Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: 214 St. George - Donald Bessey
Title: Report and Recommendations, Tabby/Coquina Wall
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095521/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report and Recommendations, Tabby/Coquina Wall 214 St. George St. Augustine, Florida, for Donald L. Bessey and Conale J. Bessey
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: 214 St. George - Donald Bessey
Physical Description: Report
Language: English
Creator: Steinbach, Robert H.
Publication Date: 2001
Physical Location:
Box: 8
Divider: 214 St. George - Donald Bessey
Folder: 214 St. George - Donald Bessey
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
214 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Saint Augustine Civic Center (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 214 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.891653 x -81.312925
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095521
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






REPORT and RECOMMENDATIONS

TABBY/COQUINA WALL

214 St. George St.
St. Augustine, Florida

for
Donald L. Bessey and Conale J. Bessey


Prepared by:
Robert H. Steinbach
Historic Preservation Consultant
1 November 2001






REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
FOR
TABBY & COQUINA WALL
214 ST. GEORGE STREET
ST. AUGUSTINE, FL

1 November 2001

DESCRIPTION: The wall, located along the south line of the property, begins at the
southeast corner, and extends in a westerly direction for a distance of 22'-3". It is 11"
thick and 6'-0" 2" in height from the asphalt paving on the south side to the bottom of
a concrete beam. This beam, 1'-4" 3" in height, is supported on the north side by four
16" X 16" concrete columns. These columns taper to approximately 22" at the top in
the N/S dimension. The beam and it's associated columns act to stabilize and
consolidate the wall, preventing it's collapse.
The top of the wall leans to the south and is approximately 5 1/" (4 1/' 1 0) out of
plumb.
The lower portion of the wall on the south side exhibits severe erosion, particularly at
ground level. This erosion may have be aggravated by vehicular traffic in the parking
lot.
Remnants of a lime stucco or render are still visible on the upper sections of the south
side of the wall.(Color Photo # 1). This material has lost most of it's bonding to the
substrate.
The render on the north side is in better condition, although far from pristine. There is a
considerable amount of mold and mildew on the lower portions.

The tabby portion of the wall begins at the SE corner and extends westward 14'-10".
The center of vertical concrete patches, varying in width from 4" to 12" are located at 5'-
6",12'-0" and 14'-10" from the east end. The first two of these locate the remains of
wooden posts that were intrigal with the wall. A portion of one is still visible at the
bottom of the 12' patch.(Color Photo # 6) The third patch locates the transition of
building material from tabby to coquina.

The coquina portion of the wall can be described as "rubble work" masonry, as it is not
laid in regular courses. At least two of the stones are laid with the bedding plane in a
vertical position, not the normal horizontal aspect. A section of the wall on the north
side, at the west end near the top, appears to have been re-laid.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The tabby portion of this wall is the only known example
of an above grade tabby construction within the colonial city. At the end of the First
Spanish Period, there were 132 (39%) tabby houses in St. Augustine. By 1788 the
number had been reduced to 13 (5%) and by the end of the 20th century to 0.

TABBY CONSTRUCTION: The presence of wood posts within the walls raises some






interesting questions. Manucy postulates that wood posts or poles were inserted into
the walls to carry the load of the roof until the tabby had time to harden. This type of
construction requires the use of forms approximately 12" high. When a wall is built
using this technique, it usually produces distinctive horizontal lines between each lift, as
each must harden sufficiently to carry the weight of the form before the next one is
poured. Holes from the form pins are also generated from this process. Neither of these
characteristics is present in the wall.
A second method, documented through archaeological excavations, involves raising a
post and beam structure and in-filling between the posts with tabby. Forms would have
been clamped to the frame, allowing the work to progress quickly and allowing each lift
to bond with the previous one. No form pins would have been required because of the
relatively short distance between posts.
Roque's house #129 describes a "House of thin wall of tabby and posts......" which
may well have been this type of construction.
It would appear that this wall may well be representative of the second method of
construction. Removal of the concrete patches to verify the dimensions of the posts
could well resolve the issue.

COQUINA CONSTRUCTION: The coquina portion of the wall follows traditional colonial
construction practices and needs no further discussion.

HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS: The Puente map of 1764 gives lot dimensions as well
as a brief description of the houses. By plotting the distance from the SW corner of
King and St. George Streets, southward, we get a distance of 205.8' to the south line of
the Horruytiner property. The present distance is 208.4', an error of only 3.4'. It would
seem logical to assume that the wall is a remnant of the north wall of a house on the
property to the south (Puente # 216), since the Spanish usually built their houses along
the north line to take advantage of the southern exposure. Several problems arise with
this assumption. One, the house to the south is described by Puente as a stone house,
not a tabby one .Two, the Roque map indicates that the house to the south has
disappeared and that the Horruytiner house lot has expanded to the south. Further,
there is no fence or wall shown in this location. The Clements map of 1834 shows the
Horruytiner lot returning to it's original N-S dimension.
There would seem to be several possibilities to explain the existence of the wall.
1. Puente was mistaken about the wall material in #216. It is also possible that the wall
is a remnant of an earlier structure, and was incorporated into the stone one. This
would seem to be the most plausible explanation.
2. Roque's map in error. It must be remembered that this map was copied a number of
times, and a fence or wall line could have been left out.
3. The wall is post-colonial. This is, of course conceivable although highly unlikely as
there is no documented tabby construction in St. Augustine after 1763.


Page 2 of 5






RECOMMENDATIONS


South Face -

1. Remove all loose stucco or render. Save representative samples for later
analysis.
2. Remove portions of the concrete patches that cover the wood posts. Document
the posts original sizes and association with the wall.
3. Wash entire wall with a mild detergent and water. Rinse with generous amounts
of clean water.
4. In-fill the eroded sections of the tabby wall with a mixture of one part St. Astier
HL5 (natural hydraulic cement) and 1 /2 to 2 parts course sand (At mason's
discretion) Add oyster shell to provide a workable consistency. Patch all other
voids with the same material, less the oyster shell.
5. In-fill the eroded sections of the coquina wall with the same mixture as above,
but substituting small pieces of coquina for the oyster shell.
6. Scratch in-fills after 6 8 hours and allow to cure for 2 5 days. Shade from sun
with burlap drapes and mist occasionally.
7. Dampen wall to provide adequate suction and apply a first coat of HL5 in the
proportions of 1:1.5 or 1:2 using a course sand. Thickness can be up to 3/8" if
applied in two lifts. It is preferable to cast on the material to provide a better
bond with the substrate. Scour back and key (crisscross patterns are preferred
to combing) after initial set.
8. Check for initial shrinkage. If found, dampen surface lightly with water and
tighten back and re-key. Repeated shrinkage is usually a function of poor quality
sands, poor suction control or rapid drying. Shade from sun with burlap drapes
and mist as necessary. Allow to cure for 2 5 days.
9. Dampen wall and apply a finish coat of HL 3.5 and a finer well graded sand in
the proportions of 1:2. Add just enough water to obtain workability The more
water is added the higher the risk of shrinkage. When the mortar is firm enough,
proceed to float up with a cross-grained wood float. This is the most important
phase of the finishing work and should be done diligently. Together with good
curing and protection it is vital in obtaining a good finish.
10. The upper 2/3's of the east end of the wall could be left open Consolidate the
substrate with a polymer such as Acryl 60. Completely saturate the substrate by
applying with a garden sprayer. A mix of 3:1 is the normal ratio. As this material
will not re-emulsify when exposed to water, application should be done at one
time because of the real possibility that additional coats applied after
polymerization will not adhere to the previous one.
11. Allow finish to completely dry, and then apply a coat of Keim Granital (silicate
paint) diluted by 30% with Keim Granital Dilution by brush or roller, working well
into all surfaces. Allow a minimum of 24 hours before applying the final coat
undiluted.


Page 3 of 5






North Face -


1. Remove mold and mildew with a solution in the proportions of one (1) pint of
sodium hypochlorite (household bleach), one (1) cup of trisodium phosphate (
such as Spic & Span), and one (1) gallon of clean water. Apply with soft bristle
brushes. Flush with copious amounts of clean water.
2. Repair coquina at the top of the wall near the west end using the same material
as specified in #5 above.
3. Sound the existing render. Remove any loose material and replace with the
material specified for the south face..
4. Apply two coats of Kiem Granital as specified in #11 above.


SOURCES:
LIME RENDERS, NATURAL HYDRAULIC LIME
The Virginia Lime Works
166 Green Hill Road
Monroe, VA 24574
Phone 804/929-8113

Fax (804)929-6859
Internet http://www.valimeworks.com
E-mail jprice@iwinet.com
Jeffery B. Price or Jimmy Price (Jeffery's father).
Both are most helpful.


