• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Memorial to Henry Morrison...
 Last will and testament, with codicils...






Group Title: Miscellaneous Papers
Title: Flagler: memorial, will.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095317/00018
Finding Guide: A Guide to the James Edmundson Ingraham Papers
 Material Information
Title: Flagler: memorial, will.
Series Title: Miscellaneous Papers
Physical Description: Archival
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Folder: Miscellaneous
 Subjects
Subject: Ingraham, James Edmundson, 1850-1924.
Flagler, Henry Morrison, 1830-1913.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095317
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Memorial to Henry Morrison Flagler
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
        Page A-11
        Page A-12
        Page A-13
        Page A-14
        Page A-15
        Page A-16
        Page A-17
        Page A-18
        Page A-19
        Page A-20
        Page A-21
        Page A-22
        Page A-23
        Page A-24
        Page A-25
        Page A-26
        Page A-27
        Page A-28
        Page A-29
        Page A-30
        Page A-31
        Page A-32
        Page A-33
        Page A-34
        Page A-35
        Page A-36
    Last will and testament, with codicils thereto of Henry H. Flagler, deceased
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
        Page B-22
        Page B-23
        Page B-24
        Page B-25
Full Text





In Memorial


HENRY
MORRISON
FLAGLER


_ ~1


ICI~---












Memorial to

Henry M. Flagler


On Sunday morning, March 15th,
services in memory of the late Henry
M. Flagler were held in the Royal
Poinciana Chapel, which he had
built. The services were conducted
by George Morgan Ward, D.D.,
LL.D., who had been a close friend
as well as pastor to the deceased
gentleman for sixteen or more years.
The chapel was beautifully deco-
rated for the occasion, the side walls
being covered with palm branches.
At the rear of the chancel was a cur-
tain, formed of asparagus ferns,
studded with pale pink carnations.
The chancel rail was hung with as-
paragus vines and pink carnations
were suspended from the chande-
liers. The pulpit was banked with
pink roses.
The front seats were especially re-
served for invited guests and old em-
ployees of the Flagler system.
The invited guests, who were all
personal* friends of the late Mr.








Flagler, were:-Mr. William R. Ke-
nan, Mr. W. R. Beardsley, Dr. Owen
Kenan, Dr. H. B. Casselberry, Dr.
N. F. Schaffer, Mr. Henry E. Bemis,
Mr. Leland Sterry, Mr. J. D. Rahner,
Mr. John F. Harris, Mr. Sturges, Mr.
H. M. Tilford, Mr. John J. Sinclair,
Col. A. D. Andrews, Dr. G. A. Quinby,
S Col. William Hester, Mr. R. H. Flem-
ming, Mr. Philander C. Knox, Mr. S.^
L. Schoonmaker, Mr. F. P. Scudder,
IMr. J. Howard Wright, Col. Willis S.
Paine, Mr. George W. Perkins, Mr.
William L. Van Anden, Mr. Robert
M. Fair and Mr. Henry T. Sloane.
The chapel was crowded, the aisles'
being filled with extra chairs. There
was an overflow filling the vestibule
and steps of the Chapel, and many
were turned away vho could not
gain admittance.


(Stenographic Report of Address.)


Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me!
And may there be no moaning of the
bar,
When I put out to sea.

But such a tide aS moving seems


asleep,
Too full for sound and foam,


..* 4







When that whi4h drew from out the
boundless deep
Turns again home.

Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the dark!
And may there be no sadness f
farewell,
When I embark.

For Tho' from out our bourne of
Time and Place
The flood may b ar me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crossed the bar.


After the rendering of that beauti-
ful poem of Tennyson's I need no
text for these exercises whatever;
no introduction for anything that I
may say. I think most of us know
the association that that poem has
for most of us. About a year before
Mr. Flagler died we were crossing
the grounds to attend a funeral and
he said to me, "Doctor, what was the
poem that you repeated at a fun-
eral about a year ago?" I told him
it was Tennyson's "Crossing the
Bar." He said, "I wish you would
repeat that this morning," and then
grippirng my arm a little, he said,
"I wish when my time comes you
would use it too."


1 1. 1- lip








That is all the introduction I need
this morning. We are not here for
any formal service, not such a ser-
vice as will be held at the St. Augus-
tine resting place of the man we
would honor. We are here in this
little house where he loved to wor-
ship, the only place that he did come
to regularly for the last eight or ten
-years of his life-this little chapel
with its disregard of creed and rit-
ual, a place those who are 'empora-
rily gathered together here at Palm
Beach may make their meeting place
with God.
I am not here to talk of the man's
accomplishments. I shall not go in-
to detail as to the work he did. I
was never in any way associated with
his business. He came to me for a
mental vacation. I speak as his pas-
tor. My hardest task is to cull from
nearly twenty years of friendship
that which shall be most appropriate
for these exercises.
This was the house where he loved
to worship. We owe this place to
him and this pulpit which he wished
to be the freest spot in the world
where a man might speak regardless
of anything save the dictates of his
heart and what Almighty God in-
spired him to say. I ask no per-
mission. I have no one's consent. I








make no excuses. I have no ex-
planation. I need neither text nor
pretext. I speak from my heart, and
the only motive I have is the love I
bore the man.
I read you this morning from
Isaiah's prophecy: Isaiah called on
that wondrous poetic instinct of his
to describe his land when Jehovah
should reign-"The wilderness shall
bloom and the solitary place shall
be glad. The weak shall be made
strong. The desert shall rejoice and
blossom as the rose. It shall blos-
som abundantly and rejoice with
singing." Isaiah's prophecy is slow-
ly but surely coming to pass, has
come just as far as the precepts of
the Nazarine, whose coming he fore-
told, have become the dominant note
in society. All this has been accom-
plished under God's direction at the
hands of men of his own choosing.
We had first conquerors, mighty
men of valor, who won a kingdom
with their strong right arms Then
prophets and seers, the statesmen
of their times, who foretold the
right and the wrong to their people.
Next came the discoverers. men who
"sailed on and on," seeking new
worlds for discovery, and last with
the founding of America there came
into existence a new type of leader,







the pioneer, strong, resourceful, as
became the blood from which they
sprung, intelligent as no man who
has his own way to make in the
world has ever been before-ambi-
tious as only an absolute free man
can be-God-fearing as became the
man who had left home and kindred
to face the dangers of an unsettled
land rather than yield his soul's con-
viction.
Day after day of such progress
and a mighty nation stretched from
ocean strand to strand where once
there knelt in prayer only an humble
Pilgrim band.
Florida's pioneer came not in the
fabled voyage of Ponce de Leon, not
in the iron rule of General Jackson
as he tried to shape this country, but
Florida's pioneer came as a mere
visitor, a man who had the ability to
do for this State what no other man
had done or would do. His perfect
health needed no tonic his restless
brain craved activity, his already ac-
quired wealth demanded investment,
and his reverent mind sought some
legitimate sane method of returning
to the land in which he had earned
his wealth a benefit in keeping with
the prosperity he had won.
In his heart was the fear of God he
bad inherited from his missionary








father, himself a clergyman pioneer
in the days of Ohio settlement, and
wherever in the State he extended
his investments or pushed his way
he established first of all a house of
worship that the God of his fathers
might find fitting acknowledgement
and his name praised.
The man's outlook on life, as I
state, was of the very broadest, and
so in the midst of the State for which
he did more than any other man to
bring prosperity, in this community
where he made two blades of grass
to grow not merely where one had
grown before, but where no life
seemed possible, in a community of
his own creation and in this building
where he loved to worship, a proof
of his devotion to the faith of his
fathers, we meet today to honor the
memory of Henry Morrison Flagler.
I would speak of him first as the man
who founded this church and made
it possible. I have often said this
was the freest pulpit in the world.
Early in my ministry, yes even be-
fore assuming the position, I said to
Mr. Flagler, "I do not think I am
so constituted to talk soft nothings
to the guests of Palm Beach." His
answer was prompt "Who asked
you to talk soft nothings. Speak as
you think right." "Yes," I said,







"But are you and I both disinterest-
ed.enough and big enough not to be
influenced at times?" "Try it and
see," was his answer, and after six-
teen years of a very happy relation
to this pulpit and people I can say
he never by word or sign indicated
his difference of opinion on any save
possibly some denominational belief
we had discussed together. I re-
member once a friend of my own
was leaving this chapel. He did not
know Mr. Flagler, and as he went
out the man turned to him and said,
"I think that man will lose his job."
"No," said Mr. Flagler, "I guess not.
He has a few friends here. I am
one of them. My name is Flagler."
One morning we differed on a trifle
regarding the clerical gown worn in
this pulpit, and the next day he sent
me a legal document with a brief
note saying, "I came near breaking
my promise and interfering with
your pulpit. To avoid possibility of
repetition I hereby put it out of my
power to influence your position.
You hold it independent of me. Now
I can't trouble you."
I remember discussing with him
the status of this church. He had
spoken of it as part of the East
Coast jSysten. I differed and said
"I thought, Mr. Flagler, it was the







