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Florida Master Site File, Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, Historic Properties Inventory Form - De Mesa-Sanchez
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095525/00002
 Material Information
Title: Florida Master Site File, Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, Historic Properties Inventory Form - De Mesa-Sanchez
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: FMSF: Arrivas, De Mesa, Joaneda, Paredes
Physical Description: Application/form
Language: English
Creator: Nolan, David
Physical Location:
Box: 8
Divider: Florida Master Sites File Info
Folder: FMSF: Arrivas, De Mesa, Joaneda, Paredes
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
48 King Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Government House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 48 King Street
Coordinates: 29.892465 x -81.313142
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00095525:00002

Full Text

FLORIDA MASTER SITE FILE
HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE PRESERVATION BOARD
HISTORIC PROPERTIES INVENTORY FORM

I. LOCATION & LEGAL DESCRIPTION
FDAHRM 802== Site No. 1009==
Site Name: De Mesa-Sanchez 830== Survey Date:7809 820==
Address: 43 St. George Street, St. Augustine, FL 32084 905==
Instructions for Locating:


813== County: St. Johns


Location: City of St. Augustine
(subdivision)


7


(block)


6


(lot)


Owner of Site: Name: Trustees of Int
Address: Elliot Building


808==
868==

868==


ernai Tmnrov~m~nt Triint Fund~


Tallahassee. FL 32084


902==


Occupant or Manager: 904==
Type of Ownership: State 848== Zoning: HP-3
NR Classification Category: Building 916== Recording Date: 832==
UTM: 17 469744 3307125 890== Location: T07S R30E N18 812==
(zone) eatingn) nothingn) (T) (R) (S)
Map Reference: USGS St. Augustine 7.5 MIN 1956 (PR 1970) 809==
Recorder: Name & Title: Nolan, David (Historic Sites Specialist)
Address: H.S.A.P.B. 818==


II. SITE DESCRIPTION


Condition of Site:
( ) Excellent
( ) Good
( ) Fair
(x) Deteriorated


Integrity of Site:
(x) Altered
( ) Unaltered
(x) Original Site
( ) Restored Date:
( ) Moved Date:


863==
863==
863==
863==



858==
858==
858==
858==
858==


Threats to Site:
( ) Zoning
( ) Development
(x) Deterioration
( ) Borrowing
( ) Transportation
( ) Fill
( ) Dredge
( ) Other


878==
878==
878==
878==
878==
878==
878==
878==


7


....,..


era mrvmntTutFn


-~--







II. SITE DESCRIPTION, continued.
Original Use: Priv. Res. 838== Present Use: Museum 850==
Date: +1764 844== Period: 18th cent.845== Culture:Span/Eng/Amer 840==
Architect: 872==
Builder: 874==
Style: Spanish Colonial 964==
Plan Type: L-shape 966==
Exterior Fabrics: Stone, coquina, stucco
854==
Structural Systems: Stone wall, wood frame 856==


Features of Structure: (942)
Window Type: DHS 12/12, 6/6
Foundation: Stone wall
Roof Type: Gable intersecting
Secondary Roof Structures: Balcony
Porches & Balconies:


942==
942==
942==
942==


Chimney Location: Outside end, offset end
Materials: (882)
Chimney: Stone,stucco
Roof Surfacing: MtPal, -v errmp ,) ,
Ornament Exterior: Chamfered wood posts,
work.


882==
882==


turned spindles, wrought iron


Quantitative Data: (950-954)
Chimneys: 2 952==
Other:
Surroundings:
Relationship to Surroundings:


Dormers: 954==


882==


Stories: 2 950==
956==
864==


859==


III. PHOTOGRAPHY
Photographic Records Numbers: 860==
Contact Prints


(


942==
942==





pdae 1
eorg final
... update


Site S~32_6.20

Recorder f#


SITE NAME: DeMesa-Sanchez House
HISTORICAL CONTEXTS: 18th century
NAT. REGISTER CATEGORY: building / /
OTHER NAMES OR MSF NOS:
COUNTY: St. Johns OWNERSHIP TYPE: state govt
PROJECT NAME: DHR NO:
LOCATION: (Attach copy of USGS map, sk.etch-map of immediate area)
ADDRESS: 43 St. George St. St. Augustine, Florida
VICINITY OF/ROUTE TO: East side of St. George St. between Oran
ge & Cuna Streets
SUBDIVISION: City of St. Augustine BLOCK: 7 LOT: 6
PLAT OR OTHER MAP:
TOWNSHIP: 7S RANGE: 30E SECTION: 18
IRREGULAR SEC? E Y N LAND GRANT:
USGS 7.5' MAP:
UTM: ZONE: 17 EATING: 469744 NORTHING:3307125
COORDINATES: LATITUDE D M _S LONGITUDE _D _M