KIEM MINERAL PAINTS

KEIM Mineral Systems
c/o The Cohalan Company
53 Cape Henlopen Drive, #62
Port Lewes
Lewes, Delaware 19958
Phone (302) 644-1007
Fax- (302)644-0866
Contact Mame Cohalan
Cell Phone (302) 34-9094
E-mail M938@aol.com





ACRYL 60


Page 4 of 5






Charger Corporation
299 Welton Street
Hamden, CT 06517
Phone (800)922-4623
Fax (203) 562-2053
E-mail answers@charger.com



Enclosures:

1. 13 Color photographs w/ negatives.
2. 16 Black/white photographs w/ negatives.
3. Keim technical data sheets.
4. St. Astier technical data.


Page 5 of 5












12" COQUINA WALL _,


w
LLI


8" C.B. WALL w

/ CONCRETE COLUMN 0


S------ COQUINA --- -- TABBY --

WO. POST MOLD
8" C.B. WALL c-
(TO BE VERIFIED) "
O


____"______ _'-o" ____________ 51 4




PLAN VIEW

TABBYICOQUINA WALL N
214 ST. GEORGE ST.
ST. AUGUSTINE, FL


SCALE 1/4" = 1










COQUINA CAP,


S' l SIDEWALK
\ '/o "' s'-"





SOUTH ELEVATION

TABBYICOQUINA WALL
214 ST. GEORGE ST.
ST. AUGUSTINE, FL.

SCALE 1/4" = 1'














Main data and application recommendations


Product specification: Pure and Natural Hydraulic Lime (NHL). Contains no additives.
Conforms to European Norms (EN 459) and French Norm NFP 15.311


Strength factor: 3.5 (Moderately hydraulic)
Residue @ 0.09 mm: 6.5%
Density volumetricc weight) : typical 650gr / litre
Available (free) lime after slaking Ca(OH)2: 25% +
Packing: 25kg. Bags


Whiteness index: 72
Surface cover (cm2 per gram): 9000
Expansion : < Imm
Residue of quick lime after slaking: < 1%
Shelf life: 8-12 months kept sealed and dry


MORTARS

MIX RATIO


Compressive strength N/mm2


EN459* 1 :2


1:2.5 1:3


Elasticity Moduli (Mpa)

1 : 2 1 :2.5 1 :3


0.75 0.57 0.53


7 DAYS
28 DAYS


6 MONTHS
12 MONTHS
24 MONTHS


Consumption for Im3
of mortar Kg. +/- 10%


3.5* 1.88 1.47 1.34
7.1 5.34 3.94


7.5 5.90 3.90
8.63 6.00 3.97

305 244 216


9010 9000


8070


15260 13501 12450
15280 13620 13150
17480 13785 13670


* Incoming European Norm EN 459 ( mortar ratio 1:1.3 with ISO 679 Sand)

Mixing: can be mixed in cement mixers.

Application by spray gun: possible. Please consult us.

Working temperatures: not below 50C or above 300C. Make sure that high suction materials are
thoroughly dampened before application. Avoid rapid drying due to high temperatures or strong
winds by curing with a light water mist several times a day if necessary.Protect from frost, rain,
direct sun and strong wind for a minimum of 72 hours.
SUITABLE FOR LATH WORK/LIME CONCRETE/INJECTION/GROUTING see relevant
sheets.


Reworking: possible within 12 hours.




















NHL 3.5
(Chaux LC**** Pure)
Main data and application recommendations


Mortar composition: MASONRY/POINTING/ CAPPING/ BEDDING/ ASHLAR

Binder: sand ratio: from 1:1.5 to 1:3 depending on the support/background conditions, the size of the joint
and the fineness of the sand. Always use well graded sands ( 3 4mm down to 75 microns). See also
"General Guidelines Sands for NHL mortars".

RENDERING


A. Scratch coat (3-5mm)


1 VOLUME OF NHL 3.5 : 1.5 VOLUMES OF SAND Cast on.


B. Undercoat (15-20mm) 1 VOLUME OF NHL 3.5 : 2 VOLUMES OF SAND*


C. Finishing


(5-10mm) 1 VOLUME OF NHL 3.5 : 2.5 VOLUMES OF SAND


With very fine sands possibly containing clays the binder content may have to be reduced.