House of God. As such it cannot be
a part of any human system." Quick
as a flash he answered, "You are
right, and if it ever has been in any
way dependent, it never shall be
again." That he kept his word in-
violate a gentleman now in this
house can testify. He asked me on
one occasion: "Why is the Chief (as
we lovingly called him). so particular
with the expenses .of this building,
' etc.?"
He had a wondro--sly broad out-
look on life. First of all he knew by
experience the lessons of poverty and
hard work. 'He used to say that- his
schooling had been that of advers',y.
Many a time he has told me .of the
hardships of his boyhood. He used
even to say he had had no boyhood.
He was born in 1830 in the little
town of Hammondsport, New York.
His father, of old Dutch and Yankee
stock, was a pion ;er missionary
preacher, one of the meni who put
the stamp of God upon the Middle
West. Laboring for a salary of $300
or $400 per year, he has no means
with which to send his child to
school and college. In a record of
his life which, he gave to me he
writes: "October 1844 I went to
what was then a new country Sene-
ca County, Ohio, and located in the







Town of Republic where I was a
clerk in a country store." Notice
the term, if you please a boy of
fourteen "locating." He has told of
the hardships of those years, work-
ing virtually for board and lodging,
sleeping under the counter of the
store in the open space reserved for
the loose wrapping paper in use in
those days-rolling himself up on
cold nights and burrowing down
among those crackling papers to
keep warm-working so hard that
when "circus day," came the great
holiday of those times, he was too
tired to go with the others, eager as
he was, and forsooth took his lunch
in a piece of paper and went out into
the woods to drop like a little log on
the pine needles and sleep away the
entire day in an effort to make up
the rest his growing body craved.
Later he went into business for
himself in the middle west before
he was 21. He said it was a matter
of barter largely in those days. There
was no money and salt was the me-
dium of exchange everywhere. He
grew interested in its manufacture
and went up into Michigan and there
he faced disaster. He came back to
Ohio $40,000 in debt. I said to him,
"Did you fail to pay up "What
do you mean?" he said, "Why of







course not, I paid it all and came
back and started again $40,000 in
the hole." You can't keep a man of
that kind down a great while.
In 1867 he formed a special part-
nership with Messrs. John D. Rocke-
feller, William Rockefeller, Samuel
Andrews and Stephen V. Harkness
for the manufacture of and dealing
in crude petroleum and its products.
Seeing as he believed an advantage
to all concerned, consumer as well as
producer, he approached one of his
partners as they were walking along
one morning and said, "John, I won-
der if we couldn't combine these lo-
cal interests to advantage?". The
response was that the plan was a
good one, but it would be impossible
to secure a unit of value (a "yard-
stick" as his partner put it) by
which to value the different plants.
"If I will find a "yardstick" on
which they will agree, will you be
governed by it?" he asked. "Yes,"
was the response, "But you can't
find it." In a brief time, as he
used to put it, I fund my yardstick
and had measured up the different
properties to the owners' satisac-
tion, and Standard Oil was an accom-
plished fact. To show how good a
yardstick it was, he told of a Dutch-


~,r...;-~--- ,------~







man he had known on the river in
the early days. To quote his own
words, "I met him one day and said
Hans, what are you doing here? He
said I am running a little refinery
up on the lake. It was so small a
refinery that I had never known it
existed I asked him if he wouldn't
like to come in with us and told him
our plans. He said: Come on and
measure up my property. I valued
his plant at $4,700. He said he had
$2,000 and had borrowed $2,500.
That must be a pretty good yard-
stick."
It was the wealth thus won that
in the winter of 1883-84 he return-
ed to Florida and in December 1885
began the construction of the Ponce
de Leon-his first.large undertaking
in this state. From that day to this
his work has been continuous, not
to the 21st of last May, but today his
work is going on. One object was
accomplished only to be laid down
for another. One point was reached
only to be passed and another goal
set.
One night John D. Rockefeller,
his partner, was here, and he said
"About 10 or 15 years ago this man
(pointing to Mr. Flagler) said I am
going to invest about $30,000 in an
orange grove in Florida. Don't you







want to join me? I guess he's got
$30,000 in here. It looks like it."
What kind of a man was he? 1
asked him once his purpose in Flori-
da. He had asked me a most per-
tinent question and in response I of-
fered to trade questions-to answer
him if he would answer me an equal-
ly pertinent question. "Well," he
said, "I shall not trade blindly.
What is it?" "What are you try-
ing to do in Florida? Is this invest-
ment or philanthropy, or are you
anxious to pose as a State builder?"
"That's pertinent enough," he said.
'I hope to live long enough to prove
myself a decent business man by
getting a dividend on my investment.
This is a safe kind of work for me
to do. I believe it's a 'thousand
times better than your colleges and
universities (that was rubbing it in-
to me) -but I do hope to live long
enough to prove I am a good busi-
nesss man."
I do not think, if we analyze the
situation, that at the outset the no-
tion of philanthropy entered his
head, but as the work progressed it
grew .upon him and the desirability
of such a country as this became a
positive factor in his work. Later
when we thought his railroad build-
ing days were over, ae called me in-







to his office one day and showed me
a map of Florida with a red line
drawn through the keys down to
Key West. "What do you think of
that?" he asked. "Why," I said.
"It looks to me like a very fair map
of Florida. What is there unique
about it?" "Do you notice that red
line?" "Yes, what is it?" "That
is a railroad I am going to build,"
was his answer. "A railroad in that
God-forsaken section?" "Yes."
"Well," I said, "You need a guar-
dian." "I had supposed you would
make some such foolish remark,"
was his answer. "It is amusing how
little some supposedly intelligent
men know."
In January, 1912, Key West on
his birthday welcomed as a victori-
ous monarch, the greatest owner of
railroad holdings in the world, a
gray-haired old man who had con-
quered the very seas and the ele-
ments and discouraged by nothing
had pushed his triumphant way
from key to key till he had reached
the Southern outpost of our great
nation. I do not think I ever knew
a braver or bolder thing and there
are few who know what that under-
taking cost him. I am not speaking
of the millions it cost him-they are
an unknown quantity to me. I do







not know what you mean when you
talk about twenty or thirty million
dollars, but I do know the criticism
he encountered, the slanders he
met, the set-backs from stock mar-
kets and mankind and nature her-
self. At the time of the big storm-
the cyclone disturbance that swept
the peninsular during the road's con-
struction, I received one day at my
home in the North a package of cop-
ies of about fifty telegrams from the
seat of trouble. "Such and such
damage done here, there and every-
where." Not a word of comment of
any kind. I sat there looking at
them and wondering what he meant,
and suddenly it dawned on me that
he wanted to know if he were mor-
ally responsible for that disaster.
I had been taught as a boy -that
there were two things that excuse
everything, morally and spiritually
-one was the Act of the Public En-
emy and the other was the Act of
Almighty God.
Again when a. hostile administra-
tion at Washington went out of its
way to persecute, not a system, but
a man, and found amongst those
who were receiving his greatest ben-
efits fit tools with which to work re-
venge, he faced troubles and anxie-
ties which shortened his life rather
than yield his purpose.







And again when, his whole fortune
was at stake behind an uncompleted
work, he never flinched, but staked
his all on the road's completion. A
gentleman now dead, a. railroad
man,, a member of a board of direc-
tors of a concern to whom he had ap-
plied for millions, said when asked
his opinion on the wisdom of the
loan. "I know nothing of the road
and care nothing, but I am satisfied
to lend anything he asks for to the
man."
His ambition was to see this a
great State. Can you fancy a more
Aladdin-like achievement than his?
At Miami there dwelt two families
when first he came-now there is a
city of twenty thousand. Here where
we stand and across yonder lake and
all along this coast to Jacksonville
are cities and towns, places of busi-
ness, banks and churches, and happy
homes by the thousand, because this
pioneer, this Columbus, dared "Sail
on and on and on."
He felt responsible for this sec-
tion. When the great freeze of
1894-95 wiped out of existence a
hundred million of dollars worth of
property in i night, when men walk-
ed the streets, with stricken faces
and discouraged hearts, the tragedy
of that day no one save a Floridian







can ever know. In. other sections
Smen packed what they could carry
of their earthly possessions and
tramped their way back north, leav-
ing their houses to the bats and the
owls and the negro tramp, but in
These sections a man now in this
house was sent on a mission. "Find,"
were his instructions, "Any and ev-
ery case of real need where a chance
to start again will be appreciated
and see that they have that chance,
and the only condition I impose is
that they do not know the gift
comes from Henry M. Flagler. Like
our text, he strengthened the weak
hands.
He was anxious this sLould be a
God-fearing section, a section where
God's day was observed and His
Name honored. His respect for the
day is marked in a hundred different
ways all around us. We have had
some discussion recently as to the
wisdom or unwisdom of closing the
various amusements on the Sabbath
Day at this resort. With Mr. Flagler
S it was not a question at all. He said
to me again and again, "If they do
not like it they need not come. I
am not asking their opinion in this
any more than I consult them about
my other affairs. Sunday is to be
kept at Palm Beach. Its observance


