Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
Title: Statement for Management (Third Draft)
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 Material Information
Title: Statement for Management (Third Draft) Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
Physical Description: Report
Language: English
Publication Date: 1978
Physical Location:
Box: 8
Divider: Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
Folder: Castillo de San Marcos National Monument
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
Castillo de San Marcos National Monument (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine
Coordinates: 29.897836 x -81.311491
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095513
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


















STATEMENT FOR MANAGEMENT


(THIRD DRAFT)


CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT


Prepared by:
rintendent








WASO
WASO RDaniel J. Tobin, Jr.
Policy Review:
Associate Director
Management and Operations


Final Approval:
Regional Director
Southeast Region


June 28, 1978
Date









May 5, 1978
Date


Date

















I. PURPOSE OF THE PARK

Based on the Antiquities Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225),

Presidential Proclamation No. 1713 (43 Stat. 1968), dated

October 15, 1924, proclaimed Fort Marion (as the Castillo was

known from 1825 to 1942) together with the historic structures

and objects appertaining to be a national monument.


The fundamental purpose of the Castillo de San Marcos National

Monument is to conserve the scenery, history, historical objects

of the structure known as Castillo de San Marcos, and its

surrounding lands which are associated with the Spanish influence

and subsequent cultures in what is now the United States, and to

provide for the enjoyment of these values in such a manner and

by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of

future generations. See appendix for appropriate legislation

which substantiates this purpose, as follows:

A Proclamation, October 15, 1924

Act of June 29, 1936 (49 Stat. 2029)

Act of June 5, 1942 (56 Stat. 312)

Act of July 5, 1960 (74 Stat. 317)

Act of August 27, 1964 (78 Stat. 611)

















II. SIGNIFICANCE OF PARK RESOURCES

Castillo de San Marcos is the symbol of the presence since 1565

of Spain in today's Southeastern United States. Spain's settle-

ment of Florida confirmed and strengthened her title to this

section of the Spanish colonial empire. Its continuous occupation

denied to other nations the use of Florida's east coast as the

site of potentially hostile bases along the vital intercontinental

seaway.


The Anglo-Spanish struggle for the Southeast opened with English

settlement at Charleston in 1670, on Spanish-claimed land. This

hastened the decision to replace the wooden fort in order to con-

tain English expansion, for the intensity of the contest was bound

to increase. Thus Spain constructed the masonry fortification

that still survives and reminds us of her contribution to the

settlement of the continental United States. Castillo de San Marcos

played a major part in delaying the advent of English supremacy in

the Southeast.


The Castillo is the oldest masonry fortification within the

continental United States. It is also exceptionally preserved,

clearly illustrating the development of European military architec-

ture and its transplantation and adaption to the New World.


The historic structure of Castillo de San Marcos and its component

works -- moat, ravelin, water battery, covert way, and covert way

wall -- occupy a surface area of 346,336 square feet. The


















Castillo walls are 30 feet high. The City Gate pillars, also part

of the National Monument, cover an area of 864 square feet and are

24 feet high.


The condition of the Castillo and the City Gate pillars is good,

and results from stabilization work performed by the War Department

and the National Park Service.


Major topographic features.

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument is located in the City of

St. Augustine (Florida), mid-way down the eastern shore of a

peninsula bounded on the east by the Matanzas River, Hospital

Creek, and Robinson Creek, and on the west and south by the San

Sebastian River. The peninsula is four-and-a-half miles long

from the north city limit to the junction of the San Sebastian

and Matanzas Rivers, one mile wide at its widest point, and one-

half mile wide at its narrowest point. The lower half of the

peninsula is split in two by tidal Maria Sanchez Lake, three-fourths

mile long, which joins the Matanzas River north of the junction of

the latter with the San Sebastian.


The St. Augustine peninsula is flat land and sandy soil. Ex-

tensive portions of it have been earth-filled. Tidal marsh land

girds three sides, but it is more extensive north of the Monument

to the city limit and at the southern tip of the peninsula.


The St. Augustine peninsula is predominantly an urban area. The

















other two urban concentrations within the city limits are north

Anastasia Island, to the east beyond the Matanzas River, and West

Augustine, beyond the San Sebastian. The residential development

on north Anastasia has been built on filled-in marsh land.


Two main roadways parallel each other up the St. Augustine peninsula

for three-fourths of its length. From the south, U. S. 1 enters the

peninsula by crossing the San Sebastian River southwest of the

Monument, and runs northward along the western shore. About one

mile before reaching the north city limit, it is joined from the

west by Florida 16, which is actually a feeder from 1-95, five miles

west of St. Augustine. About one-half mile from the city limit,

U. S. 1 is joined from the southeast by San Marco Avenue.


Florida A1A, the other roadway, runs on Anastasia Island from the

south. It enters St. Augustine peninsula from the east over the

Bridge of Lions, turns northward, and reaches the Monument's

southern boundary. Between the bridge and the boundary, A1A is known

also as Avenida Menendez. Entering the Monument, the 4-lane highway

becomes Castillo Drive also, follows the southern and western boundary

lines, and leaving the Monument runs outside a part of the western

boundary line.


Just outside the northwest point of the Monument's boundary, off a

privately-owned commercial chain visitor attraction, Castillo Drive

branches westward to U.S. 1, 3/10s of a mile away. Florida A1A, picking


















up the name San Marco Avenue, continues northward eight-tenths mile,

turns eastward to proceed over Vilano Beach Bridge, and then turns

northward. San Marco Avenue continues another mile to its junction

with U. S. 1.


East of the St. Augustine peninsula, that part of the Matanzas River

extending from the shore line of St. Augustine's historic quarter to

St. Augustine Inlet is known locally as Matanzas Bay. The inlet,

connecting the bay and the Atlantic Ocean, is a man-made World War

II cut. South of the bay end of the inlet, north Anastasia Island

is indented from north to south by a body of water called Salt Run,

three miles long and a dead-end. The land between Salt Run and the

Atlantic Ocean is called Conch Island.


North of St. Augustine Inlet is Vilano Point, where the Tolomato

(North) River's mouth is located. The Tolomato affords water

passage northward to the St. Johns River. From St. Augustine Inlet,

the Matanzas River, actually an arm of the sea, extends sixteen miles

southward to the Atlantic Ocean again through Matanzas Inlet, forming

Anastasia Island. Both the Tolomato and Matanzas Rivers are the local

segment of the Intracoastal Waterway.


Castillo de San Marcos National Monument contains twenty acres of

contiguous land. However, Florida A1A separates a small triangular

parking lot, another small piece of land, and the City Gate pillars

from the bulk of the Monument.

















On the south and west, the Monument is bounded, from the south to

the northwest, by Avenida Menendez, Cuna Street, Charlotte Street,

a tavern, a private residence, a gift shop, a restaurant's rear

parking lot, another gift shop, Fort Lane, a moped rental lot, a

privately-owned visitor attraction, Orange Street, and Florida A1A.

Outside this southern and western boundary line, a restaurant, a

visitor attraction belonging to the Historic St. Augustine Preservation

Board (an agency of the State of Florida), and a city visitor

information center are located across Cuna Street, Charlotte Street,

and Florida AlA, respectively. Inside the south boundary line,

adjoining Cuna Street, there is a triangular "bus" parking lot

separated from the bulk of the Monument by Florida AIA, but it is

not used by buses because of the hazard in entering to and exiting

from it.


On the north, the Monument's boundary adjoins, from west to east,

a privately-owned commercial chain visitor attraction, its parking

lot, a private residence, Water Street, and another private

residence. A fence separates the Monument from its neighbors.


On the east, the Monument is bounded by the Matanzas River. A

sea wall "fences" the Monument from the river.


Between the south front of the Castillo and Florida A1A, there is a

138-car main parking lot and a bicycle rack for visitor use. A

walkway leads from the parking lot to a concrete apron just outside

the ravelin drawbridge of the Castillo. To the south of the draw-

















bridge there is a temporary booth for collecting the admission fee.

Along the sea wall, another walkway parallels the entrance walkway.

On top of the glacis, parallel to the entrance walkway, a small paved

area with benches offords a place of rest to the visitors.


Between the west front of the Castillo and Florida A1A, there stands

on the grounds a concrete reproduction of part of a Spanish earth-

work line.


On the north grounds, a pedestrian walk from the City Gate and another

one from the water battery cross over to Water Street. On the north-

west corner of the Monument stands the administration building and its

parking lot. Inside the north boundary line, there is an exit road

from the administration building to Water Street. A chain gate at

inner end of the parking lot and a log gate at Water Street close the

exit road when required.


Dominant vegetative cover

Despite its urban character, the St. Augustine peninsula is dotted

with slash and longleaf pine, oak, cedar, elm, and hackberry trees,

and the sabal and Washingtonia palms. The tidal marshes grow grass.

For soil over, St. Augustine and rye grass are used mainly. And of

course, there are the ornamental shrubs and plants commonly used in

landscaping, such as yucca aloifolia, oleander, crepe myrtle, etc.