*At this dosage the consumption is approx. 0.35kg. ofNHL 3.5 per m2 for each mm thickness.

Please also refer to General Guidelines: NHL Renders.


The above details are given for information purposes only. Final dosages and application should be
checked with our technicians. The Factory reserves the right to alter specifications.














(Chaux 100 narurelle Pure)
Main data and application recommendations


Product specification: pure and natural hydraulic lime. Contains no additives.
Conforms to European Norm (EN 459) and French Norm NFP 15.311


Strength factor: 5 (Eminently hydraulic)

Residue @ 0.09 mm: 7%

Density volumetricc weight) typical. 700 gr. / litre
Available (free) lime Ca(OH)2 after slaking: 15-20%

Shelf life: 8-12 months kept sealed and dry


Whiteness index: 67

Surface cover (cm2per gram): 8000
Expansion: < Imm

Residue of quick lime after slaking: < 1%

Packing: 30kg. Bags


MORTARS

MIX RATIO


Compressive Strength N/mm2
EN459* 1:2 1 :2.5 1:3


Elasticity Moduli (Mpa)

1 :2 1 :2.5 1 :3


7 Days
28 Days
6 Months
12 Months
24 Months


Consumption for Im2
of mortar Kg +/- 10%


1.96 1.00 0.88


n/a n/a


5* 2.20 2.00 1.5 10800 11000 10000


7.31 5.91 5.31
9.28 8.84 6.50
10.81 8.81 7.8

350 280 233


18000 17050 16900
18510 17280 16150
21500 18020 17430


S*Incoming European Norm EN 459 (mortar ratio 1:1.3 with ISO 679 Sand)

Mixing: can be mixed in cement mixers.

Application by spray gun: possible. Please consult us.

Working temperatures: not below 50C or above 300C. Make sure that high suction materials are
thoroughly dampened before application. Avoid rapid drying due to high temperatures or strong
winds by curing with a light water mist several times a day if necessary. Protect from frost, rain,
direct sun and strong wind for a minimum of 48 hours.
SUITABLE FOR LATH WORK / LIME CONCRETE/INJECTION/GROUTING:see relevant
sheets.


Reworking: possible within 8 hours.
























(Chaux 100 naturelle Pure)
Main data and application recommendations


Mortar composition: MASONRY/POINTING/CAPPING/MASS WALL BEDDING/
FOUNDATION/SEA DEFENCE WALLS/CHIMNEY STACS/NEW BUILD (Masonry)

Depending on the conditions of the support/background, the fineness of the sand and the size of the joints,
binder : sand ratio values vary between 1: 1.5 to 1: 2.5

Choose well graded sands (3 or 4mm down to 75 microns).
See also "General Guidelines Sands for NHL mortars".

RENDERING

A. Scratch coat(3 5mm) 1 VOLUME OF NHL 5 : 1.5 VOLUMES OF SAND Cast on recommended
B. Undercoat (15-20mm)1 VOLUME OF NHL 5 : 2 VOLUMES OF SAND (1:2.5 max)

*At this dosage the consumption is approx 0.4 kg. ofNHL 5 per m2 for each mm of thickness
C. Finishing (5-10mm) USE NHL 3.5 OR NHL 2, see relevant sheets

Please also refer to General Guidelines: NHL Renders.

The above details are given for information purposes only. Final dosages and application should be
checked with our technicians. The Factory reserves the right to alter specifications.










u- Making NHL Mortar




NHL Mortar preparation: can 4e mixed in normal cement mixers.

Small mixers Larger mixers
1. Introduce V2 of the required sand Introduce equal parts of the required sand.
2. Add all of the lime. Add equal part of lime.
Mix well (about 2 minutes until uniform colour is achieved)
3. Add remaining sand. Add more sand (in equal parts).
Mix well again (1-2 minutes)
Add remaining lime and remaining sand.
4. Continue mixing until required workability Mix DRY for a couple of minutes to homogenize
is achieved adding water slowly, and then continue mixing adding water slowly until
Time of last mix: approx. 10 minutes. workability is achieved. approx. 12 minutes.

