Group Title: Manuscripts, Speeches, and Writings
Title: A Man's Work.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095313/00001
Finding Guide: A Guide to the James Edmundson Ingraham Papers
 Material Information
Title: A Man's Work.
Series Title: Manuscripts, Speeches, and Writings
Physical Description: Archival
Publication Date: 1884-1909
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Folder: Manuscripts, Speeches, and Writings
 Subjects
Subject: Ingraham, James Edmundson, 1850-1924.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095313
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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ONE :AUTS WORK.


By J. E. Inr shOn.




The State of Florida ha, an area of 54,200 square miles. It has

over 1200 miles of seacoast. In 1880 its population was 269,493, an/

aver-ge of five persons to the square mile. There were but 408 miles of

Railroad in the StaLte. There were no factories, but a few sLaall saw

mills a few b:nks with but little capital and but little business any-

where. The salubrious cliiate of the State was but little known except

locally and tourist travel was of no importance. Orange .rowing ad un

investment had just started in a small way in various part of' the State.

Florida h-.d only been known as a land of alligators and insects and sA a

desirable place's~ecially for conjuniptives. Its possibilities as play

ground for the nation or as an iipcrrtant source of supply for vegetables

and fruit of all kinds, lumber, cotton n-.val stores &Eeto, and as a

profitable location for factories of ,.ny kind was unthought of. The

E:st Coast of Florida ovr 500 miles in extent w-s utterly unknown to

the world. There were a few towns along the East Coast of which

Jacksonville, St. Augustine, New Smyrna, Titusville Mneabourn .nd Key

West were the principal ones. The population of the Counties now known

a>s the East CcOast counties .e-Duval, St. Johns, Volusia, Prevard, St.Lucie,

j Dade and Mlunroewere 39,935. The gross valuation in 1834 of these

counties for tx.es were $r12,166,157 .0n the gross Valuation for taxes

for the whole Pt.ate of Florida in 1884, was $60,048,655.00.

The time for mail from New York or the Test varied from five to

seven d.jys to Jck:onville, .nd many ch Lnges of cars iaa to be made

before the weary traveller could land safely in Jacksonville by rail

from the North or West. Such things "s through Pullma.n or sleeping cars

were unknown. Tr vel w s largely by steamers froi.. Charleston or

Savannah by sea or by the St. Johns River to interior points.

The 3u-age of atll the principal Railroads south of Quantico on the

East and the Ohio River on the 17est aere wide :u;;e or 5' 2" while that

of the Northern and western lines are 4' 8j", ii. ing it necessary for

the southern roads to r:iaint;in costly and cu;-bersoime car hoists at

v-rious point, and extra sets of wheels or trucks in order to secure


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#2.

a through movement of cars without bre~k.in., bulk. Rates were high,

the time consumed by freight movj.,ent was very long, and in consequence

there was but a small intarcilhnge of business bet.~j-n the south and the

rTorth by Railroad. These are some of the principal difficulties that

had to be overcome in the upbuilding of Florida.

7, In 1884 a Zre,Lt man come to Florida in se-rch of health and pleasure.
A man who hadi made a l1.r._ fortune and who believed that it was given

him in trust to be used in the '.seat aiy for the benefit of his fellow

man and for the greatest good to the -reitest numberr"

He was attracted by the quaint old City of St. AuuJtine. ie bought

a marsh lying within the City Gates and filling it up, built the Ponce

de Leon Hotel, one of the most perfect and beautiful buildings in the

world. This he opened to the public in January 1886.