......1 ~







is one of the features of the place."
And it was a profitable feature. He
was not establishing a place for tin
sports, but for the bNst American
people, and they responded to his
plan, and so long as he lived the
question never arose. Between us,
it was no one's affair but his. The
stranger is always surprised on Sun-
day nights to hear the strains of the
doxology, to see the audience rise
in respect. The plan was his own.
That there was nothing narrow
minded about him all are agreed.
His purpose oftimes expressed was
that those strains should mark the
close of the Sabbath Day.
The man himself was an unusual
combination of strength and weak-
ness, of boldness and modesty.
Strong he was with a strength that
was oftimes unyielding, as was nec-
essary to be the organizer of the
greatest business of history. It was
the custom in their Board Meetings
to take no action until such action
was unanimous. Again and again
his was the only minority vote and
he lived to see the Board come to
his way of thinking in every one of
these instances. I remember when
some one who had made a fortune
from his work presented him with
a heroic bronze statue of himself he







said, "I wouldn't dare have that
around. It will be well enough when
I am dead. Alive I wouldn't have
it."
Strong as he was, he was thought-
ful for weakness in others. I re-
member the case of a workman who
had done his best to hamper his
building here at Palm Beach and
who had met with a serious accident
which incapacitated him for work.
A lady came .to me with a subscrip-
tion list asking for help. I asked her
if this was not the man who had at-
tempted to do Mr. Flagler so much
damage. She said, "Yes, but his
wife and babies are not to blame and
they are suffering now." I looked
the case up, found that the need was
genuine and taking her subscription
paper wrote my own name at the
end of the list for a trifling amount.
Then I said to her, 'Now go to Mr.
Flagler, put this list before him,
and above all do not talk. You may
tell him I sent you." She met me a
few days after and her face was
beaming. "I called on him, laid the
subscription list on his desk and
told him that you had sent me. He
looked down the list until he came
to your name, smiled little and
said, 'You need go no further. I'll
take care of the man'." And he did







so, paying all the family's expenses
until the wage earner was able to
take his place again.
Some days after we were walking
together and he took out his pocket
book and extracting a $10.00 bill,
said, 'This is the money I owe you."
In surprise I said, "You owe me
nothing, thougi- I wish you did."
"Yes," he said, "I do. I know when
it costs you $10.00 to teach me a les-
son."
He was a born leader of men, a
captain. of industry, the most suc-
cessful organizer I ever knew, and
I am told by men Who are capable of
judging 'one of the greatest experts
in this line which America. has
known. A gentleman sitting in this
house this morning, an honored offi-
cer in the Confederate Army, said to
me a day or two since, "I told Mr.
Flagler a half dozen times that I
wished with all my heart that at the
time of the War he had gone into
the Northern Army. Skillful as he
was in the matter of organization, I
believe he would so have re-organiz-
ed your army that you would have
ended the War at least a year be-
fore you did and would thus have
saved both North ani South all that
suffering.
He was methodical in all things. I







have never known his like, not mere-
ly in certain directions, but in every
detail of dress and habit and way of
thinking. Economical of all things,
including time, his own as well as
others,' because he knew the value
of time. He realized time was life,
and so part Af Eternity. He was
proud of keeping his w-rd. He used
to say, I like to make these little
things matter of record. It helps to
keep my mind at ease and prevents
their being forgotten.
He loved to overcome obstacles
and once they were conquered they
lost their charm. At once he look-
ed for new worlds to conquer. I
confess I was worried when the ex-
tension had finally reached Key
West. I wanted hil to see his un-
dertaking completed, but I dreaded
the withdrawal of this spur to liv-
ing.
I have spoken of his more assertive
side. .He was modest and retiring to
the last degree. Bold, yes, as a lion
in his business and daring in his
methods, but at heart the man was
himself so sensitive that he shrank
from even the approach of publi-
city. This sensitiveness was often
mistaken for hard-heartedness and
disregard of public opinion. It was
not true. He craved the companion-







ship of his peers, but could not ask
it. He had no small talk. I remem-
ber his gripping my arm on an ex-
cursion on which we were both
members and calling i. y attention to
a well known man who was laying
down the law to the ladies of our
company. 'Doctor, how do you sup-
pose he finds so much to say?"
I did my best to induce him to use
the audophone or ear trumpet. His
devoted wife and I schemed to have
one installed without his krowledga
and when it was in he owned up he
was ashamed to be seen holding it to
his ear.
I remember one day long years
ago when the cars used to come in
this side of the Poinciana. I had just
landed from the train and was has-
tening into the hotel when some one
pulled my coat tails ai d I turned to
see him sitting on a little fence that
protected the gardens. He was
smoking and watching the arrivals
and looked like a big, happy boe.
I asked him how it felt to think that
he could stop the whole thing in
a minute if he liked. His reply was,
"I had never thought of it in that
way. I didn't realize that it was
really mine."
He was sensitive too in thought.







There was a poem of Ironquill's
that he was fond of hearing:
Oh, Theme of themes
Are men mistaught
Are hopes like dreams
To come to naught?
Is all the beautiful and good
Delusive and misi understood?
And has the soul no forward reach?
And do indeed the facts impeach
The theories the teachers teach?
And is this immortality?
The child of ideality
Delusion or reality.

And yet-at times-
We get advice
That seems like chimes
From Paradise;
The soul doth sometimes seem to be
In sunshine which it cannot see;
At times the spirit seems to roam
Beyond the land, above the foam,
Back to some half forgotten home.
Perhaps--this immortality
May be indeed reality.

After I had read it to him the first
time I said "You will see what a.
wide range he covered. He wro
this and he also wrote these absurd
skits I am going to read you.
"Don't please don't," he said. "Af-
ter that it would be sacrilege."








He was a wide reader. A gentle-
man asked me a day or two since as
I quoted from the poem I repeated a
few moments ago, "Did Mr. Flagler
care for such literature as that?"
He was one of the widest readers I
ever knew. Many of the books I
treasure most dearly are books he
first discovered and read. He was
Catholic in his literary preferences
as in all else. We read together
philosophy, science, the humorous
(he dearly loved David Harum), a nd
above 11 the Bible. History he did
not care for. You see it was past.
His only interest was in the present
and above all the future. He literal-
ly lived in the future. His knowl-
edge of the Bible was unusual, espec-
ially of the psalms, and he constant-
ly quoted the psalms of comfort and
promise. "Like as a father pitieth
his children. He knoweth our
frames. Far as the east is from the
WESt."
One noticeable characteristic of
the man was his phenomenal ability
to retain subordinates. His men
never left him. To work for "Uncle
Henry" was a life job generally. It
takes far more to delegate, to organ-
ize and to direct than it does to per-
form actual labor. While he never








seemed to delegate anything, he was
a born leader. Despite the fact that
he almost never praised an assist-
ant, his employes were to a man loy-
al to the "Chief," or to "Uncle Hen-
ry," as they lovingly called him.
An amusing incident came to my
attention two years ago. Mr. Flag-
ler and myself were sitting on the
piazza one moonlit evening in St.
Augustine when we were joined by
one of his oldest employes who be-
gan to "Reminisc," and wound up as
follows: "I was the first man on his
pay roll, doctor, and I have never
missed drawing my pay a month
since, and I don't intend to do so as
long as I live." I can still hear the
Chief's quiet voice as he smiled at
me over his employee's head and re-
marked: "I have every reason to
hope you will live to a' ripe old age,
my friend."
Although he never seemed to give
his full confidence to anyone, yet
once he trusted it took an earth-
quake to shake his confidence. With
sloth and laziness he had no pa-
tience because he had no apprecia-
tion of idleness-an indefatigable
worker himself. The onj sinner he
could not forgive was the shirk.
He craved companionship, yet al-
ways claimed he could not win it.







Badly as he wanted to he could not
let himself go. In his later life you
frequently saw Lim with the little
white dog that rode with him in his
chair. I have seen him for mo-
ments at a time with his face buried
in little Bobby's fur talking to him
like a father to his child. He craved
especially the companionship of
youth, the gaiety of light and color,
yet he had been trained so long to
hold himself in chec-, had been self-
repressed so long, he could not go
half way, Then too like all men of
his wealth, he feared the insincerity
of those who sought him. I remem-
ber sitting with him one day on the
loggia in silence. Finally I said,
'I guess I will go home. We don't
seem to be doing anything." "Sit
still," he said. "We do not have to be
doing anything. I just want you for
company." He had no small talk,
could not talk soft nothings. Many
a time in the later years when I was
much in his company he would say,
"Well, let's think that over a bit be-
fore we decide what our views are."
He was very prone to let others do
the talking. In some subtle way he
would draw a man out and when he
had pumped him dry would turn
with that inscrutable smile of his
and in a few sentences sum up the