Note: the best results are achieved by adding water slowly. The mortar should be more like a dough than a slurry.
The longer the final mixing time, the more workable (fatter) the mortar will be

A small addition of lime putty (max. 10% of the weight of the NHL binder) can be made. Do not
add putty when working with NHL 2. This is to achieve immediate workability and reduce the
mixing time. It is not necessary and it is left to the user's preference. If putty is added this should
be done before the optimal level of water is added as putty contains water and adding it when the
mix is complete would produce a mortar that is too wet and therefore unsatisfactory. The putty
addition, within the maximum stated, will reduce the strength of the mortar (see Mortar Tests).

Dosing: Use standard buckets, always leveled. Once full, tap on the side to ensure that contents
settle and fill to level. Dose at the volumes agreed with the supplier (1:1.5, 1:2 etc./ NHL: Sand).
With the correct aggregates and dosages, mortars from Class II to Class IV are easily produced
(from 10 to 2 N/mm2) by using NHL 5, NHL 3.5 and NHL 2 (see also individual products data
sheets).

Reworking: All St. Astier NHL mortars can be reworked for up to 24 hours (see individual
products data sheets). This is due to the absence of cement or gypsum in the lime and to the
minimal quantity of aluminates.

Reworking diminishes potential waste, and mortar can be prepared and left overnight so that a
quick start can be made in the morning.

When preparing an NHL mortar for later use, place it ona board after mixing and cover it to
avoid contact with possible rain or sun. When re mixing add the least possible water (in some
.- ..1 --A 1. 1 -.. .. .. .1

































cases it is not necessary to auu any). ine irauesmen s goou j uugmen is require.

Main Rules : Do not over saturate with water, mix well, use well graded sands.












a Sands for NHL mortars





Choosing the correct sand when making a mortar is of extreme importance.

Sands should be clean and uncontaminated by clay/silt. These occur in the range from 0.04mm and below
and the most effective method to establish their presence is the wet sieve analysis.

Normal dry sieve analysis does not accurately reveal the presence of clay or silt as they do not examine
particles passing 0.075 sieve. Furthermore when the sand is dried before sieving, clay or silt particles can
coat some particles and these will not pass the 0.075 sieve. In contact with water, however, these particles
will return to colloidal state, retaining moisture and general instability. The result is a much longer drying
period which, if winter is approaching, would not allow the mortar to be sufficiently dried to withstand
frost.

The fines in a sand will demand more water. This is due to much higher surface area to be wetted. A high
proportion of fines in sand and the consequent high water content in the mortar will have negative effects
in compressive and flexural strength. High moisture will promote shrinkage and could lead to de-bonding
especially in mortars applied to low suction areas.

There is a tendency to choose sands because of their colour. The fact is that the colour of a mortar will be
given by the fines contained in the sand and therefore fine sands are chosen for a number of jobs where
they are not appropriate.

In renders, for example, a good, well graded, coarse sharp sand is needed for the backing coats. A finer
sand can be chosen for the finishing coat based on its colour. If, however, the colour of the sand is due to
clay (earth) presence, as clay is a binder, the quantity of lime will be reduced to avoid producing a binder
rich mortar.

Fine sands require more water. A high proportion of these sands lead to longer setting time, possibility of
shrinkage, lime leaching and more sensitivity to adverse weather conditions.

Sands are mostly responsible for the void structure of a mortar and, therefore, for its vapour permeability,
so vital for the performance against accumulation of condensation.
It is for this reason that well graded sands are recommended. If sharp, the void structure will be even more
efficient.

Monogranular sands (particle size mainly between 1 or 2 grades) will not allow good vapour exchange,
they will also diminish workability and therefore increase the danger of too much water addition in order
to achieve it. In making NHL mortars with good sand, workability should not be achieved by adding more
water but by allowing a little more time for mixing. It is also advantageous, if time permits, to let the
mortar rest for a while: the water will settle between the particles and allow better hydration of the free
lime content resulting in a fatter, more homogeneous and workable mortar.






- ,.:..