HISTORY
ARCHITECT: Herschel Shepard (restoration)
BUILDER:
CONSTRUCTION DATE: +1764 REST
MODI F ICATI ON DATE () :
MOVE: DATE: / / ORIG LOCATE
ORIGINAL USE(S): priv. resid.
PRESENT USE(S): museum


ORATION DATESS: 01/01/78


ION:


DESCRIPTION
STYLE: Spanish colonial
PLAN: EXTERIOR: L-shape
INTERIOR:
NO. : STORIES: 2 OUTBLDS: PORCHES:
STRUCTURAL SYSTEM(S): stone wall, wood frame

EXTERIOR FABRIC(S): stone (coquina), stucco


DORMERS:


FOUNDATION: TYPE stone wall
PORCHES: overhanging balcony on street (west)
ROOF: TYPE gable intersecting SURFACE wood shingle
SECONDARY STRUCS. shed balcony and rear addition
CHIMNEY: NO. 2 MTLS stone, stucco LOCNS end ridge
WINDOWS: DHS 12/12, 12/8, 12/6, 6/6 8-pane casement, tra
nsom and sidelights
EXTERIOR ORNAMENT: bargeboards, ashlar scoring
CONDITION: SURROUNDINGS: urban, narrow streets
NARRATIVE (general, interior, landscape, context; 3 lines only)


ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS AT THE SITE
FMSF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FORM COMPLETED?
ARTIFACTS OR OTHER REMAINS


Y N (IF Y, ATTACH)


HISTORICAL STRUCTURES FORM
FLORIDA MASTER SITE FILE

















F=MSF 1-IISTORICL STRUCTURE FORM


RECORDER'S EVALUATION OF SITE
AREA OF SIGNIFICANCE: architecture, tourism, ethn-heritage, arch
aeol-his

ELIGIBLE FOR NAT. REGISTRY? _Y _N _LIKELY, NEED INFO _.._INSF INFO
SIGNIF. AS PART OF DISTRICT? __Y _N _LIKELY, NEED INFO __INSF INFO
SIGNIFICANT AT LOCAL LEVEL? _Y _N __LIKELY, NEED INFO _INSF INFO

SUMMARY ON SIGNIFICANCE (LIMIT TO THREE LINES PROVIDED, SEE PAGE 3)



* DHR USE ONLY * * * * * * * DHR USE ONLY * *


DATE LISTED
KEEPER DETERMINATION OF ELIG.(DATE)
SHPO EVALUATION OF ELIGIBILITY(DATE)
LOCAL DETERMINATION OF ELIG.(DATE):
OFFICE


ON NR:
-YES -NO
-YES -NO
-YES -NO


* * DHR USE ONLYx * * .* * * * DHR USE ONLY ** *

RECORDER INFORMATION: NAME
DATE / / AFFILIATION


PHOTOGRAPHS (ATTACH A LABELED PRINT BIGGER THAN CONTACT SIZE)
LOCATION OF NEGATIVES:
NEGATIVE NUMBERS:


P H 0 T 0 G R A P 1-1


Site 8. _.-52_.0


Page 2


Ifl F P







SUPPLEMENT FOR FMSF SITE FORMS


Site 8SJ2520

SITE NAME DeMesa-Sanchez House, 43 St. George Street
NATURE OF SITE -standing structure archaeological site both

A. NARRATIVE DESCRIPTION OF SITE

The colonial architecture of St. Augsutine was influenced by a royal
ordinance concerning the laying out of new towns issued by the King of Spain
in 1573. It was decreed that in hot climates the streets should be narrow,
and that: "All town houses are to be so planned that they can serve as a
defense or fortress against those who might attempt to create disturbances or
occupy the town. Each house is to be so constructed that horses and household
animals can be kept therein, the courtyards and stockyards being as large as
possible to insure health and cleanliness."

Thus, in St. Augustine, the streets were narrow, and the houses built
right upon them, with walls protecting the courtyards from the street.