whole situation and show that his
opinions had been formed before he
spoke. He told me that he inherited
that trait from his father.
He said that during the latter
years of his father's life he prepared
and published a little memorial to
his mother. After making up the
list of addresses to whom this me-
morial should be sent he asked his
father if there were any names he
wished to add to the list. "Yes,"
sai, .-., Rev. Mr. Flagler. 'There
is Mrs. So-and-So, of Iowa; Mrs. So-
and-bo, of Wisconsin; and one oth-
er." Mr. Flagler took the addresses
down and then turning to his father.
said, "Who are these people?"
"Why," he said, "Henry, they are
your aunts."
He loved to sit in silence on the
loggia of his home, and once after
we had sat there for an hour almost
he suddenly said, pointing off to the
Southern sky, "Doctor, do you think
there is anything more beautiful
than that in Eternity?" He dwelt
much, as we all do, on the thought
of Eternity, and with the natural
tendency of a strong, self-willed man
he was restless he could not know in
advance what the future contained.
He wanted proof of Eternity. Fa-
miliar as he was with theology, he







knew by heart all the arguments for
a life beyond the grave, but like all
honest men he knew that argument
was of little value-he wanted to
know. Like all strong men his
hardest problem was to say "Thy
will be done," t yield his own
will. It is easy for the weak man to
do this. It is sometimes even a com-
fort to be re-eved of the necessity of
making a decision. But for your
man of action God places no such
trial as this.
I remember one Sunday morning
I had spoken of every man's life as a
plan of God. He took exception to
thought of God's control, said we
were independent beings and under
our own control. "For example,"
said he, "I am going to live to be
100 years old. I have a purpose and
work to do and I cannot go sooner."
And when I said "That is not for you
to say, the decision does not rest
with you. This is the one thing in
your life you cannot shape," I knew
by his silence he did not agree with
me. And later when he lay stricken
down by that cruel fall, he asked
one day, "Doctor, do you think that
was just fair of God? I was old and
blind and deaf, was it fair to make
me lame?" And later-"Was this a
part of a plan to make me see my








helplessness?" But, thank God, the
day came when he thrust his hand in
mine and said, "Doctor, I do not
want to go, but I can say and say
honestly I am ready to do His will."
I never knew a man with so deep
a feeling of respect for God (I use
the term respect intentionally). It
was almost too great. He could not
conceive that he, a mere unit in so
great a universe, could be a factor in
God's plans, and when he did yield
it broke me down, for to yield a will
like his was the supreme sacrifice.
He told me that he never went to
bed at night or rose in the
morning without going down on his
knees and asking God to make him
a worthy steward of this wealth
which was his.
I often wonder what Eternity must
be to him. Martineau said "Death
is God's means of colonizing Heav-
en." If so there landed on the
shores of Eternity that 21st day of
May just as the tide went out on
yonder beach one who can do much
for the native land of his soul as he
did for the native land of his mor-
tal body. Can you net fancy what
the possibilities of Heaven must
mean to such a character? If we are
sent to earth to learn to make the
most of ourselves, it opens a new







vista of the possibilities of Eternity.
If, as I have tried for years to teach
from this desk, we are not mere hu-
man beings with a chance of Eterni-
ty, but immortal suuls whose real
home is Eternity, but who are so-
journing here on earth for a time
that we may learn to appreciate
Heaven, then think of the possibili-
ties that a day of a thousand years
would open to a strong, well discip-
lined soul. And for you and me,
friends, when we have climbed the
steeps, when with advancing years
we have reached the heights (for let
no one tell you that old age is going
down hill) climb up and up till we
reach the heights where God is.
Dear people, I have spoken from
my heart. One cannot live for 16
years beside a character like his and
not be conscious of his influence and
grateful for the regard I think was
mine in response to the affection he
knew I had for him. This is no
place to allow his i. timate personal
life to be discussed. I do not dwell
on his deeply placed affections. His
heart, so hard to reach, once reach-
ed was sanctuary. It mattered not
outlook on life. It mattered not
the difference in your characters or
that oftentimes we differed until one
day he said, "I think, Doctor, you







have contradicted me more in this 16
years than all my acquaintances in
history." I knew and he knew that
we were friends who trusted what
we did not always understand.
'This is no place to touch on his
home life. I do not dwell on the
one great passion of his life-his
love for his wife, his absolute devo-
tion to the woman to whose hand he
clung with ever increasing intensi-
ty as the shadows darkened. This is
too sacred to name. The man's love
was like the rest of his character,
intense, and as he realized his days
were numbered he could not spare a
moment's separation from the wife
who spared neither strength nor
thought, but gave of herself with
ever increasing devotion as the pen-
dulum of his life beat more and
more slowly till it stopped.
I have spoken of the founder of
this church. May God rest and
bless him. I have spoken of the god-
father to this State. May the State
of Florida recognize his benefits. I
have spoken of one of the great
men of his time and of history. The
coming years will make clear how
wise was his judgment. He was a
man amongst men with a strong
man's failings, a strong man's vir-
tues. I have spoken of-my friend.


J













LAST 17ILL AND TESTA'IEITT, WITH CODICILS THERETO

OF

HENRY M. FLAGLER, DECEASED.,


I, Henry M. Flagler, of Palm Beach, county of Dade and state of Florida,

do make, declare and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking

all former wills and testaments by me made.

First: I direct all my just debts, funeral expenses, and the expenses

of administering and carrying out the provisions of this instrument to be fully

paid.

Second: I hereby appoint William H. Beardsley of the city, county and

state of ITe York, and William R. Kenan, Jr., at this date residing in the

city of Lookport, state of I1eu York, and Joseph R. Parrot, of the city of

Jacksonville in the s~hte of Florida, to be executors of and Trustees under

this my last will and testanmnt.

Third: I have been for nany years investing in railroads, hotel and

land companies in the state of Florida, and it is my intention in the future

to foster, protect and properly develop such properties, and to provide against

my decease while such properties are in the processes of development and to

relieve my beloved wife, hereinafter named, from the immediate cares and

responsibilities of so varied and such extensive interests, I hereby declare

a trust concerning all my property, both real and personal, and wheresoever

situated, except what is covered by the "Fourth" Item of this instrument, and

may be necessary for the expense of administration by my executors, including

court costs, to my Trustees above named, which trusts shall be and continue for

the length of time hereinafter by this instrument provided.

Fourth: I have agreed by letter addressed to John F. Forbes, to

contribute to the John B. Stetson University, the sum of Sixty Thousand Dollarn

(!'0,000) to be paid from time to time as the needs of said University shall

seem-to require, and if any portion of said Sixty Thousand Dollars (460,o00)

shall remain unpaid at the time of my death, I hereby direct my said executors

to pay said balance out of any moneys or property coming into their hands Ws

such.

I have also agreed to contribute to the Florida Agriculture College,






9 -*


-2-




which college is located at Lake City, Florida, the sum of Twenty Bhousand

Dollars ($20,000) for the erection and equipping of a gymnasium, and if any

portion thereof shall remain unpaid at the time of my death, I hereby direct

my executors to pay the same to the proper authority of said college out of any

moneys or property coming into their hands as such.

Fifth: The balance of my estate I place, according to the purpose de-

olared in the "Third" Item of this instrument, in the hands of my said Trustees,

to be used, managed and controlled by them and their successors for the purpose

of protecting, fostering, operating and developing" during the life of such trusti

all my Florida properties according to the purposes indicated by the charters

of the several companies, and as nearly along the lines which I have adopted,

or may hereafter adopt, as may be consistent wPth their judgment, and discretion

under the conditions which may hereafter exist. The said trust shall continue

for five years from the time of my death, and if at the end of such fite years

the condition of the Florida East Coast Railway Company and the Florida East

Coast Hotel Company ( they being my Florida railroad and hotel properties re-

ferred to) or of either of them should be such as to require financial aid

from sources outside of themselves or itself, then I direct that such trust

shall continue ao long as either or both of such last named companies shall

require such assistance, but not longer, however, that a period of five years

from the termination of the above mentioned or first period of five years, It

is,however, to be distinctly understood that I do not authorize the railroad

of said Raylwa:. Oompany extended south of liami and no power to do so is given

hereby.

sixth : During the existence of said trust I charge said trust estate

with the payment of the following annuties and expenses and direct the same

paid by the Trustees:

1. To my dearly beloved wife, Mary Lilly Flagler, the annual sum of

One Hundred Thousand Dollars (100,000) payable in quarterly installments from

the date of my decease; and I further direct that so muoch annual net income

from said trust property over and above the said annuity and that hereinafter

by subsequent clause of this item provided for, as shall not be required during


r











S-


the extended or second period of said trust, provided for in the "Fifth" Item

of this instrument shall be paid to my said wife annually.

2. To the Trustees of the Memorial Presbyterian Church Society of

St. Augustine, Florida, the annual sum of Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000), .

payable in quarterly installments from the date of my decease; but it is to be

distinctly understood that this annuity toisaid-Trustees shall cease upon the

payment of the bequest to said Trustees hereinafter made by subsequent item

of this instrument.

3. The lawful expenses of such trust.

Seventh: At the expiration of said trust, the Trustees shall deliver,

assign, and transfer by proper instrument or instruments to my son Harry

Harkness Flagler, Five Thousand (5,000) shares of the capital stock of the

Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, which shares of stock are hereby given to

my said son. And in the event that at the expiration of said trust there shall

be any child or children of my said son living, then I direct that eight

thousand shares of the stock of the said Standard Oil Company shall be delivered,

assigned and transferred to such child or children as shall then be living,

such children, if there be more than one child, to take such stock in equal

proportions, and should there be no child of my said son living at the termi-

nation of said trust, then such eight thousand shares of stock shall remain

a part of such trust estate and go to my wife with the balance of the residue

thereof the same as if no provision had been made herein as to such eight

thousand shares of stock. I have heretofore in my life given tomy said son

securities which have during the last five years yielded him an annual income

of more than seventy-five thousand (175,000) dollars. My son has not shown for

me the filial regard that would make me inclined to do more for him now than

is done by this item of my will.

