2009. The meeting focused on the severe decline
being experienced by the industry. Members pointed out the high oc-
cupancies on the French side compared to the low occupancies on
the Dutch side and agreed with determination that the Simpson Bay
Lagoon Authority Corporation (SLAC) and its exorbitant fees were the
singular cause of the dramatic downturn. www.smmta.com.


Interlux Appoints General Manager
Interlux has appointed Fred Daoust to the position of General Man-
ager, North America. Daoust has been with International Paint LLC
(Interlux) for 20 years, most recently as Vice President Sales Northern
Region. Interlux focuses on paint solutions for boat yards, boat build-
ers and applicators, carries an extensive retail range and offers techni-
cal support to boat owners and consumers. www.yachtpaint.com.


12 ALLATSEA.NET





























Up-n-Out: A Dinghy
Ladder for Safer Boarding
Tired of belly-flopping into your dinghy af-
ter a swim? Scandia Marine Products has
introduced a stainless steel dinghy ladder
with an interlocking rung design in an easy
to mount and store package. The solid stain-
less rod can be collapsed or extended with
no additional parts and forms a rigid struc-
ture that curves outward under water away
from the boat. Scandia says any swimmer
can get a firm foothold without a high leg
lift to reach the first rung. Up-n-Out Dinghy
Ladders come in two models designed to fit
inflatable or hard-sided dinghies, both avail-
able in the standard 2-step version or longer
3-step version.


News from Cruising
Rally Association
Nineteen sailboats took part in this year's
850-mile Atlantic Cup offshore sailing rally
from Tortola to Bermuda. Antonina, a Cheru-
bini Schooner, sailed by Vince Archcetto
from New Jersey was the Overall Handicap
Winner for the event. The Cruising Rally As-
sociation, sponsor of the event, expects 50
sailors to attend its next Ocean Sailing Semi-
nar in Hampton, Virginia on September 19
and 20. The association's 2009 Caribbean
1500 Rally, slated to start November 2, will
be the 20th annual running of this event and
founder Steve Black anticipates a record en-
try of ralliers returning for reunion activities.
www.carib1500.com.


SAVE THE DATE

SEPTEMBER 26 OCTOBER 30, 2009:46th Marlin Tourney
2009 marks the 46th running of the Port Antonio International Marlin Tournament
sponsored by the Sir Henry Morgan Angling Association. www.errolflynnmarina.com







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YACHT CLUB NEWS

SHARE YOUR HAPPENINGS WITH THE CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY


Martinique Yacht Club
All at Sea thanks Danielle DeRouck of the St. Lucia Yacht Club for pro-
viding this report: The Yacht Club de la Martinique (YCM) organized La
Transcanal Regatta from Martinique to St. Lucia on Saturday, May 30,
and invited the St. Lucia Yacht Club (SLYC) to participate.
Five local Martinique yachts and one Lucian J24 participated: Sona-
dio & Open the Barre in the racing class, Ocean Two, Foxy & Europa
in the Cruising Class. The only J24, Grayling, was skippered by Edgar
Roe and his junior sailing crew from SLYC. A powerboat carrying the
representatives from La Conseil Regional de Martinique accompanied
the fleet. Sonadio, an Archambault A40, was the first to cross the finish
line at 13.41.
All yachts headed into
Rodney Bay Marina where
they had arranged to leave
their boats at reduced rates
thanks to IGY Marina. Sail-
dors attended a briefing for
ASunday's race, prize giving
a o and dinner. Philippe Volny,
Commodore SLY, President of the Yacht Club
t de la Martinique, Lionel
Baud, President of the as-
sociation Open the Barre who heads the organizing committee of Le
Combat de Coques, Albert Lapiquonne Club Nautique du Marin Sail-
ing School and Jean Michel Pastourelli Sailing Instructor Cluc Sportif
Militaire de la Martinique attended.
Jean Trudo presented the prizes from YCM and a traditional ex-
changing of Burgees was made between the Philippe Volny, YCM and
Charles Devaux, SLYC, Commodores of the two clubs. On Sunday rac-
ing continued in Rodney Bay with the St Lucian J24s and Lasers racing
with the Martinique yachts, followed by a beach BBQ.


St. Maarten Yacht Club
Administrator Petra Guilders supplied a great report and photos of
the club's 2nd annual "Statia/Nevis Offshore Regatta" June 12 to 14.
Seven yachts set off on the first leg to Statia Friday morning. The Race
Committee flew to Statia to finish the race but not quick enough -
as the French side trimaran Karibuni had made the trip in three and
a half hours! An hour later, Bobby Velasquez arrived with his crew on
L'Esperance, followed by Panic Attack, Kick em Jenny, Kate from St.
Kitts, Nipolos and Antares. The teams gathered at the Old Gin House
for a great BBQ Dinner.
Saturday morning was the trip to Nevis. With hot, unfavorable sail-
ing conditions, the fleet was slower to arrive than anticipated, and an
afternoon race that had been organized by the Nevis Yacht Club had
to be cancelled. Crews were happy to get ashore to the Oualie Beach
Resort where at the buffet dinner there was a burgee exchange be-
tween the two Yacht Clubs and impromptu prizes for several boats.


Sunday morning was the last leg and again, Karibuni had the Race
Committee rushing to get to their plane and fly to St. Maarten before
their arrival in Simpson Bay....which they did, but without a minute to
spare! Karibuni sailed the trip from Nevis to Simpson Bay in just under
four hours.
Prize Giving was held at the Sint Maarten Yacht Club on Sunday
evening. Karibuni was awarded "Fastest boat around the Course."
L'Esperance won the Non Spinnaker Class, and Panic Attack came first
in Spinnaker Class.


St Lucia Yacht Club Day
Danielle DeRouck reported on for St. Lucia
the "End of Term Fun Day" for 28 kids
of St. Lucia's 40 sailing kids. Four
teams were formed: Solar Pow-
ered, Schizophrenic Pathogens,
Blue Tied, Grasshoppers. Lily (our
Sailing Programme Administrator)
headed the organization, assisted
by the coaches Rob and Katie.
The day started off with Trivia
questions like "How old is the Yacht
Club?" (yes, indeed 45 years!) The
kids then had to make a balancing
"sculpture" with recycled material and run a challenging obstacle course.
In the afternoon, the games continued till 4 p.m. The club presented
awards for both the Fun Day and for the 2nd Optimist Championship
(see report this issue.) www.stluciayachtclub.com -


To contribute news from your local yacht club or sailing association,
please write to editor@allatsea.net. Deadlines are six weeks prior to
the publication date.


14 ALLATSEA.NET

































UI. e .I











CHARLES THOMAS

RETIRED CARIBBEAN CHARTERER


COPYRIGHT 2009 BY CAP'N FATTY GOODLANDER


is-don't panic! The story will come. I believe in fate. My
job is not to seek but to recognize. And to relax while doing
so. The less static in my brain, the more receptive my an-
tennae. That's my core journalistic belief-that the weird & wonderful
stories I bring to these pages will find me if I but listen.
Recently, while on deadline to All at Sea, I was invited to a wedding
party at the Rebak marina on the island of Langkawi, just off Malaysia's
west coast. I knew nothing about the happy couple-only that free
food and drink would be available.
Or, to put it another way, I knew enough. Let's be honest: at my pay
scale, I'd go to the opening of an envelope if it offered free crackers
and ice cubes. So I wasn't paying much attention to the giggling new-
lyweds as they came swooping in on a golf cart trailing tin cans, cut
the large, lavish cake and danced romantically-I was too busy scop-
ing out the delicious trays of chicken wings, platters of shrimps and
mountains of fried fish... Mmmm, where to start?
...when suddenly, the 77 year-old groom detached himself from his
blushing bride, strolled across the floor and said to me, "Fatty?"
I knew I knew him-but in what context? That's a problem for a trav-
el-addled circumnavigator such as myself. My memories are scattered
to the four corners of the world. But I immediately recognized him as
a boater... then a charterer... then the BVls popped into my mind...
and the image of a lovely Mason 63 named Zinga which had chartered
in the Caribbean for over a decade.
"...Charlie?" I asked. Charles Thomas is a sailor's sailor and a man
with a unique overview of American boat building-and the entire rec-
reational marine industry as well.
"I was in Korea and it was freezing," Charlie told me. "I'd go into
this warming hut every other hour to thaw out from guard duty. In
there was a copy of Yachting magazine. There was a picture in it of a
smiling guy on a boat in Tortola-and I decided to be that guy."
Funny how life is, eh? Charlie had no history with boats-but that
image changed him forever Once out of the service, he decided that
boats and boating would be the centerpiece of his life. He set about it,
like everything he does, in a methodical, business-like way He wrangled
an invitation to crew from famed west coast Dragon sailor Willis Boyd.
"Do you know how to set a spinnaker?" Willis had asked him and
Charlie had said, "Sure," and then spent the remainder of the week
being privately tutored by a local sailing instructor.
Saturday morning came and Willis told Charlie everything was all
set but Charlie held his hand up before they left the dock and said,
"Willis, I pack my own chute, okay?"
They became fast friends and won many races. This allowed Charlie
to meet all the local sailors-and scope out the exploding California
boatbuilding scene at the same time. Soon he was working as the mar-
keting director of Jensen marine-then skippering the company.


"All in all, I worked
17 years for Jensen,"
Charlie says. "We made
Cals and Rangers... and
eventually took on the
O'day, Luhrs, and De-
Fever lines as well. At
one point, we had 800
people working for us. It
was a great time to be a
boat builder in the 1960s
and 70s, especially in the
Costa Mesa area of Cali-
fornia. Jack Jensen and
I'd go to a bar after work
and have a drink with Bill Lapworth, Gary Mull and Bruce King, etc. There
would be the building crews from Westsail, PAE, Columbia, Downeast,
Ericson, Norhaven, Hobie and Islander... all sitting down and having a
brewski together after work. Innovation was in the air
"We at Jensen were the first to develop the floor pan or grid concept-
which was dropped into the bare hull with bulkheads, fixtures, plumbing,
wiring, etc., attached. This saved both time and money and, if done right,
made the vessel stronger as well. We were all building on our mutual suc-
cesses, turning out a stronger, cheaper product. And we all wanted to
win-to sell the most boats. I had my own Cal 46 at the time, and I'd modi-
fy it almost weekly The best part, the most rewarding part, was coming out
with a new model. There are many variables. It is risky I'd sit down with our
marketing team, our designers, our floor foremen and our accountants-
and try to figure out the best value for our customers. We had a number of
dramatic successes-and, of course, some failures too."
Eventually Charlie shifted from racing to cruising-and decided he,
too, wanted to sail the world. When Jensen marine eventually sold to
a large conglomerate, he was happy to jump ship for a year dozing in
the Caribbean (aboard his Cal 46) and five years of headquartering out
of the Isle of Venice area in Fort Lauderdale.
"I really enjoyed cruising the Bahamas and the Florida keys," Char-
lie says, "but investment bankers kept calling me up and asking me to
help them turn around badly managed marine companies. I found this
quite challenging. Many of the people involved were wonderful hard-
working folks who made a great product-and were just horrible busi-
nessmen. I'd step in and help them for a year-to demonstrate sound
business practice. Then we'd gradually give control back and allow
them to do their own thing. I'm still friends with a lot of 'em after all
these years. But it was hard, stressful work walking up to a hard-driving
CEO and telling him was a nice guy... who was doing it all wrong."
By the late 1980s, Charlie wasn't interested in boat building nor cor-
porate interventions-he wanted more time at sea. So he purchased


16 ALLATSEA.NET









a Mason 63, named her Zinga (after the fictional warrior monks), and
began skippering her in the USVI/BVI charter trade.
"I had a great 11 years," Charlie says. "Most seasons I did around
20 weeks of charters. I enjoyed my guests and loved the whole scene.
I got along great with Lynn Jachney and Ed Hamilton, two of my fa-
vorite charter brokers. When I had a rare week off, I'd sail into Coral
Bay and hang out at Skinny's with Thatcher Lord and the other local
St. John sailors. Or I'd sail up to Marina Cay to hang out with Fritz
Seyfarth, the writer. Jeannie Drinkwine and Reg Buxton at the Virgin
Islands Charteryacht League were good friends on St. Thomas, but I
booked with Francis David at Caribbean Connections in Tortola.
"In the off-season I'd blow over to Sint Maarten and visit with Rob-
bie Ferron of Budget Marine or just hang out in St. Barts at Le Select.
It was a magic time and a magic place. I really enjoyed it-despite
making very little money for my time and investment."
Eventually Charlie realized he was tired of raising the mainsail. "I didn't
tire of the sailing," he muses, "just that first mainsail hoist on a new char-
ter It started to get old. After a decade, the work seemed to be increas-
ing faster than the fun. So I quit. And look back on it all with happiness."
But Charlie wasn't done with boats or adventuring yet. In Thailand,
he met his current wife Tam and decided to switch to a trawler as
well-which he'd done a lot of thinking about while building the De-
Fever line. He started off with a Grand Banks 50 and soon traded up to
a Cheoy Lee 66 motor yacht named Bravado.
Alas, on every parade some rain must fall. He and Tam blew a main
engine in Indonesia and were 'trapped' there in Jakarta for many
months. "It was horrible," he says. "It is the most corrupt place on this
earth. Pay-offs are a way of life. Nothing gets done without them. Alas,
no matter how much you pay-it isn't enough. And more and more
'officials' show up to demand an ever larger share. It was just utterly
awful. It pains me to think about it. At one point I almost grabbed a
golf club and started swinging it. I really did. I was that close to los-
ing it. I had to pay $400 each for our kidnapped passports-and the
American embassy wasn't even interested. In all my travels it is the
only place I hate. And someday, well, I hope to even up the score a
tad. I'm not sure how... but, hey, I'm ever hopeful!"
Despite his 77 years of age, Charles Thomas still bristles with raw ener-
gy and good humor He has numerous friends scattered through South-
east Asia AND the rest of the world. Best of all, he's in great health. (He's
also still intrigued with martial arts-a hobby he took up in his 50s-but
no longer competes in tournaments against men half his age.)
"I haven't made a ton of money but I've had a lot of fun," he says.
"Boaters are interesting people-always have been and always will
be. Tam and I entertain a lot. We enjoy it. She's a great cook and loves
to play hostess. We plan on heading back to Thailand and working on
her house soon-then, who knows? Maybe in my eighties I will begin
to slow down. Or not. Right now I'm having fun. With Tam and with
Bravado. Last night we strolled down the dock and joined your little
sing-along-didn't we, Fatty? Life is good. Tomorrow's a new day."-


Cap'n Fatty Goodlander lives aboard Wild Card with his wife Caro-
lyn and cruises throughout the world. He is the author of "Chasing
the Horizon" by American Paradise Publishing, "Seadogs, Clowns
and Gypsies" and "The Collected Fat." For more Fat-flashes, see
fattygoodlander.com.


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SAILING WITH CHARLIE
SWINE FLU

BY JULIAN PUTLEY

ll of a sudden the news is
full of it. People are drop-
ping like flies. "It's likely to
become a pandemic." Charlie knew


the word epidemic but pandemic
sounded worse. He looked it up in
the dictionary and it says "prevalent...
over the whole world." So by the time


you read this you may well be dead -
there's no known cure! Presumably outer space is immune so
heaven will be safe. And in hell, a bout of flu, even Swine Flu,
would hardly make a dent in your discomfort level as you burn in
flames for eternity
Not long ago Bird Flu was to be the scourge of humanity
and Charlie took it very seriously, not being certain that he
would be rewarded with heaven in the afterlife. He hauled
out his boat and painted three thick coats of anti-fowl on the
bottom. Then he got some old sails and painted them too
and wrapped his whole boat, cocoon-style, with the protec-
tive layer. Not a bird, a bird virus or even a frozen chicken
could make it on board. It worked! He didn't contract even
as much as a sniffle.
But what could you do to prevent Swine Flu? He re-
searched the internet for 'anti-swine paint' but came up with
nothing. He found a subject on pork barrel spending by the
US government. One item that had been awarded millions
was: "Effects of cow flatulence." Could this be useful? No,
he decided. Everywhere he looked people were buying pro-
tective breathing masks, oxygen producing apparatus or
wearing mouth-covering scarves. After an hour of racking his
brains to find a solution he went to the bar for refreshments.
Then, during a visit to the toilet, behind a closed door in
the sit-down section, he heard an unmistakable "oink, oink,
oink." Some guy was having a coughing fit in pig language.
It was a dead giveaway Swine Flu had reached the islands.
Charlie immediately grabbed his favorite girlfriend, stocked
his boat for a three month's cruise in the Caribbean and next
day he was sailing away.
As I helped him untie his lines I asked him where he was
going. "Straight to the middle of the Caribbean Basin and
I'm heaving to for a month," he replied. "I'll keep track of
events on the radio. When Armageddon's over we may be
responsible for repopulating the world." His favorite girl-
friend gave him a loving smile and cuddled up close. She
was ready to start practicing right away. -4


Julian Putley is the author of "The Drinking Man's Guide to the
BVI," "Sunfun Calypso," and a new sequel, "Sunfun Gospel."


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ALLATSEA.NET 19











FLORIDA SAILOR WINS SCOTIABANK

INTERNATIONAL REGATTA

"OPTI-DADS" OUT IN FORCE AT ST. THOMAS OPTIMIST EVENT

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


F ifteen-year-old sailor Alex l
Sly delivered his dad one i
heck of a Father's Day pres-
ent: an overall win, plus final
standing as top sailor in the 13- to
15-year-old Red Fleet trophy, at the
Scotiabank International Optimist
Regatta (SIOR) sailed out of the St.
Thomas Yacht Club June 19-21.
"My strategy was to get good starts t
and stay consistent," said the Florida
teenager, who never fell lower than f
third place overall on the scoreboard
throughout the three day regatta. "Af-
ter that," said Sly, "I just waited until
the end to do something."
That "something" was a come-
from-behind win when Sly poured on
the boat speed after fellow U.S. sailor,
13-year-old Christopher Williford, who
was the top place competitor going
into the last race, started that race too
early and lost valuable time on the
required restart.
"Even so," said Williford, who also
hails from Florida, "I'm still happy This is
my third year coming here and this is the
best I've finished. It's my favorite place
to sail because there's always wind." H
Williford ultimately ended third over- i. ..
all, with Guadeloupe's Arthur Fortune
finishing second through the display of
some incredible tactics.
"I trained a lot with my coach from
France before this regatta," said Fortune, who also won the 11- to
12-year-old Blue Fleet. "I'm small and there was a lot of wind, so I was
pleased with my finish."
Trinidad's Abigail Affoo bested the 10- and under White Fleet. "It
was fun," said Affoo, who follows in the footsteps of three older broth-
ers who have competed in this event from its inception.
Finally, it was Juan Diego Vargas of Puerto Rico who topped the
beginner Green Fleet. "I feel good for me but bad for beating my
friends," said Vargas, who treated fellow Green Fleeter, seven year-
old Savannah Baus, to an ice cream after she scored four first place
finishes on the final day and ended the competition in third.
There's lots of talk about Opti-Moms. There are bumper stickers
that read "Opti-Mom," organizations of Opti-Moms and of course


cheering crowds of Optimist mothers at every Opti
regatta. There are Opti-Dad's too, and they were out
in force on this weekend celebrated in the U.S. as
Father's Day.
Sacrifice my hammock and steak for my kid's sailing
regatta? "Of course," said St. Croix Dads Jesse Berg-
strom and Skip Hoffman in enthusiastic unison.
"It's a great way to spend time together," Hoffman
added.
The BVI's Mike Donovan comes from a power boat-
ing background, yet he's not only supportive of his daughter Mollee's
sailing, he's the team leader for the BVI Optimist Dinghy Team, travel-
ing to Curacao last summer and the Dominican Republic this summer
for the Optimist North American Championships.
"Over a period of time I've picked up tips from the coaches about
rigging and tactics and I try to pass that on to Mollee," Donovan said.
"It's something we enjoy together"
Joe Affoo from Trinidad calls himself an 'equal opportunity' Dad. He
traveled to St. Thomas to bring his three sons now age 25, 23 and
18 to this regatta, and this year brought his 10-year-old daughter,
Abigail. "What I like about sailing is the self confidence it gives kids.
For me, what I like as a Dad is the quality time that I can spend with
them while sailing or simply at the regatta."