The DeMesa-Sanchez House at 43 St. George Street is a good example of the
resultant Spanish Colonial architecture, with later additions from the American
territorial period.

It is two stories high, L-shaped, and placed right on the street line with
an overhanging balcony.

The building material is mainly coquina, a native shellstone quarried on
nearby Anastasia Island. The finish is pink ashlar-scored stucco designed to
protect the porous rock from moisture and give the impression of a grander
stone building. A portion of the second floor ell is wood frame with beaded-
edge weatherboard siding.

The wood-shingled gable roof has a north-south orientation along St.
George Street and a double pitch to the rear. It intersects with an east-west
gable over the ell on the north side of the building. Overhangs are minimal.
Shed roofs are found on the balcony and on a small one-story addition to the
south rear of the main section. Bargeboards have beaded edges.

There are two end ridge chimneys, an interior one at the east end of the
ell and an exterior one on the south side of the St. George Street section.

The front balcony and open porch on the ell have chamfered wooden posts
and beading onthe top and bottom horizontal parts of the balustrade. The rear
porch has an exterior stairway. Two-panel double doors lead to the balcony.

Doors and windows reflect different periods in the building's evolution
from colonial to territorial times. Some of the doors are of wide vertical
boards with beaded edges. Others are six-panel and four panel cross patterns.
Some of the interior doors are faux-grained. Hardware includes both wrought-
iron latches and interior box locks with small brass knobs.






DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


Windows include 12/12, 12/8, 12/6, 6/6, and 8-pane casements, as well as
transom and sidelights. First-floor windows have vertical board shutters with
Z-bracing, wrought-iron hinges and hold-backs. There are some interior windows
in what were originally exterior walls.

The building as it appears today is the result of extensive restoration
work from 1978-80 with Herschel Shepard of Jacksonville as project architect.
Archaeological investigation revealed how the house had grown from a single
room in the northwest corner during the First Spanish Period, to three rooms in
the British Period to two stories by the Second Spanish Period to its current
size by the American territorial period. Additions and changes determined to
have been made subsequent to that time were removed or altered in the restoration
process.

The area of the old colonial city between Hypolita Street and the City
Gate has been the major area of restoration efforts over the past two decades
and is one of St. Augustine's leading tourist attraction areas. There are
eight colonial buildings and structures in the area, a number of reconstruc-
tions, and other buildings designed or remodeled in the St. Augustine Colonial
Revival style. Restorations and reconstructions line most of St. George Street.
Elements contributing to its colonial ambiance include buildings constructed
right at the street line, walls lining the street (some of tabby or exposed
coquina), overhanging balconies and ornamental rejas. Side streets like
Spanish and Cuna still have a number of post-colonial buildings. The bayfront
has a number of commercial structures of modern vintage. The area generally
retains the old colonial street patterns, though there have been major altera-
tions around the City Gate and bayfront. Traffic is limited in the area and
banned on St. George Street, but there are still serious traffic and parking
problems because the area is so heavily traveled. Because of the commercial
value of the land, there are continuing pressures for new development in the
area. It is an area of combined tourist, commercial, and residential usage.
It is bounded on the east by the Castillo de San Marcos, the seawall and the
bayfront. On the west it is bounded by the Model Land Company subdivision
developed by Henry Flagler. This section of the colonial city is part of the
National Landmark District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

B. DISCUSSION OF SIGNIFICANCE

The northernmost section of the walled colonial city was bounded in the
18th and early 19th centuries by the Cubo defense line and City Gate on the
north and by the Rosario defense line, present-day Cordova Street, on the west.
This area first developed in the late 17th century as a work camp during the
construction of the Castillo de San Marcos and later as a neighborhood after
the completion of the fort in 1695. All structures were destroyed in the 1702
seige of the city, those generally north of Cuna Street by the Spanish to
establish a clear field of fire from the fort, and those south by the invading
South Carolinians. By mid-century buildings had been rebuilt mainly along St.
George and Spanish Streets, and a number of them still stand on St. George:
Avero, DeMesa, Arrivas, Rodriguez-Sanchez, and Paredes Houses. During the
British Period, the Minorcans generally settled in this section of town, and
it remained the "Minorcan quarter" well into the 19th century. New construction
continued in the Second Spanish Period (1784-1821), with a number of extant
structures, such as the Triay House, the Oldest Schoolhouse, and the City Gate,






DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


dating from this period.(1) By the mid-19th century, development expanded
westward along Hypolita and Cuna Streets. The post-Civil War years brought
intenxe commercialization to part of Hypolita Street and all of St. George
Street as the main thoroughfare became lined with shops, boarding houses, and
large hotels. The areas off of St. George Street remained essentially resi-
dential, and Spanish Street became by 1900 one of several exclusively Black
neighborhoods outside Lincolnville, with its own school and church in the
southernmost block of the street. St. George Street underwent major changes
in the late 19th and early 20th centuries with the construction of the massive
city hall at Hypolita Street and with the demolition of colonial structures
and the erection of brick commercial buildings.(2) This section of the street
gradually deteriorated into a depressed business district. Since 1959 the
Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, in conjunction with the St. Augustine
Restoration Foundation and private citizens, has restored and reconstructed
twenty-five buildings along St. George and Cuna Streets as part of a movement
to recognize the city's disappearing colonial past. Several of the Preservation
Board's buildings are operated as part of a living-history museum, the Spanish
Quarter (formerly San Agustin Antiguo). In addition to the Restoration Area,
this section of the city, especially along Spanish and Cuna Streets, also has
a large concentration of 19th century buildings, particularly from the pre-
Flagler era, and even some pre-Civil War structures. Avenida Menendez, formerly
Bay Street, has become a modern commercial street adjacent to both the Restora-
tion Area and the Castillo de San Marcos.(3)

C. HISTORY AND BIBLIOGRAPHY OF PAST WORK AT SiTE

The first recorded owner of the house at 43 St. George Street was Antonio
de Mesa, a native of Veracruz, Mexico who came to St. Augustine in the 1740s and
married Geronima Santollo, a native of this city, in 1746. DeMesa was a shore
guard employed by the Royal Treasury at an annual salary of 132 peaos, aug-
mented by the collection of fees from incoming vessels. His home was just one
room, with a rear loggia and patio and a detached kitchen. His family was
large. He fathered seven children, 4 girls and 3 boys. When Spanish rule gave
way to British in 1764 deMesa evacuated with his family to Havana, where he
died two years later.

With the British arrival the property was acquired by New York merchant
William Walton whose export company had contracted to supply St. Augustine from
1726-1739 and from 1754-1763. In the course of recouping debts owed him by the
Spaniards in St. Augustine at their departure, Walton became the fourth largest
property owner in the city at the beginning of the British period.

After Walton's death in 1768, the property at 43 St. George Street reverted
to the British crown, whose representative, Governor James Grant, granted it
in 1771 to Joseph Stout, a former Philadelphian who had arrived in Florida in
1767 to manage a 31,000 acre estate at Mount Tucker on the St. Johns River.
Stout had earlier served as apprentice to Dr. William Stork, a prominent
promoter of settlement in East Florida. Though Stout lived at Mt. Tucker until
1779, and then at a 950 acre tract of his own, the building on St. Goerge Street
served him as both a town house and offices. Improvements were made to the
property during his ownership. In 1783 his wife noted: "We have been at a
great expense for repairing and raising a new roof to the house in town." But
by the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles that year, Florida was returned






DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


to Spanish rule, and Stout soon departed for the Bahamas where he became a
prosperous merchant and cotton planter-though he was forced to sell his St.
Augustine house for one-third of its appraised value due to the depressed
market at the time of transfer.

The buyer was Juan Sanchez, the Chief Master Caulker of the Royal Works.
He was a man of some means, earning a salary of 420 pesos annually. In 1787
he was able to buy a 25-ton schooner which carried cargo between Havana, St.
Augustine and Charleston before he sold it in 1789. He was also well-connected:
his daughter married Tomas de Aguilar, an official on the governor's staff.
Sanchez enlarged the building, adding an east wing and second floor. The Royal
Treasury and Treasurer's quarters were located on the second floor in 1793-4.