Eighth: At the expiration of said trust the Trustees shall pay to

each of the following named persons and institutions the cash amounts herein-

after provided to be paid; but no such persons or institution shall take here-

under unless such person or institution shall be living or in existence at the

expiration of said trust. Should, however, any such person not be living at the

time his or her amount is payable as above and hereinafter provided,






4 4


-4-


then I direct that such sum shall be paid to his or to her child or children,

if there be any such child or children then living, such children, if there be

more than one, to take share and share alike, and where there is a wife

surviving she is to take as a child; but if suoh donee be dead and there be no

child or children nor any wife in case the donee is a male person, then the

legacy shall not take effect or be operative.

1. To Miss Annie 0, MoKay, of the city of St. Augustine, Florida,

and to Mrs. Ella Green, now at Palm Beach, Florida, and to Stephan A. Brave,

John P. Beckwith, William H. Chambers, E. J. Triay and George W. Wilson, each

the sum of Five Thousand Dollars (.5,000)

2. To Bernard O'Brien, my coachman, George Holland, my butler, and

Ida Scheiffer, my housekeeper, the sum of Five Thousand Dollars (45,000) each

in recognition of their long and faithful service in such capacities.

3. To James A MoGuire, R. T. Goff, Fred Sterry, John Anderson, Joseph

D. Price, Henry W. Merrill, Joseph A. McDonald, William H. Beardsley, and

Jasper 0. Salter, each the sum of Ten Thousand Dollars (110,000).

4. To James E. Ingraham, the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars (020,000).

5. To Joseph R. Parrott, the sum of One Hundred Thousand Dollars

(00OO,OOO),

6. To Charles D. Boice and Lawrence C. Hayes each the sum of Twenty

five Hundred Dollars (2,500).

7. To the Florida Agriculture College above named, the sum of Eighty

Thousand Dollars (t80,000).

8. To the John B. Stetson University above named, the sum of Forty

Thousand Dollars ($40,000).

9. To the trustees of Hamilton College in the state of New York

One Hundred Thousand Dollars (?100,000).

10. To the trustees of the Mltmorial Presbyterian Church Society of

St. Augustine, Florida, above mentioned, Seventy-five Thousand Dollars (A75.000)

Should my Trustees find that all of or any of the bequests hereinbbove by this

item of this indtrurent provided for, can be paid before the expiration of said

trust without interfering with the purposes of such trust then they may pay the

said bequests or such of them as they may decide can be paid without such






*A


interference and shall elect to pay, preferring that made to the Trustees of

the Memorial Presbyterian Church Society above the others.

Ninth: All.the rest, residue, and remainder of my estate whether real

or personal and wheresoever situate, including of course all property covered

by or included in said trust and not payable out of the same or at the end of

said trust and all other property and estate of any and every kind whatsoever,

I give, devise and bequeath to me beloved wife, Mary Lilly Flagler (formerly

Mary Lily Kenan of Wilmington, North Carolina) forever, and I hereby authorize,

empower, and direct my said executors and Trtstees to pay over and transfer to

my said wife at the expiration of said trust all such estate and property. And

it is my intention to include in this gift, bequest and devise all accumulations

or enlargements of my estate and property as shall have arisen during the life

and operation of said trust; and it is also mi intention to include in such

devise my summer home at Mamaroneck, in the County of Westchester, state of

New York, and my property, Number Twenty-one West Fifty-fifth Street in the

city of New York, atate and county of New York.

Tenth: For the purpose of the fulfillment and us execution of the

above trast I hereby invest my Trustees with full power and authority to execute

all such instruments, obligations, assignments or transfers as may be necessary

in the course of their business as such Trustees and to mnnew, refund, and by

new obligation to provide for the extension, adjustment and payment of any

and all obligations that I may leave outstanding at the time of my decease, to

the end and that if possible all and any such obligations shall be paid and

discharged out of the income of my estate during the continuance of such trust.

The names or titles, executors or Trustees wherever used in thisi-

instrument shall be deemed to include and denote any and all persons who shall

be, under the provisions hereof, be appointed substitutes or successors whether

Bmmediatel*,:or otherwise, of such Trustees or be otherwise appointed successors

or substitutes for such executors as executors; and I hereby authorize, empower

and direct said Trustee, their substitutes or successors to pay from my estate

all the necessary expenses of administering and carrying into effect such trust,

and my executors to pay all the necessary expenses of administering as executors

and such Trustees shall receive from said trust estate, each the sum of five


I I .


- - -











-6-



thousand dollars (A5,000) annually to be paid in cash annually as compensation

for each year-as such Trustee.

It is my will and intention, in so far as I an legally able to do so

to exempt my Trustees in the matter of investment and reinvestment of any

portion of my estate from the limitations as to the classes of securities that

may be named in the provisions of the statutes of the state of Florida or of

any other state or of the United States in respect to the investment of the

proceeds and income of trust estate;.the principle object of this exemption-

being that if any of the various enterprises, companies or corporations referred

to above in which I am interested shall require temporary assistance the pro-

visions of such statutes shall not interfere to prevent any loan to or on ar:couti

of such companies or corporations as in the absence of such statutory restrict-

ions might seen wise or advisable on the part of my said Trustees; it is, how-

ever, not my intention that any such assistance shall be extended to any other

than the following companies:

The Florida East Coast Railway Company, and the Florida East Coast

Hotel Company.

I direct that my executors and Trustees naminated or appointed in or

under the provisions of this instrument shall in either capacity not be re-

quired to give bond or surety or indemnity for or in connection with the a

discharge orppowers or duties here under,

If by reason of failure to qualify or otherwise any or all of the

Trustees specifically nominated in this instrument shall not serve or shall

cease to serve after having'qualified as such I hereby direct that such vacancy

ok vacancies be filled by appointment by such of them as may qualify or be

serving at the time, that any such vacancy may occur, and should they be unable

to agree then such vacancy shall be filled by the Circuit Judge of the Judicial

Circuit in which Palm Beach, Florida, my place of residence may be at the time,

from two persons, of whom one shall be nominated by each of such Trustees then

surviving; and should there be two vacancies existing at any one time, then

such vacancies shall be filled by the remaining Trustee and my said wife, and if

such surviving Trustee and my wife cannot agree, then such vacancies shall be


_ I I I


I -


* f









e-7-





filled by appointment to be made by Circuit Judge as follows:-

One from two persons to be natinated by such surviving Trustee and the

other from two persons to be nominated by my wife; and should there be a vacancy

at any time as to all of such .Tristees, then the same shall be filled by appoitth

ment by my wife subject to the approval of the Circuit Judge. If at the time

of the filling of any such vacancy there should be duties to be performed under

this instrument by executors as distinguished from Trustees then the person or

persons appointed to such vacancy or vacancies as Trustees shall act as executor

or executors under this instrument.

Eleventh: I do further direct, ordain and declare and it is my will that

if any person named in this instrument as a beneficiary or legatee or devisee

or any one interested thereunder shall at any time or in any manner institute

or cause to be instituted or shall aid, abet, connive at or directly or in.

directly promote, the institution of any contest of, or proceeding or litigation

contesting or intended to contest, defeat or obstruct this instrument or any

provision thereof or the enforcement of any such provision, then any and every

such offending person or persons whether natural or artificial shall, whether

such contest, proceeding or litigation be successful or not- thereby forfeit

all interest under this instrument, and the provision made in and by such

instrument for any such offending person shall be of no effect and t:is in-

strument shall be executed and carried into effect as if such person were not

named therein and no provision had been made therein as to or for such person.

Twelfth: I desire and direct that Mr. Joseph R. Parrott above named

hall be continued during the continuance of such trust in the same official

and business relations that he now occupies as to and in the management of and

administration and operation of my,said railroad and hotel companies and land

companies and the properties of the same and each of them, and that he-shall

receive compensation for his services therein not less than he may be receiv-

ing at my death, such compensation to be in addition to and distinct from the

above provided annual compensation of five thousand dollars as Trustee under

this instrument; and it is to be distinctly understood that nothing in his

duties as such Trustee is to interfere with his continuing such existing relat.'











-83-


ion as to such companies and properties or either or any of the same, now with

his voting any stock held by his and his o&-Truattes as such Trustees, in any

such company or voting as director or otherwise acting to the end that his

being continued in such existing relation to such compaILies or properties or

any of the same. I further desire and will and direct that nothing in the

duties of such Trustees hereunder shall prevent them or any of them from act-

ing as a director or other official of any company aforesaid or of any company

in vhich I may be a stoukholdoeror interested. Whatever transfer of atock to

xny one of such Trustees may be necessary to enable hir to be a director in

any such company I direct shall be made by such Trustees and I authorize such

Trustees to depute and authorize any one of their number to vote and otherwise

act for all such Trustees at any meeting of stockholders.

