Group Title: Lake Alfred AREC Research report
Title: Packinghouse newsletter
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095555/00037
 Material Information
Title: Packinghouse newsletter
Series Title: Lake Alfred AREC Research report
Alternate Title: Citrus packinghouse newsletters
Packing house newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Citrus Experiment Station (Lake Alfred, Fla.)
Citrus Experiment Station (Lake Alfred, Fla.)
Agricultural Research and Education Center (Lake Alfred, Fla.)
Citrus Research and Education Center (Lake Alfred, Fla.)
Indian River Research Education Center
Publisher: Citrus Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Lake Alfred Fla
Lake Alfred Fla
Publication Date: November 1972
Copyright Date: 1965
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruits -- Harvesting -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus fruits -- Packing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued on the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: No.1 (Sept. 1, 1965)-
Issuing Body: Issued by the Citrus Experiment Station (no. 1-38); Lake Alfred (Fla.) Agricultural Research and Education Center (no. 39-136); Lake Alfred (Fla.) Citrus Research and Education Center (no. 137-189); and the Ft. Pierce (Fla.) Indian River Research and Education Center (no. 190- ).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 202 (Aug. 1, 2005)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095555
Volume ID: VID00037
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02430250
lccn - 2006229390

Full Text

sletter No. 49


Lake Alfred AREC Research Report-CS72-27
November 30, 1972-WFW-1300










Editor: W. F. Wardowski
Harvesting and Handling Section
University of Florida
Agricultural Research and Education Center
P. O. Box 1088
Ske Alfred, Florida 33850


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

and

STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF CITRUS


*Anyone wishing to receive this newsletter
may send a dozen stamped, preaddressed
envelopes to the above address.








wsletter #49


Lake Alfred AREC Research Report-CS72-27
November 30, 1972-WFW-1300


Harvesting and Handling Section


PACKINGHOUSE


NEWSLETTER


CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA'S CITRUS FRUIT FUMIGATION REGULATIONS


The California Department of Agriculture has notified this office that shipments
of citrus fruit made on November 1, 1972, and thereafter must be fumigated to prevent
movement of Caribbean Fruit Fly infested fruit. Whereas in the past, fumigation was
required only during the period March 1 to September 1, it is now to be required on
a year round basis. Only green limes are exempted.

This action was taken by California due to their interception of Caribfly in
fruit during the period fumigation was not required.


The fumigation chambers at
operation November 1, remaining
12:00 midnight Saturday. As in
Saturday will be fumigated.


the Doyle Conner Building in Gainesville will begin
open 24 hours per day from Monday 8:00 A.M. to
the past, any trucks waiting on the lot at midnight


Shippers must complete a Request for Fumigation form. Please read the
instructions contained on this form carefully. If you need a supply of this form,
please request them from the address below.


Ralph E. Brown, Plant
Florida Department of
Services, Division
Doyle Conner Building
P. O. Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida
(904) 372-3505


Specialist Supervisor
Agriculture & Consumer
of Plant Industry


32601


FUMIGATION OF GIFT FRUIT FOR CALIFORNIA


Fumigation of gift fruit poses a special problem due to the small amount of
fruit normally shipped at one time. Gift fruit shippers and individuals intending
to send citrus fruit to California should check with the Division of Plant Industry,
Gainesville (above). We are advised that arrangements are underway for fumigation of
small lots of fruit.
H. M. Riley
Division of Fruit & Vegetable Inspection
Winter Haven

REFRIGERATION CAPACITY AND POWER REQUIREMENT

We are seeing an increasing pressure towards more use of refrigeration; and
use of refrigeration calls for some costly decisions.





November 30, 1972


These two graphs need not be thoroughly understood in order to be extremely
useful to packinghouse managers. The information contained herein can be valuable when
planning and discussing new storage or precooling capacity and refrigeration equipment
generally. Figure 1 illustrates that by decreasing head pressure from 180 to 80
psi and increasing suction pressure from 10 to 30 psi, the refrigeration capacity
can be more than doubled without changing horsepower. Figure 2 is another way of
looking at the same information wherein reversing the pressures mentioned above,
it would take more than twice as much horsepower to produce the same amount of
refrigeration capacity.

In general, small condensing equipment,run fast at very high pressure
differentials, tends to be cheaper to purchase initially; but more expensive to
run and maintain. Also the "tonnage" that a given system can deliver is related
to the coil temperature. The lower the coil temperature required, the lower must
be the suction pressure. As Fig. 1 shows, tonnage per horsepower delivered by a
given system drops drastically with decreasing suction pressure. Conversely, as
seen in Fig. 2, maintaining a required tonnage capacity from a given system calls
for sharp increases in use of horsepower as the required suction pressure (and hence
coil temperature) drops. Thus small coils, run very cold, can be cheaper to buy,
but (apart from inevitable defrosting and humidity control problems) very expensive to
run.

This is the sort of information that refrigeration engineers are accustomed
to using, but often find very hard to explain to managers and owners seeking to make
the wisest choice between immediate price and future costs. We hope these two charts
will help to provide a common ground for future discussions between contractors and
management.
Fig. i. .Fig. 2.


W. CrtLrion, AREC, IFAS, University of Florlds, Lake Alfred, Aprtl, 1972.


REFRIGERATION POWER REQUIRMENT
rEFECT OF HEAD AND SUCTION PRESSURES ON
OWER REQUIREMENT (AS HORSEPOWER PER TON) OF
A TYPICAL AMONIA* COMPRESSOR SYSTm .


10 15 20 25 30 35
Suction Pressure, Ib/sq in
*ESSENTIALLY SIMILAR RELATIONSHIPS PREVAIL FOR FREON AD OTHER REURIGERANTS.


V. Crieron, AREC, IFAS, University of Florid., Lake Alfred, April, 1972.
W. Grierson
Agricultural Research & Education Center


Newsletter #49






November 30, 1972


AVAILABLE PUBLICATIONS


Available from Dr. W. Wardowski, Harvesting and Handling Section, Agricultural


Research and Education Center, P. O. Box 1088, Lake Alfred, Florida 33850.


"Heating of Citrus Fruits During Degreening and Associated Temperature Gradients
Within the Typical Horizonal Airflow Degreening Room", by Douglas L. Deason
and W. Grierson. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:259-264. 1971.

"Postharvest Decay Control Recommendations for Fresh Citrus Fruit", by A. A.
McCornack and W. F. Wardowski. Extension Circular 359, March, 1972.

"Market Diseases & Blemishes of Florida Citrus Fruits", by A. A. McCornack and
G. E. Brown. Florida Department of Citrus. A valuable aid for identification
of 12 diseases and blemishes including color photographs.

Available from Publication Distribution Center, Cooperative Extension Service,


Building 664-IFAS, Univ. of Fla., Gainesville, Florida


32601 (NOTE: Residents


of Florida may obtain these from their County Extension offices.)

"The Tahiti Lime", by C. W. Campbell. Fruit Crops Fact Sheet No. 8, June, 1972.

"The Banana", by C. W. Campbell. Fruit Crops Fact Sheet No. 10, June, 1972.

"The Carambola", by C. W. Campbell. Fruit Crops Fact Sheet No. 12, June, 1972.

"The Macadamia", by C. W. Campbell. Fruit Crops Fact Sheet No. 9, June, 1972.


"The Papaya", by
June, 1972.


S. E. Malo and C. W. Campbell. Fruit Crops Fact Sheet No. 13,


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost
of $201.60, or two and one-half cents per copy to inform
county agricultural directors, ranchers, and growers of
research results in harvesting and fresh fruit handling
and marketing.


Newsletter #49







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