After Sanchez's death in 1803, Tomas de Aguilar became head of the house-
hold. Though members of the family migrated to Havana with the coming of
American rule in 1821, the Sanchez heirs retained ownership until 1832. Then
it was sold for $1,000 to Lewis G. Melizet of Havana and John M. Melizet of
Philadelphia.(4)

The Melizets sold it in 1835 to James Lisk from New York, whose heirs sold
it in 1837 to Seth Gifford of Camden, S. C. who served as 3rd Lieutenant in
Company G of the St. Augustine Guards during the Seminole War. Gifford rented
the building until 1841 to a fellow soldier, Charles Loring, brother of Confederate
General William Wing Loring, but was unable to hold the property, losing it in
a foreclosure of mortgage in 1844.(5)

Another long-term family ownership began that year when the building was
purchased by Ann Hurlbert for $550. She was the widow of Captain Daniel
Hurlbert (1776-1836), a native of Weathersfield, Connecticut who came to
Florida in 1801, served as a St. Augustine city alderman and, according to the
epitaph on his tombstone at Tolomato Cemetery, "was known and esteemed as an
enterprising and capable master mariner having been engaged as such for many
years." The widow Hurlbert sold the property in 1851 for $500 to her daughter
and son-in-law Mary and Darius Allen (1806-1895). A native of Rhode Island,
Darius Allen was listed in the 1850 census as a carpenter, but in 1871 he
became commissioner of pilotage, and one of his sons combined the careers of
sea captain, fire chief, and boarding house proprietor. Allen's wharf was one
of several that lined the bayfront of late 19th century St. Augustine.(6)

In 1867 the Allens sold the building to Mary Strischka for $1,150, and
in a separate agreement for $150. Allen, as carpenter "promises and agrees
to place in tenantable order, on or before the first day of August, 1867, the
House and Lot . and also to repair, and place in proper condition, the
fences around said premises."(7)

Strischka and her sister had sewn the white flag of truce that was flown
over Fort Marion in March 1862 to signal the surrender of St. Augustine to the
Union forces in the Civil War. She was a native of Massachusetts. Once Allen
finished the necessary carpentry, Strischka rented the building for use as a
hotel, called the St. Johns House. It was operated until 1869 by J. V.
Hernandez, then taken over by Mrs. Romon Canova, whose husband, a famous Con-
federate blockade runner, had served as Mayor of St. Augustine in 1866-7. It
was well regarded for its accommodations in the age that preceded the palace


-4-





DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued) -5-

hotels, but with Strischka's death in the 1870s it began deteriorating to a
condition of dilapidation. The Strischka heirs finally sold it in 1885 and
the next year it was being operated as a boarding house by Susan E. Meyers.
She soon sold it to Bernard C. and Alice Maxwell of London who paid $4,500 in
1886 but were able to sell it for only $1,750 six years later.(8)

The 1892 purchaser was Frederick Sulzner (1823-99) who ran a music store
and composed and published "Reminiscences of St. Augustine, Florida" for the
guitar in 1894. In 1895 the local press reported the sale of "the estate of
Prof. Frederick Sulzner on St. George Street comprising three stores and tene-
ment above to C. T. Anderson, Esq., the jewelry manufacturer of Reading, Pa.;
the consideration was $4,000. This property was formerly St. John's Inn, at
one time the fashionable hotel of this city, tradition dating its palmy days
back to the seventeenth century. At one time it was the property of Mrs. Scott
Maxwell, a grandniece of Sir Walter Scott."(9)

There is, however, no record in the county courthouse of this deal being
consummated. Rather, the property seems to have been held after Sulzner's
death in 1899 by his heirs until 1905 when his daughter Sallie, the manager of
the Women's Exchange, sold it to an out-of-town buyer. The building was listed
as vacant in the city directory until acquired in 1912 by its next long-term
owner, Margaret Mullaney, a widow who later remarried and became Margaret
Butler. She held it for nearly 37 years, renting furnished rooms, selling
antiques and novelties and making some major changes in the property. Two
large arched openings were put in the street-level facade and the balcony,
threatened by traffic was removed, though its overhanging roof remained, sup-
ported by cross braces to the wall. A clay tile bungalow was built in the
back yard.(10)

During World War II the entire building was leased by Ruth Pontius who
operated it as the Old Spanish Inn, offering "Guest Rooms furnished in Antiques.
$1.00 up" and a Tea Room which featured "Famous St. Augustine Dinners." It
was a popular eating place for both locals and tourists.(ll)

In 1949 Margaret Butler sold the property to Thomas and Doris Wiles, who
occupied the bungalow and rented out the main building for antique and gift
shops. Thomas Wiles went on to manage the Barcelona and St. Augustine Beach
Hotels. Doris Wiles became administrative historian with the St. Augustine
Historical Society. In 1952 the Wileses sold the property to Marguerita
Phillips, a poet, artist and character in St. Augustine since the 1920s.(12)