Sands for NHL mortars


A practical guide to choosing sands:


General Building Rendering
Maximum particle size
approximately 1/3 of the height of Dubbing out: same sand as per base coat
the joint
Depending on the size of the Stipple coats, base coats and Smooth finishing coats
Depending on the size of the
rough finishing coats:
joint, sands from 6mm down to 2 m (or l) down to
2.36mm (or less) down to
0.075 can be used, with a
0.075 can be used, with a 3mm down to 0.075mm particles 0.075mm. Particles between
proportion from 0.150 to 0.075 between 0.150 and 0.075 not 0.150 and 0.075 not above 20%
about 20% of the mass. a e
above 15%
Example (% retained): Example (% retained) Example (% retained)
5 mm 2 5 mm 0 5 mm 0
3.35 mm 3 3.35 mm 0 3.35 mm 0
2.36 mm 6 2.36 mm 4 2.36 mm 0
1.18 mm 15 1.18 mm 10 1.18 mm 6
0.600 mm 23 0.600 mm 20 0.600 mm 12
0.300 mm 32 0.300 mm 35 0.300 mm 34
0.150 mm 15 0.150 mm 20 0.150 mm 30
0.075 mm 4 0.075 mm 11 0.075 mm 18
There are a vast number ofsands, differing in gradings and qualities. To be sure that a well graded sand
is being used it is necessary that at least 4 grades form a substantial part of the proposed sand.

In rendering, sharp and well graded sands should be used for all coats.
For smooth finishes finer sand can be used, in which case this should still be well graded. The
structural soundness of a render depends on the bonding with the background and between coats.
Bonding is partly dependant on the capillary suction of the background or the previous coat. A
percentage of finer particles (10 15% between 0.150 and 0.075mm with 0 below 0.075) will
promote bonding without affecting vapour permeability and capillary suction.
Indoor smooth plastering will require fine sands. Particular attention should be given to curing.
Fine sands will also be used in ashlar work.

In all cases NHL binder quantities should be carefully considered and this should be done in
relation to the performance required and the quality of the sand.

This document is a guide only and is not intended to be a specification. Its purpose is to provide the
reader with helpful information that may assist in determining the correct choice of materials,
methods of application and the best working practice. The guidelines refer to our experience with St.
Astier NHL binders and some recommendations might not be applicable to other products.











NHL mortars:

WA Consumption Chart




NHL products are bought by weight but mixed by volume. Their low density in comparison with other
binders means that with the same weight one would produce up to three times the amount of mortar.


Binder consumption for 1m3 of mortar: volume /weight comparison

Average Volumetric Mixes Kg/m3

Binder Density (Kg/m3) 1:2 1:2.5 1:3
NHL 5 666 333 266 222
NHL 3.5 610 305 244 203
NHL 2 560 280 224 186
Lime Putty 1350 675 540 450
OPC/W.Cement 1450 725 580 483

Mortar required per 100 square metres of brickwork with 10mm joints.
Brick sizes have been taken to be 215mm x 103mm x 65mm. Mix ratio 1:2.5.


Type of wall


Half brick
Cavity
One brick solid
one & half brick solid


Wall
thickness


103mm
255mm
215mm
328mm


No. frog
m3


1.38
2.76
3.54
5.69


Single
frog m3


2.26
4.52
5.38
8.34


NHL
364/5
728/11
934/13
1502/2


Amount of NHLs in Kg
(No frog/single frog)

5 NHL 3.5 N1
69 336/551 309
193 673/1102 618
199 863/1293 793,
201 1388/2034 1274


IL 2
/506
/1013
/1187
/1868


St Astier NHL binders required (in kg approx.) per mm. per m2 of render / plaster
using well graded sand 3mm: 0.075 (1 litre of sand per m2 per mm of thickness).


Mix ratio
1:1.5
1:2
1:2.5
1:3


NHL 2
0.37
0.28
0.22
0.19


NHL 3.5
0.41
0.31
0.24
0.20


NHL 5
0,47
0O35
0.28
0.23











Technical DATA
KEIM Granital
,-:. ; .;; * .- '* .* ,. .-- - .:""-. ,:., ...- .:',.. 4.i *^.' ,^: ^ -,^,,,..
I Produce l IriIoriTiatiorn
Mineral silicate paint system for use on mineral surfaces. Offers water repellency, carbonation protection, vapor permeability and
forms a chemical crystalline bond with the substrate KEIM Granital is made using pure inorganic mineral fillers, earth oxide color


f,, -id ,:.i "ppi,:.A,.:,r.
For 311 minprgl gbt nrbnit tiJrfr3-c in p3rtiril3Ir f"r rPftnrrtinn rn3tiinc nn rpp3ir -j ?nd .tripr.'j i..;rfseSP
,* ... :.-'. ,. p_.t, t:. ... .. ..... . ...
-' Pro, u.; 'I r,,r.,let'ii ,' s
Water vapor permeable
Tested to Class 0 and Class 1
Color fast
Resistant to mould and fungal growth
Easily Cleaned
Free from solvents
Free from blocides
Easy to over paint
Non-flammable