Within the Monument, the entrance sign site, the triangular "bus"

parking lot, the strip separating Florida A1A and the main parking

lot, and the City Gate site are landscaped with one or more of the

















following: day lilies, oleander, crepe myrtle, Southern wax myrtle,

yaupon holly, Canary Islands date palms, sabal palms, shore junipers,

coontie palms, Carolina laurel cherry, Japanese privet, Eastern red

cedar, live oak, agave americana, and bigblue lily turf.


Adjoining the covered way wall on three sides of the Castillo and

in the water battery, there are planted a hackberry tree and several

cedar trees and sabal palms.


Between the west front of the Castillo and Florida A1A, along the

exit road to Water Street, and along the northern boundary line,

a hackberry tree, cedar trees, and sabal and Washingtonia palms are

found on the grounds. Both sides of the pedestrian walk between the

City Gate and Water Street are bordered with Florida elms. Around

the administration building and its parking lot and on the grounds

just south of it, there are cedar and oak trees, and sabal and

Washingtonia palms.


This park-like appearance evolved-slowly after the fortification

outlived its defense role. The belief was that the historic

structure should properly have an attractive setting.


Location and nature of historic resources within and adjacent to

the park

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, located on latitude

290 53' 50" and longitude 810 18' 43", consists of the Castillo

itself, the U. S. water battery, and the City Gate pillars. These

















historic structures are on the SERO List of Classified Structures

as No. 1, 2, and 3 respectively.


The Castillo is located mid-way between the north and south

boundaries on the shore line of the Matanzas River, The Castillo

is a coquina stone structure built by the Spanish in 1672-95,

remodeled in 1738-40, 1752-56, and 1762. It replaced the last of

nine wooden forts which had existed in succession since the found-

ing of St. Augustine in 1565. The town's fortification strength-

ened Spanish dominion over Florida, protected the route of Spanish

shipping along the east coast of Florida, and (after 1670) limited

British southward expansion. The Castillo became British in 1763,

Spanish again in 1784, and finally American in 1821.


The U. S. water battery is actually an 1842-44 modification of the

east front of the Castillo. The modification consisted of filling-

in the moat on that side, the strengthening of the sea wall, and

construction of barbette-type gun emplacements and the hot shot

furnace. It integrated the Castillo into the 19th Century U. S.

seacoast defense system.


The City Gate provided the only opening in the earthwork which,

from the Castillo westward to the San Sebastian River, girded the

colonial north city limit. The City Gate pillars, located about

550 feet due west of the Castillo, were erected in 1808 in connection

with a reconstruction of the earthwork that year. The pillars are

















separated from the bulk of the Monument by Florida AlA.


There are several historic sites within the Monument. The ninth

wooden fort (1654?-75) lay just south of the Castillo, probably on

the south glacis and the main parking lot. The English in 1702

had siege trenches "within a pistol shot" of the southwest and

northwest bastions. In 1737 a Costa Indian village lay about

550 feet northwestward of the point of the northwest bastion,

approximately in the area of the administration building. An

earth and log "covered way" was planned in 1737 on the north and

northwest grounds of the Castillo and was later built. The

foundations of the King's Smithy (1793-1821) lie partly under the

east end of the triangular "bus" parking lot and partly under

Florida A1A. The remnants of an 1808 Spanish earthwork line lie

under the part of that earthwork reconstructed on the west grounds.



Current use of historic resources within the park.--The his-

toric structures making up the Monument are used mainly as centers

for historical interpretation. The Castillo itself serves as its own

visitor center, providing museum exhibits, interpretive markers, audio

stations, conducted tours, and living history demonstrations, and

housing the artifacts collection and colonial artillery pieces.

The water battery is the repository of U. S. artillery pieces.

The City Gate is provided with an audio station and interpretive

markers. The Castillo is used also for maintenance and artifact

storage.


















The grounds are sometimes used for staging special events and

provide the public with a place for passive recreation.


















III. LAND CLASSIFICATION

All lands within the boundaries of Castillo de San Marcos

National Monument are in a historic zone, which is the

St. Augustine Town Plan Historic District, a National

Historic Landmark.


The administrative site, parking areas and adjacent roads

are classified as developmental zub-zones. These areas

are identified as such in order to accommodate the

demands of the visitor and management for parking,

administrative office space, maintenance, and right-of-

way access for Florida A1A (U.S. Business #1) and

Orange Street.





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IV. INFLUENCES ON MANAGEMENT

A. Legislative and Administrative Constraints

1. Act of Congress, July 5, 1960 (74 Stat. 317) allows the

park to acquire lands left within park boundaries by the

road relocation of 1965.


2. Public utility companies, the City, and the State together,

hold 9 permits of a recurring nature which authorize rights-

of-way for electric, gas, water, and sewer lines, most of

which lie underground. The Superintendent must protect the

Park Service's interests in permitting the use of park land

while maintaining effective relationships with the permittees.


3. The St. Johns County School Board has capital improvements

representing over a million dollars in replacement value on

land that is part of the original Castillo reservation. This

land was deeded to the Board with the stipulation that whenever

the property ceased to be used for educational purposes, it

would immediately revert back to being the property of the

U. S. Government. The improvements (school buildings) are

on a portion of the historic Cubo Line site, part of which

has been reconstructed by the National Park Service. There

is still some pressure for the Park Service to reconstruct

that portion on which some of the School Board improvements

are located.


















The Cubo Line (named for the cube-like redoubt at

its western terminus) was built in 1808 on the site of

earlier earthworks. This line reached from the Castillo

de San Marcos on Matanzas Bay to the San Sebastian River,

a half mile distant, thus barring the land approach to

St. Augustine. Needle-sharp Spanish Bayonet (yucca gloriosa)

at the foot of the wall helped to make it a formidable

barrier. The present sement of the wall is a reproduction

that was built in 1964 that extends from the Fort's west

glacis to the City Gate, broken by the 4-lane highway

U. S. Business 1 and State A1A.

4. Although the Park Service has exclusive jurisdiction over

all law enforcement matters within the Monument boundaries,

the St. Augustine Police Department works closely with the

park staff on some law enforcement matters, especially

traffic control on Highway A1A. Since the Monument has a

limited number of law enforcement personnel, it is vital

that the Superintendent cultivate and perpetuate a spirit

of cooperation between the two agencies.

5. Highway A1A, owned by the State of Florida, traverses the

western boundary of the Monument. Most of the right-

of-way is presently owned by the Park Service with the

remainder having been acquired by the State through several

special use permits and agreements. According to--Memorandum

of Agreement dated July 29, 1958 between the National Park


















Service, Florida Department of Transportation, St.

Augustine City Commission and the St. Johns County

Commission--, those portions presently owned by the

State will eventually be transferred to the Park

Service.

6. Future developmental planning should encompass

those elements that can be practically accommodated

allowing accessibility of facilities to handicapped

visitors. Planners should be guided by the

implications of the Architectural Barriers Act

and the Rehabilitation Act, however, extreme care

should be taken not to jeopardize the historical

fabric and other values of this 306-year-old

structure and its historic environs.


















1. The City Coir~misoson of S. Augustine, an elected municipal

body, governs tre city which surrounds the Monument. Since

the historic Castillo, City Gate, and Cubo Line are immediately

adjacent to the heart of the city, the Park Service shares with

the city an extremely heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic

problem. The Superintendent administers written and verbal

special use agreements with the city on such matters as

street location, law enforcement, utility location, and

lighting. A number of streets vital to the city traffic;

pattern and Master Plan are on Monument property. City

actions and developments outside the Monument sometimes affect

Monument operations. Since such decisions are often determined

by local politics, the Superintendent must work closely with

city officials and influential citizens to insure that Park

Service interests are considered in such planning.

Adjacent to the Monument is the St. Augustine Historic District,

designated as a national historic landmark to commemorate the town

plan. Actually the Monument's northern boundary and part of the

western boundary constitute part of the District's northern bound-

ary. The District comprises the town area enclosed at one time

by earthwork lines on the north, west, and south city limits.

However, the District has been enlarged by the inclusion of the

former Ponce de Le6n and Alcazar Hotels, architectural landmarks

of the American gilded age, erected outside the west city limit.


The St. Augustine Historic District contains 40 colonial structures.

All of them are houses except the Castillo, City Gate, Cathedral

21


















of St. Augustine, Government House, Public Market, Trinity Episcopal

Church, Public Library, St. Francis Barracks, and the King's Bakery.


Within the District, 24 buildings border St. George and Cuna Streets,

west and southwest respectively from the Monument. They have been

restored or reconstructed with public or private funds by the

Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board since 1959. Another five

buildings are located on Charlotte, Treasury, King, and Aviles Streets.

The structures represent historic types of St. Augustine architecture,

and are adapted for use as residences, museums, and colonial crafts shops.

Four of the 29 buildings are included in the number mentioned in the

preceding paragraph.


Also within the District is the St. Augustine Historical Society

complex, about one-half mile south of the Preservation Board area.