She, in turn, leased it in 1954 to Walter B. Fraser, a former Mayor, State
Senator and gubernatorial candidate who operated the Fountain of Youth, Oldest
Schoolhouse and other attractions. Fraser already owned the adjacent colonial
building on the north, and the lease provided that he should "have the right to
make such alterations and changes in such parts of the buildings as he finds
necessary for his pruposes, especially the right to repair or rebuild the roof
of the Spanish Inn building and to convert a window on the north side of the
Spanish Inn building into a door leading into the patio of the Governor Salazar's
mansion, at his own expense, provided, however, that such alterations shall not
in any way injure the buildings or depreciate their value . ."(13)

In 1958 Fraser assigned his lease to Gerald Horton Bath, a former public
relations director for the tourist center, whose interest in historic places had






DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


led him to St. Augustine. "We found the city charming but couldn't help note
how its Spanish heritage had been neglected," he said. "I came to the con-
clusion that the only way restoration could be accomplished was through indi-
vidual effort, so Mrs. Bath and I decided to look for a suitable building which
could be restored as a possible inspiration to others." He believed that the
building he leased had been used as an inn during the Spanish and British
Periods, so he planned to re-do it as a Spanish inn of that day might have
looked. He took photographs and drawings of the building to Spain so that
architects there could prepare plans. Furnishings were assembled by the Madrid
antique firm of Abelardo Linares. Art professor Jacinto del Caso copied 1580
portraits of the King and Queen of Spain from the Prado Museum. A tile portrait
of Pedro Menendez, founder of St. Augustine, was done in Seville. Arthur F.
Deam of DeLand, Florida, former head of the architecture department at the
University of Pennsylvania, designed the patio. Boyd Parker of St. Augustine
was the contractor for the building. The results featured exposed coquina walls
with metal grillwork on the windows. The balcony was reconstructed along the
length of the facade but, because there was still traffic on the street, it was
only half as wide as it had originally been. Even at that there was trouble
with trucks, and Bath got the city to lay a sidewalk in front of the building
as a protective barrier, and encouraged closing the street to traffic.(14)

It was opened to the public as the Old Spanish Inn on July 4, 1959 with
hostesses, including a former "Miss St. Augustine," dressed in the regional
costumes of Asturias, Spain. It did not offer either meals or lodging to the
public: it was strictly an exhibition. It did not prosper. Bath had diffi-
culty paying the bills. In 1963 he bought the property from Marguerita
Phillips at the available option price of $35,000, promptly mortgaged it for
the same amount, and offered it for sale for $150,000. Not until the end of
1965 was he able to sell, at a lower price, to the St. Augustine Restoration
Foundation, which first leased and later, in 1977, sold it to the Historic St.
Augustine Preservation Board.(15)

Faced with deterioration of the old building, the Preservation Board
launched a major restoration project in 1977, for which Herschel Shepard of
Jacksonville was the architect. ARchaeological excavations led by Dr.
Kathleen Deagan of Florida State University uncovered 5 Guale Indian burials
on the site and several layers of tabby floors, one laid over another, which
were dated, according to available pottery fragments, as c. 1760, c. 1800 and
c. 1813. Evolution of the building from its original one room to its current
two-story L-shape was traced. Historical research dispelled the old view that
the origins of the building were lost in the mists of time.(16)

It was decided to restore the DeMesa-Sanchez House to its appearance in
the American territorial period, since anything earlier would entail wholesale
demolition of the historic fabric. Paint expert Frank Welsh took sample chips
from the building and pinpointed the appropriate exterior finish as ashlar-
scored stucco, painted pink. This led to controversy in the community among
people who liked the exposed coquina that had been visible since Bath's earlier
remodeling. Dr. William R. Adams, director of the Preservation Board, was
called upon to address civic groups on the topic "Why Pink?" Unflattering
bumper stickers were distributed by opponents, and soon after the work was
completed the front of the building was defaced by grafitti saying "Pink Sucks."






DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


The pink remained, however, and the DeMesa-Sanchez House was reopened to
the public in the 1980's, looking very much like it did in the earliest known
photographs of a century before.