Material Data:
Resistance to vapor diffusion Sd = 0.01 m
Density
Q=0 20kg/m2h0 5 1 42 1 51 colors
Water Absorption Co-efficient
Thermal Expansion
Comparable to the mineral substrate to which it is applied onto
Flash point Non-Flammable
-.. w *..t..i. 0 ... . j.. . -- -.. ,- .-...,,..- ; W.'__,.. :t *;M 44.% 1,S..--.- t,
Color Shades:
,.7 ;a,-,,3 ._i ,: :,1:.,i 3,:,:,:,. j i ,h ih".: W ."EIt pa-.- tt.I. l::..- -1I. a ,. ,l-

4. Application
Substrate Preparation:
When all surfaces are clean, sound, wind dry, dust free from all surface contaminants, decoration using KEIM Mineral Paint may
proceed
Decoration:
Onto a unpainted surface KEEIM Granital should be applied as a two coat system, the first coat should be diluted with 30% by
weight KEIM Granital Dilution and applied by brush or roller, working well into all surfaces. After a minimum period of 12 hours a
final coat of KEIM Granital may be applied undiluted For previously painted surfaces KEIM Granital Grob should be used as a first
coat
Air and surface temperature >5C
Consumption:
For two coats onto a smooth surface approx 0 4 kg/m2 KEIM Granital and 0 06 It/m2 KEIM Granital Dilution.
Tools:
Clean immediately after use with water
5. Packaging
5 & 25kgs containers
6.Storage
Approx 12 months if kept cool, but frost free in tightly closed containers
7. Identification Ref Ordinance Of Dangerous Materials:
Not Applicable
8. Danger of Class in Goodstraffic:
Not Applicable
9. Safety Instructions:
Cover surfaces which are not to be painted. in particular glass, natural stone, ceramics etc Protect the eyes and skin from
splashes. Keep out of reach of children

Refer to OSHA data sheet...

rim




















Technical DATA
KEIM Granital Dilution
.. .- .: ,.....-, .." .-,-. Qrfw? ,J,-.,,.f .-;^ .-.. ."tfe ete^
; Pr.:duc[ Irl,.,T lh.rii ..
Dilution for KEIM Granital, KEIM Contact Plus, KEIM Granital Grob and KEIM Biosil Reacts chemically with the surface. The
product comprises of liquid special potassium silicate pure acrylate stabilizers
.- '' P f -^,.,'!&-,'b : ..'**Li ,'Qt-. -a ,.,t''a saas.-._a ..
Field r of A ppil,..ia.c.r
IIprjed to connllrdate friablp cijrfgracs q a binder cagt for the 'KEIM,4 Mineral Sytemc

3 Product Characteristics
Water vapor permeable
Consolidates the surface
* Odorless
* Non-toxic
*. .. .. '* .....* '- :. . .** ,. *.- ..-;v ,.-.,,-. ,.j ', t ^;-<, |. .f^
Material Data:
Density
O=1 17g/cm3


. App ,,ai.,c.r.
Substrate Preparation:
All loose flaking paint should be removed using wire brushes and broad bladed scrapers to get back to a sound edge When all
surfaces are clean, sound, wind dry, dust free from all surface contaminants, decoration using KEIM Mineral Paint may proceed
Decoration:
KEIM Granital onto unpainted surfaces should be diluted with 30% by weight in the first coat. KEIM Contact, Contact Grob and
Contact Plus should be diluted with 5-10% by weight and KEIM Biosil Grund should be diluted with 10% by weight, For exact
specifications please contact KEIM direct
Air and surface temperature >5C
Consumption:
According to absorbency of the surface as primer approx. 0 21t/m2 For use with other products please refer to product data sheets.
Tools:
Clean immediately after use with water
5. Packaging
5 & 201trs containers
6.Storage
Approx 12 months if kept cool, but frost free in tightly closed containers
7. Identification Ref Ordinance Of Dangerous Materials:
Not Applicable
8. Danger of Class in Goodstraffic:
Not Applicable
9. Safety Instructions:
Cover surfaces, which are not to be painted, in particular glass, natural stone, ceramics etc Protect the eyes and skin from
splashes Keep out of reach of children

Refer to OSHA data sheet...


-4 .







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