The complex consists of the Gonzflez-Alvarez (Oldest) and Llambias

Houses, both designated as national historic landmarks, the historic

Tovar House, the modern Webb Memorial Building, the Dunham Memorial

Library, and the De la Rosa, Corbett, and Garrido Houses. The latter

four are reconstructions based on historic types of St. Augustine

architecture. A museum of St. Augustine social history mainly is

house in the Webb and Tovar structures. The Society's library makes

available locally books, maps, photographs, and artifacts related

to St. Augustine history, and reproductions of materials on the

subject kept in repositories away from the city.


















Outside the District's western boundary, between the City Gate

and the city visitor information center, is the Public Burying Ground.

To the southwest are the Spanish Tolomato Cemetery and Flagler Memorial

Presbyterian Church (1889-90).


Outside the District's southern boundary, less than one-half mile

away, is the site of the Spanish Powder Magazine (1797-1800).


Outside the District's eastern boundary, on north Anastasia Island,

lie the quarry sites, designated as a national historic landmark.

The quarries provided the coquina stone for building the Castillo and

public and private buildings. There is also the site of a British

battery during the 1740 siege.


Other historic sites connected with the Castillo history, lying

within a 40-mile radius, are listed in the Castillo de San Marcos

Base Historical Maps.


2. The Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board is a state

agency charged wich preserving and restoring St. Augustine's

colonial houses. This agency was established in 1959 (originally

known as the St. Augustine Historical Restoration and Preservation

Commission) and is now active in a reconstructed complex

immediately adjacent to the'Castillo. Although the Park Service

and the Preservation Board have similar basic missions, the

Board shows some differences in its interpretive emphasis

because of political and commercial considerations. The


















Superintendent must maintain a close working relationship with

the Preservation Board while being careful not to get the

Park Service involved in conflicts between the Board and other

organizations.


3. The public relations program for the Castillo de San Marcos

National Monument is very complex. In addition to the

legitimate historical attractions in St. Augustine, several

non-historical attractions beckon to the visitor in the nation's

oldest city. There is still some local opinion that the Castillo

should be available for commercial exploitation by local groups.

The park's public relations program must continually seek local

support for National Park Service policies and procedures.

Since the park is surrounded by several different governing

bodies, it is necessary to maintain close working relationships

with them.


4. The Superintendent frequently receives important individuals

and groups, most of whom wish to tour the Castillo. These

include individuals from all walks of life, including members

of the press, radio, and TV media and many foreign dignitaries.

The people of Spain, of course, hold a strong interest in the

Castillo, and visits by high ranking citizens from that country

are common. Frequent contacts are maintained with many federal

and state representatives on relevant matters.


















5. St. Augustine, unlike southern Florida, has not had

a high frequency of hurricanes. Only one (Dora) has occurred

with any appreciable effect in the last ten years. The

hurricane season extends from May through October, with

greater probability of a hurricane striking during

September and October. Although the Castillo has survived

305 "hurricane seasons", the problem of flooding and of

high winds eroding the coquina walls during these storms,

remain without any immediate answers.

















C. %L in n r i :., .:

1. Visit duration Co the Cascillo is about 40 minutes. Optimum

visitor use cap-icity haz buen estimated at 400 persons for

each 40-minute period of Lhe day or about 4,800 visitors in

8 hours. However, during the summer season, peak visitation

occurs between tie hours of 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., totaling

at least 600-700 persons per hour. Total daily visitation

frequently exceeds 4,300 with a record 7,772 people visiting

the park on December 28, 1975. When the optimum capacity is

exceeded, congestion and undue noise result plus accelerated

damage to the historic fort fabric.


2. A concessioner uses one room of the Castillo to sell high

quality souvenirs relating to the Castillo and St. Augustine,

films, pictures, books, and other publications. This facility

enables the park to have a dependable outlet for Service

publications and other theme-related material that is

essential to the interpretive program.
3. Heavy visitor i-pact increases the need to find modern

preservation and maintenance products which will not impair the

appearance of the fort while still maintaining structural

integrity. Although the fort structure was engineered to

withstand bor.bardmcnt fro- military weapons of the time, ever

increasing visitors create a completely different maintenance

problem that must be solved.



















4. The primary theme of the area is the Spanish influence and

presence in the New World, therefore, all interpretation,

reconstruction, and other associated park activities are

greatly influenced by the lack of data found primarily in

Spanish language manuscripts.

5. With an average monthly visitation of well over 60,000

people at Castillo de San Marcos, long-term uniformed

seasonal employees are required to handle the many

visitors during the so-called "off season". Difficulty

is experienced in hiring and training people for these

long-term seasonal positions due to personnel regulations.

Permanent employees are of insufficient numbers to

service the ever increasing visitation.

6. The Castillo, covered way walls, moat walls, portiorsof

the seawall and the City Gate pillars are composed of a

shellstone, locally quarried, called coquina. Historically

it was bonded with an oyster shell lime mortar and faced

with plaster that has since weathered away except for

very sparse areas. At best, coquina is a soft stone with

some portions being more resistant to the elements than

others. It has a definite grain. When it weathers, the

outer layer turns grey and hardens.

Park maintenance staff observations indicate that when

dried to an undetermined degree the coquina crumbles. It

















does not weather evenly but does so with the grain. The

joints weather better than the stone creating a concave

surface between them. In some places, due to heavy wear,

the stone will come apart in chunks, separating with the

grain. When water is applied to newly cut stone, it is

quickly absorbed.

By not knowing all the physical characteristics and

limits to this material, the park maintenance staff and

historic architects are handicapped at planning for the

optimum preservation of the historic fabric of the

resource.

Heavy visitation, 780,595 in calendar year 1976,

causes wear on those surfaces within reach of the visitors.

Winds, along with other environmental elements, have

eroded the fort's fabric. Because the Spanish did not

provide for expansion, cracks in the walls and gundecks

allow water to course through the coquina and this

causes accelerated deterioration of the Castillo.

7. Archeological investigations on park lands and nearby

park lands have resulted in 4,500 artifacts being deposited

in the park's collection. This collection is presently

being temporarily stored in Casemate No. 7 which is

totally inadequate for'this purpose due to environmental

reasons. Because of future archeological investigations

in the program, along with those artifacts being processed

from excavations at Fort Matanzas, an extension to the

















administration building to house and preserve these artifacts

is being programmed. Artifacts in the collection include

but are not limited to: pre-Columbian Indian, first period

Spanish, British, second period Spanish, pre-Civil War,American

War Department period and modern.

8. The Castillo has been collecting a fee for adminission since

July 1, 1935, however, placement of this intrusive function

on the historical scene has been a problem for management

ever since. The present temporary wooden structure adjacent

to the outer drawbridge, detracts from the fort's historical

impact nor is it architecturally in keeping with the Spanish

military theme of the surrounding area. Park management's

attempts at moving the fee collection function to the

parking lot have been unsuccessful so far.

9. The need of the visitor for pre-arrival information and

preparation continues. The Castillo does not have a

Visitor Center and the visitor arriving direct from his

parked automobile to the fort is spatially disoriented.

Pre-arrival information devices and/or services are needed.

10. Due to the special nature of the 306-year-old structure and

its environs, there exists certain inherent hazards that

present problems to the park visitor. Interpretive and

developmental planners must take into consideration these

elements to allow for a safe visit, however, extreme care

should be taken so as to not jeopardize the historical fabric

and other related values of the Castillo.

















V. MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES

1. General Management

a. To program and plan for the reduction of conflicts between

fee collection facilities and activities, and the visitors'

appreciation of the historical architectural values of the

Castillo de San Marcos.

b. To improve the level of information and orientation of the

arriving visitors so as to reduce present disorientation due

to inadequate devices and services.

c. To preserve and protect more than 4,500 artifacts,now in

temporary storage,from adverse climatic conditions presently

existing within the Castillo.

d. To promote consistent, effective enforcement of State and

Federal laws in the park.

e. To secure adequate information to provide a basis for

determining the appropriate future the Service plans

for the Cubo Line extension area in the event the School

Board properties are transferred to the National Park

Service.

f. To acquire those lands remaining non-federal resulting from

the 1965 road relocation intended for, but not yet transferred

to, the Service.

To maintain a close working relationship with those

historical associations, societies and organizations that

have legitimate goals in preserving and interpreting the

historical values of the City of St. Augustine in order


















that the Service will be able to continue and further the

support for the Service's policies and procedures in the

preservation and interpretation of the Castillo.

g. To cooperate with local and state governmental entities,

community and civic organizations to maintain the scenic and

historic setting of the park which serves to heighten

visitor perception and enjoyment of the Castillo's

predominance in the historic setting that is St. Augustine.

2. Resource Management

a. To secure an adequate representation of documents and objects

that are essential to the public understanding and appreciation

of the Castillo in concert with the park's museum acquisition

policy guidelines.

b. To restore, reconstruct or provide a basis for determining

the appropriate future treatment of historic structures in

accordance with Service policies, in order to promote

public understanding and appreciation of the significance of

the Castillo in the early Anglo-Spanish history of the

southeast.

c. To minimize to the greatest extent practicable, the adverse

effects of weathering and visitor wear on the Castillo's

coquina structures.


