20 ALLATSEA.NET









Working, notjustwatch-
ing, is what St. Maarten's
Ruargh Findlay enjoys
about helping his son,
Rhone, to sail. "We like
to participate by helping
out, not just spectating,"
said Findlay "That means
setting buoys for practice
at home. At this regatta,
we helped out on one of
the mark boats."
Finally, Ramon Gonza-
lez from Puerto Rico said,
"I'm a power boater, but I
used to race sailboats. To-
day, I like to let the coach
take care of coaching my
son, Manuel. I myself, as
a parent, feel my job is to
work on his 'head,' build
his confidence, help him


'9
-, rr


focus, do his best and most importantly have fun."
Many Dads got to spend a full week with their kids, as the three-
day Sea Star Clinic and one-day Sea Star Team Racing Championships
preceded the regatta.
"The clinic was one of the best we had in terms of skill level," said
Agustin "Argy" Resano, the USVI National Team Coach and who
headed up both the clinic and team racing. "We had two former South
American champions as well as the U.S. Worlds team participating. In
addition, we had perfect conditions winds of eight to 12 knots."
Thirteen teams of four junior sailors each competed in the 2009 Sea
Star Team Racing Championships. At the end of the day, it was Team
U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) that emerged victorious.
"In the past, every time we'd lost we'd learn from our mistakes and get
better," said Kyle Brego, one of the champion Team USVI sailors. "This
year we had some new team members and practiced a lot. It paid off."-&


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ALLATSEA.NET 21


Florida's Alex
Sly with his
first place in
the 13- to
1 5-year-old
Red Fleet
trophy. Sly
was also top
,,006.overall.



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CARIBBEAN COLLEGIATE SAILORS
A HOME AWAY FROM HOME AT THE ICSA NATIONALS

BY ANDREA BAILEY


It was the awards banquet for the 2009 ICSA College
Sailing National Championship in San Francisco and
Thomas Barrows had just accepted the Allan Trophy '
for winning A division in fleet racing. His team, the Yale
Elis, had placed second overall, behind St. Mary's Col- I
lege of Maryland.
After thanking his teammates, coaches and all the com-
petitors for a great regatta, Thomas turned to walk off the
stage. Just as he got to the stairs, he paused and rushed
back to the podium. "I also want to thank all my VI boys;
Cy [Thompson], Taylor [Canfield] and Nate [Rosenberg].
I grew up sailing with them in the Virgin Islands, and if it I
wasn't for you guys, I wouldn't be here today. Thank you.
"With that, he exited the stage to a round of applause and
a few shouts of "VI Massive," which could be heard com-
ing from various sections of the room.
The 2009 "Nationals" offered a satisfying end to the col-
legiate sailing year for the six kids from the Caribbean who S
took part in the competition. Serving as the final regatta of
the school year, the regatta is held at a different venue every year,
and is comprised of three three-day events: women's fleet racing,
coed team racing, and coed fleet racing. This year's location for
fleet racing, right in front of the prestigious St. Francis Yacht Club,
allowed those who had grown up in the islands to showcase what
they knew best: sailing in big breeze with a lot of chop.
Aside from Barrows' big win in A division, Cy Thompson, who
sails for the Roger Williams Hawks, received third in B division,
and Taylor Canfield, Marco-Teixidor Latimer, and Nathan Rosen-
berg all made appearances for their teams over the course of
the regatta. They were able to contribute their knowledge to
their teams' successes. As Thomas put it, "In college I learned
more about boat handling, and how important it is, especially in
light, shifty conditions and flat water At home we get pretty good
breeze and big waves, so I came in knowing a lot about down-
wind boat speed and surfing waves, which was definitely helpful
at nationals this year."
Both Barrows and Thompson were named All-Americans, and
Canfield received an Honorable Mention.
The team racing portion of the event was held separately in a
protected cove off of Treasure Island, and the Boston College Ea-
gles, who counted sophomore and native St. Thomian Taylor Can-
field among their top skippers, took first place. In fact every team
with a Caribbean sailor made it to the final four, including the third
place Georgetown Hoyas who had their very own Caribbean boat
of Marco Teixidor-Latimer and Andrea Bailey, and the Yale Elis, who
were led by Barrows.
These kids are used to seeing each other at the top, though.
Besides the Virgin Islanders, Marco, who is from Puerto Rico,
would come over to St. Thomas for some of the bigger regattas.


-r U fe Ji If


i*J I |
~3 ?


When asked if competing against each other in college was dif-
ferent than competing against each other as individuals, the an-
swer was a definite no.
"We're still very competitive with each other. We race really
hard, but at the same time we have a lot of fun and are able to be
really close friends off the water," Barrows said. Taylor Canfield
agreed, adding "It's a little different because there's less of an
individual aspect to it. You're on a team, so you're not always
sailing but you're supporting your team no matter what, and do-
ing whatever you can to help them get better But it's also always
good to see our guys do well. If my team isn't going to win, I want
to see one of them win."
Because they all go to school on the East Coast, everyone gets
to see each other a lot as well, which keeps the spirit of camarade-
rie going strong. Canfield, Barrows, Thompson and Rosenberg all
attend schools in New England, so they see one another almost
every weekend for conference regattas. Canfield even found a
summer job for Thompson; they're working together as coaches
at the Chicago Yacht Club. "It's going to be sweet, we get to
travel together and do regattas together all summer" he said.
So even though these boys aren't practicing hard together in the
warm blue waters of the Caribbean, they still talk "at least once
a week." When you're making it home for maybe a few weeks a
year, it's nice to be able to keep in touch with friends who know
where you come from.


Andrea Bailey is a recent graduate of the College of Liberal Arts
at Georgetown University, Washington, DC and a former colle-
giate sailor who has returned to her home island of St. Thomas.


ALLATSEA.NET 23











PROFILE: JIMMY LOVELAND

SPORTS FISHING MOVER & SHAKER

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


Jimmy Loveland has a passion for the profession and sport of
fishing and it's something he wants to share-literally-with
the world.
A native of Miami, Florida, Jimmy grew up on the docks at the
Miami City Yacht Basin's Pier 5, where he sold live bait, washed boats
and mated for his father. Neighbors included today's fishing greats
like Buddy Carey, Whitey Fulton and Pudgie Spalding, who worked
as mates, as well as the late legendary captain Tommy Gifford.
"Thousands of people would come down each afternoon when 20
or more sport fishing boats would line up on either side of the docks
to sell their catch," he recalls.
After graduating from high school, Jimmy wanted to make money
and the method he knew best was fishing. He moved over to the Cast-
away's dock and, with captain's license in hand, he started running the
45-foot Rave for dock owners Ray and Vera Shand.
"People would come to charter and ask me where the captain was,"
says Loveland, who was then a boyish-looking, tall, thin redhead.
Three years later, the traveling bug hit and Jimmy headed to
Montauk on Long Island for a summer of sword fishing. "The com-
mercial fishermen were still using harpoons," he says. "We were
recreational, so we'd spot the fish, get ahead of them and bait
them with squid."
This was the summer when Jimmy got married, honeymooned in
Lake Placid, New York, and promptly asked his wife to move back to
the warmer state of Florida. There Jimmy freelanced as a mate and
captain. One day, he arrived back at the dock to find a gentleman
waiting for him.
"Capt. Johnny Harms asked me if I'd like to run a sports fish-
ing boat in the Virgin Islands," he recalls. "I said, 'Sure, where are
they?' That night, I told my wife, and we both got out the atlas we'd
received as a wedding present to look up the location."
Harms had been hired a few years earlier by Laurence Rockefeller
to explore the potential for sports fishing as a way to entertain Rock-


efeller's guests at Caneel Bay on
St. John and Little Dix Bay in Vir-
gin Gorda. On January 14, 1963,
Jimmy landed on St. Thomas,
took a taxi to the Caneel Bay
dock and found Harm's Savan-
nah Baywaiting for him.
"Those days were paradise,"
says Jimmy. "We'd fish every


"Capt. Johnny Harms
asked me if I'd like to run
a sports fishing boat in
the Virgin Islands," he
recalls. "I said, 'Sure,
where are they?"'


day, some 250 days a year, exploring, never knowing what we'd see."
Celebrities flocked to the Virgin Islands for fishing, including actor Da-
vid Janssen and politicos Hubert Humphrey, Lady Bird Johnson and
Mo Udall. Charters back then cost $125 per day. Today, full day marlin
charters are upwards of $1500.


In the mid-60s, Harms purchased land in Red Hook for a marina,
while Jimmy, Capt. Jerry Black and A.T Horn took over Harms' old
marina in the Lagoon.
By then, says Jimmy, "At a young age I had had all the ice cream I
could eat working for others and I knew from my father's struggles that
I didn't want to be an owner-operator"
What he did become was an entrepreneur, starting a travel com-
pany called Treasure Isle Cruises that offered guests on the newly-
founded cruise lines excursions to neighboring St. John. Jimmy
also ran the Hassel Island ferry for a while, as well as a succession
of three restaurants, the last being Sib's on the Mountain, which he
sold in 1994.
In 1980 he took over the running of the USVI Open/Atlantic Blue
Marlin Tournament (ABMT), known as the "Boy Scout Tournament"
for its chief beneficiary. "Energy behind the tournament and entries
at the time were both waning," he says. "I knew I could bridge
the local boats and the Florida boats and bring everyone togeth-
er. I also wanted to change things, like start releasing blue marlin


24 ALLATSEA.NET









rather than boating them. I took a lot of grief over the special tour- Series of tournaments, and will next year launch the Pacific Rim and
nament rules for this, but gradually there were anglers willing to Southern Cross Series.
follow these rules." Jimmy envisions these series leading to another kind of series-
The ABMT was the first tournament in the world to release blue reality TV. "There's a strong desire to tell the whole story about
marlin. Since then, Jimmy has innovated other 'firsts'. He's spear- the sport of big game fishing-especially to a public hooked on
headed the development of the "Big Game Room" at the Miami the new genre of reality programming-and we hope to do
Boat Show. He's developed the Bermuda Triangle and Spanish Main just that."


INTERNATIONAL ANGLERS COMPETE IN CUBA
59TH ERNEST HEMINGWAY TOURNAMENT DRAWS 19 TEAMS


On June 1st, the Hemingway International Yacht Club of
Cuba (CNIH of Cuba) was ready to celebrate the Cap-
tain's Meeting of the 59th Ernest Hemingway Interna-
tional Bill fishing Tournament and welcomed captains and anglers
of 19 registered teams coming from Canada, Cuba, Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Spain, the United States, France, Guadeloupe, Holland,
England, Cayman Islands, Czech Republic and Russia.
Jose Miguel Diaz Escrich, Commodore, who is the IGFA Represen-
tative in Cuba, welcomed all participants, especially 11 repeat teams
which included the French team from the Big Game Fishing Club of
France, winners of first prize at the 56th and 57th editions. He also
noted the three US teams representing their fellow countrymen and
paying homage to Ernest Hemingway, symbol of the friendship and
cooperation between the peoples of the United States and Cuba.
The first Hemingway Tournament was held on May 1950 and
organized by the Havana International Yacht Club. Rafael Pozo,
Commodore of this yacht club at that time, invited Hemingway,
who lived in Cuba for 20 years, to sponsor an international bill
fishing tournament named after him. So the writer donated the
Cup and participated in the first Tournament.
In order to win the Cup, a team must take first place three times.
At the tournaments, the first capture, the biggest dolphin and the
first three places by points are awarded. This time, anglers were
given 300 points for a released marlin and 50 points for a tagged
marlin. The tournament lasts for five days, four fishing days and
one free intermediate day.
During the first two fishing days of this 59th edition the good
weather prevailed as well as marlin and dolphin captures. All
boats fished in an area between the Morro Fortress in Havana
and Cojimar village called the Hemingway Mile, where the writer
used to fish on board Pilar accompanied by his friend Captain
Gregorio Fuentes. Some were luckier than others, but all had the
pleasure to feel the strike of more than one marlin or fish a dol-
phin-33 marlin strikes were reported. Teams Wet Dream from
the United States and Havana from Spain occupied the first and
second positions respectively with 700 points each.
Marine forecasts predicted that on Friday and Saturday the Gulf
Stream would move towards the centre of the Straits of Florida.
The third fishing day was crucial for the position of the winning
teams and lasted from 08:00 hrs to 17:00 hrs. At 08:48 hrs, the


French team tagged and released a black marlin and scored 1000
points, which won them the first place, an achievement they had
earned at editions 56 and 57, which entitled them to have their
names engraved in the Hemingway Cup.
In the award and closing ceremony that took place in the ma-
rina restaurant Masay at Hotel Acuario, Mr. Alexis Trujillo, Deputy-
Minister of the Ministry of Tourism of Cuba, congratulated win-
ners of the event and thanked all for their presence in the 59th
edition. Anglers Francois Gerald Aprile, Christian Agustin Muioz
and Catherine Monique G. Sauvager, captain Jorge Yuvero and
sailor Rodolfo Barcel6 received special congratulations and got
an ovation from the public while holding the Hemingway Cup
where their names will later be engraved as three-time winners.
Commodore Escrich announced that the 60th Ernest Heming-
way International Billfishing Tournament will take place on May
24th-29th, 2010 and invited those present to meet once again
next year at the yacht club to pay homage to Ernest Heming-
way-first Vice President of IGFA and the most famous marlin
angler in sport fishing history.


Report submitted by the Hemingway Intl. Billfish Tournament


ALLATSEA.NET 25











ANCHORING UNDER SAIL

"THAT'S WHAT THE SAILS ARE FOR..."

ARTICLE AND PHOTO BY ANDY SCHELL


SI o think that a lot of people consider it very difficult to en-
ter a harbor without an engine...it depends on the harbor,
of course, but if they would only try it, perhaps they would
"never again press the starter. It is so much more genuine to
come in under sail, listening to the silence, without unnecessary words
or gestures."-Bernard Moitessier, "The First Voyage of the Joshua"
After sailing close-hauled all day en route from Anse Marcel at the
north end of St. Martin, I was determined to sail right into the steep-
sided cove at lie Fourche, which meant clawing to windward in the stiff
trades. The sailing was exhilarating, each puff sending the leeward rail
awash. The boat and her crew were in their element.
The bay at lie Fourche is small and protected from the easterly
trades, and it's relatively accessibly under sail. Though you must enter
directly upwind, the steep cliffs that surround the cove are wide at the
entrance, gradually narrowing the further in you sail. Aside from two
well-charted rocks, it's steep-to right up to the cliffs.
As we approached the harbor, the wind became increasingly erratic,
bending around the rocky highlands and funneling in every direction.
The sun was behind us, setting in the west, and cast an otherworldly
glow on the island, enhancing the illusion that we were landing on the
moon. We held each tack as long as we dared, galloping towards the
cliff faces on either side of the entrance at seven knots-I could see
every crevice in the rocks in super-fine focus. Farther in the cove, our
tacks became shorter and shorter We struck the sails and grabbed a
mooring as the sun sank in the west. The only sound was the breeze
echoing off the lunar slopes of lie Fourche.
Anchoring under sail requires an intimate knowledge of your boat.
How fast does she come through a tack? How quickly does she accel-
erate and stop? How hard is it to strike the sails? The maneuver itself is
fairly straightforward, but hesitation can spell disaster unless you have
a bailout plan-even if it means firing up the diesel.
Start by finding a mooring ball and sailing onto it. This forces you to
sail to a spot rather than just dropping the hook any old place. Learn
to control your speed by feathering the sails and the helm. To wind-
ward, I find it easiest to maneuver at speed, which means I fly as much
sail as the boat can handle for the conditions. To slow down, slack the
mainsheet or luff up with the helm. Just before the mooring, when
you're sure you're high enough to weather not to miss it, furl the jib to
slow down. Luff up at the ball, drop the main and open a beer.
Off the wind, I find it easiest to sail under mainsail alone and slowly
let the boat amble on down to the mooring. Once abeam of it, bring
her head to wind, drop the main and grab the mooring line.
Anchoring can be even easier, as you don't have to find a specific
spot. The challenge is getting the anchor to dig in without the stern-
way provided by an engine. My yawl Arcturus will actually sail back-
wards by backing the mizzen. In a sloop, find your spot and sail toward
it. Luff up and drop the anchor once the boat has stopped drifting for-


ward. To get the anchor to set, back the jib as you pay out the anchor
rode, as if you were heaving to. The bow will blow off and you'll drift
to leeward. Once enough scope is out, make fast the anchor line and
wait. Once comfortable that you're going to stay put, strike the main
and furl the jib. Now you can open that beer.
While it make take a few years and a few mishaps before running reef
breaks in the Pacific single-handed like Moitessier, learning to anchor
under sail can add an entirely new dimension to your sailing. Instead of
lumbering under power the last few boring miles into a harbor, you can
experience the exhilaration and satisfaction of sailing in. That afternoon
cold one now comes enhanced with the flavor of accomplishment. "-


Andy Schell is a professional captain and freelance writer, based in the
Caribbean, Annapolis and Stockholm, depending on the season. He
lives aboard his yawl Arcturus with his fiancee Mia.


26 ALLATSEA.NET


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ROYALTY IN THE ANCHORAGE

BY DEVI SHARP


Every day is a bad hair day
for a Royal Tern. These large
terns have a spiky crest that
lifts up in the wind and at
times seem to have a life of its own. To
match the "punky" hairdo, they have
an orange bill. Perhaps it is the crest
that has earned these terns the name
"Royal Tern." The breeding adults have
a black cap that extends from the top
edge of the bill to the crest. As the
nesting season progresses, the fore-
head becomes more white and remains
so through the non-breeding season,
leaving what looks more like a mask.
In non breeding birds there is a
white eye ring in the black mask and
the forehead is white. The Juveniles
and non breeding adults look similar;
they have a black crest, but lack the o
full black cap. In all birds the legs are I
dark and the tail is long and moder-
ately forked. The bill on the juveniles is a bit smaller and pale yellow.
What do you need to look at when you see a tern? You do not have to
remember everything about a bird, the trick is to know what to look for
and remember the key field marks. Each group of birds has its own.
When I first see a tern, I look for the color of the bill and feet and try
to determine the shape of the tail. Some terns have very long forked
tails; others have shorter tails with a small V like fork. Royal Tern tails
fall somewhere in the middle. On my second look, I try to find any
distinctive wing or tail patterning. Most terns are shades of white, gray
and black, but there are many wing patterns that can help you sort our
which species you are looking at.
For example, royal terns look a lot like Caspian Terns, but the latter
has a lot more black on its wings. Caspian Terns are very rare in the
Greater Antilles and do not occur in the Lesser Antilles. A bird book is
very helpful for sorting out what is likely to occur in your area.
Royal terns have a very large range. They breed on the east coast
of the United States, all the way through the Caribbean and south to
Argentina. Their winter range overlaps much of the breeding range.
They also nest irregularly along the southern California coastline of
the Pacific Ocean. Royal Terns are locally common in the Greater and
Lesser Antilles. A second subspecies of Royal Terns is also found on
the western side of Africa and may reach as far north as Spain. Unlike
many species of terns who feed in both salt and fresh water, Royal
Terns feed only in salt water environments.
Terns have a distinctive way of hunting-they look down while
they are searching for food and hover for a moment before they dive
into the water At times, the dive is so fast and powerful they look
like someone has thrown a dart into the water Royal Terns dive from


heights up to 30 feet. Their diet consists predominantly of small fish,
squid, shrimps and crabs. Royal Terns can be seen feeding alone or in
small flocks. Feeding adults normally wander up to 40 kilometers from
their colony
Royal Terns nest in dense colonies that can number into the thou-
sands. Colony sites are quite varied, but isolation, good distance visibili-
ty and absence of mammalian predators are essential prerequisites. The
nest is an unlined shallow depression in the sand. The pair defecates
directly on the nest rim, perhaps to reinforce the nest against flooding.
Like most terns, Royal Terns fiercely defend their nest and young.
Royal Terns lay one and rarely two buff or whitish colored eggs with
brown blotches. The egg is incubated for 30-31 days and both parents
incubate. The chicks hatch with downy feathers and are mobile only
hours after hatching. Chicks will remain at the nest for up to a week
unless disturbed. By two weeks of age, most young gather together
in a large mobile group known as a creche. While in the creche, chicks
are normally fed only by their parents, who identify their young by
vocal and visual characteristics. The function of the creche is to make
it more difficult for predators to pick out one chick to prey upon. The
main threat to Royal Terns is mammalian predators and development
on or near their nesting sites.


Devi Sharp is a retired wildlife biologist and is exploring the birds
of the Caribbean with her husband, Hunter, on their sailboat Arctic
Tern. Chuck Shipley is a former professor of computer science and an
avid amateur photographer He and his wife Barbara live aboard their
trawlerTusen Takk II in the Caribbean.


ALLATSEA.NET 29






















1tlnlTl


PARADISE FOUND ON THE SAN BLAS ISLANDS
ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY DAVE FERNEDING

WHERE IS THE SOVEREIGN NATION CALLED KUNA YALA?
It's a tropical island paradise off the coast of Panama, forever known as the San Bias Islands
and the only place an indigenous people survived every attempt by foreign influences to
exterminate them. The Spanish conquistadors failed to conquer and the Republic of
Panama failed, too. Even the islands' own corrupted politicians failed.
GEE, WHO CAN BEAT THAT SURVIVAL RATE?


j ~n~n,







Juan Garcia is not a Ben and Jerry's ice cream flavor, famous baseball
player or a Wal-Mart janitor Juan Garcia is a 70 year-old, five foot high,
bowlegged Kuna Indian with dancing eyes and a beguiling smile that
captures everyone. His demeanor and handshake says, "Take me."
For 25 years Juan was employed by the Panama Canal Zone as a cook
for the Americans. He mastered Spanish and fluent American English. In
the early 1960s, he was persuaded to lease his small island and its palm
trees to the Smithsonian Institution for a research station.
Things change. When the Canal Zone was transferred to the Re-
public of Panama, Juan lost his job. The Smithsonian contract expired.
That left him with his little island, minus palm trees that had been re-
placed with cement pilings and old research buildings. Juan converted
them into his own Kuna-style hotel and restaurant. It became an island
paradise for those who are more into paradise than plastic.
So, why extol about an old Kuna native in the San Bias islands?
Things change. Sun seekers today want more out of a holiday than a
non-stop ticket to a "rated" hotel, a sandy beach and a complimen-
tary pink gin floating a paper umbrella, all provided with the simple
swipe of a credit card. Done that.
Evolution is cloaked in many forms. Juan and his Kuna wife Albertina
(traditionally dressed in Kuna Yala habiliments) have found themselves
thrown into this new era by a bruised global economy and the simple
change of tourist taste. Since the Kuna Indians have repelled all past
attempts to recast their Arcadian way of life, even modern tourism is
under their cautious eye of intervention.
The only "free wheelers" are visiting cruising yachts-as long as they
play and pay by Kuna Yala rules. Yachts are popular because they come,
they spend, they leave. Sun, sand, palm trees, clear warm waters, coral
reefs and friendly natives are a given. Very little infrastructure is required.
Members of the cruising community are fondly known as the Sandblast-
ers. They possess that innate brotherhood of the sea with the Kuna Indian.
Both tribes are rooted to the life of sailing small vessels and subsisting
among tropical islands. It's a good fit. Sandblasters are welcome to the
hundreds of paradisiacal islands and harbors-the perfect tourist trade!


Juan Garcia's resort is one of about ten strewn about the San Bias
Islands. Guests enjoy shopping for the native molas (Kuna women's
artwork) and daily treks to the traditional native villages. The cruising
yachts often frequent the hotels for a change from boat cuisine and
the chance to meet with the hotel guests from all over the World.
Juan's hotel is called, UKUTUPU. In the Kuna Yala tongue it simply
means Sand Island (Uku=sand/Tupu=island). Experiencing Kuna Yala
will leave you with a different concept of the term Native Americans.
The Kuna Yala nation has been bisected thoroughly by every anthro-
pological institution in the world. The conclusion is that if our Native
Americans had been left alone, they may have survived in peace and
retained their aboriginal culture.
See that spark in Kuna Juan's old eyes? In his American accent, "You guys
like fish and French fries or chicken and rice tonight? We got rum too, man."--



David R. Ferneding is a retired charter boat captain who spends sum-
mers in Penobscot Bay, Maine and winters aboard his Alberg35, Cielo,
with First Mate Martha in the San Bias Islands. He has written three fiction
novels and collections of short stories available on Amazon.cor and is
working on his fourth book, "Plundering the Caribbean with a smile."





















WEEKS & WEEKS OF SAILING INJ


EB GILLY GOBINET



























Tommy Paterson has always been very hands-on: I interviewed him flat
on his back, antifouling the Boston Whaler formerly used to go shark
fishing by the late Dr. Erhardt, visionary and creator of Jolly Harbour
Marina, of which Tommy is Dockmaster.
A very keen, modest and highly popular yachtsman, Tommy has been
on the Antiguan sailing scene for over 30 years. His contractor father, Jack
Paterson, came to Antigua in 1961 to escape the Canadian winter and
build Curtain Bluff Hotel, followed by a 212 year-old Tommy a few years
later Jack was interested in sailing and was a founder member of the Anti-
gua Yacht Club, which he also built. Tommy began sailing Sunfish and has
fond memories of whole summers spent camping out at the yacht club.
In 1970 there were not many fibreglass boats around and Jack
bought Jackpot, a Colombia 22 (still here in Antigua). Tommy enthu-
siastically took her out every afternoon after school. This early experi-
ence made Tommy the youngest skipper ever to enter Antigua Sail-
ing Week at the age of 15 (and, he claims, on the slowest boat ever)!
Growing up in Antigua, like every other boy, Tommy learned to drive
as soon as his feet could reach the pedals.


32 ALLATSEA.NET


































In 1976, Tommy went back to Canada to study, but found that he
preferred building yachts. He worked for CS Yachts for about three
years, building hundreds of boats (he still owns Gypsy, a CS40 on an-
chor in Belfast Bay, Seatons). Armed with a Class A driving license, he
became "designated driver" at the boatyard, pulling trailers and haul-
ing out boats with ease. He also delivered many boats all over Ontario
and commissioned yachts for owners in Vancouver, Annapolis, Puerto
Rico and other yachting centers.
Life was perfect, except for one thing: the weather Heading for the
sun, Tommy returned to Antigua in 1982, running the water sports at
Halcyon Cove Hotel for about 15 years. Jackpot had been on the same
mooring in Dickenson Bay for the previous five or six pre-hurricane
years and Tommy hauled anchor and headed for Sailing Week. His
interest in this annual race prompted Jan Santos to invite him onto the
committee where he has been since 1985.
Tommy also took part in Sailing Week on various boats he acquired
over the years, such as Campuchano, Quick Getaway and the J24
Knockabout. However, juggling the responsibilities of owner, partici-
pator and organizer became too much so he started sailing on the
well-known Caccia alla Volpe with Carlo Falcone (who claims Tommy
was the firstAntiguan he ever met), an arrangement which suited them
both for about the next 20 years.
Together with Captain Carlo and the same winning core team of
Henry Peper, Peter Simmonds and Juan Campos, Tommy also sailed
on Abracadabra, the Frers 80ft Maxi Emeraude, and the magnificent
79ft Mylne yawl Mariella. Together they have won many Caribbean
regattas, missing the Overall BVI Spring Regatta by one second to the
Swan 56 Noonmark 6, and Antigua Sailing Week by one point to Frank
Savage's Swan 56 Lolita. Tommy believes that, thanks to Carlo, more
up and coming professional skippers and crew have gained valuable
experience on Caccia alla Volpe than on any other boat in the Carib-
bean and all are proud to be part of the Caccia Crew.
As Chairman of the Race Committee for the last ten years, Tommy is
immensely proud of Antigua Sailing Week and the exceptional experi-
ence it provides for all participants, not least due to the unique histori-
cal setting and friendly atmosphere as well as the excellent Caribbean
sailing conditions. Peaking at 256 boats in 1997, he was delighted that


140 took part this year (making it a lot easier to get to the bar...). The
races themselves, the shortened program and new events organized
around English and Falmouth Harbour were all highly successful, with
absolutely everyone dancing to the small hours after Prize Giving.
Tommy once told me that if


"TOMMY'S ADVICE TO
EVERYONE SAlblNG
IN THE CARIBBEAN
IS TO TRY TO GIVE
BACK SOMETHING
TO THE SPORT:
VOhUNTEER FOR RACE
EVENTS AND YACHT
ChUB COMMITTEES"


he didn't go sailing once a week,
he would go crazy. Jolly Harbour
Yacht Club, founded about 15
years ago, is the only club in the
Caribbean providing regular Sat-
urday racing: two and one-half
hours of hard sailing followed by
three hours of socializing the
perfect program! Every week-
end sailors such as Bernie Wong
on High Tension, Geoff Pidduck,


Tony Sayer, Tanner Jones, etc. compete with Tommy on his Hoby 33
Slingshot, dispelling the rigours of the working week.
Tommy's favorite race is the Nelson's Pursuit Race, which he
started with Stan Pearson from Antigua Rigging five years ago. This
fun but spectacular event takes place out of English Harbour on
the last day of the year, with around 40 boats ranging from 22 to
115 ft, the slowest starting first, only jib and main allowed. Many
participants come in to anchor afterwards to celebrate New Year's
Eve. The dominant feature, however, is Tommy himself in his period
Admiral's costume!
Tommy's advice to everyone sailing in the Caribbean is to try to give
back something to the sport: volunteer for race events and yacht club
committees. Help make sailing and all sporting events on your island
successful, not just for the pure enjoyment but also because of their im-
portant economic contribution to tourism. Above all, keep sailing! -&



Biologist and former Eurocrat Gilly Gobinet took up permanent
residence on Antigua in the Caribbean in 1984. She has been paint-
ing and writing-and sailing-ever since. Her work can be seen at
originalcaribbeanart.com.


ALLATSEA.NET 33









VISITING SAINT EUSTATIUS


THERE ARE NOT MANY PLACES LIKE STATIA LEFT
IN THE CARIBBEAN. UNTOUCHED BY INTERNA-
TIONAL FLIGHTS, IT STILL MOVES TO THE SLOWER
RHYTHM OF 20-SEATER ISLAND HOPPERS, WEEKLY
CARGO BOATS, AND A LITTLE OVER 500 VISITING
YACHTS A SEASON.


Apart from the excellent Golden Rock Regatta (November 11
to 17) that blasts into town once a year, most of the vessels head-
ing to the island are aloof oil tankers hooking up to replenish the
giant tanks at Statia Terminals.
This is a palpably quiet island
where front doors remain un-
locked, passing motorists wave
and honk, and the only attacks on
the daily equilibrium come from
roaming goats. It is almost impos-
sible to believe that Statia, with its
3,000 or so inhabitants, used to be
one of the most influential islands
in the Caribbean, an oasis of free
trade among warring French,
Dutch and British neighbours.
During its heyday in the 1770s
and 80s, over 3,000 ships a year
came to service the warehouses
in Gallows Bay that teemed with
traders in slaves, raw materials,
and (crucially) weapons for the
American Colonies. (See www.
allatsea.net for archive articles
on Statian history).


34 ALLATSEA.NET























































Canons at Fort de
Windt Guard the
channel to St Kitts


IF YOU GO:


According to Nicole Esteban, Manager of Statia
National Parks, some 500 yachts visit Statia each year,
excluding regatta boats. www.statiapark.org
The island should only be approached during the day
as much of the coastline is hazardous, and there is an
exclusion zone near the oil terminal.
The only anchoring zone is in Oranje Bay, but this is
neither comfortable nor safe in heavy swell.
Statia Marine Park maintains 12 yacht moorings in the
bay (yellow buoys.) There is a yacht fee of $10/night
or $30/week for either anchoring or mooring in the
Marine Park.
Customs and Immigration are at the Harbour Office
(VHF 14) (open Monday-Friday: 0800 1600,
weekends: 0800 1100). The Parks Office (VHF 17) is
open Monday-Thursday: 0800- 1700, and Friday:
0800-1600.





in Shelley's "Ozymandias": "Round the decay/Of that colossal wreck,
boundless and bare,/The lone and level sands stretch far away"
Away from the history, which is preserved by the St. Eustatius His-
torical Foundation, Statia is dominated by the The Quill, the cone of
a dormant volcano that stands some 600 metres above sea level, with
lush rainforest at the foot of the crater A network of easy to demand-
ing hikes threads through forests of gum trees and giant silk cotton
around the Quill; the whole area is national park. One hike leads round
the crater and down the other side to the Botanical Gardens, a tranquil
spot opposite St. Kitts. From here, a rickety road leads back through old
plantations and parallel to the coast, which is rocky, rough and no place
for a yacht, the reason why Oranje Bay is the only safe anchorage.
There is not much of a beach scene in Statia. The only one is at
Zeelandia, where the sand is black and quickly becomes hot enough
to roast peanuts. In any case, the surf here is far too dangerous for
swimming. The windswept landscape is deserted, making it a valuable
turtle nesting site and peaceful gathering spot for cows.
Diving, however, is another matter Like neighboring Saba, Statia is
a world-class dive site, and there is a collection of excellent dive centers
on Oranje Bay which depart for reef and wreck dives in the protected
marine park. Some of the wrecks date back three hundred years, while
the imposing Charles Brown was sunk just a few years ago.
With fewer than 100 hotel rooms on the island, options for dining out are
limited. On top of the hill in Oranjestad, Superburger and Sonny's Chinese
Restaurant are ideal for cruising budgets. Down in Gallows Bay, Blue Bead
is a popular French Creole eatery, while The Old Gin House and King's Well
are two hotels with high-end dining- the former French, the latter German.
Finally, Smoke Alley is a BBQ restaurant at the foot of the hill which comes
alive late on Friday night, making it the island's official nightspot. A'



Nick Marshall is an English journalist living on St. Maarten who was
consultant editor of All At Sea from 2003 to 2005.


ALLATSEA.NET 35










ISLAND EVENTS & INTERESTS
ALL AT SEA'S CARIBBEAN COVERAGE
PAGE 43
Open/Atlantic
Blue Marlin Tournament





PAGE 60
Klein Curacao Challenge

Curacao


36 ALLATSEA.NET


~bS







British
Virgin (B.V.I.)
Islands


PAGE 48
North Sails Regatta
PAGE 49
Aguayo Sweeps Laser
Championships
PAGE 50
Gulf Rascal Wins
The Fishing Event


St. Maarten/St. Martin
St. Barthelemy


U.S. Virgin a
Islands
(U.S.V.I.)


* Antigua


Guadeloupe


PAGE 57
Martinique's Combat du Coque


Martinique



i St Lucia


PAGE 58
SLYC Holds 2nd
Opti Championships


Tobago

Trinidad


ALLATSEA.NET 37

















































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PRESIDENT AMENDS D.R.

PLEASURE YACHT LAWS

GOAL IS TO REGULATE INDUSTRY, SIMPLIFY PROCEDURES


signed a new Decree (No. 280-09) in early May amending
already existing Law regarding pleasure yachts. The Decree
has been a result of almost a year long efforts of privately
owned marinas in the Dominican Republic, Ocean World Marina,
among others, to overcome existing challenges that many vessels'
owners, passengers and crew had experienced in Dominican ports
that has as consequence given the Dominican Republic bad publicity
in yachting magazines and websites.
Early in May of this year the General Supervisor of the Dominican
ports informed privately-owned Marinas that the President had signed
a new Decree in order to regulate the marine industry, simplify the
procedure and improve the image the Dominican Republic as yachting
destination. The President has reinforced that the yacht industry is a
very important part of the Dominican tourism. The Port Authority
would be overseeing the implementation of the new Decree and the
Dominican Navy would be in charge of policing.
The resume of the new Decree stated, in laymen's terms, that any
private yacht coming to a private marina in the DR from a foreign port
will not be boarded by all the different governmental officials, but only
one Navy representative with one other official can search the vessel
if there has been a report of suspicious activity on the vessel. All other
Governmental forms are to be filled out in the marina offices by the
Captain of the vessel.
Dominican Port Authority was going to charge two percent of all
fuel invoices. This is being put on hold until further notice due to it
unpopularity with all the marinas.
The Captain of the vessel must inform the marina with his name,
vessel's name and the number of passengers on board of the vessel
any time the vessel leaves the marina. The 5% of the dockage fee in
the marinas covers cruising permits up to 90 days.
There is going to be a new vessel entrance form that will be filled
out with the vessel, crew and passenger information. This will be given
to all governmental authorities and one copy to the captain of the
vessel as proof of entry and clearance when traveling between marinas
in the DR. This document is still being made by the marinas and needs
to be approved by the Dominican Port Authority.
As mentioned above, Ocean World Marina has, along with other
privately owned marinas in the Dominican Republic, persevered in its
efforts to demand from governmental authorities the new regulations
of the marine industry that would simplify the procedure and give the
Dominican Republic the place it deserves as yachting destination. Z-


Information provided courtesy of Capt James C. Wilford, Marina
Operations Manager, Ocean World Marina, Cofresi, Puerto Plata,
Dominican Republic. www.oceanworldmarina.com


TRANSPARENCY
OF PAYMENTS


All monetary payments are to be made to the marinas
directly and will show on the receipt given to the yacht
when they leave the particular marina. The following
fees will be charged by the Dominican Port Authority,
Dominican Navy and Immigration:

* Five percent (5%) of the vessel's dockage before tax
charged by Dominican Port Authority;
* Ten USD ($10) or equivalent in Dominican Pesos to
the Dominican Navy for a Dispatch Letter only when
departing to a foreign port; vessels traveling in
Dominican waters from one marina to another do not
pay any fees regarding the Dispatch Letter;
* Ten USD ($10) for each passenger on the vessel
(excluding the crew of the Vessel) paid to Immigration;
* Sixteen USD ($16 or DOP 500) for each crew or
passenger that leaves the Dominican Republic or
arrives to the country by plane and is des-enrolling or
enrolling on a vessel.


ALLATSEA.NET 39









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THE LIFE OF A BOOK EXCHANGE

BY ANDREA JANSEN


in 1998 after a grueling cruise from Florida, we
wandered around until we came to a local institution
called Galloway's. I thought I'd died and gone to
heaven: I understood the language, could visualize the food as I
perused the menu, and a small book exchange was tucked in a corner.
Welcome to Puerto Rico!
Continuing toward Salinas, we were forced by a storm to make
landfall early and stopped in the fishing village of La Parguera,
complete with a small strip mall. Coming on the heels of Galloway's,
I declared my cruising days were over. Amiable Ken, assessing my
mental state, relented and in short order he had built and opened a
small kite shop on the grounds of the mall.
I have always acknowledged that while I live on a boat, I am
not a boater. Boaters are capable individuals who handle hooks,
lines and sinkers with aplomb. When First Mates proudly give their
tours, I am particularly impressed with their storage compartments:
everything in its proper place. Not on Ruff Life, our 33-foot trawler.
Organizing is not one of my skills, and I am constantly crying, "Get
it off the boat!"
Dismal TV choices had us cherishing whatever books we could lay
our hands on. With the kite shop situated in the heart of the community,
it was easy for people to pass Ken their old books, which of course
came on board. At first I was thrilled, but then the quantity became
silly and I issued my favorite demand.


The books were transferred to a milk crate and kept outside the kiosk
during the day and inside at night. Eventually the crates increased to
the point where Ken posted a sign, "Book Exchange", which most
people ignored.
One week when Ken was stateside, I womanned the shop, dutifully
dragging the crates back and forth. On one particularly bad day (as
in 'crabby'), I shut the shop, realized I'd forgotten the books, thought


'to heck with this' (I'm
editing) and left them on
the sidewalk. That evening
there was a terrible
thunderstorm and I became
remorseful, wondering how
to explain his ruined library
to Ken. The next morning
I went in and was shocked
to see that the books were
just fine. The overhang
had protected them.
From then on, the crates
remained outside.
A funny thing happened.
We discovered that books
would come and go dur-
ing the night-apparently
having someone nearby
was too intimidating. Over
the years the exchange
grew. When the mall owner
built permanent shops, he included an outdoor space dedicated to the
book exchange. I painted a sign and it has been thriving ever since.
The exchange is free...all that's asked is that the books be treated
with respect. There are times when someone
gets a bit piggy, but the majority appreciates
and respects this gift to the community. Ken
IE I TI methodically cleans and categorizes his pet
project, and while he repeatedly complains,
"Too many romance novels," I know the ladies
of Parguera are thrilled.
We worried that the exchange might fall
to ruin once we left. That theory was tested
these past months while Ken has been
stateside assisting with family matters. I take
a few moments to pick up the trash and return
books to their shelves but, all in all, it has
been well maintained. Perhaps not to Ken's
specifications, but by now it's taken on a life
of its own.
The shops have changed over the years
but the book exchange remains, beckoning
readers of all languages. Thank you, Ken, for creating this marvelous
exchange. I kinda miss those milk crates. -&


Andrea Jansen is a certified Artesana, a title reserved for artists who,
using materials indigenous to Puerto Rico, capture the island's rich
culture. She lives aboard Ruff Life, a 33-foot trawler


ALLATSEA.NET 41







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THE USVI OPEN/ATLANTIC

BLUE MARLIN TOURNAMENT

"BOY SCOUT TOURNAMENT" SET FOR AUGUST 3 TO

BY CAROL M. BAREUTHER, RD


calendars each year for the three days before the August
full moon and one day after August 3 to 7, 2009 when
the "Super Bowl of Sports Fishing Tournaments," namely
the USVI Open/Atlantic Blue Marlin Tournament (USVI Open/ABMT),
takes place in Virgin Islands waters.
Tournament director Jimmy Loveland says, "Last year's event was a
huge success, with the fleet of 29 boats collectively releasing 125 blue
marlin over the four days of fishing. That's a catch rate of over four fish per
boat, something you see in few other destinations around the world."
Loveland adds, "All releases were on relatively lightweight 50-pound
test line. This requires adept angling skill and hopefully makes for a
quick release that doesn't tire out the fish. We're proud to say a blue
marlin hasn't been boated in nearly 20 years. The ABMT was the first
blue marlin tournament in the world to have special rules that call for
the release of blue marlin."
In 2008, Richard Rice, fishing aboard the April Michelle, scored the
prestigious Top Angler prize and pocketed $10,000 cash, with the
release of six blue marlin. Meanwhile, the husband and wife team
of Luis and Jennifer Bacardi, angling off the Rum Bum, collectively
released 10 blue marlin to take the Top Boat title. These two feats are
what many in this year's fleet will hope to surpass this season.
"We're expecting over 25 boats to register," says Loveland. "This year,
the economy is holding some boats back, but we have several boats new to
the tournament on the way Last year, fuel prices of up to $5 per gallon were
a problem. But last week (early June), fuel was down to $2.80 a gallon."
The year's events start with the Kick-Off Party on August 2, from 6:30 to
10:30 p.m. at the newly remodeled Virgin Islands Game Fishing Club in
Red Hook. Prior to this, the Innovative Cellular Handline Tournament will


take place on the docks at American Yacht Harbor from 9 a.m. until Noon.
Over 200 kids are expected to fish. Registration is free. All entrants receive
a free T-shirt, pizza lunch and beverage. Handlines and bait are provided.
The first day of fishing gets underway the next day from 8:30 a.m.
until 5:30 p.m., with "Outback Night", held under the tents at the
American Yacht Harbor, starting at 7:30 p.m. Fresh grilled strip steaks,
chops and ribs, along with all the trimmings, will be for sale.
Fishing continues August 4 as well as August 5 when the Boy Scouts
cook and serve at the Cheese Burgers in Paradise party on the docks
starting at 7 p.m. The Caribbean Night Show begins an hour late and
features steel pan players and stilt-walking Mocko Jumbies.
Fishermen take a break on the Full Moon Lay Day, then finish up
fishing August 7 when the fleet makes a final mad dash for shore
at 4:30 p.m. with the Jim Smith 'Race From The Edge'. Tournament
winners are named at the evening Awards Banquet, to be held at the
Wyndham Sugar Bay Resort & Spa.
Started by Chuck Senf back in 1972 and nicknamed The Boy Scout
Tournament since a portion of the proceeds have always benefited
the VI Council of the Boy Scouts of America, one of Senf's favorite
charities -the ABMT has evolved into the competitive saltwater sports
fishing events in the world. It's a qualifier for the International Game
Fish Association's Offshore World Championship, and the cornerstone
event in both the Bermuda Triangle Series and Spanish Main Series.
For more information, call: (340) 775-9500 or (888) 234-7484;
Email: loveto@islands.vi; Web: www.abmt.vi -&


Carol M. Bareuther, RD, is a St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands based
marine writer and registered dietitian.


ALLATSEA.NET 43










35TH ANNUAL FOXY'S WOODEN BOAT

REGATTA IS A WINNER
FIBERGLASS CLASSICS JOIN ACTION THIS YEAR

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY VAL DOAN


F oxy Callwood of Great Harbour,
Jost Van Dyke, held another stellar
event this May to celebrate 35 years
of wooden boat racing, as he gets
ready to accept his MBE. Although we have lost
so many wooden boats that have gone by the
wayside through sinking, falling into disrepair,
sailing over the horizon, owners passing away,
and crew moving on, the West End Yacht Club
still puts on a great weekend with Martin Van
Houten at the helm as Commodore.
Wooden boat numbers were way down,
so Foxy eventually agreed to include the
Classics, boats over 30 years old, in this
year's event. This boosted numbers enough
to round out the fleet. It is unfortunate that
the BVI has lost some of its boat building
tradition, as the elder craftsmen have passed
on, and very few have stepped in to pick up
the reins. Although the college has attempted
to revive the Tortola sloops, they didn't quite
make it for this year. One Tortola favorite, Dr. Tattersall's Diva, a 30
Square Meter, showed up in fine form with Pat "Pot Belly" Bailey as
crew to sail in near perfect conditions.
And then there was the fleet built by Steve White of Brooklin Boat
Yard in Maine. Three wooden beauties Vortex, Wild Horses and
Marjorie stopped in on their way from Antigua to Newport to make
this a special event for those who raced aboard.
Vortex, a 55 Square Meter, owned by Steve White and gallantly
lent for the event, was sailed in the single-handed race Saturday
by James Buchanan who won overall. He also won her class in this
edition of Foxy's Wooden Boat Regatta in the crewed division on
Sunday, along with Tracy Obert and myself sharing helm in the second
race, and Denise Holmberg and James calling tactics. It was a photo



RESULTS


Island Sloop Traditional
Rig Senada Rose
Island Sloop Modern -
Sweet Ting
Under 40 Fin Keel Diva
Over 40 Fin Keel Vortex


Over 30 Traditional
Rig Buxom
30-40 Modern Grace
40-50 Modern Indigo
Over 50 Modern Marjorie
Single handed race -
James Buchanan, Vortex


finish at the wire when Wild
Horses was neck and neck
With Vortex, whose crew
was euphoric to finish boat
for boat with a 76 footer of
equal pedigree.
The W-76 Class yacht Wild
Horses was launched in June
of 1998 and her sister followed
in September of 1998. She
was designed by Steve's
father Joel White for Donald
Tofias, who commissioned the
construction of two identical
yachts. Brooklin Boat Yard built Wild Horses and Steve's brother in law,
who owns Rockport Marine, built White Wings. These boats and Vortex
were designed as inshore racers, not passage makers, although they
have sailed on their own bottom from Newport to the Caribbean as well
as sailing from France to the Caribbean. More usually they are shipped.
They are cold molded as well, of Douglas fir, cedar and mahogany The
W's have carbon fiber masts and rudders.
Marjorie was also designed by Robert Stephens (now of Stephens,
Waring and White Designers, which is a sub division of Brooklin Boat
Yard) and launched in 2007. This was her first winter in the Caribbean.
She ably won her division. We look forward to seeing them all return
for next year's fun.


44 ALLATSEA.NET









In the Classic division the Cal 40 Rascal, which was refit over the past the fantastic posters and T Shirts. The race committee did a stellar job of
five years by owner Adrian Sinton, came in first across the line in her making this great weekend happen, and Foxy, Tessa, Paul Mason and crew
division but was beaten out by Osprey in corrected time. There was stepped up to the plate to serve up another great event. A-
a decent sized fleet from small 20' up to the Columbia 57 Rainbow
Maker showing up for the fun and mayhem.
Another classic was the committee boat, Silver Spirit, donated for the Val Doan grew up sailing the islands and makes her living on the sea
weekend byherowners. Shehasherown incrediblehistoryofbeing rescued delivering, teaching, racing, cruising, researching, writing and loves
and rebuilt, which is whole other story Les Anderson once again designed photographing her adventures




SAILORS WORK FOR CLEAN CARIBBEAN SEAS


BY CHRIS MANCINI


S lF ive, four, three"...Crouched on the upper deck of
the committee boat, I kept my eyes and ears on the
countdown, determined to start this race off right. It was
my job to raise the flag and send the A Fleet barreling west off
Nanny Cay on this first day of the 2009 BVI Spring Regatta.
I was in the BVI to support and promote the first-ever Silver
Level Clean Regatta as certified by Sailors for the Sea but my
job at the moment was to set the starting flag to help each fleet
cross without a hitch.
Sailors for the Sea is a nonprofit organization based in Boston,
Massachusetts that educates and empowers boaters to protect and
restore our oceans and coastal waters through our programs and
projects, the oldest of which is Clean Regattas. We offer resources
and information that raise awareness of critical ocean issues and we
provide the important link between knowledge and practical, direct
action that can truly improve the health of our waters.
Clean Regattas is a voluntary certification system designed by
Sailors for the Sea that encourages yacht clubs, sailing programs,
and regatta events to take steps to make a more positive impact
on the aquatic environment. This three-tiered system allows
certification at a Bronze, Silver or Gold Level, with the certification
criteria becoming more intense at the higher levels.
In its fourth year, Clean Regattas is gaining a lot of momentum.
This year marks the first year Clean Regattas became international
with the participation of the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, the BVI
Spring Regatta and Antigua Sailing Week. Bookending these early
months were St. Maarten and Antigua. Their enthusiasm for the
program and efforts to reach the Bronze Level Certification, which
included a commitment to preventing marine debris, providing oil
spill prevention kits to all participants, educating participants on
non-toxic cleaning products, going paperless with an electronic
press kit, and using biodegradable cups, towels, and garbage bags
throughout the event, was intense and impressive.
Between these two events, Sailors for the Sea celebrated its
first-ever Silver Level Regatta with the BVI Spring Regatta. They
met the criteria by prohibiting bottom cleaning during the event in
the harbor, working to offer the sale of non-ablative bottom paints,
recycling glass, and, perhaps the biggest change, providing all
participants with reusable water bottles and distilled water stations


for bottle refilling throughout the duration of the event. This single
action reduced an incredible amount of waste generated by
eliminating the need for disposable water bottles.
Plastic trash makes up a huge proportion of marine debris. Bags
and pellets mistaken for food by birds, fish and marine mammals
that cause choking and death when consumed increase the threat.
Scientists have linked obesity, infertility, and depression with the
entry of these pollutants into the food chain; and too-tough-to-
biodegrade, plastic lasts forever If every regatta, yacht club, and
sailor took on the task to reuse and refill a single bottle, can or tank
of water rather than reaching for a disposable 12-oz., our shores
and seas would feel the relief.
Perhaps the most extraordinary thing about working with
these Caribbean events was seeing how nations with far fewer
environmental laws and regulations than the U.S. took on the
task of ocean stewardship. They galvanized individuals, inspired
commitment, and began to make a difference that will improve
the health of their clear, blue, Caribbean waters.
Back on the committee boat, I proved as adept at following
direction, and perfectly timed my flag with the starting gun. If
only cleaning up the oceans was as simple as raising a flag. In
reality, that's just the first step. Fortunately, we find ourselves in
a fleet ready and willing to set their sails and race ahead on this
long journey to clean seas. -


Chris Mancini is Program Manager for Sailors for the Sea. For
more information on Sailors for the Sea, Clean Regattas, and other
Sailors for the Sea programs, please visit www.sailorsforthesea.
org, email info@sailorsforthesea.org, call 617.248.9966, or write
to 56 Commercial Wharf, Boston, MA 02110.


ALLATSEA.NET 45

















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SEA HAWKWINS QUANTUM SAILS INTL REGATTA
ROYAL BVI YACHT CLUB HOSTS IC 24 "WORLDS"


i- SILL DESIGN


- IA









T hey say the IC 24 was conceived as a boat that could
be comfortably sailed by families. The crew of Sea
Hawk proved that June 13 and 14, sweeping to a 12
point margin of victory after 10 races in the Quantum Sails
International Regatta organised by the Royal BVI Yacht Club.
Of course it helps if the family name is Hirst, skipper Michael
joining wife Sayula and brother Robbie making up three of the
crew, together with Becky Paull-Rowlette and Mark Stephenson.
Lest they get too comfortable, they did not have it all their own
way others won five of the ten heats, but at the end of the
day consistency came through as Sea Hawk finished lower than
second only once.
The regatta featured a fleet of eight boats. As local Quantum
Sails manager Kevin Wrigley explained, while boats from other
islands were unable to come this year, the competitors were
nonetheless international in nature, including BVlslanders, Scots,
Irish, Brits, Kiwis and Americans. Saturday morning brought light
breezes and sunshine for three races. Chris Haycraft's Latitude 19,
also sporting a family crew of Bob & Kara Phillips, served notice
to the Hirsts that they were in a dogfight by winning the first race.
The Hirsts were able to take the next two before breaking for
lunch. Saturday afternoon brought a stronger breeze, and a slip
down to fifth place in one race made Sea Hawk seem suddenly
vulnerable. Latitude 19stayed in the hunt posting finishes of three,
three and two to end the day just four points back. Individual race
wins were also posted by George Lane aboard Grey Ghost and
young Olympic aspirant Alec Anderson on Lime.
Sunday brought fresher breezes and new faces at the front,
as Anderson's team Lime mounted a charge. Beginning the


day seven points behind Latitude 19, they reeled off a string of
two wins and a second to set up a final race battle for second
overall. Further back, youth sailor Donte Hodge, captain of the
BVI team in the upcoming Premier's Cup, had struggled the first
day aboard Intacbut showed a definite improvement the second,
beating several older and supposedly wiser heads.
For the final race, Committee Chairman Guy Eldridge and his
team called for a longer three lap course. While Sea Hawk's victory
was secure, Latitude 19 had slipped to one point behind Lime,
meaning Haycraft had to win and put one boat between himself
and Anderson to hold on to the second place that had seemed
assured at the start of the day. On the first lap this seemed to
be happening as Latitude charged off to a narrow lead over Sea
Hawk while Lime appeared well down the fleet. However on the
second upwind leg the Hirsts were able to escape Haycraft's
cover and take the lead while Anderson's team steadily made up
ground. At the end Haycraft could only watch as Lime slipped
past Andrew Waters' Concherer, the last intervening boat, to tie
Haycraft on points and take second place by virtue of having won
three races to Latitude's one.
Race Committee Chairman Guy Eldridge, after reminding all
competitors to clear their bar bills, thanked Quantum Sails for their
sponsorship and his team of Sue-Ellyn Eldridge, Diane Lewis, Liz
Maclean and Brigitte Gerster as well as the Yacht Club staff for all
their hard work putting the event on. "It was a fantastic weekend of
close racing" ... what better epitaph could there be?


Report by Guy Eldridge courtesy of the Royal BVI Yacht Club


ALLATSEA.NET 47


i. ~I
L:











WIND SHIFTS COMMANDEER

8TH NORTH SAILS REGATTA

TWELVE TEAMS COMPETE IN ONE DESIGN KEELBOAT CHAMPIONSHIPS


challenge for competitors during the 8th annual
North Sails Caribbean One Design Keelboat
Championships. With 12 teams competing for first
place the competition was intense, and in the end the point
difference between first and second place was only 0.7.
A total of 18 races were sailed over the course of two days
with a one pool format, with 12 teams competing in eight
boats thus allowing four teams to take a break in between
races. Both regatta organizers and the main sponsor were
thrilled with this weekend's results, and according to Ernst
Looser, owner of Tropical Sail Loft, agent for North Sails St.
Maarten, "It went very well, very enjoyable as the racing was
closer than normal. North Sails is proud to be part of such high quality
event with much credit going to the volunteers, especially Cary with
organizing the event and Race Officer Andrew Rapley's excellent work,
which kept all competitors happy."
Teams competing from around the Caribbean, with sailors such as
Simon Manley of St. Maarten, Markku Harmala of St. Barths and Frits
bus of St. Maarten battled it out over two days, twelve races each and
eighteen total races for the fleet which allowed, for the first time ever, each
team the opportunity to drop one race from their results. The winner was
decided by 0.7 of a point leaving Markku Harmala, Team St. Barth Libre,
with the win of 27 total points, and Frits Bus, Team Aqua Mania, placing
second with 27.7 points. Third place went to Simon Manley, of team Scuba
Shop with 33 points overall. Speaking to Markku after the event, he stated
"Fun, very fun. Nice people to race with, good organization even with the
shifty conditions. It was perfect one design racing!"
The teams raced on the Sun Fast 20s over the course of two days in the
Lagoon, using a floating dock and change boat Santino courtesy of Aqua


Mania and a Lagoon 41 as the committee boat. Together teams watched
their fellow sailors battle it out each race and the overall atmosphere was
total joy being able to be out on the water in such splendid conditions.
And although they were competing against each other, those who were
resting on the change boat were cheering and rooting for their fellow
competitors. The camaraderie was outstanding to say the least.
When asked how he felt the weekend's racing went, Frits Bus, of team
Aqua Mania stated, "Interesting! With the wind shifts and the ups and
downs of wind strengths. It was good sailing conditions for this regatta,
lots of different types of weather; light, breezy, shifty then steady!"
Racing was finished by 1 p.m. on Sunday, and once all the boats
were back at the dock at the Sint Maarten Yacht Club, sailors sat
down to a fantastic BBQ lunch and the prize giving ceremony. Yacht
Club board member and competitor Simon Manley thought "it was
a fantastic event, and a really great weekend. The wind shifts were
challenging along with the quality of the other crews."
The points score was more compact than in most regattas. In spite
of the leaders pulling away on points overall. Each of them spent many
moments in the "pack" trying to break out. The first positions were to
be found on the score card as low as 10th place. A great many sailors
had a place in the top three at different times.
The rules knowledge of sailors was high, which resulted in very little
contact and dissension, in spite of the very short course. Starts were
consistently high level with boats lined up right across the line showing
an elevated level of starting.
So now that the sails are put away, the boats neatly tied to the docks
and the competitors on their flights back home, it's fair to say that the
sailing conditions in St. Maarten are ideal for one design racing and
regardless of the constant wind shifts, all the competitors had a great
time and look forward to returning to St. Maarten in 2010 to battle it
out once again.


Report and photos submitted by St. Maarten Yacht Club


48 ALLATSEA.NET











RAUL AGUAYO SWEEPS LASER CHAMPIONSHIPS


the St. Maarten Yacht Club's
20th Heineken Premium '
Light-sponsored Caribbean Laser
Championships held in Orient Bay ,
June 6 and 7. Nineteen regional
sailors participated in the event with
the weather taking its toll on both
sailors and equipment.
Dominican RepublicOlympian Raul
Aguayo showed what a professional
approach, focus and preparation can
do, as he executed a perfect score in each of the event's seven
races. The 28 year old sailor was on the top of his form with perfect
boat control even in Sunday's 27-knot winds. He was enthusiastic
about the event as perfect preparation for his sailing campaign
which includes the Laser World Championships in August.
The USA took second place. "This is the 15th time that I have
participated here and the organisation just gets better and
better," Tim Landt said after the event. "I love the island and will
be back to win next year." Benoit Meesemaecker from St Barths


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got the final podium position in the
overall standings.
Young Dennis Van Den Berg from
Curacao was in a class of his own
in the radials and spent most of his
time battling sailors with the larger
-2 standard sails, creating an inspiration
for young sailors and tying for fourth
place overall. Jorge Abreu from the
DR won the Masters class, edging out
Brett Wright from Bermuda in second
and Frits Bus from St Maarten who was
plagued by equipment failures in the first races.
Commodore Frank Hoedemaker thanked all sailors at the prize
giving for attending the event despite the economy, and John Leone
from Heineken for his continued commitment to sailing. Sunsail
again provided a perfect committee boat for the race officers for the
weekend and were also shown the appreciation of the SMYC. -



Report and photo submitted by St. Maarten Yacht Club











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ALLATSEA.NET 49










GULF RASCAL WINS THE FISHING EVENT 2009
ST. MAARTEN EVENT HELD AT PORT DE PLAISANCE

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY KERRY BIDDLE-CHADWICK


Fishing over the weekend of the 27th to 31st May for this
year's The Fishing Event proved disappointing due to
unfavourable currents and the murky green of the water.
The strikes were down drastically from last year because of poor
underwater visibility, but everyone involved had a great time
nonetheless and the competition was fierce.


The Fishing Event was held at Port de Plaisance again this year,
as it was two years ago. The organizers decided to use the French
bridge rather than the expensive Dutch bridge, making the trip to
and from the Marlin Boulevard longer, but still cost effective.
Gulf Rascal, a Hatteras 68 out of St. Thomas, won the event and
landed the big prize of $35,000, plus they qualify to enter the IGFA
Offshore World Championships in Cabo San Lucas in May next year.
Despitethe difficultyofvisibilityand despite beingstruckby lightening
during a squall on the first day, the crew of Gulf Rascal managed to
catch and release two marlin over 4001bs within 42 minutes of each
other, which put them ahead right at the beginning.
Rod Windley, the owner of Gulf Rascal, described how ball
lightening hit close enough to the boat for them to feel the
electricity and how the second strike hit one of the antennae while
they were in the middle of fighting one of the two marlins that
they hooked up on the first day. The lightening strike knocked out
both engines, most of the electronics and the engine monitors.
The crew managed to get the engines back up and running and
enough of the electronics to carry on with so that they could finish
the day's fishing and get back to port safely.
Black Pearl with the Cartier crew from St. Barths and the
winners of The Fishing Event two years ago, tied with Gulf Rascal


on points at the end of the first day and came in second at the
end of the tournament with a prize of $15,000.
Princess from Port de Plaisance very nearly won the competition
when they landed a 4271b Blue Marlin on Friday and hooked a
large marlin on Sunday, their only hook up for that day, only to
lose it putting them in third place with a prize of $10,000.
Tini Tinitali's Oli-T from St. Maarten
S came in fourth, with Limited Edition
from Martinique bringing up a last
day fifth place when they released the
only marlin hooked up and verified on
SunSunday by Barbara Prot, one of two
women anglers in the competition.
Limited Edition took the $5,000 prize for
C IIE best boat of the day and Barbara Prot,
I' Vice-President of the Big Game Fishing
Club in France, took the Best Female
Angler Award.
S. f The big marlin eluded Ruth Liney
From Rum 'n Coke out of Antigua this
year, but she says that she will be back.
SDates of the Fishing Event 2010 are
Between May27 andJune6. www.fishing-
S event.com, or email organizer Bertrand
Lacotte at fishingevent@orange.fr. -


Kerry Biddle-Chadwick is a freelance writer who has been writing for
magazines in the Caribbean and online newspapers since 2006.


Winning crew from
Gulf Rascal coming
astern to doc


-II


50 ALLATSEA.NET











ST BARTH

NOVEMBER 20 22

INSCRIPTIONS OPEN FOR 2009

BY ELLEN LAMPERT-GREAUX


Three of the organizers of the St Barth CataCup
(left to right) Jelf Ledee Helene Guilbaud and
Vincent Jordil


he list of potential competitors is like the who's who in
Catamaran racing, starting with Champion of France
Emmanuel Boulogne, who won the Saint Barth CataCup in
2008 with his teammate Tangy Kervyn.
"There are 24 teams who have indicated they want to come," says Jeff
Ledee, one of the event organizers of the November race, along with
Thierry Lhinares, Vincent Jordil and Helene Guilbaud. Other potential
competitors include Enrique Figueroa, the four-time champion from
Puerto Rico, as well as acclaimed French sailor Franck Cammas, and the
French Olympic duo of Jean-Christophe Mourniac and Franck Citeau.
Along with the Nautical Center of Saint Barth and the Saint Barth
Yacht Club, with support from the Collectivity of Saint Barthelemy, the
non-profit association, Saint Barth Multi-Hulls, re-launched the CataCup
for the first time in 2008: it had taken place for three consecutive years,
1992-1994, before it was interrupted in 1995 by hurricane Luis. Everyone
involved in the organization does so on a volunteer basis, and the event
is affiliated with the French Sailing Federation.
"We would like to see it develop into the most important event in
the West Indies for sports catamarans," adds Ledee. To do so, the
association is searching for sponsors to help bring competing boats from
Europe and Puerto Rico (in 40' sea containers), and provide lodging and
meals to the participants. In addition to the pro racing, the event also
involves local sailors and kids, with St Barth Yacht Club's Optimist races,
and windsurfing competitions from the Nautical Center of Saint Barth.
"If all the big names really come, we might be able to talk about
holding an official world championship here," says Ledee, on the
beach in St Barth, looking at the clear blue sky and fabulous bay of
St Jean, where the events take place. "We have all it takes in Saint
Barth." For additional information: wwwstbarthcatacup.com -r


Ellen Lampert-Greaux lives in Saint Barthelemy where she is editor-in-
chief of Harbour Magazine, and has been a regular contributor to Al At
Sea since 2000. She also writes regularly about entertainment design
and technology for Live Design magazine, and about Caribbean
architecture for MACO, a Trinidad-based lifestyle magazine.


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RESCUE ON THE HIGH SEAS
APRIL SINKING LEADS TO NEW FRIENDSHIP FOR 2 SAILING COUPLES


BY GILLY GOBINET


Roger Culverwell and Lucyna Dziemian left St. Thomas on
April Fool's Day this year on Dreamcatcher of Jersey and
headed east toward their wedding planned for Antigua
April 8. After a windy night, they started motoring towards
Saba when they heard a Mayday call at about 8.30 a.m., a call also
picked up by CROSSAG (the French rescue service from Martinique).
Despite the very weak signal, Roger and Lucyna understood that a
boat named Helen Mary Gee had sunk and its owners were in a dinghy,
whose position they calculated as about eight miles away.
Alerting the distressed couple, CROSSAG and other search and
rescue boats that they were on their way, Lucyna and Roger saw a
red flare and, soon afterward, the dinghy itself, despite the extremely
sloppy seas. With Dreamcatcher's lowfreeboard, and a handy boarding
gate on the side, it was relatively easy to bring aboard a very shaken
Helen and Paul Glavin and their salvaged belongings.
Helen and Paul had been on their way to Antigua, pleased to have
received an invitation to crew on Lone Fox in the Antigua Classic Yacht
Regatta. At around 2.30 a.m., while travelling at about eight knots,
their Sovereign 470 yacht Helen Mary Gee hit something that stopped
them dead in their tracks. Both were slightly injured by the impact but
at first noticed nothing amiss until all the electrics shorted out at 4.30
a.m. They realized there was serious water down below and there was
no way the bilge pumps could handle this.
The night of the collision was very dark and it was impossible to tell
exactly what the object was that they hit but it had to be something
big and heavy for Helen Mary Gee to come to a complete halt at eight
knots, perhaps a container or even a whale.
Faced with the inevitable but nonetheless well prepared (thanks to
a similar sinking incident experienced by friends), they watched Helen

Rescued sailors
SHelen (left) and
Paul (right) were
witnesses at the
S- wedding


The rescue boat
Dreamcatcher


Mary Gee disappear beneath the waves at around 6.30 a.m. Armed with
flares, hand-held GPS and VHF (as well as essentials such as passports,
money, mobile phones, protective clothing, food, water, charts and a
bucket), they awaited rescue that arrived in the form of Dreamcatcher
The two couples then headed for nearby Saba (having alerted the
other rescue services) where they spent the night on board, then for
St Kitts. Upon learning of their plight, the very helpful Harbourmaster
immediately put every amenity at their disposal and Helen and Paul,
Roger and Lucyna were able to go ashore at last. As well as winding
down and recovering their forces, Paul and Helen were able to meet
the coast guard and establish a report for insurance purposes. After
two days of much appreciated Kittitian kindness and hospitality, all
four left on Dreamcatcher bound for Antigua.
Forced confinement at close quarters, especially in traumatic
circumstances, can make or break a relationship, and in this case, the
two couples rapidly became good friends so much so that Roger
and Lucyna asked Paul and Helen to act as witnesses at their wedding.
After the ceremony at 10 a.m. on 8 April at Jolly Harbour, followed by
a wedding breakfast, Paul and Helen flew back to London the same
evening with the memory of a positive ending to a negative and life-
threatening experience. Lucyna and Paul hope that Helen and Paul will
return to Antigua and come sailing with them in the Caribbean next year
For more information on this incident, visit www.helenmarygee.com -&


ALLATSEA.NET 53


i










ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA'S 43RD SPORTS

FISHING TOURNAMENT
A BRILLIANT SUCCESS


BY GILLY GOBINET

In late May this year, with over 40 boats and fierce competition,
the 43rd annual fishing tournament was a resounding success,
despite the relative lack of fish. The change of venue to
Nelson's Dockyard, English Harbour was greatly appreciated and
the organizers excelled themselves. The event was extremely well
attended by fishermen, tourists and residents alike, with a terrific
party atmosphere.
This beautiful historicsetting, near the old Copper & Lumber Store
(now a beautifully restored hotel), provided the perfect backdrop to
all the drama of the fishing tournament, with Greg Petruluzzi on Nossi
be from Guadeloupe coming in late on the first day with the winning
438 Ib Blue Marlin that he had been battling with all afternoon, after
losing a similar battle in the morning.
This year Claude Paraguel's Why Not from Martinique was
champion boat in the Marlin section, with the most tag + releases
and 1050 points; last year's winner, Antiguan John Fuller's Blue


Rapid, came in second with 900 points. Antiguans Vanessa Hall
(Miss Ashley) and Joel Paterson (Blue Rapid) were champion
Female and Male respectively with 700 points each.
Other 2009 Antiguan fishing events will include the 2nd Francis
Nunes Junior Annual Memorial Fishing Tournament and Seafood
Festival, also at Nelson's Dockyard, on October 3, and Nick Fuller's
"Best in the West" Tournament at Jolly Harbour in November.
Plans to continue the 44th Antigua and Barbuda Sports Fishing
Tournament in Nelson's Dockyard, English Harbour next year
have already been drawn up for 28-30 May 2010: register online
at www.antiguabarbudasportfishing.com. -&


54 ALLATSEA.NET







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A NORTH CARIBBEAN

THE 10TH TRANSCARAIBES RALLY APRIL 4 28, 2009


wenty boats gathered at the marina Bas du Fort of Pointe a
Pitre for the start of the 10th edition which took the group
from Guadeloupe to Cuba. Saint Martin and the Dominican
Republic, as well as new stops added this year in Haiti and
Jamaica, were the intermediate stopovers.
In Haiti at the lie a Vache south coast island, a joint humanitarian
operation was organized by the Saint Martin Rotary Club, the Dutch Red
Cross and the rally organizer The Red Cross and Rotary Club collected
second hand clothes and school supplies for the lie a Vache schools and
orphanage, and the rally participants delivered the five tons directly to
the schoolmasters and to Sister Flora in charge of the orphanage.
The sailing was smooth and downwind all the way to Cienfuegos,
Cuba; 25 knots winds were rarely reached and the group could fully
enjoy the stopovers, swimming, friendly parties and excursions.
This rally is characterized by the freedom given to participants. A
good example is the leg from Guadeloupe to Saint Martin. Some
from Marina Bas du Fort decided to go upwind around the Pointe des
Chateaux cape, others south around Basse-Terre and finally a third
group decided to wake up early and took the Riviere-Salee channel
which shortened the journey by 50 miles.
The point, for each leg, whatever the distance, is to reach the next
stop on time for the welcome briefing and party, which are set at 6
p.m. local time. A wonderful welcome was given at marina Bas du fort
as usual, and Marina Fort Louis of Saint Martin was the place where
all bought their last provisions and spares. Participants sorted out
and loaded the boats with hundreds of bags for the Haiti operation.
Everyone was ready for the adventure.
The group reached Marina Casa de Campo 320 miles later, the first
stop in Dominican Republic, a wonderful marina with first class service,
friendly people, and wonderful parties and a partner of the rally from
the very beginning. All that is possible each year thanks to Commodore
Fini's friendship and efficiency. A visit to the luxurious resort and Alto de
Chavon, a medieval Italian village reconstitution, were the highlight of that
first day The other important excursion took place in Santo Domingo's
historical quarter and gave a feeling of what D.R has to offer for those
who had time and a desire to stay longer on their return journey
The other stops were Isla Catalina, Boca Chica, Isla Beata and its
200 fishermen, and finally
l at C s, Ca Bahia Las Aguilas, the last but
Arrival at Cienfuegos, Cuba
not the least interesting stop
in D.R., with its five-mile long
deserted white beach close to
the Haitian border.
Another 110 miles'overnight
sailing and we were anchored
at lie a Vache, Haiti, where
the humanitarian distribution
took place and the memor-
able welcome the population
treated us with is still in


everyone's memory. It is amazing to see what people can offer with so
little, a lesson for all. We will definitely come back next year.
One more night sailing and we reached Jamaica, Port Antonio, Errol
Flynn Marina, under heavy rain. Three marvelous days of relaxation,
touring and provisioning before the last leg of the trip to Cuba and, for
some who were to cross the Atlantic to Europe, the last opportunity
to really embark all necessary items for that long return journey.
Marina staff, beginning by Dale Westin, the manager, and George, his
assistant, made every possible effort to make this stay a memorable
one. They were friendly, efficient, and always ready to help.
Two and a half days' sailing later we arrived at Cienfuegos for the
first time, which is going to be a memorable one for sure. In the narrow
entrance channel, small typical fishing boats from Cienfuegos welcomed
and escorted us until we reached the Marlin Marina. Local and International
press was there, TV, newspapers, radios. Cienfuegos was created by the
French around two centuries ago and from now on the rally will reach
Cienfuego for the commemoration day, April 22nd each year.
The closing ceremony in the Cienfuegos Yacht club was above
anyone's expectation the food was good and the dance ballet and
music were just fantastic. The following day we took the bus to visit
Trinidad, created by the Spaniards, and Havana City.
Special thanks to Marlin Marina Cienfuego, Habanatur (excursions)
and Comodoro Jose Miguel Escrich from Hemingway Yacht Club in
Havana; without their help, no closing of the event of that quality
would have been possible.
In conclusion, after having visited six different islands, made more
than 10 stops and covered around 1500 nautical miles, this group of 50
had the feeling they had lived the last true Caribbean Adventure.
Next year's 2010 Transcaraibes rally will take place between the 1st
and the 22nd of April. Come and join us -the organizer speaks English,
Spanish and French. Contact www.transcaraibes.com, contact@
transcaraibes.com or Stephane: + 590 690 494 590. -@


Report and photos submitted by Stephane Legendre, Transcaraibes Rally


56 ALLATSEA.NET











MARTINIQUE'S

(BATTLE OF THE HULLS)

ONLY WINS RACING/CRUISING CLASS


ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY GAELLE BOURDAIS, TRANSLATED BY NICK MARSHALL

hat a beautiful Martinique sailing event 26 'hulls'
faced up to each other in good spirits in the Grand
Sud Martinique regatta from 21 to 23 May, 2009. The
event is organized every year by Lionel Baud from
the 'Open Barre' association, in partnership with the Club Nautique
du Marin and the Hotel la Dunette. The 'Open Barre' association was
created in 1998 to allow as many as possible to sail at the highest level
and to transform every regatta into enjoyable moments.
The sun shone for the whole three days of the extended Ascension
Weekend. There was good wind, beautiful seas, and excellent
participation from a hundred or so sailors, from skippers to simple
crewmembers, participating in boats of all categories. The base was in
the Hotel La Dunette in the centre of the village of St. Anne, right at the
water's edge, with the restaurant overlooking the sea providing an ideal
vantage point. The participating yachts could anchor right in front.
This Combat du Coque or 'Battle of the Hulls' (literally a 'Cock Fight'
in French, where a hull is a 'coque') is an allusion to the Cock Fights that
take part in Martinique in a pit where the cocks must battle each other.
During the three days, the races took place on a coastal course in front
of Sainte Anne, Diamant, Ste Luce, Le Marin and the Baie des Anglais
(courses for the 21,22 and 23 May), with the "Surprise Regatta' for the
Optimists at the dock in front of the Hotel Dunette. The game of the
day for the latter was to start with five Optimists, two sailors per boat,
one helming blindfolded, the crewmember on the sheets guiding his
colleague through the course. It's difficult to sail when you cannot see!
But the youngsters enjoyed it and the spectators watched and laughed.
A regatta is above all made up of sailors, so here is a look at some
of those who took part: 'Kamikaz Organiz' sailing on a UFO 22, with
skipper Aymeric Pinto and his crew Pierric Pinto, Grazielle Bourdais and
Jonathan (all under 22 years old). "Initially, we were able to stay in the
lead towards Diamond Rock but with so little wind we became stuck to
the Rock and were passed by other competitors who had stayed more
offshore. The gap widened even further once you took into account


DU COQUE


Racing cruising
winner On1)
under sail


three knots of current which
took us way off course," '
explained Graziella.
"Many people con-
gratulated us for our return
to competition and told us
that with newer sails we'd
have done a lot of damage!
We felt our lack of training '
but we really enjoyed
ourselves. We finished ninth
even though we won last
year," lamented Aymeric.
'Infinitif (Le Ponton/
Studio 10), the only crew sailing on a Surprise made up entirely of young
women, including the 18-year-old skipper MargauxVillain and helmsman
Lina Rolland. They were happy with their start on the first day and an
excellent first leg. A few hitches with the spinnaker and the halyard didn't
dampen their determination and they continued to enjoy themselves as
much as possible. Both these boats are currently looking for sponsors.
Zwell Wvell let us not forget the dynamic and friendly President
of the League, Yves-Michel Daunar, sailing on his UFO 28. And The
catamaran Bahia 45 'Titanic Belgique' with a crew made up of young
Belgians, friends of the famous Gaston Talba, with whom they have
sailed for some 20 years. Finally, let us congratulate also the winners
-'Only' in Racing/Cruising and 'Caraibes Greement' in Racing.
This 2009'Battle ofthe Hulls'mixed togethersome good ingredients.
The pleasure of sailing along with pleasure of enjoying a good Creole
'Blaff de Poisson' before leaving in the morning; parties, three nights
of music, and the presence on the final evening of Kali, the famous
Martiniquais Rasta singer
The Surprise Association was created in 2000 to get together'Infinitif
(owned by Bruno Marmousez) and its teenagers, and 'Wind' (owned
by Jean Trudo) with the aim
of teaching youngsters to sail
Kamikaze this kind of boat. www.young-
and On1) surprise.com
Morephotosareavailableon
www.clubnautiquedumarin.
com. To register for next
year's event, contact Lionel
Baud, always present 'at the
bar (helm)', always smiling
and relaxed. Call him on 0696
25 55 37 or email on baud@
ool.fr and openthebarre@
wanadoo.fr.


ALLATSEA.NET 57


\r







4, offlce@clarkescourtbaymarina.com Live-Aboard


ptSLYC HOLDS

2ND OPTIMIST

CHAMPIONSHIP
SWEENEY WINS NATIONAL
SAILING TITLE


13 of St. Lucia's top
under-15 sailors battled
it out in the St. Lucia
"i 4M Optimist Championships. The young
sailors took to the sea in Rodney Bay
to demonstrate racing skills learned
i....m r':- .wow 00 over the past three terms of training
Psurcrhase from their coaches Rob Hemming,
rii.O.i Chris Lowe and Katie Yeo. (Youth
%.s.J.. .,f.. i .i Sailing Programme organized by
.... L i. 2 the St Lucia Yacht Club).
The committee boat II Restless carried Fredric Sweeney, the
2 young Race Officer of the Day and his geriatric crew of 70 and 80
year olds (Ted, Frank & Jonathan) and of course the never exhaustive
Compolcom photographer (Danielle) and lady coach (Katie)!
The weather did not have the same sunny mood as the sailors. The
morning schedule was for three races, and driving rain with variable
winds made for some tough racing, with wind squalls of up to 20
GRENADA M ARINE knots. Their skill and manoeuvrability was a sight to behold as they
competed in six races around an Olympic type course three races
before lunch and three after lunch! Fortunately the sun appeared in
.. the afternoon along with slightly less wind strength which provided an
ideal sailing setting to complete the competition.
The young sailors fought hard, with Marcus Sweeney (13) coming
out with two strong victories. Stephanie Lovell (13) took the other race
in the morning followed closely by Thomas Meixner (13) and Marion
Bardies (14).The afternoon racing was competitive and dominated
by the girls as Marion Bardies, lead often with Raina Bergasse (14)
also spending time at the front, while Stephanie Lovell and Marcus
Sweeney traded the fourth and fifth races.
Going into the last race, the overall trophy was still up for grabs with
Marcus Sweeney ahead of Stephanie Lovell by just a couple points.
Marcus Sweeney got off to a terrible start and had to battle back from
well down the fleet. Stephanie Lovell did everything she could to take
the lead from Marion Bardies on the second lap and went on to win
the race. Although it wouldn't be enough, Marcus Sweeney showed
the perseverance of a true champion and climbed all the way back to
finish second and take the overall title. Stephanie Lovell still took the
Girls trophy, Luc Chevrier sailed a consistent regatta to take home the
11 & under Trophy. -

I~-a n [ W.1 ex H L C Erk
Report submitted through combined efforts of the SLYC; photo by
Danielle DeRouck


58 ALLATSEA.NET









BUDGET MARINE NATIONAL DINGHY

SAILING RANKING
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO'S 2009 WINNERS


2009, the Trinidad
-
& Tobago Sailing
Association hosted
the final Budget Marine National
Dinghy Sailing Ranking for the
2008 2009 season. On this day
the nation's best sailors sailed
their final three races of the L to R (back): Daniel Briggs, Wesley
season on the water of Carenage Scott, Dekife Charles; (front) Derek
Bay to determine the overall Poon Tip & Meiling Chan Chow
winners of the 2008 2009 sailing season.
Throughout the season, sailors young and old competed against
one and other on 14 ranking days in five different classes for the title
of best dinghy sailor of the season in each class.
After the last race of this season's Budget Marine National
Dinghy Sailing Ranking finished on June 6, most classes had sailed


SEASON'S BEST
DINGHY SAILORS
OPTIMIST GREEN FLEET Meiling Chan Chow
OPTIMIST RACE FLEET- Derek Poon Tip
LASER 4.7 Wesley Scott
LASER STANDARD Andrew Lewis
CLUB 420 Daniel Briggs (skipper)
and Dekife Charles (crew)


at least 36 races overall and the best dinghy sailors of the season
could be announced. a'

Article & photo submitted by Trinidad & Tobago Sailing Association


Simplicity.


Reliability.


Long life.

NORTHERN LIGHTS



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ALLATSEA.NET 59








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OPTI KIDS TRAIN WITH
OPEN SEA CROSSING

BY MARJOLEIN VAN AANHOLT-GROL

sometimes young
kids have big
dreams and want
Sv tochallengethem-
Sselves. Nine Optimist sail-

\ years of age challenged
themselves to sail in an
Optimist of 2 1/2 meter from
Klein Curacao to Curacao, a
K Curaca o 30 km crossing on open sea
Sa with high waves and strong
e d1i winds. On Saturday, June
13, kids and their boats
Embarked on the Mermaid
e and set off to the remote
Island of Klein Curacao.
Why did they want
to challenge themselves?
First of all to make the
T population more aware that
around Curacao we have
splendid waters, which we should use to the fullest. Secondly to show
that children are able to do more things than one frequently thinks. Also
to have an intensive training for the Optinam 2009, with an emphasis on
the down wind technique. And finally to raise money to participate in
the North American Optimist Championships, the OPTINAM 2009 in the
Dominican Republic which were held in Boca Chica June 30th -July 8th.
After a briefing by coach Martin Jenkins, the sailors departed
Klein Curacao around 11:00 accompanied by five rescue boats. The
conditions were perfect, force 4 to 5 and waves between 1.70 and 1.90
meter. Without any problems, just a couple of capsizes and nosedips,
all sailors reached the Lions Dive Hotel safely around 16:30.
Kevin van Otterdijk (14), Kevin Maas (13), Jarrik Bijsterbosch (13),
Eugene (15) en Louis (13) Hendrikx, Deion (13) en Jorden (11) van
Rooijen and Just (13) en Odile (11) van Aanholt can be very proud of
themselves. At the beach the team was welcomed by parents, family,
friends, sponsors and the press. Mr. Millerson and Mr. van Wilgen of
the Netherlands Antilles Olympic Committee presented the AHO flag
to the team, congratulated them and wished them good luck at the
OPTINAM 2009.
The OPTINAM 2009 team is sponsored by: ENNIA, Banco di Caribe,
DAE, Lions Dive Hotel, CMTC, Curagaose Wegenbouw Maatschappij,
Elite Dry Cleaning, Firgos Bonaire, Firgos Curagao, Hemingway,
Livingstone, Mermaid, Onsoftarch, Sambal, Seaquarium, Wet & Wild
&Willemstad NV -C


60 ALLATSEA.NET








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CARIBBEAN MARINAS

ALL ATSEA'S CARIBBEAN MARINA GUIDE


0
() c
/ Yc?


A 0
0, o N 0
<^^ ,e<


Jolly Harbour Marina 268-462-6042 10' 250' 158 110/220 Cable 68 *

Renaissance Marina Aruba 297-588-0260 13' 200' 50 110/220 16/69


Seru Boca


599-767-9042 14' 150' 140


127/220


Dominican Marina Zar Par 809-523-5858 12' 120' 110 11020 5 FREE
Republic 308
Domiican Ocean World Marina 809-970-3373 12'+ 250' 104 110/220 16/68 *
Republic

Grenada Clarkes Court Bay Marina 473-439-2593 13' 60' 52 110/220 16/74 USB
access
Grenada Grenada Marine 473-443-1667 15' 70' 4 110/220 16 FREE

Grenada Le Phare Bleu Marina 473-444-2400 15' 120' 60 110/220/480 16 FREE

Grenada Port Louis Marina 473-435-7431 14.76' 90m 49 110/220 14 *

Grenada Prickly Bay Marina 473-439-5265 17' 200' 10 110/ 220/ 16

110/220/480
Jamaica Errol Flynn Marina & Shipyard 876-715-6044 32' 600' 33 1&3PH 0/H Cable 16/9 FREE

Puerto Rico Puerto del Rey Marina 787-860-1000 15' 260' 1,000 120/208 Cable 16/71 *

Puerto Rico Sunbay Marina 787-863-0313 12' 75' 287 110/220 Cable 16/12 *

St. Croix St. Croix Marine 340-773-0289 11' 150' 44 110/220 16/18

St. Lucia Rodney Bay Marina 758-452-0324 15' 220' 232 110/220 16/17 *
an IGY Jea na n
110/220/380
St. Lucia The Marina at Marigot Bay 758-451-4275 16' 250' 40 150/60 Hz Cable 16/12 *

St. Maarten Island Water World Marina 599-544-5310 8' 90' 54 Available Cable 74

St. Maarten Lagoon Marina Cole Bay Wtrft 599-544-2611 9' 100' 45 110/220 16 FREE

St. Maarten Simpson Bay Marina 599-544-2309 14' 200' 126 110/220/ 16/79
anI IGY d" nation 480-
St. Martin Captain Oliver's 590-59087 10' 150' 160 110/240 16/67
33-47

St. Thomas American Yacht Harbor 340-775-6454 9.5' 110' 106 110/240 16/11 *
_an IGY die, nation
Tortola, BVI Nanny Cay Marina 284-494-2512 12' 125' 200 110/220 16 *

Tortola, BVI Soper's Hole 284-495-4589 25' 170' 50 110/240 Cable 16 Cafe
Hard-
Tortola, BVI Village Cay Marina 284-494-2771 12' 200' 106 110/20/ Cable 16/71 line
anQ IGYdestination" at Slip
Trinidad Power Boats Ltd 868-634-4346 13' 65' 40 115/220 72 *


Virgin Gorda


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284-495-550 10' 180' 94


110/220


00
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62 ALLATSEA.NET


i^~ "^











EVENT CALENDAR


Please send future events for our calendar to chris@allatsea.net.
This month and next month's events are currently published here and at www.allatsea.net.
Your specific area may or may not be shown based on identified activities for these months.


H ANTIGUA

8/15
Summer Bash 2009
Crew Parties I theabracadabra.com
abra@candw.ag

W ARUBA

8/15-16
Aruba Race I Sailing

H BARBADOS

8/15-16
Caribbean Dinghy Championships
Sailing I sailbarbados.com

= CURACAO

9/5-6
Klein Curacao Insulinde Challenge
Sailing

- HAMPTON, VIRGINIA

9/9-10
Cruising Rally Association
Ocean Sailing Seminar
Industry Conference I carib1500.com
steve@carib1500.com


RENAISSANCE
MARINA


MONTE CARLO, MONACO

9/23-26
Monaco Yacht Show
Boat Show
monacoyachtshow.com
info@monacoyachtshow.mc

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

9/16-20
10th Annual YachtFest
Boat Show
yachtfest.com
858-836-0133



FISHING TOURNAMENTS

8/3-7
BTS USVI Open/ABMT "Boy Scout"
St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands
abmt.vi
loveto@islands.vi

8/14-16
Tarpon Thunder Tournament
Trinidad I ttgfa.com
info@ttgfa.com


h.- .. A t.l r. I- he" 1 -4~m~r


tocIted at 1211' N and NY02' W, Renaissance Marina is the istnd's
most beautiful marina, part of the Rnaissance Aruba Rewrt
Casino, it otetches ovevr much of this plirlurmque wallerfron t


l ST. LUCIA

8/1
Emancipation Day Race,
Open to All Classes
Sailing I stluciayachtclub.com
slycmembers@gmail.com

8/9
Last Day Hurricane Series
J24 & Big Boats
Sailing I stluciayachtclub.com
slycmembers@gmail.com





8/28-9/3
56th Intl Billfish Tournament
of San Juan
Puerto Rico I sanjuaninternational.com
info@sanjuaninternational.com

9/24-28
The Venezuelan Intl Super Slam
Tournament
La Guaira, Venezuela
intlbillfishtourns.com
rick@intlbillfishtourns.com


.I heI ig 111 I 1-p6.I


4Me minJ ..pp1,e. I cA tune, ng., Jfl j n! 10, :'U-'W 1 ,Oi i
elec-tricity, safell ite % W I h .:. uF1 b j 3r) I Cr dw 2.; lj ur % 3,3j,


Tc+ (*297 58&0260 Fax. (*297 588-0261 i wwwxenaimaocemarmancorn I Channre 16 i Renaii ~ric Marketplace, Orinicjtar Aruba


ALLATSEA.NET 63






www.forcrew.com


Free online professional social networking
destination for yacht crew
Create and Maintain your Professional Profile
Find and Connect with Fellow Crew
Put the Power of the Community back
in your Hands

p, linking captains & crews.

forcrew
Captains, Mates, Stews, Chefs, Engineers, Deckhands,
Delivery Crew, Day Workers, Ex-Crew,
ALL ARE WELCOME


4-rwo0to











THE DISH

SIMPLE INGREDIENTS FOR SATISFYING MEALS

BY CAPTAIN JAN ROBINSON


summer treat and a wonderful place to select "just-picked
vegetables." Community-based agricultural programs are
growing on many Caribbean islands just as they have in the
United States. Make fruits and veggies a staple in your day. They are
filled with lots of good nutrition that you need and add flavor, fiber
and fun! And handing your "sous chef" the grilling tongs and enjoying
your friends for an evening is something to cherish.
Send your suggestions of foods and preparation you would like
to about ... and please forward any special easy recipes that you
may like to share with other readers by mailing Jan@allatsea.net.
Happy cooking!


FRESH VEGGIES WITH PEANUT SAUCE
Preparation time: 15 minutes. Chilling time: Up to 48 hours.
Makes: About 1-1/2 cups.
1/2 cup creamy peanut butter 1 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 cup hoisin sauce 2 tsp finely grated fresh ginger
1/4 cup water 1/8 tsp bottled hot pepper sauce
2 green onions, cut up Garnish: Chopped peanuts
2 Tbsp lime juice
Assorted fresh vegetables: red pepper strips, cherry tomatoes,
radishes, baby carrots, sugar snap peas, celery and cucumber sticks,
or blanched broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, and green beans.
In a food processor or blender, combine first eight ingredients. Cover
and process or blend until smooth. Add additional water, if necessary,
to thin the sauce to a dipping consistency. Transfer to a bowl, cover and
chill. Top with chopped peanuts and serve with the vegetables.


ARUGULA, CORN AND TOMATO SALAD
Preparation time: 15 minutes.
Serves: 6.
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup minced shallots
5/8 cup (6 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 tsp salt
Freshly ground pepper to taste
6 cups loosely packed arugula (about 6 ounces)
2 cups fresh corn kernels (about 4 ears)
1-1/2 pints cherry tomatoes, halved
In a large bowl combine vinegar and shallots. Whisk in olive oil.
Season with salt and pepper. Add arugula and toss lightly to coat.
Arrange the arugula on serving plates. Add corn and tomatoes to the
bowl, toss with the dressing remains, then spoon the mixture over
the arugula and serve.


FRESH BEAN SALAD WITH SWEET WHITE CORN AND
DIJON-TARRAGON VINAIGRETTE
Preparation time: 15 minutes. Cooking time: 4 minutes.
Cooling time: Varies. Serves: 8.
1/2 tsp salt
2 cups fresh green beans, cut in thirds
1 cup fresh yellow wax beans, cut in thirds
5 cups cooked fresh white corn kernels (about 6 ears)
1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
VINAIGRETTE
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
2 garlic cloves
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper
Bring a large pot of water to boil, add 1/4 tsp salt with the green and
yellow beans and cook until crisp-tender, about four minutes. Drain
and immediately rinse beans under cold water to cool; pat dry with
paper towels. Combine beans, corn, bell pepper, and onion in large
bowl. Cover and refrigerate. Hint: Vegetables can be prepared up to
one day ahead and refrigerated.
Blend vinegar, mustard, tarragon, and garlic in food processor.
Slowly blend in both oils. Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and
pepper To serve, toss vegetables with enough vinaigrette to coat.


CORN SALSA
Preparation time: 10 minutes.
Cooking time: 15 minutes.
Cooling time: 20 minutes.
Makes: 4 cups.
2 cups fresh corn kernels (from
about 4 large ears corn)
1 Tbsp canola oil
1 large onion, coarsely
chopped (1 cup)
1 large green or red sweet pepper,
coarsely chopped (1 cup)
1 fresh jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 cup chopped, peeled tomatoes
1/4 cup lime juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper


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Cook corn kernels in enough lightly salted boiling water to cover
for three minutes or till tender; drain. Let cool. In a large saucepan,
heat oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, sweet pepper and
jalapeno pepper Cook until onion is tender but not brown. Stir in
corn, tomatoes, lime- juice, salt, cumin, and black pepper. Cook and
stir over medium heat until heated through. Let cool. Transfer to a
storage container Hint: Serve or cover and chill up to 1 week. Serve
with pork, beef or poultry.


VEGETABLES AND GRILLED CHICKEN PASTA
WITH OVEN ROASTED TOMATOES
Preparation time: 15 minutes.
Cooking time: 30 minutes.
Standing time: 10 minutes. Serves: 4.
12 Roma tomatoes, cored and halved
1 Ib baby squash (halve any large squash)
1 red sweet pepper, cut into bite-size pieces
4 green onions, sliced ,,rr:.


1-inch pieces
1/4 cup (4 Tbsp) olive od
1 Tbsp snipped
fresh rosemary
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp ground
black pepper
1 lb cooked
chicken, cut in
bite size pieces
8 oz dried penne or
bow tie pasta (2 1/2 :.' :.'
1/4 cup snipped fresh
Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
3 tablespoons snipped fresh basil
1/2 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese
Preheat oven to 450F. Place tomatoes in a 13x9x2-inch baking
pan or shallow roasting pan. Place squash, red pepper and green
onions in another shallow baking pan. Drizzle tomatoes and squash
mixture with three tablespoons olive oil and season with rosemary,
salt and black pepper Roast, uncovered, in oven about 20 minutes
for squash mixture or until just tender, stirring occasionally,
and about 30 minutes for tomatoes until very soft and skins are
beginning to brown.
In a large saucepan or kettle cook pasta according to package
directions in lightly salted boiling water. Drain pasta and transfer
to a very large bowl. To serve, stir tomatoes, vegetables, chicken,
parsley, and basil into pasta. Season to taste with additional salt and
black pepper Transfer to a serving platter and sprinkle with or pass
Parmesan cheese. -i


Capt. Jan Robinson holds certificates from the Culinary Institute
of America, The Ritz Cooking School, and the Cordon Bleu. Her
Ship to Shore Cookbook Collection is available at your local marine
or bookstore. Or visit wwwshiptoshorelNC.com, email CapJan@
aol.com or call 1-800-338-6072 and mention All at Sea to receive
a discount.


66 ALLATSEA.NET

























Windward Spiril
king.. 4 H,000.
Asking $325,000


"Crowley Too"*
3 Cabins/3 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $195,000


"Laurel"*
4 Cabins/2 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $100,000


"Obsession"*
2 Cabins/2 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $165,000


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A s ing. 9 H. il.
Asking $195,000


Dill
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Asking $300,000


"Perroquet"*
3-4 Cabins/2 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $75,000


"Fern"*
3 Cabins/2 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $90,000


"Aria I"*
2 Cabins/ 2 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $115,000


"Eucalyptus"*
3 Cabins/ 1 Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $65,000


"Mina"*
2 Cabins/I Heads
Located in Tortola, B.V.I.
Asking $75,000


2005 OCENIS 42C










.I- ., ...! .




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82 Dufour Nautitech 1995 52' Endeavour 1990
Tri r- llJuui'. U Opp il unily 'Verv C(le3n.Comforltbl'.
SGreat Candition Asking S')r'.k G GFeat Condrtion. Akinq S 169.'







S49'Jeannneau Sun Ody.'04 47'Bluewater /Vagabond'87
iLoaded.Ver Cle an. Good Pirice All Fulirng bestl alue
SA.k.ng S1c K I Acking SilsK


51'CSY Sarasota Marine'SB
Ch3rtbe Molgan Cuitom 51
'Majo Pelit Askinc 5 159K


50 8Oneteau 1997
Lud.Jcd Vtiy Clt-n. .God Piic
Asking SIBO .







47'Privilege 4651999
aWrld Cruisnq g Cr at GrLear
Price Askn QSi339g


49'Oyster49PH 1992
Rjre Pilulhou.,vr Inllmaullate
Askinq S379l.


AbsoluTcel Loaded
A'.kir..1: S 195'h

LlhtX *'/


46 Morgan461 1980 45'Robertson &Caine 1999
ivelv Siurdy and Spacilus Lols ol Upgradei.Lc'-. P.ice
2 Available CS<.lnr.ng 52 9X AkiLny S309K

, -' 1- ; ,.,


44'Moody 1993
E.riernely w.-ll Equipped
Creat Piin-e A, ng "1 S'9K


. rounialne rdajo venezia
*i .Well Prl ,d Al.;tlal, lp
imrtirng a, S2.6,1


%z naI3oerg-n3asy 1la4,
M~nor Flilr:. Just Reduccd-
Aslng 160K1







41'Beneleau 411 2001
tJleei Chartered Very Well
EoulDled ASkilna I 19iK


45'Wauquiez Amphitrite'90 44'Morgan 1958
NWA. LO ~eI Pril,- Offtho iE xrjlardfinair Valu Grea l Price
Crurisr Ask.ng S175k Ask.ng I I 19K

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,.7. I T


42' Beneteau 423 2004
Clean V IIl Mjanidined
Asking 112t29'


Trie Clai- c Ainairiy Piicv
Asking S99K


4s nuntel qsu I iv
Well Equipped in Anllqua
2 Available Starlrng .i 599K


4A %u11 Ial r t l.r i
I nT' of lJ4gr.a nle
Asking S?-9K


42' Beneeau 42s7 1995 42' Lagoon 420 2008 41'Lagoon 410 2001
Imnmicul iti. irtil r iqgn Fa J F:-n Pr.n Nerv fa i'nna Vlry Well rI-p[ and Priced
Ak.rng S99K Asking 5525K A.kinri 5219K


40'Beneleau40CC '971'00
Well Equipped Solal and Wind
A Available Srarting .- i051


38' Hallberg Rassy 382 1987
Giv:e F'i,. SuliJ Vv-,.t I
Asking S125K


38'Beneteau M38 1991 I 37Maxim Yachts 1999 36' Bayfield 1987
Peiroriarrice Cruiser Strong African Buill Cat Immaculate Gi'eal Condition
Aslng 55sk Aslirng q 1 iyY Asklng 505K


36' Beneteau 361 2000 26'Glacier Bay 2680 1999
Nc-ver Charleied Very Clean Tvwin I50HiP 1 Stroke
A, ing $85k Asking SO'iK


'r "-









DEAN CATAMARANS





m -- -
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DEAN 441 44ft OCEAN CRUISING CATAMARAN
Owners of "7 Seas* Valerie and Oiivier comment on
their experiences in the following letter:
It was at the Grand Pavols of the La Rochelle Boat Show that we diuovred the Dean
-l4 I AlhIt iti .i.'ngial ~?r.-r.p., IMF rr ih I-u 4jl.F, C1 i ,T.'itm. ".ll .,,.1 i s ve.ry complete list
Ail in.-rld Pro il .~i l v.'- n F Ir-i .ll.irr.g -rp ;I4pf, v13-rn- in, we did sea tests of
other catoa s making a fast deosion i nolone of our qualities. MPost m I
becrarre urncomTrar ce once ir.e eA3 be.or'eF da14L3Ie3i iL 'e iL- iar i si3nTC .Tr.g
under rtro hndgrcE.c, .'l li'r!I triOC De.n 141n .I no airid ,~ann iq l 'ij did nor nli[t
m1 ch CiDespio rn. li, n i, C Te.*1 nagjad.Ji .r.mi 115 1* I i-A rills '.i. u'. rI n il.'- I.
woUld handle the waves better. and we decided to travel to South Africa to investigate
further 026
The Dean facory Is located close to Cape Town and for us is the perfect size. Not too
big, nor too small Too big and you are one customer among hundreds and material
quality suffers, Too small makes us fee tIhe defects o too little experience,
At Dean Cata arans boats are hand built and personalled, and we were very cordially
welcomed by Paler Dean. When we saw him we understand what il mant by "the
passion or boatbutding' "He answers all our questSons with precision, intelligence and
a sniler He reflects and finds solutions for each one f our wishes.
Although we would only know it afterwards, this same up froni kindness and glenerosity
continued during and after the construcb lr of the boat.
The entire Dean team and their French agent. Bernard Mondoulet, particularly
Impressed i r, ,r .,, a~ilr.inI.lr, r..id irheLdrw Anyqueston ortedchncal inq uryIs

Currently we are infinilely satised with our choice ol yadll Indeed we can confirm
;.lir iJ anno In .i.-ie a rsi,,ll 'r boat passes over waves gently, even n heavy seas
r, bj.id a-he, ra roeal aile in i's protected cockpit and it's seaworhlness
rieajures Tris 1.xod I-o ioring c i1 de,. gear ensures Ihe boat is easily handed by
two people and even an ocean crossing could be done single handed
And what happiness, when we ln-rve :.1 in JricnlC'ji. o e.1i0ii pul cdholi gyn ri the
water and explore all the pretty creeks and enjoy some good vwrnmm ng.
Lastly and especially, the intenor and comfort is immense We note indeed that Iftete ris - ,
a .liffersri, rarorri,-. I., rna .in Aril iu, i.i pg.r9q c ,.rF .A -1i ic n.. i* n a rr-B aeek
I. ri*r at 'rL : id.* J ..ir, T--r [.I n ... .iXir.." i .' .r -in V exis r -,*o we
wanl connfortl
'7 Seas' s re..- q n,.i .n d,, h an u -l .i n,.s cor.i-.-i...] .rb in Inc.r.r c.l Everything as
roomy and prachcal with plenty of storage space for everything including our diving
compressor, bicycles and musical instruments We are glad to be able to sit
comfortably at the pi(a stalian, to never have to duck your head in any cabin, to be able
to cook fast meals. and especially to sleep in a roomy bed like at home
Need we say morel

DEAL DIRECTLY WITH THE FACTORY ONLY AND VISIT OUR WEBSITE ,www.eancatamarans.com FOR ADDrTIONAL INFORMATION
DEAN CATAMARANS ROTHMAN STREET
TEL. 00 27 21 5r7 2222 ATLANTIS. CAPE TOWN
E-MAIL powercal@adeancallammraiis corn SOUTH AFRICA


DESIGNING SINCE 1980 MANUFACTURING SINCE 194 PROTcYPE LAUNCHED 1982































1972 Najade ................................................................... US$12,000
1977 Roberts Home Built (located in Barbados)............... US$40,000
1968 Cheoy Lee Off Shore 40 .......................reduced to US$70,000
1981 Divorne Steel ............................................................ US$50,000
1986 TaShing Tashiba (excellent condition) .reduced to US$179,500
2002 Hermine DI (launched 2008)..................................... US$410,000
1982 Sigma Marine Project ................................................ US$60,000
1985 Irwin Ketch .................................................................. US$85,000
1986 Endeavour.................................................................... US$98,000
1999 W auquiez Pilot Saloon................................................ EU247,500
1985 Gitana .......................................... ............... ................ US$115,000
1998 Peterson cutter................................................... US$189,999
1999 Passport a/c 44.................................... US$365,000
2001 Tayana (Vancouver pilot house) ........................... US$329,000
1974 Motor Yacht (locally built) ......................................... US$80,000
1991 Celestial Pilothouse............................................... US$268,000
2001 Beneteau ...................................... EU188,000


51' 1986 Beneteau ................................................................. US$225,000
51' 1990 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey ............................reduced to EU99,000
51' 1987 Beneteau Idylle 15.5, located in Martinque............. US$160,000
53' 1984 Amel Custom Mango ................................................ US$269,000
55' 1979 Herreshoff Marco Polo ......................................... US$170,000
55' 1998 Zerft Motor Sailer (must sell!!!) ................................ US$40,000
55' 1994 Oyster 55 ....................................................................... 376,000
56' 1973 Visch Motor Yacht .................................................... US$175,000
75' 1976 Murry Peterson Coaster (Schooner) ....................... US$100,000

37' 2002 Fountaine Pajot, located in Guadeloupe ............... US$325,000
41' 1992 Prometa Cat Flotteur................................. ..................................sold
43' 2001 Lagoon Catamaran.................................. US$334,000
54' 1980 Norman Cross Trimaran ......................................... US$350,000
55' 1995 Custom Built Trimaran, located in Grenada............... US$350,000
63' 1998 Polynesion Double Canoe.......................................... EU190,000


TOHATSU
outboards


St. Thomas, USVI across from Independent Boatvard
Contact us at (340) 779-2717/775-0860 Fax: (340) 779-7119 pgxmaxirvitelcom.net


70 ALLATSEA.NET


MONOHU:LLS~





























Five cabin. Spotless.
$169K


1974/2008 GULFSTAR
MOTORSAILER.
AWESOME LIVEABOARD
WITH OFFICE!
$69K Offers


schooner. Gorgeous
3 Million Euro


.win zuu ramanas
$89K


1984 Macgregor 65. 1979 Oyster 39.
Rocket machine Blue water live aboard.
$99K Offers! All systems upgraded.
Blue water ready.
$99K OFFERS!


zuuo nanse 41o
Immaculate
Racing sails epoxy build
US$375K Offers


2005 Fountaine Pajot
Bahia 46. One owner since
new. Never chartered.
US$450K Offers


1982 Nautical 60
Very clean
$249K Dropped $100K!


1990 42 ft Carver.
Spotless and pristine
$225K


rr IVncEO l ij
OWNERS VERSION. 2005
$440K OFFERS


2008 Nouverania Inboard
Diesel 21 ft Inflatable
Low Hours
$39K


I=Iu. rncuu .EE
OFF SHORE 31
Budget Blue water cruiser.
$15K


Dynamique 62.
One careful owner
since new.
Quite Magnificent
$795K Reduced!


66 FT ALUMINIUM
EXPEDITION CLASS
LIVEABOARD TRAWLER.
READY TO GO $299K


1981 Endeavour 43
Clean, well appointed
blue water cruiser.
Many Upgrades


.uu. voyage au cat.
Turnkey charter or
bluewater cruise
$475K REDUCED!!!


2003 PURSUIT 28ft.
1050 hours on 2 x 225
Four stroke Yamahas.
Very clean $79K offers.


I.. .- l. n.umlnum
Sloop Project Boat
$250K Offers


2008 Beneteau Oceanis
As new.
All the bells and whistles.
$399K Offers


l"r Dentnmeau utcnl ,uu
two cabin
$95K Offers!


1094 Aloha 34 ft Sloop.
Good clean
Budget priced liveaboard.
$45K


1999 Hunter Passage 450.
One owner boat
Spotless $165K


1992 Dudley DixCaribbea 30 1979 GULFSTAR 37. 2003 Jeanneau Sun
Blue water Pocket Rocket SPOTLESS AND PRISTINE. Odyssey 45.5. Owner version,
loaded $35K GIVEAWAY AT $58k all the extra, never chartered
$240k Offers


gorgeous:
$450K Offers


2002 Jeanneau
Merry Fisher
$22K Offers


La rn ulonzd.
Motors as new
$30K Offers!


KOHLER 42
EPOXY CAT.
$199k


M1l --
















































10 Year Structural
Hull Warranty
1 1


72 ALLATSEA.NET


1231-Itills Yacht Sales



Buvimy or Selfint),

INIonolitill, Cawn-mran
or Trimmm

IN'twor or Sail


123 H tl)lsc(),,)


At 123 flulls, we
fulfill %our ficeds &
exceed Nour
CXI)COMImis



Office: 284-494-0054
CeIL 284-499-Oi9l
info(a 123hiilkcom
12311 till scom












Discoyer he treasures (of
the Spani Virgin Islands


I'

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^NF*


BARE BOAIr SAILING A ItI T ELI, SI NISI VI i(;IN ISLANDS
Mlarna lu nIo Diel IIRe. Fajardo. -D -If. ql-rI
kw" 'k ,ailc: rihi

t** **A


New Catamaran Inventory from


____LA
LA GO O N


Come See Them at Our Docks Today.


ATLAS YACHT SALES
Marina Puerto del Rey
Fajardo, Puerto Rico


sailatlas.com 787-439-2275


Compass Point Marina 6300 Est. Frydenhoj, Suite 28, St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00802
Phone: (340) 779-1660 Fax: (340) 775-4803 yachts@islands.vi


Too many upgrades to list! Email for
details on new mechanicals, wiring,
genset, A/C, appliances, top of line elec-
tronics, much more. Not a fixer upper.
2200 hours on 300hp Cat 3208's. Now
in Virgin Islands, probably Ft. Lauderdale
in June.


30 Albin Stratus
$45.000


49' 1988 Grand Banks
$199,500


SAIL
33' '73 Pearson 10M sloop, refit....... $25K
36' '80 Albln Stratus 75K w/business......$45K
38' '79 C&C Racer/Cruiser,36HP Yanmar...$23K
38' '92 Kennex Cat, AC, AP...................... $139K
40' '84 Endeavour, ready to cruise......$79.9K
41' '80 Morgan Out Isl, Well maintained.$79K
43' '85 Morgan Catalina, new paint.............. $89K
44' '77 CSY Sloop, new rigging.............. $115K
44' '85 Beneteau Idylle, APAC, Genset....... $86K
46' '00 Jeanneau 3 strms,great cond.....$179.9K


49' '79 Transpacific Ketch, loaded ........$180K
50' '78 Nautor Motorsailer, exlnt cond... $370K
POWER
14' '06 AquascanJetboat, 160HPYamaha...$34.9K
26' '87 Whale Boat, Diesel, CG cert........ $33K
27' '88 Luhrs Alura, cabin, IB gas cabin.. $20K
29' '77 Phoenix SF 2004 Crusaders....... $29K
29' '94 PhoenSport Fsher, T225 HP vo4s..$64.5K
32' '96 Carver 325, twin Crusaders ........$75K
34' '89 Sea Ray Express, diesels............ $55K


38' 1979 C
$23,000


55' 1983 Hatteras
$338,000


35' '00 Tiara, twin Cummins................... $160K
36' '80 Litton Trawler............................... $30K
39' '98 Mainship Trawler, twin diesels... $129.9K
40' '97 Carver MY, Cockpit, twin diesels.$120K
40' '99 Tiara Express, Twin Cats............... $275K
42' '81 Post SF, twin DD's, 2 strms....... $109K
42' '84 Present Sundeck 135 HP Lehmans..$135K
48' '02 DynaCrattMY,3strms 450HPCats...$490K
50' '88 Grand Banks, 4 strms, Caterpillars... $199.5K
53' '83 Hatteras SF, DD's, 3 strms............. $338K


Call, fax or visit our website for a complete list of boats for sale


S1


ALLATSEA.NET 73


gA .Y --


\1 114, ,










MARITIME YACHT SALES
Located in Independent Boatyard, St. Thomas, USVI
Member of The Yacht Brokers Association of America
C: 340-513-3147 T: 340-714-6271 F: 340-777-6272 vachts@vipowernet.net


48 Cheoy Lee 48, 1981 40 Tiara Express, 1994
3 cabin 2 head, aft cockpit Twin Cummins, genset, a/c & more
Major upgrades 08, must see $ 116,000 Huge reduction, Must Sell, Offers $ 119,000







38 Camcraft, 1967 44 CSY Walkover, 1978
Aluminum crew boat wth complete Recent upgrades, engine rebuild 08
cabin, GM diesel, genset, clean $ 50,000 Classic cruiser priced to sell $ 50,000


SAIL
52 1985 Irn -Four saterom, three head layout perfectforcharter... $160,000
50 1987 Gulfstar/CSY Spacous three cabin cruiser, bring offers...$125,000
48 1974 Maple Leaf- Classic CC cruiser, new paint in 2006.....$99,000
48 1970 Hughes Includes turnkey successful day charter b ..$299,900
45 1978 Endurance Wndboats- Ferro cement CC Plothouse ketch... $125,000
45 1980 Hardin CC cutter ketch, 4 cabin, 2 head, bring offers...... $95,000
45 1978 Morgan- Long range CC cruiser, ideal liveaboard .......$79,000
41 1982 Morgan 01- CC cruising ketch, Perkins, dinghy & more.. $69,000
41 1974 Formosa Yankee Clipper- Many upgrades, must see, offers.....$70,000
40 1979 Pearson Performance racer/cruer, pnced for immediae sell..$35,000
39 1974 South Seas SteelCC cutter ch, one power, proven cruer ....$59,00
38 1986 Encson Excellent performance cruiser, newAwlgnp 07.. $79,000
38 1978 Van de Stadt- Steel passage maker, ketch ng, Yanmar... $69,000
38 1978 Morgan Ted Brewer designed sloop.......................$42,000
37 1977 Gulfstar- 2004 Refit, ready to cruise or liveaboard ...$69,000


44 soomnay Ixpiorer, iurn
Extensive reft, great condition
Recent sails and ringing, much more $ 89,000


28 Bertram, 1973
Twin Fords, complete cabin,
Flybndge, new Awlgnp 08, offers $ 27,000


36 1980 Mariner- Stout cruising ketch, spacious cabin & cockpt.. $49,000
34 1988 Tartan Classic design, scheel keel, bring offers .........$44,000
33 1973 Morgan Out Island Spacious cruiser, bring offer......$29,000
31 1995 Corsair Performance trimaran with trailer ..............$79,000
30 1963 Allied Seawind Classic cruising ketch, ready to sail........ $24,900
27 1988 J-Boat-Raceready,marysaet~albr,)RT~nner07,08,09.....$27,000
POWER
57 2003 CarverVoyager Pbthouse MY-Vo bw hours. Loaded...$499,000
46 1985 Logcal PowerCat- Perfect chareror eaboad, hge cockpt.$180,000
46 1985 BertramCorertbbe-GM89s, 05 genset new bottom pat.$150,000
42 1999 CruBers 4270 Express, Cats, genset, verywell maintained...$199,000
37 2005 Fountaine Pajot Pnvate power cat, excellent condon..... $399,000
37 2002 Inrepd 377 Wakaound (3)NewSusu OBs, Newgenset..... $245,000
34 1996 Phoen 34 Twin Cats, flybridge, full cabin, clean....$114,900
31 2005 Maxum 31 Twn-Mercruers, geneset, ac, verybwhours...$79,000
30 1951 Egg Harbor-Classcwden cruiser, compltelrebuit1987......$39,000


Visit us online at www.maritimeyachtsales.com


Immaculate Condition
Length 79ft*Beam 23ft*Draught 11ft

Engine 343 Cat., dual helm. Cruis-
ing speed 10 knots. Range 6000
to 8000 miles. Large refrigerated
store below decks.

Used for day charters in St Lucia.
Beautiful varnished wood interior,
large swim platform, seated upper
deck. Owner maintained, by qualified
Marine Engineer, 45 years at sea.

Asking $275,000.00 US NEGOTIABLE


YACHTS
International Yacht Brokers


28' 2007 Geminga Aventura
69,000 Euros
I REDUCED


Located at Simpson Bay Marina,
Plaza del Lago, St. Maarten

ST. MAARTEN: +599 544 2798
ST. MARTIN: + 590 690 47 71 45
TRINIDAD: 1 868 634 4868
CALIFORNIA 1 510 814 0400


50' 1993 Tropic Multicoques Amarante
219,000 Euros
I NEW LISTING


37' 1985 Jeanneau Selection Refit 66' 1965 Onetta Long-range Alu Trawler
39,000 Euros $199,000

www.bayislandyachts.com


Perfect Condition
Attractive Price EC Vat Paid
Pacific 639 000


Amel 54 2007
Amel Super Maramu 2001
Alubat Ovni 435 2006
Oceanis 411 1998 (SuperL



Lagoon 440 2007
Lagoon 380 2004
Belize 43 2002
Athena 38 1996


MONOHULLS
St Martin
Martinique
Guadeloupe
I) Guadeloupe

CATAMARANS
Caribbean
St Martin
St Martin
Martinique


Us mid eboan -yachtor

II~m'I, I


2 30 hp Volvo
Good condition
St Martin 129 000


699 000
320 000
269 000
99 000



390 000
165 000
200 000
140 000


74 ALLATSEA.NET


AdA












BLnID


Lovely boat in excellent condition,
has Chartplotter, Invertor, comes
w/ 10' hardbottom Caribe.
Price reduced to $239,000.00
See photos & the full listing
information for this boat on our
website at www.iyc.vi




^ ii A f I [LL i ,i** * i ...


#1 SOURCE FOR NEW &
PRE-OWNED POWERBOATS










ON OUR WESITE
MA14 4%.P R.DISF.BO.1TS.COM





t-3menIre
1 **---- e
















Oid Pama Ro. S. J 1s Anzig


COST


VR CThI D S SThe Multihull Company


INNOVATIVE DESIGNS QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP


*Fast Relrabl Ferrim. *Ww. Pldng P
*Day Chater Cat *Innovativm Cruis
*Custam Deslgn *Wlngmasts


St. Croix, USVI 340.778.1004 I www.goldcoostyachis.com


5TE. U3L=J.p J. -


WE BUILD ONE OF THE MOST FUEL EFFICIENT
PASSENGER VESSELS IN THE WORLD


S3'Y aht Catamaan: 49 to 100
pseas Mrs, base pr:e $ 90.00O


46' E 1 Carsacnrn. 49 pasnger,
atrlabl*e ar inbowd r oulboas. I - - -""
slalulng a 51f3,000

** GS 9 *** -


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Sea ^^^^I Fla 4
0cm acht50 onvedble200


piig 6 II*.p 2002


ALLATSEA.NET 75




























































1990 SEA RAY 310EC CABIN
CRUISER FOR SALE in St. Lucia
powered by twin 260hp Mercruiser
Inboards. Registered and Duty Paid in
St. Lucia, Asking Price is US$45000.00.
negotiable,all reasonable offers consid-
ered. Contact Cliff Tel# 1-758-717-2827 or
email: aedelice@candw.lc

NEW LISTING! COMMERCIAL
BOAT FOR SALE: 30 FT. ISLAND
HOPPER (12 ft. beam). 420HP Cat
3126 (year 2005-low hours). Deck, deck
substructure, engine, and steering system
were all replaced in 2005!. Only $55,000
USD (289) 286-1165 or boat@mountain
cable.net.

18 FT CENTER-CONSOLE RIB.
Rendova by Nautica (Italy) 2001 model.
Stainless steel deluxe radar arch/roll bar,
solar panel. 2001 Yamaha 4 stroke under
300 hours! Never had a patch. $16,500.00
Tortola. Colin 1.284.443.2222 info@jost-
vandykescuba.com

FISHING BOAT 17 METERS TO
REPAIR FOR HOUSE BOAT, on
sale, make an offer 0690 35 98 42, jmc
boat jard

1990 SEA RAY 310EC 31' CABIN
CRUISER for sale located at the
Rodney Bay Marina in St. Lucia.
Contact email: aedelice@candw.lc or
tel# (758)285-2859.


FOR SALE:
60' 1982 Nautical Ketch


DECK CAT 31' 2007 POWERCAT
CENTER CONSOLE SPORT FISH-
ER/ DAY CRUISER, 2X150HP 2007
Yamaha,VHF, stereo ipodjack, Raymarine
E80GPS/Navionics, 20gal fresh water
tank, transom shower, wash down
upgrade, two live wells, table, extended
blmini, two swim ladders/bow/transom,
enclosed head/6' head room/sink/show-
er, custom cover, trailer, St.Thomas, US
$85,000 954-881-4131 RLLECHNER@
MAC.COM





AZIMUT 26' BUILT 1985. New suite
of North sails, New standing rigging.
Optimized, Super sailer, club racer or do
the Caribbean regattas. Fully equipped,
dependable 8.5 hp diesel, solar panel,
sleep 6. Much more, two water tanks.
$US 13000 Lying Venezuela can sail it
over to Curagao Info. escuchamel23@
hotmail.com

SAILING YACHT NANTUCKET 34
GRP HULL IN VERY GOOD CON-
DITION FROM 1983 with a 2030
volvo penta salldrive (1997) lot of new
parts, crossed atlantic in 2005 from
the Netherlands now in aruba, shower,
fridge, sleeps 7, stove autopilot, wind-
steering, dingy, etc. etc. asking $40.000
usd. Contact: snoopyblke71@hotmail.
com tel: 002975855961


SejQ,|,,ll1 Your^



BoatiII~j~ Here!^


... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..

i i i .I ...........


80 2003 Excellent condition 4 dou-
ble cabin /2bath. Low time Yanmar. Solar
+ Wind generator + large battery bank.
Must see in Guadeloupe. Call and we'll
send you a private aircraft to come see
the boat. alrtropical@yahoo.com 170.000
. (767) 4404403.

LAGOON 380 2003: 4dbl/2Baths.
Many options. Solar, Wind, 2200 HRS
on 2 Yanmar diesel 27HP, Very good
condition. French Flag. Lying between
Guadeloupe and Dominica. Priced for
quick sale at 199.000 US$. Contact
RV at alrtropical@yahoo.com. +1 767
275 4403

RACE READY 1991 J-24. Hull #4795.
Great condition with many upgrades.
New NS gin,main and jib 2008, (2) spin-
nakers, turtle and set of practice sails.
Have all cushions and interior boards in
storage. 15K US, call 340-642-3204 or
cpessler@hotmail.com

BENETEAU FIRST CLASS 8, 26',
race ready regatta yacht or daysailer,
Fantastic spirited performer, lifting keel,
new sails & rigging 07. Rediscover your
love of sailing when you helm this boat!
Lying Antigua, $US 9,950 or any reason-
able offers considered. Call RYAN 001
268 725 5445

JOHN ALDEN DESIGN 1976
BRISTOL 35 for sale in Tortola, BVI.
Beautiful new paint job, new sails, new
rig and rigging, new windows, Needs
some interior work. Asking $19,000.
Reluctant sale. BVI +284 541-1404

ERICSON 39 1978 $18,000. Nice
cutter rigged cruiser/racer that needs
some TLC and minor repairs. 2001
Phasor/Kubota 37 HP diesel. Like new.
Nice rig, good sails including full-bat-
ten main, spinnaker. Windlass, anchors,
cruising gear. St. John. 340-998-8776

LOCK CROWTHER DESIGNED
BUCCANEER TRIMARAN, "Natural
Mystic", good condition, located in
Tobago. LOA 40ft, width 27ft, draft 3.5ft
- 6ft. Yamaha 9.9hp, 4 stroke, ultra long
shaft, very low hours. New mainsail. A
beautiful sailing boat! $28,000US. Call
Sean at 868 639 9377 or 868 689 3114


76 ALLATSEA.NET


SPARKMAN AND STEPHENS 43.
Steel hull, Dismasted and with some cos-
metic damage but with all cruising gear
and some spare sails. Recently sand-
blasted and ultrasounded, located in
Grenada. Beautiful cruising boat, sadly
for sale for $20,000 obo Contact mal-
wennb@hotmail.com, or 268 728 2807

PEARSON 422, CC, 1983 EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION. The majority of its
life in the fresh water of the Chesapeake
Bay. Major upgrades. Full specifications:
www.sallboatlistings.com/view/6994 and
photos: www.plcasaweb.google.com/
caplumer/FUNTIMEFORSALE61207.
Price reduced from $125k to $90K. E-Mail:
caplumer@yahoo.com

1991 HUNTER LEGEND 43, Excellent
Condition, Windlass, 5k Generator, GPS,
2 A/C, EPIRB 2006, Spinnaker, VHF,
Zodiac Tender with Engine, Autopilot,
Depth Finder, Knotmeter, 50hpYanmar,
Electric Winch, Galvanized Steel Cradle,
Many Extras, $129,000, Located Salinas,
Puerto Rico, Contact Ronnie 939-639-
7820 OR rramosl@centennialpr.net





























O1FT AVON RHIB, with 8hp Evinrude
engine, Needs TLC, but was a good
runner when stored. $1100.00 or B/O.
Please call 340-719-6398 or 340-690-
6327 after five PM


4 staterooms, Great Charter Vessel
$240,000
St. Thomas Yacht Sales
340-779-1660
yachts@islands.vi


Lock Crowther designed Buccaneer trimaran, "Natural Mystic," good condi-
tion, located in Tobago. LOA 40ft, width 27ft, draft 3.5ft 6ft. Yamaha 9.9hp,
4 stroke, ultra long shaft, very low hours. New mainsail. $28,000 US.














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123 Hulls Yacht Sales............................... 72
American Yacht Harbor....................C2, 1
Antigua Rigging.....................................52
Atlas Yachts / Charters......................... 73
B.V.I. Yacht Sales..................................... 68
Bay Island Yachts ................................. 74
Budget Marine............. 17, 19, 21, 55, C4
Captain Oliver's Marina.......................51
Caribbean Battery................................. 78
Caribbean Marine Surveyors Ltd.......58
Caribbean Yachts ................................. 74
Clarke's Court Bay Marina....................58
Connections............................................ 78
Cooper Marine, Inc. ............................... 75
Curacao M arine........................................61
Dean Catamarans....................................69
Defender Industries................................78
Dockwise Yacht Transport ....................28
Doyle Sailmakers ..................................... 2


Echo Marine...................................... ...54
Edward William Marine Services SL..38
Electec ............................................ ....49
FKG Marine Rigging & Fabricating NV..52
Gary's Marine Service...........................70
Gold Coast Yachts .................................... 75
Golden Hind Chandlery.....................46
Grenada Marine.......................................58
Industrial & Marine Service, Inc..........75
Interlux............................................. ............ 3
Island Global Yachting ............................. 5
Island Marine Outfitters.....................11
Island Marine, Inc....................................40
Island Water World .............................. 22
Island Yachts / Charters....................... 75
Jolly Harbour Marina / Boat Yard.......55
KM I SeaLift ............................................... 18
Le Phare Bleu .......................................... 28
Le Shipchandler ..................................... 77


Marina Zar Par ..............................38
Marine Warehouse.................................66
Maritime Yacht Sales .......................... 74
Nanny Cay Hotel and Marina..............42
Nau-T-Kol Marine Refrigeration Ltd..60
Northern Lights............................ .. 59
Offshore Marine................................ 9, 72
Offshore Risk Management.................42
Paradise Boat Sales............................... 75
Peake Yacht Services ............................70
Port Louis M arina .................................... 7
Port Networks ........................ ............28
Power Boats Mutual Facilities Ltd .....62
Prickly Bay Marina ............................... 62
Puerto Del Rey Marina / Boat Yard....40
Quantum Sails.......................................... 4
Reefco Refrigeration, Air Conditioning,
Watermakers #1 .....................................42
Renaissance Marina..............................63


Rodney Bay Marina.............................. 15
Seahawk................ .......................... 13
SeaSchool................................... .........38
Secure Chain and Anchor..................... 77
Smith's Ferry Service LTD......................46
Soper's Hole Wharf & Marina ..............46
Southern Trades Yacht Sales................ 72
Spice Island Marine Services................. 6
St Thomas Yacht Sales / Charters.. 73, 76
Subbase Drydock, Inc........................42
The Little Ship Company ....................71
The Moorings Yacht Brokerage..........67
Tortola Yacht Services........................46
TurtlePac ......................................... 77
Venezuelan Marine Supply..................60
Village Cay Marina.................................27
Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbour.................C3
W.E. Johnson Equipment Company... 77
YachtBlast .......................................66


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FOR SALE: STAINLESS STEEL
RADAR ARCH, 7ft wide, 8 1/2 ft tall, with
a 1 1/2 set back. Asking $995.00 or B/O.
Please call 340-719-6398 or 340-692-6327
after five PM

FOR SALE. VOLVO PENTA 59 H.P.
DIESEL ENGINES. Two Engines
Available. See Running Now in Vessel.
$5000 for the Pair OR $3000 Each. Comes
with manuals and parts book. Located in
St. Thomas. Call Shelly at 340-775-5055.




FOR SALE DAYSAIL CHARTER BIZ,
RETAIL SHOP & BOOKING CENTER
ON ST. THOMAS. 40' Cheoy Lee sailboat,
2 shops & storage, 5 yr. lease with renewal
option, very profitable for 20 years, owners
retiring, will train, $195K plus inventory. Call
340-774-3175 or 340-513-3147

DISTRIBUTORS REQUIRED We
are an established leading edge weather
forecasting software company in the marine
leisure industry based in the UK. We are
looking for distributors to launch our product
in your country. See www.movingweather.
com for more details on the product.
Contact c.reed@movingweather.com

ENGLISH HARBOUR, ANTIGUA.
FORMER PIZZA RESTAURANT with
wood oven. Main road. Close to Dockyard.
Suit restaurant, office or retail. Call 268-464-
0845 or email:raylinnington@hotmail.com


WANT TO PURCHASE MARINA
RESORT with a small amount of rooms
available and a Dive Shop or potential
to have a dive shop in the Caribbean.
Preferably in Turks and Calcos, St. Lucia,
St Thomas, Bahamas Exuma Islands,
Tobago. Please email me at rotorworld@
mac.com with available opportunities.

FISHING CHARTER FOR SALE-
USVI. Active & Successful charter based
in St. Thomas/St. John. 2003 boat fully
rigged, trailer, booking contacts, 2007
Dodge Ram truck. Featured on ESPN.
$215,000. US. Combo home & business
also available $950,000 US. 340-693-
5823 www.bitemecharters@msn.com

36 FT PDQ (1990) LIVE-ABOARD
CATAMARAN AND ESTABLISHED/
PROFITABLE DAYSAIL BUSINESS
in St. John, USVI. Website, Customer lists,
Operational systems, Mooring, 5 years
documented exponential growth, High end
customer base with high retention. Contact
Capt. Josh Dohring @ 340-344-9947 or
Josh@BestDayCharters.com.




MOVE YOUR BOAT SOMEWHERE
SAFER FOR HURRICANE SEASON!
Compass Point Marina St Thomas has
deep and shallow slips available for long
or short term rental. Also large lockers,
Artist Studios and Office space available.
Call (340) 775-6144 or email Kevin@
compasspointmarina.com


IN PREPARATION FOR THE OPEN-
ING OF OUR NEW MARINA FACILI-
TIES, WE HAVE POSITIONS OPEN
FOR "MARINE MECHANICS." Must
be certified as a Mercury Technician
with a minimum of 3 years experience
in repairsand service of Mercury out-
board motors and Mercruiser inboard/
outboard engines. Knowledge & skill of
electrical rigging and trouble shooting
in boats also necessary. Applications
can be sent to scottsmarne@candw.ky
attention Anthony Scott.

NAUTOOL MACHINE LTD, BVI,
seeking experienced individual in all
aspects of machine shop process and
practice including welding. Design/
Technical Background a Plus. Basic
computer skills. Need background in
all yacht systems. Work alongside front
office personnel. www.nautool.com. CV
to stainless@surfbvl.com or call 284-
494-3187

CAPTAINIMATE NEEDED: 65'
Hatteras Sportfish, North Carolina sum-
mers Florida / Bahamas / Exumas in
the winter. Captain's License helpful but
not a must, owners can / do operate
vessel. A strong knowledge of marine
systems, mechanical skills, basic navi-
gation supported by routine mainte-
nance desired. Please email resumes to
sgrlffin@atlanticclaims.com

WOODSTOCK BOATBUILDERS IN
ANTIGUA has the following openingsfor
the 2008-2009 season: Metal Fabricator/
Tig Welder Engineer/diesel mechanic
* Carbonfibre/Composites fabricator
* Boatbuilder/Joiner Project Manager.
For more information send a cover letter
and C.V. To: ar@woodstockboats.com or
call: (268) 463-6359




ST. MARTIN RETAIL / OFFICE SPACE
AT OYSTERPOND GREATHOUSE
MARINA (OPPOSITE MR BUSBY'S):
Two buildings of 163 and 320 ft respec-
tively. For enquiries contact johnbrokaar@
yahoo.com




DOMINICA RIVERSIDE. Pure
Caribbean still at very affordable prices.
Citrus Creek Plantation real estate oppor-
tunity for homes, lands, or lots with
property management and building by
a French team within a tropical valley.
Check www.citruscreekplantation.com.
taberi@citruscreekplantation.com + 1767
2754403




CARIBBEAN ALTERNATE ENERGY
COMPANY: Sustainable Earth Inc.
Design, supply, installation of solar and
wind systems throughout the Caribbean
from our headquarters in Dominica. Back
up kits, full off grid or grid connected
systems. Major brands only. www.sustain-
ableearth.dm. solar@sustainableearth.dm
+1 767 440 4404


NEED A HOUSE SITTER? Caribbean
based, well educated, non-smoking
family with excellent credentials. Any
Caribbean island considered as we
can work from any location. Internet
access required. Email housesitter@
yourislands.com

NEED A HOUSESITTER OR PET-
SITTER? Island born, well educated,
non-smoking 31 year old female, with
excellent references. Will do light house
cleaning and window washing; preferably
in either St. Thomas or St. John USVI.
Email at ashbayard@yahoo.com

INDEPENDENT REFIT SPECIALIST
available! 30years in yachting. Licensed
electrician-mechanic, electronic engineer.
Fit in electrics, mechanics, hydrolics,
engines, generators rigging, woodwork
E-mail vrlsels@hotmail.com Tel. 001-
340-244-3080

YACHT MASTER 200T USSA
Master Marine Surveyor FFV Offshore
Sailing Instructor ABYC Member -
NMEA Marine IT Technician Yacht
Broker Transport Canada Airline Pilot
- Property Management Multifunctional
Captain ready to work where and when
you need him. Phone 523-0691 Email
phileo7@gmall.com

WHOLESALE OUTDRIVE UNIT
REPAIR, SALES, SERVICE, war-
ranty also, trim system and trim rams
as well. Full line mercury / mercruiser
dealer. Located in ft. lauderdale ,fla.
U.s.a. 954-764-1724 fax= 954-331-0021
or e-mail: smmarine@aol.com

KERWIN NAVAL ARCHITECTS,
INC., OF FT. LAUDERDALE, has
been designing newbuild yachts, commer-
cial vessels, and all kinds of refit projects
since 1996. Contact Kevin M. Kerwin, RE.
at 1 954 524 9013 or see our website at
www.kerwinnavalarchitects.com.





EARN EXTRA MONEY. A reliable per-
son for boat watch in Sea Cow Bay, Tortola,
BVI. Reply to twm75402@hotmail.com.

INTERESTED IN TRADING MY
CLASSIC 31' converted navy launch/
party boat for a damaged but repairable
35-38 foot sailing catamaran. The launch
is valued at $65,000. Will trade for compa-
rable value. US 207-772-4048.

WE WANT TO RENT YOUR
SAILBOAT for 6 Months We are
a mature, responsible and experienced
couple that also own a sailboat in Florida.
We are working in St. Thomas and need
a ready-to-sail boat NOW! Lease-to-Own
is an option too. Email to hectoromarre@
hotmail.com or call 340-77

FISHING BOAT WANTED: Looking
for a lobster pot hauling boat or any style
fishing boat over 25 ft long (no wood hull).
With engine or without, let me know what
you have. Email final.demand@gmall.com
or Call 284-540-2222


ALLATSEA.NET 79


LOOKING



FOR



DELIVERY CREW?










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WHAT DO CHARTER CREW


DO ON VACATION?

GO SAILING, OF COURSE, BUT PREFERABLY ON SOMEBODY ELSE'S BOAT

BY JEANNIE KUICH COPYRIGHT 2009


n May of 1971 we joined our very close friends, Doc and Renee
Gholz, on Flying Spray, their Alberg 35-foot sloop, from New
Orleans to make the 450-mile passage to the Dry Tortugas, then
to the Florida Keys, Nassau in the Bahamas and back to Florida.
The Flying Spray did not have a chance to fly, nor was there hardly
ever a drop of spray on her decks because there was practically no
wind. Fortunately she needed little wind to neatly tiptoe through the
waves. We never used the engine except to charge the batteries. Nor
did we have any deadlines but could enjoy the delightful days of slow,
smooth sailing.
Butwould most people do that today? No way! The sails would remain
furled, the engine running along with the generator for air conditioning
and videos. But on a small boat, it is just you with your little teacup of a
boat on a vast sea moving along at the whim of the wind.
Flying Spray was like a small hors d'oeuvre on an enormous silver
tray. Looking down into the sea, we saw fathoms of nothingness broken
only occasionally by a wandering fish or flotsam. It was not lonely but
serene and one's troubles seemed to fade away. Our watches were



SKY LIGHTS BYJEANNIEKUCH


August Spotlights
* Mars loses to big mama Venus
on the dawn race course.
* There is a penumbral lunar
eclipse on the 6th but this
dim event is not really visible
without telescopes.
* Another occultation of Antares
in Scorpius by the Moon occurs
on the 27th around 10 p.m.
* The Perseid meteor shower
slashes the sky from around the
6th through 18th, peaking on
the 12th before dawn.
August Planet Particulars
* On the 22nd Saturn is close
to the finish line on the evening
race course but bright Mercury
is a serious challenge on its
left. Meanwhile the wisp of the
Moon hovers to beside them.
* On the evening course
Jupiter is the racer to follow,
easy to spot and on the
morning course, brilliant Venus,
unhampered by dim little Mars
below it.


The Moon Sails Near
Thu. 6th: Jupiter in evening
Fri. 14th: Pleiades star sisters
in evening
Mon. 17th: close to Venus
with Pollux in Gemini nearby
before dawn
Thu. 20th: Saturn and Mercury
in evening
Mon. 24th: the star Spica in
Virgo in evening
Thu. 27th: the star Antares in
Scorpius (see Spotlights)
Moon Phases
Thu. 6th: Full
Thu. 13th: Last Quarter
Thu. 20th: New
Thu. 27th: First Quarter

August Brightest
Navigation Stars
Dusk: Arcturus, Vega,
Altair, Fomalhaut
Dawn: Sirius, Canopus,
Capella, Betelgeuse


sheer pleasure. We read books and had delightful conversations that
come only with the company of close comrades.
That all changed when a young Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) appeared
on the nearly slack jib sheet. Stupid bird! That's no place to land, I
thought. And what are you doing out here so far from land anyway!
The Cattle Egret is almost never found in the water except to drink.
It was clear that this egret was exhausted. With great effort it flew
onto the deck and just stood there as if in a daze. Being a chef by
trade, I instantly wanted to feed it. But what would it eat? There were
no handy insects around and no fish either.
Or was there? Many little islands of sargasso weed drifted beside
us. Might there not be fish in those? We decided to find out. Now our
watches became more interesting. Whenever we saw a likely island,
we steered for it and the bowman snagged it with the fishing net and
dumped it on to the deck. The egret, now dubbed Gordon, would
pick over it and snatch the Sargasso Fish and other tiny fish. We put
out a cake pan of fresh water for him which he quickly stood in. Now
he had his "swamp" to wade in.
It became our mission to help Gordon survive and we even carefully
cut off the "trigger" of the tiny Trigger Fish in the weed so that he
could swallow it. When we got close enough to Loggerhead Key in the
Dry Tortugas we hoped he would be strong enough to fly off to the
mangroves where he could find the insects he so desperately needed.
And Gordon did fly off to find many of his comrades on the tiny spits
of land. When he was gone, we kinda missed the little fella. -&


Jeannie Kuich, once a long-time charter chef in the Virgin Islands, has
been writing monthly columns for the Daily News since 1985 andperiodic
columns for Caribbean Boating, Nautical Scene, St. Thomas This Week
and Cruising World magazines. Jeannie is the author of "Soap Operas
of the Sky," the only stargazing sky guide for the Caribbean.


80 ALLATSEA.NET
















:rKjffy ,* I
--.a MN I "li JIM


~I~


PS


YANMAR >-


THE WORKBENCH
BOATuUILDPN ANO nROAIRU


CRC Engines & Fabricating
Providing top quality engine sales, service and
repairs. We also specialize in steel, stainless
steel & aluminum welding & fabricating
Contact Chris Cooke in the boat yard
T: (284) 495-5310 / F: (284)-495-5352
crcengfab@surfbvi.com


The WorkBench
Specializing in Wood, West System,
Refurbishing & Multihulls
Contact Geoff Cooke or Clayton Harrigan
Box 27, Virgin Gorda, BVI
T: 284-495-5310 / F: 284-495-5352
workbench@surfbvi.com
www.workbenchbvi.com


The Bath & Turtle
Dining on the waterfront
New Waterfront Rendezvous Bar
(284) 495-5239


VIRCGI GORDA


For information or reservations


WWW.IGY-VIRGINGORDA.COM


1.888.IGY.MARINAS




























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