Thirteenth: It is my will and meaning that the annual compensation of

Five Thous:nd Dollars ('Q5,000) above provided for each Trustee shall also cover

any services rendered by any Trustee, or person acting as such, as an executor.
In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal at Palm Beach

in the county of Dade and state of Florida, this first day of Fcbfuary, A. D.,

one thousand nine hundred and two.
(Signed) Henry M. Flagler (Seal)




The foregoing instrument comprising ten pages of typewritten matter, written

upon one side of the sheet only,was-on this the first day of February, A. D.

one thousand nine hundred and two, signed, sealed, published and declared by

the testator, Henry H. Flagler, as and for his last wi'l and testament in the

presence of us and of seach of us at Palm Beach in the county of Dade and state

of Florida, and we in the presence and at the request of said testator and in

the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses to

said last will and testament and have severally written opposite our respective

names our individual addresses, this thekday and year last aforesaid.

(Signed) Geo. P. Raney, Tallahassee, Fla.
B. F. Willis, Tallahassee, Fla.
Laland'Sterry, Palm Beach, Fla.










-9-


I, Henry M. Flagler, of Palm Beech, Dade County, State of Florida,being

of sound and disposing ziln and memory, do make, publish and declare alis as

and to be a codicil to my last will and testament executed by me at Palm Beach,

Dade County, Florida, Febrary lat. A. D. 1902,


Item First: Nothing in my said last will and testament is to be under-

stood or be constructed as having the effect to deny to the trustees, mentioned

in the Fifth Item thereof, the power and authority to complete any particular

extension of the railroad of the Florida East Coast Railway Company south of

Miami that may have been commenced at the tine of my death, but on the contrary

they shall have the power and authority to complete any such extension that may

have been commenced at'the time of my death.


Item Second; Nothing in the Twelfth Item or elsewhere in my said last

will and testament is to be understood or be construed as meaning that Mir.

J. R. Parrott, mentioned in said will and testament, shall not succeed me in
the Presidency of the Florida "act Coast Railway Company, but on the contrary

it is my purpose and desire that he shall at my death, become the President of

such Company, and I hereby direct that upon mu death he shall be elected to

much Presidency, and further direct that he nhall, during the continuance of

the trust provided as to said railroad and the properties of the same by my

last will and testament, be continued in such Presidency: the occupation of

such office by him, being in my judgment necessary to carry out my purposes as

to his management, administration and operation of ry railroad properties as

expressed in the Twelfth Item of my said last will and testament.


In testimony whereof I, the said Henry HF. Flagler, hhve hereunto set

my hand and seal at Palm Beach, Dade County, Florida, this February 17th, A. D.

1903.


fSigned) Henry M. Flagler f(eal),


The above written instrument was signed and sealed by Henry M. Flagler,












-10-


the testator therein, of Palm Beach, Dade County, Florida, in our presence

and by him in our presence published, acknowledged and declared to be a codicil

to his last will and testament as therein stated, and we, at his request, and

in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereto set our hands as

subscribing witnesses, at Palm Beach, aforesaid, this the day and year last

above written.


(Signed) Leland Sterry.

George E. Hopkins.

A. R. Wood.



I, Henry M. Flagler, of Palm Beach, Dade County,State of Florida, being

of sound and disposing memory, do make, publish and declare this as and to be

a second and additional codicil to my last will and testament executed at Palm

Beach, Dade County, State of Florida, February Ist., 1902.


Firsts Wherever the expression "expiration of said trust", or an

expression of similar import is used in my said last will and testament, the

same shall be understood to include the extended period of said trust as well

as the original period of five years. Such has always been my intention and

understanding of the terms used, but this explanation is adopted for the purpose

of preventing any misunderstanding of my will or purposes.


Second: I wish to further say, in explanation of the provision made in

Item numbered "Seventh" of my said last will and testament for my son Harry

Harkness Flagler, t4at in case he should not be living at the yime of my

death or at the time of the expiration of the trust therein referred to, such

expression "expiration of naid trust" to be understood as explained in the

Item numbered "First" of this codicil, then the legacy of shares of capital

stock of the Standard Oil Company therein mentioned shall bapse and become a

part of the residue of my estate.


I _


7r'











-11-



Third: I hereby revoke the Item of my said last will and testament.

nodtbered "Eight" in so far as it makes provision for the payment of eighty

thousand dollars to the Fldrida Agriculture College, now known as the Fl&rida

University, and located at Bake City, Florida, and in so far as it makes

provision for the payment of forty thousand dollars to the John B. Stetson

University, located at DeLand, Florida, and annul the gifts made therein-to

such institutions severally; and I hereby direct that at the expiration of the

trust provided for by my said last will and testament and referred to in Item

numbered "First" of this codicil, the trustees shall pay bo'`eaoh of the follow-

ing persons the cash amounts hereinafter provided to be paid, to-wit:- to

Joseph P. Greaves, Robert Murray and Laland,Sterry each the sum of ten

thousand dollars; and this provision for said three gentlemen is to be read and

construed as part of the Item numdered "Eight" of said last will and testament

and subject to the provisions thereof the same as if written into said Item

numbered "Eight" as a part of the third sub-division thereof; and in so far

as William H. Beardsley is concerned, I hereby change and increase the provi-

sion made for him by the third paragraph of Item numbered "Eight" of my last

will and testament to the sum of Fifty Thousand Dollars, it being my will

and direction that he shall be paid this sum instead of ten thousand dollars.


Fourth, The words any meeting or stockholders" at the conclusion of

Item numbered "Twelfth" of my said last will and testament are to be read and

construed as meaning "any meeting pf stockholders".


Fifth: For the purpose of declaring my will as to the disposition of

the rest, residue and remainder of my esatet mentioned in and covered by Item

numbered "Ninth" of my said last will and testament, I hereby amend the said

Item numbered "Ninth" of my last will and testament, by adding at the end of-

such item the following words to-wit: but in case I should survive my wife,

7!ary Lily Flagler, leaving no children surviving me except my son Harry Harknes

Flagler, I hereby give, devise and bequeath all of such property and estate to8

the following persons, to be divided between them share and shate alike, for-






* 4 1-


-12-



ever, sand I hereby authorize, empower and direct nmyirafd executors, to pay
over and transfer said property to them at the expiration of said trust all

of such property, viz: Rob. H. York, W, L. Harkness and Mrs. John D. Maolennan,

all of Cleveland, Ohio, William R. Kenan, Jr., Jesse H. Wise and Sarah G. Kenan,

all of 17ilmington, North Carolina, Joseph R. Parrott, of Jacksonville, Florida,

and William H. Beardsley of New York City. Should any one or more of such nine

persons not be living at my death, then the share which any such deceased

person would take if he or she were living at the time of my death shall go to

his or her heirs forever, and be payable to such heiraor heirs at the expirat-

ion of such trust.


In testimony whereof I, the said Henry M. Flagler, have hereunto set

my hand and seal, at St. Augustine, Florida, this April 28 th, A. D.,1904,


(Signed) Henry M. Flagler (eal).



The above written instrument -as signed and sealed by Henry ,7. Flagler,

the testator therein named, of Palm Beach, Dade County, Florida, in our pre-

sence and by him in our presence published, a.cIio'l edged and declared to be a

codicil to his last will and teotane-nt as therein stated, and we at his request

and in his presence and in the presence of each other, have hereto set our

hands as subscribing witnesses,at St. Augustine, aforesaid, this the day and

year last above written.


(Signed) Addrew /nderlon of St. AUgusttine,Fla

S GeorP.Raney of Tallahassee, Florida

B.F.v'illis of Tallahassee, Florida.



I, Henry M. Flagler, lately of Palm Beach, Dade County, State of Florida,

but now of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, State of Florida, being of sound

and disposing mind and memory, do make, publish and declare this as and to be

a third and additional codicil to my last will and testament executed by me












-13-


at Palm Beach, Florida, February let.,1902:


Item First: I find upon further consideration of the matter, that the

statement in Item "Seventh" of my above mentioned last will and testament to

the effect that I had prior to the execution of such last will and testament

given to my son, Harry, securities which yielded to .him during the last five

years preceding the date of such last will and testament an annual income of

more than Seventy-five thousand Dollars is not entirely correct as to the

amount; never the less, I do not consider that there is, under all the ciroum-

stances, any good reason for increasing the provision made in. favor of my said

son by my said last will and testament, and I make the above declaration simply

because of the above mentioned inaccuracy of statement if my said will and

testament. The securities referred to are Standard Cil Stock.


Item Second: I hereby revoke the provision of the "Eight" Item of my

said last will and testament, constituting the secord- sentence in such item

and reading as follows: "Should, however, any such person not be living at the

time his or her amount is payable as above and hereinafter provided, then I

direct that such sum shall be paid to his or her child or children, if there be

any such child or children then living, such children, if there be more than

one, to take share and share alike, and where there is a wife surviving she is

to take as a child: but if such donee be dead and there be no child or children,

nor any wife in case the done: is a male person, then the legacy shall not take

effect or be operative".