3. Visitor Use

a. To foster public awareness of the importance of the Castillo

de San Marcos in the early Spanish settlement of Florida, its

role as a major fortification along shipping routes from Spain's

New World Colonies, and its significance in delaying the

advent of English supremacy in the Southeast.

b. To promote increased understanding of the relationship of

man and the environment, both during the historically

significant period of the Castillo, and in today's world.

c. To ensure the availability of orientation, information, including

publications, and interpretation for Spanish-speaking, handi-

capped, and special interest groups.

d. To control visitor use as necessary for the preservation of

the resources, for the protection of the visitor, and to

insure that the quality of the visitors' experiences will

not suffer because of congestion.








(4I:I'TORlC AREAS ON CERTAIN MILITARY RESERVATIONS DELL NATIONAL //'
MONUMENTS.)


B the preaient of tic "cinitcb States of Bmlerica

L proclamation.


W IICIEREAS, there re vL various military reservations under the control of the
Secretary of War which comprise areas of historic and scientific interest;
AND WIIIuiRlAS, by section 2 of the Act of Congress approved Juno 8, 1060
(34 Stat. 225) the President is authorized "in his discretion, to declare by public
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other
objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated upon tho lands owned or
controlledby the Government of the United States to be national monuments, and
may reserve as a part thereof parools of land, the limits.of which in all cases shall
be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper care and manage-
mont of the objects to be protected";
Now TmIImi'.voi;, I, Calvin Coolidge, President of the United States of
America, under authority of the said Act oi' Congress do hereby declare and pro-
claim the hereinafter designated areas with the historic structures and objects
thereto appertaining, and any other object or objects specifically designated,
within the following military reservations to be national monuments:
FORT WOOD, NEW YORK
The site of the Statue of Liberty lEnlightening the World, the foundations
of which are built in the form of an eleven-pointed star and clearly define the area
comprising about two and one-half acres.
CAS'TLE PINCKNEY, C(larleston ,m Iaror, So)1ut1h Carolina.
The entire reservation, comp'lis)ingi three .1in one-half acres situated on Shutes
Folly Island at the mouth of Cooper River opposite tlh southern extremity of the
city of Charleston and about one mile distant therefrom.
FORT PFLASKT. GEORGiA
The entire area comprising the site of tHe old fortifications which are clearly
i defined by ditches and nimbankments, which inclose about twenty acres.
S'FORT MARION, FLORTI)A
The entire reea comprisin g 18.09 acr8 s situated in thoe city of Saint Augustine,
Florida.
FORT MATANZAS, FLORIDA
An area of one acre cpnloprising witlhili it, lie site of the old fortifidltion which
is situated on a marsh island south of tioe present main channel of the Matanzas
IRivor in the southeast (quarter of section 1.1, Township 9 South, Range 30 East,
about 15 miles fromm tlho ciy of Saint August ioi'i, and about one mile fl'om Matanzas
Inlet.

' tlj ^ileC'.' E'.eUC.1l', I li'v ho r Iorno neot my hand and caused tho
% .i of the United StiItes to bl ,liixed.

DONJI 1,, the city or W;iValiigtiol; Ithis li ifltonth day of October, in the
year of oui Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-four, and
[8mAL.] of the Independenco of the United States of America the one
hundred and forty-ninth.

CALVIN COOLIDGE
By the President:
JoSaPII C. Gm'w 33
Acting Secretary of State.


[No. 1713.]















Act of June 29, 1936 (49 Stat. 2029)


Calendar No. 2254
T4ru CONGRESS
D S:R. 12220

[Report No. 2143]


IN THE SENATE OF TIE UNITED STATES
Arran. 24 (caIndalnr day, MAY 7), 1036
Read twice and refrrnl to the Ci,,nili1tei- on P'ullic Imlnd and Surveys
MAY 12 (calendilr .l:y. MAt 29), 1936 .
Reported yl 'A Mr. Wa.NEIa, with an amendment
[Insert the part prilntd In Ilallr)


AN ACT
Ti miitlorize the aidjaustminit of the loumldary of the Fort Marion
Natialll Miiiiiiimt. Floria;i. in the vicinity of Yort Marion
Circle, and for other purposes.
1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-
2 tivcs of the ULnitd States of America in Congress assembled,
3 That the Secretary of the Interior is herbhy authorized to
4 adjust the boundary of the Fort Marion National Monument,
5 Florida, in the vicinity of Fort Marion Circle, and for said
6 purpose is authorized to convey to adjacent property owners,
7 upon such terms and conditions as may be deemed satis-
8 factory to himn, title to such portions of monument land as
9 he may determine to be no longer necessary for said monu-
10 nint, or lie may accept in consideration therefore title to















2
1 such portion of any adjacent property as he may deem
2 desirable to satisfactorily adjust the boundary of said rianu-
3 ment.
4 SEC. 2. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he
5 is hercby, authorized to accept donations of land, interests
6 in land or buildings, structures, and other property adjacent
7 to and within a distance of oie thousand five hundred feet
8 of the boundary of the Fort Marion National Monument
9 in the vicinity of Fort Marion Circle and the Old City
10 Gates,'and donations of funds for the purchase and main-
11 tenance thereof, the title and evidence of title to lands ao-
12 quired to be satisfactory to the Secretary of the Interior:
13 Provided, That he may acquire on behalf of the United
14 States out of any donated funds, by purchase at prices
15 deemed by him reasonable or by condemnation under the
10 provisions of the Act of August 1, 1888, such tracts of land
17 adjacent to the boundary of the Fort Marion National
18 Monument in the vicinity of Fort Marion Circle and the
19 Old City Gates as may be deemed desirable by him for

20 addition to the monument.
21 SEC. 3. That any lands acquired on behalf of the
22 United States under the provisions of this Act shall be, and
23 the same are hereby, added to the Fort Marion National
















3
1 Monumnen: anid a all bo subjtct to the laws, rules, and regulo-
2 tions applicable to said monument.
Passed the House of Representatives May 4, 1936.
Attest: SOUTH TRIMBLEI
Clerk














Act of June 5, 1942 (56 Stat. 312)

Cankdar I. 1452
77TCONGIESS 7 I
KR. 3937
[Report No. 1404]


IN TIE SENATE OF TIE UNITED STATES
Ocrom-I 10, 1941
Read twwic ind rferrcdl to the Conmmitter on Public lfA4l and Survey*
MAT 26,1 04
Relwrtedl by Mr. HANWH, without nmendmelt


AN ACT
T' 'lfl 1iiillge the digsllii llni of the Foil M'arion National Monu-
iiment, in the Sta>te of Flrida. andl for other iiprlposi.
1 Be it enacted by the' S'nate andt House of Reprcsenta-
2 tic./s of the Unitcd S'laIes of America it. Congrc.. a.1mCnbled,
:; Thal thie an r now within tlie Fort Marion National Mhun-
4 eiint, in the Stint of Florida, shlill thereafter he known as
5 thie "Castillo de San Marcos National Moinument", uider
6 which ninme the aforesuid inatillonl Iimoiilinninlt shall be entitled
7 to receive nid to use all moneys heretofore or hereafter
8 appropriated for the Fort Marion National Monument.
Passed the House of Representatives October 15, 1941.
Attest: SOUTI TRIMBLE,
Clerk.
















Act of July 5, 1960 (74 Stat. 317)


SA Calendar No. 1695
86TII Co onsR SENATE J Hr-oRT
2d Se sion No. 1638


-.

ADDITION OF LANDS TO CASTILIOL DE SAN_ O
NATIONAL MON-UMENT, FL


Juxz 21, 1000.-Ordered to bo printed


Mr. ANDERBON, from the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs,
submitted the following

: .' REPORT
[To accompany II.R. 8226)

The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, to whom was
referred the bill (fI.R. 8226) to add certain lands to Castillo do San
Miarcos National Monument in the State of Florida, having considered
the same, report favorably tlhreon with amendments and recommend
that the bill, as amended, do pass.
The amendments are as follows:
At page 1, line 4, after the word "procure", strike all through the
word therefore at line 6 and insert in lieu thereof the following:
", in accordance with the provisions of subsection (a) of this section ..
At page 2, beginning with line 1, strike all through line 23, page
6, and insert in lieu thereof the following:
DESCRIPTION FOR PARCEL A
Beginning at a corner of the present Castillo do San Marcos
National Monument boundary, said point also being the
northeast corner of block 1, city of St. Augustine, Florida;
thence running along the present boundary of the Castillo
de San Marcos Natiojial Monument as follows:
North 82 degrees 04 lfiinutes west a distance of 35.46 feet;
Thence north 81 degrees 47 minutes west a distance of 60.17
foot;
Thence south 30 degrees 21 minutes west a distance of 16.38
Feet;
Thence north 72 degrees 01 minutes west a distance of 4.77
feet;
Thence north 85 degrees 02 minutes west a distance of 97.52
feet;
490000 .* *'' '.l A. .,



















2 ADDITION.TO CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT, FLA.

Thence north 1 degree 28 minutes west a distance of 4.09
feet;
Thence north 11 degrees 18 minutes west a distance of 39.02
feet;
STh'cnce south 77 degrees 32 minutes west a distancaof'0.51
feet;
Thence north 10 degrees 50 minutes west a distance of 32.96
feet;
Thence north 7 degrees 36 minutes west a distance of 37.61
feet;
Thence south 88 degrees 54 minutes west a distance of 20.30
feet;
Thcnco south 73 degrees 52 minutes west a distance of 95.86
feet;
Thence north 2 degrees 21 minutes east a distance of 22.64
feet;
Thence north 4 degrees 39 minutes west a distance of 28.03
Feet;
Thence north 81 degrees 08 minutes east a distance of 0.49
feet;.
Thence north 7 degrees 10 minutes west a distance of 9.51
feet;
'Thence north 65 degrees 12 minutes west a distance of 0,01
feet;
Thence south SO degrees 49 minutes west, i distance of
71.39 feet to 1a point in the southerly right-of-way line of
the proposed Castillo Drive as delineated on the survey map
by Emmntt William i'acetti and Associates in three sheets
dated April 23, 1960i, file numnbered LD)-54 and revised Juno
2, 1960, said point being in the are of a curve, concave to
Sthe southeast and having a radius of 405.00 feet, tho radius
of said curve hearing north 58 (ldgrees 20 minutes 0:1 seconds
east from said point; thence leaving tho present national
monument boundary and running along the southerly right-
of-way line of thIn proposed (.'nstillo D)rivo along tihe arc of
said cn1vo through a central angle of 30 degrees 42 minutes
03 seconds, 219.16 feet to tlie end of said curve; thence
south 62 degrees 25 miniutlvs east 110.59 feet nlonI tihe
southerly right-of-way line of thll proposed Castillo Drive
to a point iln lhe west lino of block 1, city of St. Augustine,
Florida; thence leaving tlio soulherly right-of-way line of
the proposed Castillo Drive and running south Iti degree's
22 mniumtes we4st S1.72 feet along the west line of block 1,
city of St. August inu to tihe soulhwcesL corner of said block 1;
thonco south s3 degrees 3S minutes enist 102.00 feet along
the south line, of said block 1 to n point in the westerly right-
of-way line of Fllorida Stlate ioad A-1-A: thlence north
4 degrees (46 minutes west 14l'1.23 feet. atlonig the westerly
right-of-way line of 'l'irida Sin ae (od A-l-A to a point
in the present (Ca.stillo do San M.iarcos Nationail IMoniument
boiundil(1ry; theliene soulli 85 'degrees 05 iniultes west 8..57
feet along said national iioinulmentit boundary to a stone
monument; thence north 5 degrees 21 minutes west 34.90
feet along said national monument boundary to the poiut
of beginning and containing approximately 1.05 acres.




















ADDITION TO CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT, FLA. 3

DESCRIPTION FOR PARCEL D
Beginning 'at a corner of the present Castillo de San
IMarcos National Monument, lboiunidarry, said point also being
the northeast corner of block li. city of St. Augusline,
Florida; thence south 78 degrees 06 minutes west 72.0)5 feet
along the present Castillo de Sn \l Marcos Nationl Molnu-
ment. boundary common to the north line of said block 6 to a
oint, in the southerly rigll t-of-way line of tI i proposed Cast illo
Drive as delineated on the survey inup by J',inllett W\illiamn
Pacetti and Associates in three sheets dated April 23, 10(0,
file numbered LD-5t) and revised June 2, 1960, said point
being in the are of i curve concavo to the southwest, and
having a radius of 612.00 feet; the radius of said curvo
bearing south 54 degrees 30 minutes 11 seconds west from .
said point; thence leaving thl present national ilonumlllent
boundary and running along the southerly right-of-way line
of the proposed Cast illo Drive along tlhe are of said curvo
through a central angle of 13 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds
143.45 feet to the end of said curve; thenco south 21 degrees 55
minutes cast 169.16 feet aloni the southerly right-of-way
line of the proposed Castillo Drive to a point in the southerly
line of lot 20, block 7, city of St. Augustine, Florida, and tlhe
present Castillo de San Marcos National Monument bound-
ary; thence leaving the southerly right-of-way line of the
proposed Castillo Drive and running along the present
boundary of the Castillo do San Marcos National Monument
' as follows:
North 82 degrees 20 minutes east a distance of 62.00 feet;
Thence north 10 degrees 42 minutes west a distance of
40.27 feet;
Thenco north 33 degrees 22 minutes west a distance of
6.76 feet;
Thence north 79 degrees 26 minutes west a distance of
6.21 feet;
Thenco' south 83 degrees 06 minutes west a distance of
2.20 feet;
Thence north 75 degrees 11 minutes west a distance'of
36.48 feet;
Thence north 13 degrees 56 minutes west a distance of
152.00 feet;
,Thcnco south 80 degrees 29 minutes west a distance of
3.78 feet;
Thence north 17 degrees 13 minutes west a distance of
2.00 feet;
Thence north 17 degrees 32 minutes west a distance of
20.07 feet;
Thence north 72 degrees 20 minutes east a distance of
.2.81 feet;
Thence north 17 degrees 26 minutes west a distance of
11.61 feet;
Thence south 72 degrees 28 minutes west a distance of,
2.99 feet;




















* 4 ADDITION TO CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT, FLA.

Thence north 17 degrees 32 minutes west a distance of
67.46 feet to the point of beginning and containing approxi-
mately 0.32 acres.
At the top 6f page 6, strike the designation "Area B" and insert in
lieu thereof the designation "Area C".
At page 6, after line 21, insert the following subsection:
(a) The Secretary shall, in procuring lands or interests
therein pursuant to the provisions of this section, acquire
such lands or interests therein gply by negotiations; except
that the lands or interests therein described as block 1, city
of St. Augustine, Florida, may be acquired by the Secretary
in such manner as he may deem to be in the public interest,
including procurenient with funds which may be appropriated
therefore.
PURPOSE
II.R. 8226, as amended by the Senate, authorizes the acquisition of
about 1.37 acres of land for the enlargement of the Castillo de San
Marcos National Monument in St. Augustine, Fla.
NEED
Castillo de San Marcos was established as a national monument in
1924. It was constructed by the Spanish during the years 1672-96
as the northern outpost of their Caribbean empire for defense against
the English and French, served as the center for raids into the Caro-
linas and Georgia between 1686 and 1742, was itself the target for
Indian and English raids during the same period, played an important
role in the War of Jenkins' Ear, and served as a military prison during
the 1800's. It is, in brief, one of the most important historic sites in
the southeastern part of the United States. It attracts tens of thou-
sands of visitors from all parts of the country. Over 450,000 persons
visited it in 1959 alone.
The two tracts of land proposed to be acquired will enhance the
setting of Cnst illo de Siin M arcos and will provide parking for visitors,
make possible the relocation of an existing street, and permit the resto-
ration of the fort grounds. The plans contemplated by II.R. S226
are in part the outgrowth of an agreement between the National Park
Service, the Florida State Road Department, the city of St. Augustine.
and St. John's County for adjustment of street and highway travel
in the vicinity of the monument in order to correct a serious traflk
problem and improve parking conditions for Visitors.

COST
The land to be acquired under II.R. 8226 is unavoidably expensive(
because of the built-up character of the property. Acquisition cost
estimated at $560,000, includes the purchase of property upon whicl
is located an outdated hotel and other buildings which will be deniol
ished. Enactiment of the bill at this time, however, will avoid th,
even higher costs that would undoubtedly be incurred if there is delio
while property values continue to rise and further development occurs