1. Pedro Ruiz de Olano, "Plano del Fuerte de San Agustin de la Florida,
y sus contornos," August 8, 1740; Juan Jose Elixio de la Puente, "Plano de
la . Plaza de San Agustin," January 22, 1764; Mariano de la Rocque, "Plano
Particular de la Cuidad de San Agustin de la Florida," April 25, 1788; East
Florida Papers, Escrituras, 1784-1821; Albert Manucy, The Houses of St. Augustine,
1565-1821 (St. Augustine, 1962), pp. 22-25 and 41-47; Patricia Griffin, "Mullet
on the Beach; The Minorcans of Florida: 1768-1788," Ph.D. diss. (University of
Florida, 1977), pp. 106-108 and 134-151; John Bostwick, et. al, "A Sub-Surface
Archaeological Survey of the Northern Colonial City," (St. Augustine: HSAPB, 1978).

2. Anon., "Copy of a Plan of the City of St. Augustine," 1833; 1885 and
1894 Birds-Eye Views; Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, 1884-1930; St. Augustine City
Directory, 1885, 1899, 1904.

3. Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, 1884-1958; City Cirectory, 1959, 1960.

4. Early information on DeMesa-Sanchez House taken from Michael C.
Scardaville, "Historical Outline of the DeMesa-Sanchez (Spanish Inn) Site,
B-7, L-6, St. Augustine, Florida, with Chain of Title Appended" (August 1978)
and James M. Smith, "DeMesa Site, Revisited" (1981). Manuscripts in Historic
St. Augustine Preservation Board Block and Lot file.

5. East Florida Herald January 13, 1836; St. Johns County Courthouse, Deed
Books N, pp. 53-4 and 0, pp. 609-11.

6. St. Augustine Historical Society, Hurlbert and Allen biographical
files and cards; Deed Book P, p. 225; St. Augustine Examiner December 16, 1871.

7. Deed Book R, pp. 491-2; Miscellaneous Book A, p. 180.

8. Thomas Graham, The Awakening of St. Augustine (SAHS, 1978) pp. 100 and
266; 1860 census; St. Augustine Examiner October 9, 1869 and December 4, 1869;
Deed Books BB, p. 516; DD, p. 173; Ee, p. 429; GG, p. 72; TT, p. 138; 1886 City
Cirectory.

9. SAHS Sulzner biographical cards; Tatler February 16, 1895, p. 8.

10. Deed Book 9, p. 212; 24, p. 211; City Directories 1904-47; 1924 and
1930 Sanborn Maps; St. Augustine Record September 28, 1920, p. 4; January 21,
1927, p. 6; July 30, 1939.

11. SAHS DeMesa-Sanchez file has menus, postcards, etc.

12. Deed Book 181, pp. 249-50; 119, pp. 508-10; City Directory 1951;
St. Augustine Record October 12, 1968 obituary for Doris Wiles; obituaries for
Thomas Wiles and Marguerita Phillips in Arthur Marsh Scrapbooks (SAHS library)
Volume III, pp. 811e and 952.










DeMesa-Sanchez House (continued)


13. Deed Book 212, pp. 387-9.

14. Deed Book 243, pp. 314-6; St. Augustine Record July 2, 1959, p. 5;
Florida Times Union Sunday Magazine December 6, 1959, pp. 51-3.

15. Official Records Book 46, pp. 657-9; 80, pp. 603-9; St. Augustine
Record November 16, 1979, p. ZA; SAHS DeMesa-Sanchez file.

16. James M. Smith "DeMesa Site Revisited" (1981).

BIBLIOGRAPHY


Bostwick, J.
1978 "Further Excavations in the deMesa-Sanchez House 1977-1978,"
file Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.


MS on


Deagan, K.
1978 "1977 Excavations of the deMesa-Sanchez House Interior," MS on
file Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.

Gest, T. R.
1977 "Archaeology and Physical Anthropology of Three Burials at the
deMesa Site SA 7-6, St. Augustine, Florida," MS on file Historic
St. Augustine Preservation Board.

Letchworth, W.
1977 "British, French, and Chinese Ceramics at SA-16-23, SA-7-6, and
SA-26-1," MS on file Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.

Reitz, E.
1977 "Faunal Remains From the deMesa Site in St. Augustine," MS on file
Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.

Scardaville, M.
1978 "Historical Outline of the DeMesa-Sanchez (Spanish Inn) Site, B-7,
L-6, St. Augustine, Florida, with Chain of Title Appended," MS on
file Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.


Smith, J.
1981


Wirth, P.
1977


M.
"DeMesa Site, Revisited," MS on file Historic St. Augustine Preserva-
Board.


"Glass at the deMesa Site, SA 7-6," MS on file Historic St. Augustine
Preservation Board.