Such revocation is to apply as well to any child or children or wife of

the person named hereinafter as a beneficiary, or person named as a beneficiary

in the "Third" Item of the second codicil to my will, which codicil was

executed at St. Augustine, Florida, April 28th, 1904, as it does to any child

or children or wife of any beneficiary named in said "Eight" Item of my said t

last will and testament.











-14-


I hereby direct that at the expiration of the trust provided for by my

said last will and testament, the trustees shall pay to Henry E. Benis the sum

of Ten Thousand Dollars. This provision for said Henry E. Bemis to be read

and construed as a part of the Item numbered "Eight" of my said last will and

testament and- subjeot to the provisions thereof as amended by the above revok-

ing provision of this "Second" Item of this codicil, the same as if written

into said Item numbered "Eight" as a part of the third subdivision thereof.


Item Third: T wish to, and do hereby amend the "Tenth" Item of my said

original will by adding at the end of the first paragraph thereof the following

to-wit:


In view of the Florida asLt Coast Railway Coopany having determined to

extend and being now engaged in ext-.(din~r. its .railway to the City of Key 7'est,

I hereby authorize said trustees to borrow from time to time money in such

sunm and upon such tLren as they may find necessary and deen to enable said

Florida East Coast Railway Company to make such extension including also the

purchase and con-stiction of terminal facilities and rolling stock and other

equipment, and every proper purpose incidental to such enterprise, and to

pledge so much 6f the trust properties as may be neceisa-y for the payment of

such loans, and to lend on suoh terms as they may deem proper, such money to

said Florida East Coast nilway company to-be used by it for ouch purposes.


I also wish to and do hereby anond the "Tenth" Item of my said last will

and testament by revoking, and do hereby :r-evoke the power as th-t.h', appoint-

ment of trustees therein given to the Circuit Judgfe of the Judicial Circuit in

whIch Palm Beach, Florida, may be and ,do hereby confer upon the Circuit Judge
of the Judicial Circuit in which St. Augustine, Florida, my pre:ont place of

residence, may be, the same powers intended to be conferred by said Item upon

the Circuit Judge of the Judicial Circuit in which Palm Beach, Florida, might

be, as provided in said Item of my said last will and testament.


In testimony whereof I, the said Henry M. Flagler, have hereunto












-15-


set my band and seal at St. Augustine, Florida, this 8th. day of January,l908.


(Signed) Henry K. Flagler (Seal).


The above written instrument was signed and sealed by Henry ;.. Flagler,

the testator handed, of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida, in our

presence, and by him in our presence publish":, acknowledged and declared to

be a codicil to his last will and testament as therein stated, and we at his

request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereto set

our hands as subscribing witnesses at St. Augustine, aforesaid, this the day

and year last above written.


(Signed) John T. Dis:;ukes of St. Augustine.

Reginald YWhite of St. Augustine.

ST*. -7. Dewhurst of St. Augustine.


I, Henry Hi. Flagler, of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, State of Florida,

do make, publish and declare this instrument as and to be a fourth and

additional codicil to my last will and testament executed by me at Palm Beach,

Florida, Febraary lat. 1902.


Item First: It is my desire and will that non of the bequests made in

and by the "~'-:ht" Item of my said will and testament shall, except those in

Savor of William I. Beardsley, James H. Ingrahan and Joseph R. Parrott, be

operative in favor of any beneficiary named in such paragraph unless such

beneficiary shall at the time of my death be in the employ of layi3f individ-

ually or of the Florida East Coast .ll.ay Conmpany or of the Florida East Coast

Rotel Company; and my desire and will is the same as to the several beneficiaries

namediin the "Third" Item of the second codicil to my said will and testament, -

exeetted at St. Augustine, Florida, on the twenty-eight (28th.) day of April

A. D.1904; and I direct that no payment shall be made to any beneficiary named






4r




----
-18-


in sed "Eight* and *Third* T'tetn, excepting however said !illiam H. Bsardsley,

James E. rIgraham and Joseph R. Parrott, unless he or she shall at the time of

my death be in my employ or in that of the Florida Ea2t Coast Railway Conrany,

or in that of the Florida East Coast Hotel Company. The terms "Eight" Item

and "Third* Item as used above are to be severally unde-stood as irc.udlnp such

Items as changed by me in any codicil to my said will, and as including any

persorsor persona named in any such codicil as a beneficiary; and the fact T.hat

any such beneficiary may not now be in my employ or in the employ of eit'e:^ of

said con(PniYes shbe. not exempt him or her from the above requirement of being

at the time of my death in my employ or in that of said companies to ent-~.le

him or her to the bequest in favor of him or her.


Item FDcond: I hereby exempt all and singular the executors and Trut-tees

named in my last will and test.lannt, or that may be appointed under the pro-

visions thereof, including codicils, from lin -ir; settlements with returns,

including inventories to the County Jrudg or other Court. Such executors and

Trustees shall not, nor shall either or any of them be required to gi'e bond or

security as such.


In testimony whereof I have sot hereunto my hand and seal at St. Augustine,

Florida, this seventh day of April, A. D.,I908.



(Signed) Fenry M, Flaglor real).


The above written instrument was sign-ed and sealed by Henry M. FIrP'ylr,

the tectator therein named, of St. Augnustino, 7T. Johns County, Florida, in

our presence, and by him, in our presence, published, acknowledged and declared

to be a oodicil to his last will and test nent as therein stated, and we at

his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereto

set our hands as subscribing witnesses at St. Augustine, Florida, this the day

and year last above written.


(Signed) M. W. Harrison
967 Greete Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.


i-











-17-



(Signed) Andrew Anderson, St. Autunitine, Fla.

Geo. P. Raney, of Tallahassee, Fla.



I, Henry M. Flagler, of St. Augustine, Florida, do make, publish and

declare this instrument as and to be a fifth and additional codicil to my

last will and testament executed by me at Palm Beach, Florida, February lst,

1902.


Item 1st: My said executors and Trustees are hereby authorized and direct-

ed to continue the payment of dividends to Horace H. Flagler of St. Augustine,

Florida, for and during the term of his natural life, on the fifty shares of

Standard Oil Company #of New Jersey) stock (Certificate No.25,085 or any re-

issues thereof) and on any accumulations therein that may result from stock

dividends and upon any stock or other securitiess that may result from the sale

or exchange of naid stock in case of any change or reorganization that may take

place hereafter.


Item 2nd: The provisions made in my last will and testament in favor of

the Memorial Presbyterian Church Society of St.Augustine, Florida, are made

upon the assumption and expectation thatsuch Church or Society will maintain

and continue its connection with the Presbyterian Church in the United States

of America. Should I in my lifetime deliver to the Trustees of such Memorial

Presbyterian Church Society cash or securities or otesrpprcperty in lieu or

satisfaction of such provisions of my last will and testament, then all such

provisions of-my last will and testament shall there upon cease to be 6f, any

effect.


In testimony whereof I said Henry M. Flagler have hereto set my hand

and seal at St. Augustine, Florida, this the 22nd day of December A.D.19h0O.


(Signed) Henry M. Flagler


(Seal)













-18.

hil, above instrument was 1ig~e?'1 and sealed by Henry i. Flag er, the

testator therein nanod, of St. Augustine, St. Johnts County, Rlorida at St.

Augustine aforesaid in our presence and by him in our presence published,

aclnoiledgod and declared to be a codclil to his last will and testament as

therein stated and we at his request and in his presence and in the pres.in.e

of a.ch other. have hereto set our hands as subscribing witnesses at St. lugustin

aforesaid this the day and year last above written.



(Signed) Goo. P. Raney.

1* Warren E. Smith.


n "adr y O'Hear Thompson.


I, Henry M. Flagler of the City of St. Augustine, State of Florida, do

make this oodiBil to my last will heretofore made and published by no dated

the day of A.D. which will I hereby ratify and confirm in all

respects save as changed by this instrument.


whereas in and by my said last will I have bequeathed to the Memorial

Presbyterian Church Society, a co oration incorporated by chapter 4 --4, lawv

of Florida securities of the par value of Seventy-Five Thousand Dollats, and

sinie publishing my said last will said Memorial Presbyterian Chlurch oiiesty

by deed dated a,.y 29th.,A.n. 1911, recorded in the public records of St. Johns

County, Florida, in .Deed Book 2S, pages 61-63, has made a declaration of the

trusts under. hinh it holds the lot of land adjoining ;,aid Mei:morial Church on
which I have built the mausoleum, one of ehich trusts in to perpetually care

for and maintain said mausoleum, the expense of such maintenance to be met

by a fund by me provided. NTow, therefore, to rpovide such fund I do direct that

the income from said bequest made in and by my last will to said Iemorial

Presbyterian Ohurch Society be received, held and expended by said corporation.


First: For the perpetual care and maintenance of the mausoleum built






* r


-19-


by me, and thC church building and :-~ose, sitmated on the lot at the corner

of Sovilla and Valencia Streets, in the City of St. Auruntine, Florida, which

I gave to the trustees of the Pr3rsb-Ttrian Church of St. P.uu stine; then the

-balance of suoh income to be used for the general parish expenses of said

memoriall Presbyterian Church Society lncludin. its charities.