In 1886 he bought a little narvan gauge railroad from South

Jacksonville to St. Augustine, connecting with the Railroads running into

Jacksonville,by ferry. This mode being unsatisfactory in 1886 he used

his great influence and helped the great movement of September 1886,

when all the toads in the south chinl,ed their ,-;ugss to conform to that

of the North, ne built a great steel bridge across the St. Johns River

at Jac3sonville and the first through Pullman trains from Jerse the

far south to St. Augusatine to carry guests to the Ponce de seon Hotel

in 1886. This improvement soon :;ave the S: -.te of Florida a thirty six

hour mail train from 'Tew York. TTe also built in St. Augustine the

Alcazar Hotel and 1the beautiful Casino ind baths all of concrete

1,a,:nificently finoiicd .and furnished. He built the City Hall, the

Hospital, the exquisite Memorial Presb:-- trian Church fnd Mnuse in

memory of his only d u,;ter, and the beautiful Grace Methodist Church

and parsdnage, the colored school, ;.nd when fire dost'royed thi old Rouian

SCatholic Cathedral g.tve money with which to rebuild it. He built two

miles of asphalt streets, comfcrtable homes for his employees, cstjblished

water works, sewers and electric lights for his properties. He built hete

his COr Shops and ;,ave steady employment to hundreds of men,

In November 1888 :e bought the WAstor" Road to ~im from

St. Au;gutine and wMa& &i sL to Palatka Mj again bridging the St. Johns

River at that point, in 1890 he bought the S.V. White Railroad from

San .:Jteo to Daytoaf- chl.nged the g-uge. :nd connected Zt with his road









#3 ayb /4
at RE.tt Palatka, thus m:.king a through line to the Halifax River. He

put steamers on that River to Ne/w m ryrns to bring out the orange'ucop

of that locality. In 1890 he bought the Orriond Hotel at Ormond and

liter enlarged it to accommodate thenpeople attending the great

Automobile races from all over the world d and whichh made the Ormond-

Daytona ocean beach course f,,ous.

With the railroads that he bought and as their principal assetts he

got 168,000 acres of land, which he sdld to settlers at low prices and oA

easy terms. He established a Model farm at Hastings anri. the results of

that example ive Hastings its start. This year 1909 the products of

Hastings farms will realize nearly a Million dollars to their owners.

In 1892 he obt-ained a charter frgm the State authorizing an extension

of his line of Rail-/ay along the Indian River to Miami mind Key West, and

in the surrier of 1892 the work of construction began. In February 1893

he opened his line to Rockledge and shortly afterwards to Cocoa where

a wharf was built to connect 'ith ste~rTiers on the Indilun River.

In March 1894 he boug~h-the grounds at Palm Be-ach on Ilake northh ,

and fegan the construction of the Royal Poinciana Hotel, this work was

the most daring project ever undertaken in Florida up to that time.

Lumber and all supplies including food and labor were conveyed by rail

to Cocoa, ELu Gallie or Jensen as the ]ailroaA was fini1ahed to these

points, then transferred to Steamers anf. carried to Jupiter, then

reloaLded on narrow juage c-rs and transported to ,Lake Worth at June, and

thence rafted or barged down the lake ten miles to Palm Beach. The

Royal poinciana with five hundred ..u.est roo. vw~s opUned to the public

Sin January 1894. The Breakers another great hotel on the Oce.n B;-u-ch

was opened in 1896. 4/A V /0e a64 e

The town site of "'est Palm Beach was purchased laid out and opened

for settleiient in 1895. Having City Water works s and paUV.L streets and a

larl e Public school building. The Railroad was opened to Palm Beach

in Dade County on March 22nd. 1894.

In 1894, He became interested in the E.st Coast Canal & Transportation

Company and aided that Comnany to complete its canal! to Mif.i, from the

Indian River. He invested nearly half a million dollars in this enterprise

In 1 afterwards taking lands for his stock. The canal provided water

County competition to his line of Railway.

giving --- ------- ---- -- ---


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#3 &/- .Ab
at East Pala.tka, thus rm.aking a through line to the Halifax River. He

put steamers on that River to New Smyrna to bring out the orange' op

of that locality. In 1890 he bought the Ormond Hotel at Ormond and

liter enlarged it to accommodate thenpeople attending the gretet

Automobile races from all over the World and which made the Or:-ond-

Daytona ocean beach course fadious.

With the railroads that he bou,ht ..nd as their principal assetta he

.ot 168,000 acres of land, which he sdld to settlers at low prices and on

easy terms. He established a Model farm at Hastings and the results of

that example -,ave Hastings its start. This year 1909 the products of

Hastinrs farms will realize nearly t Million dollars to their owners.

In 1892 he obtAiined a charter irgQi the State authorizing an extension

of his line of Rail: ay along the Indian River to Miami and Key West, and

in the sutijLer of 1892 the work of construction began. In February 1893

he opened his line to Rockledte and shortly afterwards to Coco larere

a vwhrf was built to connect '4ith steamers on the Indiin River.

In March 1894 he boughtthe grounds at Palm Beach on Lake Worth,

and began the construction of the Royal Poinciana Hotel, this work was

the most daring project ever undertaken in Florida up to that time.

Lumber and all supplies including food and labor were conveyed by rail

to Cocoa, Eau Gallie or Jensen as the ]jRilroLid was finished to these

points, then transferred to Steamers and carried to Jupiter, then

reloaded on narrow guage cars and transported to Lake 'Torth at June, and

thence rafted or barged down the lake ten miles to Palm Beach. The

Royal r inciana with five hundred ;,uest rooms was orpned to the public

in January 1894. The Breakers another great hotel on the OceL.n Bich

was opened in 1896. /, CL. / -, -. -

The town site of West Palm Beach was purch-:taea laid out and opened

for settleu.:ent in 1893. Having City Water works s and pavea streets and a

large Public school building. The Railroad was opened to Pali.I Beach

in Dade County on March 22nd. 1894.

In 1894, ne became interested in the E..-st Coast Canal & Tr'nsportation

Company

Indian

In 1895 he ektendea thie Florrida E .est Coasot Ry. to MiaLi in Dude

County 36? miles south of Jacksonville, and laid but the City of Miaumi

giving it paved streets, City vu-ter Works and Electric lights and a fine


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#4.


public school building. Mi.Lmi was.s incorporated in 1896. In 1890 there

S were but 861 people in the entire County.#' A/

At Mia-mi he built great wharves und established a ste.liaship line to

to Nas;3ua, Key West and Havana. we built the Royal Palm IHotelatd?-hii

In 1896 he bought the Victoria Hotel at Ni.sAu.. a dd .there constructed

the Colonial Hotel. /- -A -- s-oAo t -- /

In 1904 he bought the Railroad tP Pablo Be..ch exten-.ed it to Mayport

where he constructed great coal and lumber wharves. He built the

Continental Hotel at Atlantic Beach near Mayport, which gcave an ocean

Beach resort to the City of Jacksonville, and the State 6onurally.

In 1906 he extended his Rail.ay twenty eight miles to Horiestead and

in 1907 began the greatest and most important Railroad Conatruction

ever before undertaken by one man, In the extension of his Railroad to

Key West by bridging by concrete viLducts, steel bridges "rnL heavy

rock fills the opening between the Florida Keys.

In January 1908, this road was opened for travel to nightss Key 477

miles wouth of Jacksonville where connection is had by steamship for

Havana and Key '"est. The Construction of the 46 miles between Knights

'ey and Key '"est is progressing rapidly and most satisfactorily. A large

fdrce of men and all the various kinds of machinery that can be u ized

in that class of construction are steadily working to finish the track

into Key W'est by January 6th. 1910, Mr. Flaglurs 80th. Birthday.

The organization of Jf Fl.-slers Railway the Florida East Co-.st

is of the highest class, practical, liberal and far -ijihted and devoted

to the successful accoi.,piibshent of his views in the dev-Jlopment of his

greatt project.

To show some of the results of this mana persistence in developing

the East Coasot of Florida. The following figures compiled from

reliable sources are appended.

The population of the State has increased to over 850,000. There

were in 1880 but few Post offices on the East Coast. In 1908 there were

141 on the line of the Florida P Cst Ooast Railway, wiay'of them being

centers of various side postoffie routes In 1880 there were 10681

School Children in Duval, ST. Johns, Volusia, Brevard, D:.,de add ,nroe

Counties, while in 1908 there are 37,643.
The gross valuations of the seven East Cotast Counties in 1884 was


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#5.
$12,166,1537.00 in 1908 $37,603,724, while the total valuation of the e~ia e

State 'de increased from $60,048,655.00 in 1834 to t159,390,1i0.00

in 1908. The seven East Coast Counties bearing 42% of this entire

valuttion made up of 46 counties of the State.

Shipments of all kinds of fruit and vegetables are made from the

east coast in train loads on fast pausenger schedules, to all parts

of the United States. Hotels accommodating nearly A thousand

touristlha.ve been provided- Towns and cities have grown up like Magiel

Churches and schools always beint the first to be est blished in the

pioneer settlements.

The Railay mileage in Florida has grown from 408 Liiles in 1880 to

3,878 in 1907 of which Mr. Fl-_lor owns 638 miles or a little over one

sixth.


Mr. Flaglers ex;,iple hsu had a tremendous influence in development

all over the State and indeed on _uch of the southern -States The

Pullman Car lines from west and north that were originally established

for the benefit of his hotel guests, h; ave been made permanent all year

around lines, thus giving a strong impetus to travel to way places"

that could not alone have secured such business facilities.

Large Cities have grovmn up in the State and numerous factories of

all kinds are established or bein,; est.iblished to meet the business

acquirements.

Key Wust which is the Southern terminal of the Florida East oa-st

y Railway, is 528 miles south of jgcksonville,. It is the southern port

of the United States, soon to be its most Southern Railroad port and

deserves more thn a passing word. It lhau a fine harbor with a 28 foot

channel tq it.

It but 90 miles from Havana, 604 from Progreso the principal port'of

Yucatan, 1060 miles from Vera Cruz and 1000 miles fror. Port Mexico both

Me:dic n fea ports, 675 miles from Belize the por' of British Hunduras,

800 miles froi., Puerto Barrios the port of Guatea."la, 760 miles from

Puerto Cortez in Honduras, 725 iiles from Trujillo, also a fRonduran, port

1125 miles from. Greytox'n the port of NTicrn.,u;ua, 1175 wiles from

Pt. Limon in Costa Rica, 1260 miles from Colon the eastern entrance

tq the Panaman Canal, 1325 miles from Cart..;'faRL in Columbia and 1775

miles from La Guira the port for Carcas in VeT:3e-ueli. The exports

from the United States to these countries e..cluding Mexico in 1906 were


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$182,038,925.00, the imports from them in 1906 to the unitedd States

were $60,388,350 a total of $188,427,275.00. The Commerce with other

Countries however with the exception of Cuba and Panama is far

greater than with the United States. The population of these countries

is 10,633,539 excluding Mexico.

There 13 one Amorican line of ships fi'omL New Orleans to Puerto

Barrios in Guatemila, three American lines and twvo forol.n lines to

Puerto Certez in Hflniuras. One Arerican, one British, one Dutch, one

French, one Cerlm:n, one Italian, one Spanish line to La Guira and

Puerto Cabello in Venezuela. Five British, one German, one French,

one Spinish, one Dutch and one Itanian, lines to Barranquilla in

Oolumbia. Ohe Amwdtaan, two German, two Britidh, one Spanish, one

French, lines to Pt. Limon in Costa Rica. Two American lines, two

German lines to Nicaragua. To Colon, Pin.4-a, three British, one French

one German, one Spanish, one American line, these facts taken from the

i StAtedlin's Year Book of 1307, indicAte a g.o.;ing business with th:

United Sta.tes from Centr -1 Ai.!rie especially, ..n when great coal

yards and an abundjant water supply are furnisLdid at Key '"est, A; they

will be, some of'tthese oteamer lines will be attracted there, hence

when the '-.inufacturers of the south realie how near they are to these

reAt r.orketa it is natural that they woulu reach out for some of this

resat business, and the fondest hopes of the projector of this great

R::.iriay be fully rtalized.
The Gover i:ent has an importLnt NJval Station at Key Vest and

the Artillery Vast established there is the largest of any South

Atlantic Ports. A lar,:oe .-rrison is maintained there all yc,'r round.

The cliim:te of Key West is vary- equable --, the :luxon Annfual tc~iperature

being 77. The annual rAinfall is 33.1" evenly distributed over the

year. Key West has an active Bo-'rd of Trade, Several Banks two

dBil.y papers. It is heat quarters for the great sponge fleet. Its

annul. out put o0' igrrirs i eno'mious and this business is increasing.

It .LS' a population approxin.ittng 22,000. It h.a fine public and

private schools, .hnd church of all aenoIinAtions. Its advi.int-ges

as a distributing center tater the Florida E~st Coast Ry. reaches it

will undoubtedly bo. availed of .nd Key "'est .vill become a; gSrdct City.


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#7.


Hitherto Mr. Flagler' s works have been largely that of developing

Sthe wilderness as his Railway was extended from point to point. Jk~-a

however the new extension will reach an important seaport with an es-

tablished business, hence he will have the cooperattS n and active sup-

port of a City whose ambitions will be aroused by his example and far

reaching influence. So it is easy td predict a great future for this

"Island City" when aided by Mr. Henry M. Flagler.

Keep your eye on Key West w

In reading this sketch of the works of Mr. Flagler since 1884

the reader must be impressed with his persistence, energy and daring,

and as well by the consistence with which he pursued the line of duty

which he marked out for himself,

It is t) be regreted however that the great benefits to the State
kA J 4 4() (1 .J
Sof his adoption followingg his developments h&az not been fully ppqeoett-

,e by the people to whom he has given so much of his life and fortune.


St. Augustine, Fla.

May 26th. 1909.


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