-C--~I



















ADDITION TO CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT, FLA. 5

DEPARITMENTAL RECOMMENDATION
'The Department of the Interior has submitted a report recommend-
ingenactnicnt of IlI.. 8226 witli clarifying aiimellniients. The miend-
ments were adopted by the House (Coinnitle on Interior and Insular
Affairs in a slightly different form than recommended. The Depart-
ment's report-follows:
U.S. DI-PAIuTMENT OF TII, INT'rIuIOR,
O()FICor rOF SECRF.TART,
Wl'ashinglon, D.C., March 8, 10G0.
Hon. 1WAYh, N. AsrPINATL,
Chairman, Committre on Interior anl Insular Affairs,
House of Ilepre.enttativs, Wi ashinglto, DI.C.
DEAI Mn. Asm'NALL: Your committee has requested a report on
H.R. 8226, a bill to add certain lands to Castillo de San Marcos
National Monumelnt in the State of Florida.
We recommend that I his legislation be enacted and further suggest
several clarifying a amendment.
H.R. 822G provides for the addition of two parcels of land to thi
Cnstillo de San Marcos National Monument. Parcel A, consisting
of approximantly 2.45 acres, adjoins the present southwest boundary
of the monument and is required to provide offstreet parking for
visitors, to relocate an existing road and make possible the restora-
tion of the fort grounds. Parcel B, consisting of about 0.31 acres,
contains a portion of the historic moat which is still in evidence. Its
acquisition would also afford protection to the historic city gate which
is a part of the monument.
On July 29, 1958, this Department entered into an agreement with
officials of the Florida State Road Department, the city of St. Augus-
tine, and St. Johns County, Fla., regarding certain difficulties con-
cerning this area. This agreement settled a problem that involved
a projected use for highway purposes of a portion of historic Cnst.illo
do San Marcos National Alonument, the oldest standing military
structure in North America. The agreement made it possible for theo
local government bodies in the area to proceed, without delay, with
the improvement of Fort Marion Circle from San Marco Avenue to
Bay Street, a piirt of the citv's bay-front improvement program. The
initial step in effectuating the agreement was the issuance of a permit
by which certain monument lands were permitted to be used for the
temporary location of the improved street.
Pursuant to the agreement, the ncet step is the addition of certain
lands to the monument in order that the Department's plan for the
restoration of the fort grounds, the ultimate road relocation, and the
furnishing of the offstrect parlding for monument visitors might
proceed.
Enactment of II.R. 8226 would authorize the acquisition of sub-
Stantiall, those lands contemplated by the agreement. In order to
avoid severance, ownership lines are followed. These lines were not
available when the agreement was executed. A small tract adjacent
to the seawall has been omitted since restoration in this area is being
accomplislied by the city. Another tract in the vicinity of the city
gate is not included since it is contemplated that the routing of Lraflio
around the historic city gate will be provided by the city.
o9004*--o .Rept., 86-2, voL 4---



















S/DDIT -ON TO CAbTILLO DE SAN MARICOS NATIONAL MONUMr~I'NT, FLA.

While differing from the agreement in certain respects. the nquJali.
tion of the lands described in the bill will enable this Department, I
carry out its program to preserve the Castillo do San Mareos Natiolli
hMonurent and to provide ofstrcet parking facilities for monullmeit
visitors. .
We recommend the following clarifying amendments to this bill:
(1) That line' 25 on page 2 be changed to read as folloms:
S"Charlotte Street 57.0 feet to a point;"
(2) Line 9 on page 3 to be changed to read as follows: "Landi
now or formerly owned by Blancho L. Cerveau, being;" "
(3) Line 13, pago 3, be changed to read as follows: "Bllancewl
L. Ccrveau to point on the southerly property line;"
(4) Line 10, page 4, be changed to read as follows: "'l'ince
tiortherly on a prolongation of said property."
In order to assure that all phases of the agreement. mentioned Iieri'.
Stoforoe are carried out, and that the integrity., of the Castillo is main.
tained, weofeel that there should be no delay in the enact nrat. of 1thi.
legislation.
It is estimated that the lands described in this legislation will cost
approximately $600,000.
T'he Bureau of the Budget has advised us that. "no conunitment.
can be nade, in view of the' present budgetary outlook, Ra to ihe
timing of a recommendation for an appropriation for the stated pur.
pose of tho bill." It has further advised us that. tlhero is no objection
to the sulnmission of this report, to your committee.
Sincorely yours,
ROOERI ENS'r,
Assistant Secretary of the Interior,
PURPOSE OF SENATE AMENDMENT
A number of property owners in the area affected by the bill as
originally introduced and tho companion legislation introduced il
the SLiOiSo by S of taking as'much land as initially proposed. At the request of
Senator Hlhllallnd, tho National Park Service conducted a resurvcv
of hoe dlesiri'd properties. As a result, the National Park Service
revised lth bonndalris in tho proposed addition in order that thle
most urgent rcequir''melts of each property owner will be respected,
so far aM is possible, without substantially impairing the purpose
of thi proposed taking. Tho Senato amendment respecting land
descriptions carries out. the resurvey mentioned above.
Testimony was received by the commit tee from several landowners
in St. Augustine. In that. certain hardships could result from the
proposed land acquisition program contemplated in the bill, and as a
means of assuring that. such hardships will not, be brought, about
unneVessarily, the committee adopted the laInguageo in section 1(a)
to restrict the powi r of tho National Park Service to acquire certain
properties through condemnation, proceedings.
Set forth below is a letter front tho Director of the Park Service
relating to this issue.




















ADDITION TO'CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL MONUMENT, FLA. 7
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THU INTEIlIOn,
r NATIONAL PARK SEIUVICi,
n shinulIun, D.U., June 7, 10GO.
lion JoseIrl C. O'M IIoN.;y,
Chairman, Plublic Lands Subcommittie,
Committee on Interior anld Insular Aflairs,
U.S. Senate, lW'ashlinlton, 1).U.
DAlt SENATrol O'MA,\ONEIv '. This is in response to Ith request of
the Subconulitten on I'ublic Ilnlds that, we siuplVy ta htiitemlent in
connection witl the I louse Illnd Senate bills on ('Cstill. do San il rcos
'National MIonument, for which he airing were held on Jlune G.
Tho survey by ;Emmett Willinam I'acetti & Associates, lile No
LD-54-1, revised June 2, 1960, nild submit trd at the heiarin'rs, depicts
a smaller area of acquisition Ihan that contained in lII .. 822i aind S.
2328 its they were introduced. The effect, of the revised ;survey is to
limit taking to the arei lying between tIhe existing ionouiient bouindry
and the outside curb line of the proposed. road. ,Enclosed is dlescrip.
tion of the land depicted oil the survey in (question. The descriptions
designated on the ecnclosire ns pr I'cerls A and 1B should be substituted
for the description IIppenril il the bills a.s arii A. 'The description of
area B, as contained in the bills, should bo retained bill. redesignateml
area C. This particular land is a Iract lying west of the city gates
along Orange Street and is in public ownership. Thlo controversy
which has attached itself to tlhe other land is not, involved with
respect to this tract, which contains a part of the old city a11ot.
The land described in the encloslure aini depicted on til revised
survey represents iL satisfactory revision of the proposed niddition to
Castillo do Saun ilarcos National MonuIlmenIt, which is acceptable.
If the proposal is enacted, the National Pnrk Service will proceed
promptly to take the necessary steps looking toward tle acquisition of
the Bennett Hotel property. Preliminary negotiations have already
been conducted.
In order to avoid hardship to the present. owners of thie land shown
on tle revised J'ac.ttc i survey, other than tlie Belennett llotel property,
such land will be. acquired through voluntary sales negotiated within
these owners. Coldlemnlation will not be instituted Iaginst, I l persons'
now owning the property except if alienation of tlhe property by them
in imminent, or if they undertake to so change the existing use of or
developments on the land as will render the ulliunlte acquisition by
the United States exorbitantly costly or will seriously interfere witii
the preservation and administration of Castillo de Snn Mnrcos Na-
tional Monument. If, after negotiating a 'voluntary sale, title difli-
uilties reninin, we would resort to condemnation to clear title. Wo
offer this assurance to the committee with the tlioughit that this state-
ment may bo included in the committee's report, if the committee
sees fit to do so. We recommend that, in view of theso assurances,
the pending legislation be reported favorably, amending only the
description to coanforni to the revised survey by Ennmett William Pa.
cetti and Associates.
Based upon the information available to us we estimate that the
cost of acquiring the lands under such an amended bill would be ap.
proxinately $500,000.
Sincerely yours,
CoNRAD L. WIRTu, Director.




44























1960
10842 CONGRESSIONAL SENATE June 23

DDITION OF CERTAIN ANDS TO Thence westerly along the said southerly
ADDITION 0 CEIRTAIN \LAN~DS TO property line of land now or formerly owned
CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS NA- by Mrs. J. O. Windsor 140.0 foot, more or
TIONAL MONUMENT, FLA. less to a point on the easterly property line
Mr. SM ATIIRS. Mr. President, I of land now or formerly owned by Dlanche
ML. Corveau. belng lot 10, block 7;
move that the Senate proceed to the con- Thence northerly 80.5 foot, moro or less,
sideration of Calcndar No. 1605, House along said easterly property line of land now
bill 8226. or formerly owned by Blanche L. Cervoau
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The bill ] to a point on the southerly property line of
will be stated by title for the information land now or formerly owned by Mary Peck,
of the Senate. being lot 18, block 7;
OThe ClimE CLERK. A bill (I.R. 8226) Thence westerly along said southerly prop-
1rty line of la nd now or formerly owned by
to add certain lands to Castlllo de San Mary Peck 125.5 feet, more or less, to the
Marcos National Monument In the State easterly property lino of land now or for-
Of Florida. merely owned by Colonial St. Augustino.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Inc.. being lot 5, block 7:
question Is on ngrcclng to the motion of Thence northerly along said property line
the Senator fromn Florida. of land now or formerly owned by Colonial
the Senator Flod. St Augustine, Inc., 42.0 feet, more or less,
The motion was agreed to; and the to the southerly property line of land now
Senate proceeded to consider the bill, or formerly owned by Frank Upchurch, be-
which had been reported from the Coin- ing lot 4. block 7:
mittee on Interior and Insular Affairs Thence easterly along said southerly prop-
with amendments, on page 1, line 4, after erty line of land now or formerly owned by
the word "procure", to strike out "In Frankr Upchurch, 60.0 feet, more or less, to
such manner as he may deem to be In the westerly property line of land now or
formerly owned by Mary Peck:
the public interest, including procure- Thence northerly along said property line
ment with funds which may be appro- of land now or formerly owned by Mary
printed therefore" and Insert "In accord- Peck and along said property line prolonged
anco with the provisions of subsection 140.0 feet, more or less. to a point on the
(b) of this section"; at the top of page 2, southerly property line of land now or form-
to strike out: erly owned by F. Victor Rahner, fragment
AA XA of lot 1, block 7.
Thence westerly along said southerly prop-
Starting at a point in the seawall of Cas- erty line of land now or formerly owned
tlllo de San Marcoe National Monument, by F. Victor Rahner 40.0 feet, more or less,
which is the southeast corner of the present to a point on the easterly property line
Federal reservation: thence westerly 01.08 of land now or formerly owned by the R. L.
feet, more or less, along the exl.ting bound- Parks estate. portion of lot 1. block 7;
ary of Castillo de San Mnrcon National MIon- Thence northerly along said easterly prop-
unmnt to the Internsctlon of said line with erty line of land now or formerly owned by
the west right-of-way line of Day Street, the the R. L. Parls estate 05.0 feet, more or
point of beginning less, to the Intersection of said property line
Thence southerly along the west right-of- with the southerly right-of-way line of
Way line of Day ltrect 143.5 feet, more or Port Alley which point is the northeoat
lose, to the int.racctlon of esid right-of-way corner of lot 1, block 7, and the northwest
line with the north right-of-way line of Cuin corner of lot 21, block 7;
Street which Is the southenat corner of block Thence northerly on a prolongation of said
1; thence westerly 104 0 feet, more or le.s, property line 14.0 feet, more or less, to a
along the north right-of-way lino of Cuna point on the north right-of-way line of
Street to the Internection of said right-of- Fort Alley:
way line with the aW;terly right-uf-way lion Tlience westerly 50 feet. more or less, to
of Charlotte Street, which is the southwest the point on said right of way line which
Corner of block 1;: s the southwest corner of lot 6, block 6, and
Thence northerly along the east right-of- the rsuthen.a.t corner nf lot 4, block 6;
way lne of Herrea Way 25.0 feet. more or Thence northerly 148.0 feet, more or less,
les, to a point whore said right-of-way line along the lot line which is common to lot
6. block 6, and lots 2 and 4, block and
is intersectod by a prolongation of the north- said line prolonged to a point on the south-
erly right-of-way 'lno of Cunna Sreet; early property line of land now or formerly
Thence westerly across Charlotto Street to owned by the Gulf Oil Company:
the northwest corner of Charlotte and Cuna Thence westerly along the southerly line
Streets. which Is the southeast corner of of said land now or formerly owned by the
block 7; Gulf Oil Company and its prolongation to
Thence northerly along the west right-of- a point 60 feet eastward of the easterly right-
way line of Charlotte Street 67.0 feot to a of-way line of Saint George Street:
olnt: Thence northerly along a line parallel to
Thence northwesterly 20.3 feot, more or and 60 feet eastward of the said enaterly
ess, to a point located 20 feet west from the right-of-way line of Saint George Street a
ost right-of-way line of Charlotte Street distance of 05.0 feet, more or less, to a point
on the southerly property line of land now in the present boundary of the OCtillo do
or formerly owned by Mrs. J. O. Windaor, San Maroo National Monument;
iboing lots 13 and 14, block 7; Thence easterly along the said present
boundary of the monument a distance of


- ----45 -- -4

























10842 CONGRESSIONAL-SENATE June 23, 1960

107'.011 foot Lo i, marblo cornrllltlaiio. 1e(iu Tlhnilre leading the nou therly rlght-of-way
tlo norLtheiult cfrni ir Of nulSi block )(; LiieliCO 111r of thn proponed Cnutlllo Drive and run-
colnlinllUi.n tong lIhe o anil JpiIeIClt liounludry n1n1g boutih 10 degree 22 mlnlltes weat 81.72
of tihe Castllo do flan Marc,' National Mon. feet aong the west line of block 1. city of
ument in a g:nera;l enaterly and south- Saint Augustine to the southwest orner of
easterly direction to theo point of beginning. said block I;
containing In all shout 2.46 acres of land.
Sh Thence south 83 degrees 38 minutes east
At the top of page 0, to insert; 102.00 feet along the south line of .ild
VOrcarUrTON roF PARC-L A block 1 to a point in the westerly right-of-
Beginning at a corner of the present Cas- way line of Florida State road A-I-A;
tlllo do San Marcos National Monument Thence north 4 degrees 40 minutes west
boundary, said point also being the north- 140.23 feet along the westerly right-of-way
cast corner of block 1, city of Saint Augus- line of Florida State road A-I-A to A point
tine. Florida; thence running along the nl the present Castlllo de 8aa Maro. Nam
present boundary of the Castlllo de San Uo nal Monument boundary
Marcos Natlonnl Monument as follows:
North 82 degrees 04 minutes west a dia-
tance of 35.4G feet;
Thenco north 81 degrees 47 minutes west
a distance of 60.1'feet;
Thence south 30 degrees 21 minutes west 13989
a distance of 16 33 feet;
Thence north 72 degrees 01 minutes west
a distance of 4.77 feet;
Thence north 05 degrees 02 minutes west
a distance of 07.62 feet;
Thence north 1 degree 28 minutes west a
distance of 4.00 feet; Thence south 86 degrees 05 minutes west
Thonco north 11 degrees 18 minutes west 8.57 feet along said National Monument
a distance of 30.02 feet; boundary to a stone Ionulnent;
Thence south 77 degrees 32 minutes west Tlicco north 6 degrees 21 minutes welt
adintanco of 0.51e fcet; 3400 feet along said National Monument
Thience north 10 del;roca 60 minutes west bountclary to the point of begnliing and con-
a ldistlance of 32.00 fret; training npproxiniately 1.05 cnres.
rhencce north 7 degrees 30 minutes west DracurrrON M PAarC l
a dIstLance of 37.61 feet;
Thence south 118 drgrees 64 minutes west Beginning at a corner of the present Cas-
a distance of 20.30 feet; tlllo de San Marcoa Natalnl Monument
Thence south 73 degrees 62 minutes west boundary, said point also being the north-
a distance of 05.86 teet; rast corner of block 6, city of BIInt All-
Thonce north 2 degrees 21 minutes east gustine. Florida;
a distance of 22.G4 feet; Thence south 70 degrees 00 minutes west
Thence north 4 degrees 30 minutes west 7295 feet along the present Castillo de San
a distance of 20.03 feet; Marcoe National Monument boundary oom-
Thence north 81 degrees 08 minutes east mon to the north line of said block 6 to a
a distance of 0.49 fet; point in the southerly ri'ht-of-way Itno of
Thence north 7 degrees 10 minutes west the proposed CLstillo Drive as delineated
a distance of 0.61 feet; on the survey map by Ilnmmtt William Ra-
Thence north 65 degrees 12 minutes west cetti and alsoclates in three sheets dated
a distance of9.01 feet; April 23. 10t0, file numbered LD-54 and re-
Thence south 00 degrees 40 minutes west Vired June 2. 1960. said point being in the
a distance of 71.30 feet to a point In the arc of a curve concave to the southwest and
southerly right-of-way line of the proposed having a radius of 612.00 feet: the radiuI
Castlllo Drive as delineated on the survey of said curve bearing south 64 degrees 89
map by Emmett William 1Pficetti and Asso- minutes 11 seconds west from said point;
dates In three sheet dated April 23, 1I60, Thence leaving the present National Monu,
llo numbered LD-54 and revised June 2, ment boundary and running along the
1900. said point being In the arc of a curve, southerly right-of-way line of the proposed
concave to the southeast and having a radius Castillo Drive along the arc of Eaid curve
of 465.00 teet, the radius of said curve bear- through a central angle of 13 degrees 25
Ing north 68 degrees 20 minutes 03 seconds minutes 41 seconds 143.45 feet to the end
ean:t from nald point; of said curve;
Thence leaving the present National Mon- Thence south 21 degrees 65 minutes east
umnont boundary and running; along the 100.10 feet along the southerly right-of-way
southerly right-of-way line of the proposed line of the proposed Castlllo Drive to a
Castillo Drive along the arc of said curve point in the wrutherly line of lot 20, block 7.
through a central angle of 30 degrees 42 city of Saint Augustlne, Florida, and the
minutes 03 seconds, 240.16 feet to the and present Castillo do San Marcoo National
of said curve; Monument boundary;
Thence south 03 degrees 25 minutes east Thence leaving the southerly right-of-way
110.69 feet along the southerly right-of-way line of the proposed Castlllo Drive and run*
line of the proposed Castilllo Drive to a ning along the present.boundary of the Cos-
point In the west line of block 1, city of tillo do Ba8 Marcoo National Monument a
fiaat Augustine, Florida; follows


46






















CONGRESSIONAL-SENATE June 23, 1960 13989


North 82 degrees 20 minutes east a dis- land. constituting about an acre. That
tance of 62.90 fcet; course is thoroughly agreeable to the
Thence north 10 drerees 42 minutes west Senators from Florida. It will leave a
a llstance of 40.27 feet;
Thence north 33 degrees 22 minutes west small tract to be acquired in the future,
a distance of 6.70 feet; unless It can be acquired by negotiation.
Thence north 70 degrees 20 minutes west There is a third small tract included
distance of 0.21 fcet; in the bill, which is already In public
Thence aouth 83 degrees 00 minutes west ownership, and which does not have to
a distance of 2.20 feet; be either paid for or considered as a part
Thenco north 71 degrees 11 minutes west of the added lands. It comprises a part
a distance of 30.46 feet:
ahnce nor 3 egres 60 minutes st of the moat of the ancient city of St.
adlthanco ot 132.00 feet; : Ai:.'ustlnc. Thils tract has already been
Thence south 80 degrees 29 minutes west acquired and deeded to the public.
adistanco q 3.78 feat; The Senators from Florida are thor-
Thence north 17 degrees 13 minutes west oughly agreeable to the amendments
L ditance of 2.00 feet; proposed, and we ask that the amend-
Thence north 17 degrees 32 minutes west a i mcnts be considered en bloc at this time,
distance of 20.07 feet; and promptly agreed to. for this reason:
Thelcnce north 72 degrees 20 minutes east Tle descrption is a very lengthy and
a dlhtnnce of 2.91 feet:
Thence north 17 degrees 20 minutes west involved one. and will have to be checked
adintanco of 11.61 f6et4 carefully by the House, as It was by us.
Thence south 72 degrees 28 minutes west It is based on titles nearly 400 years old,
distance of 2.00 fect; and it is a metes-and-bounds descrlp-
Thence north 17 degrees 32 minutes west tion. We hope that a conference may be
a distance of 7.40 feet to the point of be- avoided, but if it should become neces-
ginning and containing approximately 0.32 sary, we want to allow ample time for the

On page 11, line 12 to strike out conference to agree on the provisions of
"AREA B" and insert description for the bill.
scr n fr Let me add, in closing, that the House
Parcel C.
And, on page 12, after line 9, to in- Members from Florida are in complete
sert: accord with the changes suggested by
the Senate committee.
(b) The Secretary shaIl, In procuring Mr. ALLOTT. Mr. President, will the
lands or Interests therein pursuant to the
provlilons of this section, acquire such lands Senator yield?
or interests therein only by ncgotlatlons; Mr. HOLLAND. I yield.
except that the lands or interests therein Mr. ALLOTT. We went into this
described as block i. city of baint Augustine, question very thoroughly. I think the
Florlda, fmy be acquired by the Secretary In Senator from Florida has presented the
such manner a. ho may deem to be In the
facts. There Is no reason why the bill
public Interest. including procurement with should not be passed.
lunds which may >eo appropriated therefore. Tho PRESIDING OFFICER. Tho
S Pr T rI nGO IE. The question is on ngreclnr to the commit-
Tlec inPREiIDING oMCER. The tee amendments. Without objection,
question is on agrccing to the commit- the committee amendments are agreed
tee amendments. to en bloc.
Mr. O ANI. Mr. President, this The bill is open to further amendment.
Is a House bill. to add certalln lands to If there be no further amendment to be
the CasUillo de San Marcios N.atonal proposed, the question is on the engross-
Mounument, at St. Autust.ic, Edi. ;ilc ment of the amendments and the third
bill whlichl passed tlie House provided for reading of the bill.
thle addillon of nearly 3 acres of land-I The amendments were ordered to be
believe t was 2.7 acres--to this mon- engrossed amendments were ordered to hibe
mcnt area. There were complaints from engrossed and the bill to be read a third
some of thi property owners. At the re- tine.
quest of the Senators from Florldn a re- (.R. 822o ) was read the
.survey wasi mande, which reduced the The bill ( 8
acr cge to be addet to 1.37 acres. third tAio and passCd.
Thle icnalte committee- conducted
hcarnllcs, andt n:irc'dl to recommend the
bill with a namendment which would
reduce the added area to 1.37 acres as
shown by thi' resurvey.
The second change which the commit-
tee recommended was to withhold the
right of condemnation at this time from
the National Park Service, except as to
the principal and most needed tract of














I his If, i lllt C l.S.ll ',l


L 1 STAIIS L)EI'ARI'ME N'l' OF: 'I IR
NArihINAI PARtK Sr.AVICE


of |pagcs


PERMIT NO.
0 AA c 1 --'


EXPIRES


... SPECIAL USE PERMIT ,.
S. t rii PRVIOUS.PERM
::., .- .,., ,. .iwi.,Casti,.llo .de San l acos National,. ionwuent o j CO r. co I ,.. 'T N .... ,
(A'rea)" .. I
l da ,Sbate RoaDepartment .. Tallahassc ';. Florid.A'''- .uth
during the period from June 16 ., 4. ', 1 ;1i7q
to'use' the foll6wing-described lAhhd in the 'above-namd area:
,Ijnds within .the boundaries .o0f:, Castillo ,de San, 1-.rcos '1ation,al inument; as ,shown .,on ,,
the plan prepared by .the iNational Park: Service titled: ,1Adjusted road!allgnrulnt11
and numbered NM-,CSi 1010-A. The plan is also. designatedr;Exhibit 1O" :and 'dated
"April',',!? '198,









for the purpose of constructing and maintaining a publiohighway, being that part of0,
Fort Vyrion' Circle :connecting San'.,arco Avenue,-north', of ;the ,old- City Gate, with Bay
Street.'




subject to the conditions on the reverse hereof and attached pages and to tl e payment to the Government of' the United
States of the sum of ' Dollars ($)
in advance l(Monthly, scniannually, etc.) or as follows
The fee s waived because the pernlrttee is a stage agency and the road is for the use
of the public,
payment to be made to the Superintendent by Express or Postal Money Order, Certified Check, or Draft payable to
the. National Park Service, or Cash,
I I' ,
Issupd at.,.. .. Rjichmond, Virginia this 29h day of' August 19 58


i i ._ Superinhondent,
Tr Ional Direct sor .

The undersigned hereby accepts this permit subject to the terms, covenants, obligations, and reservations, bxprdssed or implied, therein:
TWO WITNESSES TO SIGN.iTUiES PERMITTED (SIoNATuaS)
NAME ,i NAME
NA N I ...STAT;E _.OAD DEPARTMENT OF PLORID
ADD IESS y ADDRESS 1 _/ _ r_ i ___

NAME, , . .. .. ''. E Execut ve Director.,i

ADDRESS ADDRESS
"N41)o)^ ^ ATTE ST: --, /
APPROVED: (If approval is required by higher outhriy)' Secretary
NA I TITLE DATE

Sign nam dr'n arres a written in hodf of permit; for coparlncrshlil, pernmittrs should sign as "members of firm"; for corporation, the officer authorized to exrecut
mntrnrtls, etc., should sign, with little, the uifliriincy of T ich iirnnlture hwing atIsted hy the Scretary, with corporate seal, in lieu of witnesses.
48 (This copy for i'vrmittee) J, PR t.p I


L













* ". """', NATIONAL PAINK SIlVICIC
SPECIAL USE PERMIT CONTINUATION SHEET
ARLA PERMIT NO. PAGE NO.
Castillo de San Tircos National Nonument __

16. The permitted shall protect the scenic and aesthetic value of the right of way
and the adjacent land as far as possible consistent with the authorized use,
during construction, operation, and maintenance of the highway. The permitted
shall provide and maintain in a manner satisfactory to the Superintendent means
of access to the national monument for the use of visitors and for normal ad-
ministration and operation.

17. Permittee agrees that it will hold the United States and/or its employees free
and harmless from any and all claims for injuries or damages to persons or
property arising either directly or indirectly from its use of the premises
and/or exercise of the privileges granted under this permit.

18. Permittee agrees that upon completion of road construction, and relocation, all
sections of the old Fort Pfhrion Circle will be obliterated, and the curbs removed.
All of the area on the national monument side of the new curb will be brought to
approved grade with good top soil and will be seeded and spot sodded with grass
in a manner prescribed by the Superintendent of the National Monument.

19. The permitted agrees to transplant or replace in kind all trees and shrubs which
are disturbed or in the way of the construction. This landscaping work shall
be carried out as prescribed by a planting plan which will be prepared by the
National Park Service and in a manner satisfactory to the Superintendent of the
National Monument. The permitted agrees, under paragraphs 18 and 19, to maintain
new lawn areas and planted trees for one year after planting to assure an initial
survival, and will replant any areas or specimens which die within one year from
the date of approval of the work.

20. The permitted agrees to present the construction drawings to the National Park
Service far approval before advertising for bids.

21. This permit is automatically renewable fo* further periods of one year each for
a total term of not exceeding twenty (29 years in all from June 16, 1958.


_ ________ _111~11-~ ~1 I--- II


iii rir 49 11-1H 01




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