In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this tonth day of

Januuary, A. D.1?1?, at St. Augustine, Fllrida.



(Signed) Henry M. Flagler T)


The foregoing instrument was signed, published and declared at the date

thereof by the said Henry I. Flagler as a codicil to his last will in the pre-

sence of us, who at the same time at his rsqucst and in his presonce, and in

the presence of each other, hereunto subscribe our names as attesting witnesses.



(Signed) 'ai:re-n E. Smith.

SWaddy O.Thonnpon.


I, Henry M. Flagler, resident of the City of St. Augustine, in the State

of Florida, having heretofore made, published and declared my last will and

testament, do hereby make, publish and declare the following as and for a

codicil thereto.


First: "7horeas in my said last will and testament, I have bequeathed to my

son, and to his children, in the manner described and provided for in my taf

last will and testament, certain shares of Standard Oil stocks, therein more -i

particularly designated and described, and whereas since the time of the making|

publishing and declaring of my said last will and testament, certain change

in the form of said shares and the rights thereunder have taken place, by

reason of which some uncertainty might arise as to my intentions in relations

to the said bequests.






4 -




-20-



Now to abviate any uncertainty relating thereto, I do hereby declare it

to have been, and still to be my intention to include by the term of shares of

Standard Oil stooka, in my said last will and testament, the said shares, or

such other shares of stock, property and rights as*have been, or may heroaf+er

be is;iued to or received in the place and stead of said shares of StandYrd Oil

stocks as the same existed at the time of the making of my last will and tenta-

ment, excepting therefore, however, uch subscription rights under said stock

or arising from the ownership thereof, as I have heretofore or may hereafter

exercise and pay for.


Second: It is my will that the legacy and bequest, to my oon, be void

and lapse, if my said son should die before me, and in that event, the legacy

and bequest, to him, shal1 become part and be part of my residuary estate.


Third: I hereby revoke the provision in my last will and testas.nnt

made for the benefit of Horace H. Flaglor, of St. Augustine, Florida, and I

hereby will and direct that my 2-Ostoes and executors named in my last will

and testament pay to the said Horace H. Flagler, during the tern of his natural

life, the sum of Two Thousand Dollars per anniuI, same to be paid in quarterly

installments, of Five AfundZed Dollars each, on the first days of January, April,

July and September of each year.


Fourth: ,m Ii hereby ratify and confirm my said last will and testa-

ment in every respect, exoppt in so far as any part of the amo is inconsistent

with this codicil.


In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and : ,al, and published

and declared this to,'oe a codicil to my said last will and testament in the

presence of the witnesses named below, this thirteenth day of September, in

the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and twelve.


(Signod) Henry M. Flagler (Seal)






.4 4_







V- r


-21-



Signed and deolared by the said Henry M. Flagler as and for a codicil

to his last will and testak nt in our presence.



(Signed) R. H. Warren.


S a7nm. L. "ar'r.


James Wooks.



Stdre of Florida, Oounty of St. Johns, SS.


Be it remembered that onr thin 4th day of Ta', A. D. 1913, duly rrc'y-ed

the foregoing will, with codicils thereto, in the public rweorll of said

county.


M. R. Cooper

County Judge.






I- o*


PFrTTTIOW OF JOHN T, DISM-"KES,




IN THE COUNTY' JUnTIG'S COURT, SITTITTG f PROBATE, STATE OF

FLORIDA, ST. JOHNS COUNTY.


In re Estate of

HR7HRY M. FLAGLER ) St. Johns County.
Deceased )



To the Honorable M. R. Cooper, Oounty Judge in and for the County of St. Johns,

State of Florida, Sittiw! in Probate.


Your petitioner, John T. Dismukes, would respectfully show unto this

Honorable Court:



First: That he, the said John T. Disaukes, is a resident of St. Johns

County, Florida, and above the age of twenty-one years.


Second: That Henry M. Flafler died on Tuesday, the twentieth day of Mlay,

A. D. 1913, and at the time of his death was a citizen of said state and a

resident of said county, being above the age of twenty-one, to-wit: eighty-three

years of age, and at the time of his death was seized and possessed of certain

real and personal estate, situate and being in said county and state.



Third: That the said Henry M. Flagler died leaving a last will and

testament dated the ftrst day of February, A. D. 1902, wherein and whereby

the following named persons were named as executors thereof, to-witj Joseph

R. Parrott, William H. Beardsley, and William R. Kenan, Jr., and the said

Henry M. Flagler executed said will in the presence of George P. Raney, B. F.\

Willis, and Leland Sterry, as subscribing and attesting witnesses thereto.


Fourth: And your petitioner further alleges that the said Henry M.















Fla _er ..~in. uently executed divers codicls to said w'ill4and testament,_

which said codioils were made and executed and attested and witnessed at the

times and dates as hereinafter set forth.


(a) Codioil dated February 17th, A* DI. lO, executed in the presence

of Leland terry, George ;E. opiina and A. R. 7"ood, as ublh.3uAibing and attest-

in.- wvitnes.oes there to,


(b) Codioil datod April 2Cth, A. D. 1904, executed in theylpresenoe

of Andr-ew Anderson, C-orge- P. :n;-y, and B. F. T'.illieas subscribing and

atte .ting vritneases thereto,


(c) Codicil dated January 8th, A. D. 190C, executed in the presence
of John Ti. Disnukos, 7P3ie-iq l 7Thite, and W. T. Dewhurst, as subscribing

,nrd testingg witnesses thereto.


( ) Codicil datod !April 7th, A. D) 1908, executed in the presence of

Andrew Anderson, Goorge P. Raney, and Ii. '. garrison, as subsoribing and

attesting witnesses thereto.


(e) Codicil dated cDecembr 2nd, A. D. 1910, executed in the presence

of George fP. Raney, 'r:'; E. Smith and '"al.y O"'ear .Thonpson, as subscribing

and attesting witnesses thereto.


(f) Codlcil dat-7f. TvJaluary 10th, A. D. 1091, executed in the pr:-:en1ce

of fr.rr-r: E. smithh and "'a'!'-y 0. Thompson, as subacribing and attesting

witnesses thereto.


(g) Codicil dated September 15th, 1912, executed in the presence of
R. H. warren, William L. Warren and Jaies '1-:ek3, as subscribing and attesting

witnesses thereto.












-24-


Fifth: And your petitionerr further alleges that he vrily believes

that the paper writings horeoiith propounded for probate and record as for

the last will and .estament of tihe ?aid Henr-y I Flagler, deceased, and all

the codicils heretofo~e- subosribed and forth .ith the several dates herein
N,
before described and set forth and attested and signed by said w'itnosos as

herein before described and set forth is the true last will and tectaxcnt

and codicile to said last will and tostetaont of said Henry 1., Plagler, dcccnecd.



Sixth: Your potitionor further oays that hoe Is no interact hatevor

under the said last will and:ttestaent or under any of the codicilu theroto.



Therofore your p-etitioner prys that the s-Aid paper writing horosith

p ropounded for probate and r,.-cood be admitted to probbato an rodrcord as and

for tho lact l rll and testament and the codicils ther to of th. daid Icry ,:.

Slagler deceasod, and that Lttors ToOtaientary be granted to the Caid

executors hereinbefore named and sot forth in ,nid last ":7.1 and tostaimont

pursuant to law,- .the said Henry L'. Fl'llor av'i. ,-:.-:- i the 'ta of '1'rid

on the day and year first beore S t forth.



And your petitioner will ever pray, eto.


(Signed) John T. Dismukes,

Petitioner.


State of 'lorida )

C .uity of It. Jolhns.)


Personally appeared before me John T. Di-mukes, to me will known who,

being by me duly sworn, says that the foregoing petitiom by him subscribed,

is true.


Signed and sworn to before me this 24th day of itay, 17 L1.


(Signed) M. R. Cooper.

County Judge.
(Court Seal)





1 -25-



State of Florida, )
) as.
County of St. Bohns.)


Be it remembered that on this 24th day of May, A. D. 1913, I

duly recorded the foregoing oath in the public records of said County.


(Signed) M. R. Cooper.

County Judge.
Endorsed: Filed iay 24th,1,lS.


Proof of the will ahd oodicilo by subscribing witnesses dated,

lay t4th, 1l1S. Filed ::ay 24,1915.

May 24th, 1913, William H. Beardsley, William R. Kenan, Jr., and

Joseph R. Parrott, appeared before the County Judge, in the Probated Court

of St. Bohns County, Florida, and pray that Letters Testamentary issue to

them as provided by law. Filed May 24,1913.

iMay 24th, 1913 will admitted to Probate and Record.

May 24th, 1913, Oath of Executors filed.

May 24th,,1"1, Letters Testamentary issueO to 'illiam H. Beardsley,

iilliam R. KenanJr., and Joseph R. Parrott.

May 29th, 1914 Oath of subeoribing witnesses to codioil of will

recorded.

(Signed) :. r. Coop r,

County Judge.
(seal).




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs