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 Front Cover
 Abstract
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Appendix
 Back Cover






Group Title: Computer series
Title: An Economic analysis of field corn as a cattle feed
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095264/00002
 Material Information
Title: An Economic analysis of field corn as a cattle feed a microcomputer application
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Alvarez, Jose, 1940-
Pate, F. M. ( Findlay Moye ), 1941-
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1984
Copyright Date: 1984
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Economic aspects   ( lcsh )
Corn as feed -- Economic aspects -- Computer programs   ( lcsh )
Corn -- Transportation -- Costs   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Jose Alvarez and F.M. Pate.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 14.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, computer series circular 600
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095264
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 10705447

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Abstract
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Appendix
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Cover
        Page 20
Full Text


January 1984


Floppy disc included with this
item has been shelved separately.
Consult LUIS or ask circulation
staff for assistance.


Circular 600


An Economic Analysis

Of Field Corn as a Cattle Feed:

A Microcomputer Application


I COMPUTER SERIES


Jose Alvarez and F. M. Pate


1903


101
F6 36c rative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / John T. Woeste, Dean
600
guide








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

(904) 392-7853


REPLY TO: IFAS Software Support
Building 120, Room 203
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611


December 8, 1988


MEMORANDUM

TO: IFAS Software Customers

FR: Dennis G. Watson

RE: Running BASIC programs


The program you have just purchased was written in the
Originally, we distributed only the BASIC language sou
BASIC interpreter to run the program.

We now distribute BASIC programs in compiled form.
to load BASIC prior to running the program. Until the
this change, please refer to the following instructions to
"Economic Analysis of Field Corn as a Cattle Feed".


BASIC programming language.
rce file and required that you use a


This means that you do not
documentation is updated to
start program 010, titled


have
reflect


First, make a duplicate copy of the distribution disk. Store the distribution disk in a safe
place and use the duplicate copy as your working disk. To run the program simply type:

CORNCIRC

at the DOS prompt and press the Enter (or Return) key.

Once you have started the program, the instructions in the documentation should apply. In
some cases, the documentation or program may allow you the option of exiting to BASIC
or DOS. With a compiled program, regardless of which you choose, you will exit to
DOS.

If you need more space on your working disk, you can delete any files with the extension
".BAS". These are BASIC source files and you do not need them to run the program.

If you have any questions about this program, please contact the IFAS Software Support
office, Bldg 120 Room 203, Gainesville, FL 32611 or phone (904) 392-7853.





The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research.
educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS. UNIVERSITY OF
Fl ORIDA II R nFPanT Vrc T flP Ar tOili ri T IM AN l hOARDS OF C iilNTYV rMMI si rpipF:q ronPPRATING












ABSTRACT


Limited supplies of locally grown feedstuffs are a major factor af-

fecting the development of a Florida feedlot industry. Sizable acreages of

field corn can be grown in specific areas with the potential for feeding

a large number of cattle. The microcomputer program presented in this cir-

cular performs an economic analysis of feeding high moisture grain, earlage,

and silage to beef cattle. A transportation analysis, showing maximum af-

fordable hauling distances, is also included. The program allows changing
variable values to assess the effects on net returns per animal.


Key words: field corn, feedlot, microcomputer.















TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page
ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . i

INTRODUCTION .. . . . . . . . . . . ... 1

A MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . 2

Running The Program ................. 2

Explaining The Program . . . . . . . . 11

REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14

APPENDIX: PROGRAM LISTING . . . . . . . . . 15









AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF FIELD CORN AS A CATTLE FEED:

A MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATION


Jose Alvarez and F. M. Pate*


INTRODUCTION

Interest in the economics of beef production and marketing in the South-
east region of the United States in general, and Florida in particular, has

been increasing. One study (5) points out that limited supplies of feedstuffs

are a major factor affecting the development of a Florida feedlot industry

and locally grown feeds must be produced to minimize feeding costs.

Field corn may be harvested, processed, and stored in different ways

when utilized as feed for beef cattle. These include high moisture corn grain

(harvested with about 25% moisture), corn earlage (the chopped grain, cob,

and shuck of the plant in the late dough to mature stage with about 40%

moisture), and corn silage (the aerial plant cut about one inch above ground

containing 60-70% moisture).

Cost differentials of these products, particularly those related to

energy, demand that an economic evaluation of each alternative be conducted

on a periodic basis. Alvarez and Pate did a study for the Everglades Agricul-

tural Area (1) and later outlined the methodology (2). The process, however,

is cumbersome and subject to errors even when a calculator is used.



*Jose Alvarez is Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, Uni-
versity of Florida, Agricultural Research and Education Center, Belle Glade,
FL. F. M. Pate is Professor and Director, Agricultural Research Center, Ona,
FL, and was an Animal Nutritionist at Belle Glade,


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES









Microcomputers can help producers rapidly analyze corn feeding altern-

atives on a periodic basis. The purpose of this circular is to present a

microcomputer program that performs the necessary calculations in a fast and

accurate manner. Although the methodology is identical to that previously

outlined (1,2), the results are shown in terms of net returns per animal and

not in the break-even prices format.

A MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAM


The microcomputer program listed in the Appendix was written in BASIC.

In its present format, it runs on most Radio Shack machines and the IBM Per-

sonal Computer. Minor modifications in the BASIC code and/or screen formats

may be necessary before the program can be run on other brands of computers.

Producers interested in obtaining copies of this program should contact:

Farm Computer Support Group

c/o Dean John T. Woeste

Florida Cooperative Extension Service

1038 McCarty Hall

University of Florida

Gainesville, Fl 32611


Running the Program

The program is simple to run; however, accurate data reflecting the

nature of an operation must be available to obtain meaningful results.

The first two screen displays show some background information about the pro-

gram:





































This information stays on the screen for a few seconds. Then, without

having to press any key, the computer displays the purpose of the program:


THIS PROGRAM PERFORMS AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS ON THE USE
OF HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN, CORN EARLAGE AND CORN
SILAGE AS FEEDS FOR GROWING-FINISHING BEEF CATTLE.


PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ?


Once the ENTER key is pressed, the user is made aware of the assumptions

of the program concerning the net energy values for gain per unit of dry mat-

ter (4):


** CORN AS A CATTLE FEED **
VERSION 1.0

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (IFAS)
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (UF)

COPYRIGHT 1983 BY IFAS, UF


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT

FARM COMPUTER SUPPORT GROUP
C/O DEAN JOHN T. WOESTE
FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
1038 MCCARTY HALL
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611


ANALYSIS OF CORN AS A CATTLE FEED


/I,











THE ASSUMPTIONS CONCERNING NET ENERGY VALUES FOR GAIN
PER UNIT OF DRY MATTER ARE:
CORN GRAIN = 1.48 MCAL/KG
CORN EARLAGE = 1.30 MCAL/KG
CORN SILAGE = 0.99 MCAL/KG

PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ?



The microcomputer is now ready to take the input values entered by the

user. The first set of questions concerns the moisture contents of the three

products. The italicized figures are not supplied by the program. They are

just example numbers used to illustrate the program:


ENTER THE MOISTURE CONTENT FOR:

CORN GRAIN (%) ? 25

CORN EARLAGE (/) ? 43

CORN SILAGE (%) ? 67


At the end of each display where data are solicited, the program asks

the following question:

( ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y

If incorrect values have been entered, typing an "N" makes the program go back

to the beginning of that section. If all figures are correct, a "Y" leads the

user to the next section:











ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

CORN GROWING COST ($/ACRE) ? 185
EXPECTED YIELD (BUSHELS/ACRE) ? 120

FOR HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN:
HARVESTING COST ($/ACRE) ? 20

FOR CORN EARLAGE:
HARVESTING COST ($/TON) ? 3.40

FOR CORN SILAGE:
HARVESTING COST ($/TON) ? 3.40

ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y



The next set of questions is required to perform the transportation

analysis:


ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION

DISTANCE FROM THE FIELD TO THE FEEDLOT (MILES) ? 26
TRUCK CAPACITY (TONS) ? 22
TRANSPORTATION COST ($/MILE) ? 1.26
EXPECTED PRICE OF NO.2 SHELLED CORN AT HARVEST ($/BUSHEL) ? 2.80


ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y


In the next three sections, the user enters feeding information, animal

daily gain data, and storage costs information for the three products. High

moisture corn grain is presented first, followed by corn earlage and corn

silage:

HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN

CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ? 14
SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LBS/DAY) ? 1.5
AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ? 2.5
NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ? 100
CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ? 7.60

ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y
J_____________________________









































The last input section requests the remaining information the computer

needs to perform the feeding analysis. Fixed feeding cost is the charge for

the feedlot facilities. Variable feeding cost is the charge for labor, vet-

erinary expenses, etc. The remaining questions are self-explanatory:


NOW ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

FIXED FEEDING COST ($/HEAD/DAY) ? 0.15
VARIABLE FEEDING COST ($/HEAD/DAY) ? 0.09
SUPPLEMENT COST ($/TON) ? 200
INITIAL WEIGHT (CWT) ? 500
CALF PURCHASE PRICE ($/CWT) ? 45
CALF SELLING PRICE ($/CWT) ? 50
DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN GRAIN (#) ? 98
DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN EARLAGE (#) ? 84
DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN SILAGE (#) ? 84
INTEREST RATE FOR DISCOUNTING INCOME (%) ? 14

ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y
\_____________.________________________J


CORN EARLAGE

CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ? 13
SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LBS/DAY) ? 1.5
AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ? 2.25
NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ? 111
CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ? 2.40

ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y

L _____________________________


CORN SILAGE


CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ? 11
SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LBS/DAY) ? 1.5
AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ? 1.5
NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ? 167
CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ? 4.35


ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ? Y










The next screen display shows the results of the transportation analysis.

The computer prints the input data (truck capacity, corn price, and transpor-

tation charge per mile) along with the maximum affordable transportation dis-

tances given the moisture contents assumed for the three products:



**TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS**

FOR A 22 -TON TRUCK, WITH THE PRICE OF NO.2
SHELLED CORN AT $ 2.8 PER BUSHEL AND $ 1.26
CHARGE PER MILE, MAXIMUM AFFORDABLE DISTANCES
WITH THE MOISTURE CONTENTS ASSUMED ARE:

CORN GRAIN = 618 MILES
CORN EARLAGE = 491 MILES
CORN SILAGE = 238 MILES


PRESS ENTER TO SEE THE RESULTS OF THE FEEDING ANALYSIS ?



These mileage figures mean that, when the produced corn has to be trans-

ported a greater distance than shown, it is more economical to purchase No. 2

shelled corn at $2.80 per bushel.

By pressing the ENTER key, the data entered and the results of the feed-

ing analyses are shown on the screen:

**FEEDING ANALYSIS**
A.INIT.WEIGHT 500 B.CALF PUR. PRICE 45 C.CORN YIELD 120
D.INT. RATE 14 E.CALF SEL. PRICE 50 F.CORN PRICE 2.8
GRAIN EARLAGE SILAGE
GROWING COST G. 185 G. 185 G. 185
HARVEST COST H. 20 I. 3.4 J. 3.4
STORAGE COST K. 7.6 L. 2.4 M. 4.35
TOTAL INTAKE (FED BASIS) 2017 2572 5817
DAILY GAIN 2.5 2.25 1.5
FEEDING DAYS 100 111 167
FINAL WEIGHT 750 750 751

NET RETURN PER ANIMAL $ 50.73 $ 57.71 $ 38.63

LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ?









The first section of the screen display (variables A to F and also

variable G in the second section) contains input values of a general nature;

i.e., data that apply to the three products considered. The next section

shows cost, feeding information and cattle performance data for corn grain,

earlage and silage. Total intake is expressed on an as-fed basis.

The net return per animal appears in the next line under each product.

They are $50.73, $57.71, and $38.63 for grain, earlage and silage, respec-

tively. Under the cost structure used in this study, with the performance

data provided, corn earlage shows the highest net return.

Note that, except for total intake and final weight, all variables dis-

played on the screen show the values entered by the user. However, the res-

pective units are missing due to lack of screen space.

The line at the bottom of the screen allows the user to obtain answers

to "what if?" questions. After entering the variable name, an opportunity

to change variable values, one at a time, is provided. At this point, the

user is given the units value missing above; i.e., $/acre, $/ton, $/bushel,

etc.

Let us assume that the user wants to know the effect that a yield lower

than 120 bushels per acre might have on transportation distances and net re-

turns. After typing a "C" for the "letter to change question," the computer

prompts for the new value:

LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ? C
NEW EXPECTED CORN YIELD (BUSHELS/ACRE) ? 75

A lower yield in south Florida is due to planting in the fall when in-

sects and diseases can damage the crop to a great extent. The first output

is again the transportation analysis:











**TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS**

FOR A 22 -TON TRUCK, WITH THE PRICE OF NO.2
SHELLED CORN AT $ 2.8 PER BUSHEL AND $ 1.26
CHARGE PER MILE, MAXIMUM AFFORDABLE DISTANCES
WITH THE MOISTURE CONTENTS ASSUMED ARE:

CORN GRAIN = 58 MILES
CORN EARLAGE = 168 MILES
CORN SILAGE = 143 MILES


PRESS ENTER TO SEE THE RESULTS OF THE FEEDING ANALYSIS ?



Maximum affordable transportation distances are affected considerably

with the new yield assumed. First, a 37.5% decrease in corn yield brings

about 91%, 66% and 40% decreases in the number of miles that the three pro-

ducts can be transported before an economic loss is present. Second, corn

earlage is now the product showing the largest number of miles, followed by

corn silage and corn grain. In the previous example, the descending order

was grain, earlage, and silage. The changes are the result of lower quanti-

ties of each product produced; thus, their higher production cost.

The results of the feeding analysis, which are also considerably dif-

erent from the previous example, show the new value for variable C:

**FEEDING ANALYSIS**
A.INIT.WEIGHT 500 B.CALF PUR. PRICE 45 C.CORN YIELD 75
D.INT. RATE 14 E.CALF SEL. PRICE 50 F.CORN PRICE 2.8
GRAIN EARLAGE SILAGE
GROWING COST G. 185 G. 185 G. 185
HARVEST COST H. 20 I. 3.4 J. 3.4
STORAGE COST K. 7.6 L. 2.4 M. 4.35
TOTAL INTAKE (FED BASIS) 2017 2572 5817
DAILY GAIN 2.5 2.25 1.5
FEEDING DAYS 100 111 167
FINAL WEIGHT 750 750 751

NET RETURN PER ANIMAL $ 22.88 $ 36.97 $ 24.79

LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ?
\______________ _____--- -------








Although corn earlage is still the feed showing the highest net returns,
corn silage now brings more returns than corn grain. The results of both the
transportation and feeding analyses point to the importance of re-evaluat-
ing feeding programs with changing conditions.
As a last example, let us assume that the user wants to change the price
of corn from $2.80 to $2.30 per bushel. He types an "F" for the "letter to
change question" and enters the new value:
LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ? F
NEW EXPECTED PRICE OF NO.2 SHELLED CORN AT HARVEST ($/BUSHEL) ?
2.30.
After pressing the ENTER key, the results of the transportation anal-
ysis are shown on the screen:

**TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS**
FOR A 22 -TON TRUCK, WITH THE PRICE OF NO.2
SHELLED CORN AT $ 2.3 PER BUSHEL AND $ 1.26
CHARGE PER MILE, MAXIMUM AFFORDABLE DISTANCES
WITH THE MOISTURE CONTENTS ASSUMED ARE:
CORN GRAIN = -218 MILES
CORN EARLAGE = -26 MILES
CORN SILAGE = 62 MILES

PRESS ENTER TO SEE THE RESULTS OF THE FEEDING ANALYSIS ?

Corn silage can be hauled 62 miles only. Hauling high moisture corn
grain and corn earlage indicates an economic loss because it is cheaper to
buy corn at $2.30 per bushel than produce corn. Changing economic conditions,
such as the price decrease assumed, alter the transportation analysis in an un-
expected way.
The results of the feeding analysis are identical to the previous one:










**FEEDING ANALYSIS**
A.INIT.WEIGHT 500 B.CALF PUR. PRICE 45 C.CORN YIELD 75
D.INT. RATE 14 E.CALF SEL. PRICE 50 F.CORN PRICE 2.3
GRAIN EARLAGE SILAGE
GROWING COST G. 185 G. 185 G. 185
HARVEST COST H. 20 I. 3.4 J. 3.4
STORAGE COST K. 7.6 L. 2.4 M. 4.35
TOTAL INTAKE (FED BASIS) 2017 2572 5817
DAILY GAIN 2.5 2.25 1.5
FEEDING DAYS 100 111 167
FINAL WEIGHT 750 750 751

NET RETURN PER ANIMAL $ 22.88 $ 36.97 $ 24.79

LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ?


Even though the computer took the new price (note that variable F is now

$2.30), net returns are the same as before. The reason is simple. Trans-

portation distances changed because they are computed based on corn market

prices. Feeding costs, however, are calculated taking into account produc-

tion and transportation costs of the amount of dry matter fed. The price of

purchased corn is not considered as an opportunity cost in this porgram be-

cause the purpose is to show net returns per animal based on production and

other fixed and variable costs of the three corn feeds being produced and

analyzed.

When the user is ready to finish the analysis, a "Z" is typed and an

END OF PROGRAM message is displayed.


Explaining the Program


The purpose of this section is to explain how the program works. Users

will be made aware of the methodology and, if necessary, will be able to alter

the program to suit individual circumstances.

The first line (100) clears the screen. Lines 110-310 show some general








information, which remains on the screen for about 15 seconds because of the

instructions provided in lines 210 and 320. Once line 330 has cleared the

screen, lines 340-400 display the title and objective of the program. The

next screen shows the assumptions made regarding net energy values for gain

per unit of dry matter (lines 430-490) for the three corn feeds.

Once line 500 has cleared the screen, the computer is ready to take in-

formation concerning moisture contents for the three products (lines510 to

570). Line 590 allows for correcting mistakes while entering data in this

section. When a correction needs to be made, and N is typed and the program

goes to the beginning of this section (line 600 returns the program to line

500). If a Y is entered, the program clears the screen (line 630) to start

a new input data section (Notice that line 620 recognizes entering a wrong

character and makes the user aware of this fact).

From line 640 to line 760, the computer requests data on corn yield and

growing and harvesting costs. Lines 770 to 800 contain the now familiar

checking procedure. Data needed to perform the transportation analysis are

solicited from lines 820 to 870.

Cattle performance and cost data for the three feeding alternatives are

requested in the next section: high moisture corn grain (lines 930-990),corn

earlage (lines 1050-1120), and corn silage (lines 1170-1230). General and

specific information are entered from line 1290 to 1400. The number of days

from planting to harvesting are necessary for discounting purposes.

The computer is now ready to perform the analysis. Lines 1470 to 1490

compute the dollar values per ton of dry matter in relation to the price of

No. 2 shelled corn with 15.5% moisture and the net energy values for gain per

unit of dry matter. These values are then used in lines 1510 to 1530 to

compute the dollar value of a truck load of a given capacity. Production









costs per ton of dry matter are calculated in lines 1550 to 1570. Maximum

transportation distances for each product are then computed from lines 1590

to 1610, and rounded to the nearest mile in lines 1620 to 1640.

The transportation costs per ton of dry matter computed in lines 1660

to 1680 relate to feeding costs. The total feeding costs can now be calcu-

lated from lines 1690 to 1720. They include all fixed and variable costs

entered by the user and the figures calculated by the computer.

Net returns per animal for the three products are figured out in lines

1740 to 1760 by deducting total costs from total revenues. No death loss has

been assumed. These figures are discounted by the factors given from the re-

sult of adding corn growing days and number of feeding days in lines 1780 to

1800, and rounded to two decimal places in lines 1820 to 1840.

Total intake per animal on an as-fed basis are computed and rounded to

the nearest pound in lines 1860 to 1880.) Lines 1900 to 1920 compute the

final weights and round them to the nearest pound.

The next section of the program (lines 1930 to 2180) contains the print-

ing instructions. From line 1930 to 2020, the computer is instructed to pre-

sent on the screen the results of the transportation analysis. The results

of the feeding analysis are printed from line 2060 to line 2180.

Then the user is given the opportunity to change any input value, one

at a time, to assess the effect of that change on the transportation anal-

ysis (if applicable) and on net returns per animal. Lines 2200 to 2270 per-

form this function. Line 2340 ends the program when a Z is entered.









REFERENCES


(1) Alvarez, Jose and F. M Pate. 1978. The Economicsof Growing Field
Corn in the Everglades Agricultural Area and of Transporting and Feeding
to Beef Cattle, Economic Information Report 102, Food and Resource Economics
Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl, November.
(2) Alvarez, Jose and F. M. Pate. 1981. "Economic Evaluation of Three
Field Corn Feed Alternatives." Journal of the American Society of Farm
Managers and Rural Appraisers, Vol. 45, No. 2, October, pp. 4-9.

(3) Baker, F.S., Jr. 1973. "Feeding Value of High-Moisture Corn and
Sorghum for Beef Cattle," in Effect of Processing on the Nutritive Value
of Feeds. Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences.

(4) National Research Council. 1970. "Nutrient Requirement of Domestic
Animals," No. 4, Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle. Washington, D.Co:
National Research Council'

(5) Prevatt, J. Walter, Bryan E. Melton, Thomas H. Spreen and Kary Mathis.
1978. "The Economics of Carcass Beef Production: An Appraisal of Florida's
Feedlot Potential," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 10,
December. pp. 49-55











APPENDIX


PROGRAM LISTING



100 CLS
110 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
120 PRINT ** CORN AS A CATTLE FEED **"
130 PRINT VERSION 1.0"
140 PRINT
150 PRINT COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE"
160 PRINT INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND"
170 PRINT AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (IFAS)"
180 PRINT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (UF)"
190 PRINT
200 PRINT COPYRIGHT 1983 BY IFAS, UF"
210 FOR 1=1 TO 5000 5 NEXT I
220 CLS
230 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
240 PRINT FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT"
250 PRINT
260 PRINT FARM COMPUTER SUPPORT GROUP"
270 PRINT C/O DEAN JOHN T. WOESTE"
280 PRINT FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE"
290 PRINT 1038 MCCARTY HALL"
300 PRINT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA"
310 PRINT GAINESVILLE, FL 32611"
320 FOR I=1 TO 5000 : NEXT I
330 CLS
340 PRINT "ANALYSIS OF CORN AS A CATTLE FEED"
350 PRINT:PRINT
360 PRINT "THIS PROGRAM PERFORMS AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS ON THE USE
370 PRINT "OF HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN, CORN EARLAGE AND CORN
380 PRINT "SILAGE AS FEEDS FOR GROWING-FINISHING BEEF CATTLE."
390 PRINT:PRINT
400 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ";A$
410 CLS
420 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
430 PRINT "THE ASSUMPTIONS CONCERNING NET ENERGY VALUES FOR GAIN
440 PRINT "PER UNIT OF DRY MATTER ARE:"
450 PRINT "CORN GRAIN = 1.48 MCAL/KG"
460 PRINT "CORN EARLAGE = 1.30 MCAL/KG"
470 PRINT "CORN SILAGE = 0.99 MCAL/KG"
480 PRINT
490 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ";A$
500 CLS
510 PRINT "ENTER THE MOISTURE CONTENT FOR:"
520 PRINT
530 INPUT "CORN GRAIN (%) ";Z1:Z1=Z1/100
540 PRINT
550 INPUT "CORN EARLAGE (%) ";Z2:Z2=Z2/100
560 PRINT
570 INPUT "CORN SILAGE (/.) ";Z3:Z3=Z3/100
580 PRINT
590 INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";Os
600 IF O$="N" THEN GOTO 500
I,-












610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
770
780
790
800
810
820
830
840
850
860
870
880
890
900
910
920
930
940
950
960
970
980
990
100G
101
102C
103C
104C
105C
106
107S
108
109G
110C
111I
112G
113G
114+


IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 630
PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL. WORK. TRY'AGAIN."'GOTO 590
CLS
PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:"
PRINT
INPUT "CORN GROWING COST ($/ACRE) ";CG
INPUT "EXPECTED YIELD (BUSHELS/ACRE) ";BC
PRINT
PRINT "FOR HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN:"
INPUT "HARVESTING COST ($/ACRE) ";CH
PRINT
PRINT "FOR CORN EARLAGE:"
INPUT "HARVESTING COST ($/TON) "l EH
PRINT
PRINT "FOR CORN SILAGE:"
INPUT "HARVESTING COST ($/TON) ";SH
PRINT: INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";0S
IF O$="N" THEN GOTO 630
IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 810
PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 770
CLS
PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION"
PRINT
INPUT "DISTANCE FROM THE FIELD TO THE FEEDLOT (MILES) ";D
INPUT "TRUCK CAPACITY (TONS) ";CP
INPUT "TRANSPORTATION COST ($/MILE) ";TC
INPUT "EXPECTED PRICE OF NO.2 SHELLED CORN AT HARVEST ($/BUt
PRINT: INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";0S
IF O$="N" THEN GOTO 810
IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 920
PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. 'TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 880
CLS
PRINT "HIGH MOISTURE CORN GRAIN"
PRINT
INPUT "CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ";Dl
INPUT "SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LES/DAY) ";S8
INPUT "AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ";G1
INPUT "NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ";Fl
INPUT "CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ";C1
PRINT: INPUT "ARE: THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";0$
2 IF' O$="N" THEN GOTO 920
IF OS="Y" THEN GOTO 1040
PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 1000
i CLS
I PRINT "CORN EARLAGE"
I PRINT
I INPUT "CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ";D2
I INPUT "SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LBS/DAY) ";S2
I INPUT "AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ";G2
I INPUT "NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ";F2
0 INPUT "CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ";C2
I PRINT: INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";OS
0 IF O$="N" THEN GOTO 1040
0 IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 1160


3HEL) ";PC


1












1150 PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 1120
1160 CLS
1170 PRINT "CORN SILAGE"
1180 PRINT
1190 INPUT "CORN DRY MATTER INTAKE (LBS/DAY/ANIMAL) ";D3
1200 INPUT "SUPPLEMENT INTAKE (LBS/DAY) ";S3
1210 INPUT "AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (LBS) ";G3
1220 INPUT "NUMBER OF FEEDING DAYS (#) ";F3
1230 INPUT "CORN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERIOD) ";C3
1240 PRINT: INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";0$
1250 IF 0$="N" THEN GOTO 1160
1260 IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 1280
1270 PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 1240
1280 CLS
1290 PRINT "NOW ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:"
1300 PRINT
1310 INPUT "FIXED FEEDING COST ($/HEAD/DAY) ";X1
1320 INPUT "VARIABLE FEEDING COST ($/HEAD/DAY) ";X2
1330 INPUT "SUPPLEMENT COST ($/TON) ";X3
1340 INPUT "INITIAL WEIGHT (CWT) ";X4
1350 INPUT "CALF PURCHASE PRICE ($/CWT) ";X5
1360 INPUT "CALF SELLING PRICE ($/CWT) ";X6
1370 INPUT "DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN GRAIN (#) ";Y1
1380 INPUT "DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN EARLAGE (#) ";Y2
1390 INPUT "DAYS FROM PLANTING TO HARVESTING CORN SILAGE (#) ";Y3
1400 INPUT "INTEREST RATE FOR DISCOUNTING INCOME (%) ";XX:IR=XX/100
1410 PRINT: INPUT "ARE THESE ENTRIES OK (Y/N) ";Os
1420 IF O$="N" THEN GOTO 1280
1430 IF O$="Y" THEN GOTO 1450
1440 PRINT "ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK. TRY AGAIN.":GOTO 1410
1450 CLS
1460 REM DOLLAR VALUES PER TON OF DRY MATTER FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS IN RELATION
TO THE PRICE OF NO.2 SHELLED CORN WITH 15.5% MOISTURE
1470 DC=(2000/47.32)*PC
1480 DE=(1.3*DC)/1.48
1490 DS=(0.99*DC)/1.48
1500 REM DOLLAR VALUE OF A TRUCK LOAD FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS ON A DRY MATTER BAS
IS
1510 V1=DC*(CP-(CP*ZI))
1520 V2=DE*(CP-(CP*Z2))
1530 V3=DS*(CP-(CP*Z3))
1540 REM PRODUCTION COSTS PER TON OF DRY MATTER FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS
1550 PI=((CG*2000)/((64-(64*Z1))*BC))+((CH*2000)/((64-(64*ZI))*BC))
1560 P2=(CG*2000)/((100-(100*Z2))*BC)+(((EH*(100-(100*Z2))*BC)/(2000-(2000*Z2)))
/( ( (100-(100*Z2))*BC)/2000))
1570 P3=(CG*2000)/((340-(340*Z3))*BC)+(((EH*(340-(340*Z3))*BC)/(2000-(2000*Z3)))
/( ((340-(340*Z37 )*BC)/2000))
1580 REM MAXIMUM TRANSPORTATION DISTANCES BEFORE AN ECONOMIC LOSS IS PRESENT
1590 Ml=((V1-(P1*(CP-(CP*Z1))))/TC)
1600 M2=((V2-(P2*(CP-(CP*Z2))))/TC)
1610 M3=((V3-(P3*(CP-(CP*Z3))))/TC)
1620 M1=INT(M1+.5)
1630 M2=INT(M2+.5)
1640 M3=INT(M3+.5)
___ ________________________________________________________________________












1650 REM TRANSPORTATION COSTS PER TON OF DRY MATTER FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS
1660 T1=(TC/(CP-(CP*ZI)))*D
1670 T2=(TC/(CP-(CP*Z2)))*D
1680 T3=(TC/(CP-(CP*Z3)))*D
1690 REM TOTAL. FEEDING COSTS FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS
1700 Ai=(X1*F1)+(X2*F1)+((S1*F1)/2000)*X3+((T1/2000)*D1*F1)+((C1/2000)*D1*F1)+((
P1/2000)*D1*F1)
1710 A2=(X1*F2)+(X.-F:')+((S2*F2)/2000)*X3+((T2/2000)*D2-*F)+((C2/2000)*D2*F2)+((
P2/2000)*D2*F2)
1720 A3=(X1*F3)+(X2*F3)+((S3*F3)/2000)*X3+((T3/2000)*D3*F3)+((C3/2000)*D3*F3)+((
P3/2000)*.D3*F3)
1*730 REM NET RETURNS PER ANIMAL FOR THE THREE PRODUCTS
1740 Nl=((X6/100)*(X4+(GI*F1)))-((X5/100)*X4)-A1
1750 N2=((X6/100)*(X4+(G2*F2)))-((X5/100)*X4)-A2
1760 N3=((X6/100)*(X4+(G3*F3)))-((X5/100)*X4)-A3
1770 REM DISCOUNTING NET RETURNS
1780 N1=N1/(( 1+IR)E ((Yl+F1)/365))
1790 N2=N2/((I+IR)E ((Y2+F2)/365))
1800 N3=N3/((1+IR)[((Y3+F3)/365))
1810 REM ROUNDING NET RETURNS TO TWO DECIMAL PLACES
1820 NI=INT(100*N1+.5)/100
1830 N2=INT(100*N2+.5)/100
1840 N3=INT(100*N3+.5)/100
1850 REM COMPUTING TOTAL INTAKE PER ANIMAL ON AN AS FED BASIS AND ROUNDING THEM
TO THE NEAREST POUND
1860 II=((DI/(1-Z1))*F1)+(SI*FI): I1l=INT(II+.5)
1870 12=((D2/(1-Z2))*F2)+(S2*F2):I2=INT(I2+.5)
1880 13=((D3/(1 -.Z3))*F3)+(S3*F3):I3=INT(13+.5)
1890 REM COMPUTING FINAL WEIGHTS AND ROUNDING THEM TO THE NEAREST POUND
1900 W1=X4+(G1lF1):W1=INT(W1+.5)
1910 W2=X4+(G2*F2) *:.-=INT(W2+.5)
1920 W3=X4+(G3,F3):W3=INT(W3+.5)
1930 PRINT TAB (19) ;"**TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS**"
1940 PRINT
1950 PRINT TAB(10), "FOR A" ;CP; "-TON TRUCK, WITH THE PRICE OF NO.2
1960 PRINT TAB ( 10);"SHELLED CORN AT $" PC; "PER BUSHEL AND $";TC
1970 PRINT TABE(10);"CHARGE PER MILE, MAXIMUM AFFORDABLE DISTANCES
1980 PRINT TAB(10); "WITH THE MOISTURE CONTENTS ASSUMED ARE:"
1990 PRINT
2000 PRINT TAB(10) ;"CORN GRAIN = ";M1; "MILES"
2010 PRINT TAB(10);"CORN EARLAGE = ";M2; "MILES"
2020 PRINT TAB(10);"CORN SILAGE = ";M3; "MILES"
2030 PRINT:PRINT
2040 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO SEE THE RESULTS OF THE FEEDING ANALYSIS ";AS
2050 CLS
2060 PRINT TAB(23);"**FEEDING ANALYSIS**"
2070 PRINT "A. INIT.WEIGHT";X4;TAB(21);"B.CALF PUR. PRICE";X5;TAB(45);"C.CORN YIE
L.D" ;BC
2080 PRINT "D.INT. RATE";IR*100;TAB(21);"E.CALF SEL. PRICE";X6;TAB(45);"F.CORN P
RICE" ;PC
2090 PRINT TAB(26);"GRAIN";TAB(40);"EARLAGE";TAB(54);"SILAGE"
2100 PRINT "GROWING COST";TAB(26);"G.";CG;TAB(40);"G.";CG;TAB(54);"G.";CG
2110 PRINT "HARVEST COST";TAB(26);"H.";CH;TAB(40);"I.";EH;TAB(54);"J.";SH
2120 PRINT "STORAGE COST";TAB(26);"K.";C1;TAB(40);"L.";C2;TAB(54);"M.";C3






3 1262 04376893 5

410


2130 PRINT "TOTAL INTAKE (FED BASIS)";TAB(26);I1;TAB(40);12;TAB(54);13 ouil d
2140 PRINT "DAILY GAIN";TAB(26);Gl;TAB(40);G2;TAB(54);G3
2150 PRINT "FEEDING DAYS";TAB(26);F1;TAB(40);F2;TAB(54);F3
2160 PRINT "FINAL WEIGHT";TAB(26);W1;TAB(40);W2;TAB(54);W3 SCIENCE
2170 PRINT TAB(26); "--------" ;TAB(40);"----- ";TAB(54); "---------- LIRPAOV
2180 PRINT "NET RETURN PER ANIMAL";TAB(25);"$";NI;TAB(39);"$";N2;TAB(53);"$"IN3
2190 PRINT
2200 INPUT "LETTER TO CHANGE (A-M) OR Z TO END ";C$
2210 IF C$-::"A" THEN INPUT "NEW INITIAL LIVEWEIGHT (LBS) ";X4
2220 IF C$="B" THEN INPUT "NEW CALF PURCHASE PRICE ($/CWT) ";X5
2230 IF C$="C" THEN INPUT "NEW EXPECTED CORN YIELD (BUSHELS/ACRE) ";BC
2240 IF C$="D" THEN INPUT "NEW INTEREST RATE (/) ";XX:IR=XX/100
2250 IF C$=="E" THEN INPUT "NEW CALF SELLING PRICE ($/CWT) ";X6
2260 IF C$="F" THEN INPUT "NEW EXPECTED PRICE OF NO.2 SHELLED CORN AT HARVEST ($
/BUSHEL) PC
2270 IF C$="G" THEN INPUT "NEW CORN GROWING COST ($/ACRE) ";CG
2280 IF C$="H" THEN INPUT "NEW HARVESTING COST FOR CORN GRAIN ($/ACRE) ";CH
2290 IF C$="I" THEN INPUT "NEW HARVESTING COST FOR CORN EARLAGE ($/TON) ";EH
2300 IF C$="J" THEN INPUT "NEW HARVESTING COST FOR CORN SILAGE ($/TON) ";SH
2310 IF C$="K" THEN INPUT "NEW CORN GRAIN STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PERI
OD) ; Cl
2320 IF C$="L" THEN INPUT "NEW CORN EARLAGE STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PE
RIOD) ";C2
2330 IF C$="M" THEN INPUT "NEW CORN SILAGE STORAGE COST ($/TON OF DM/FEEDING PER
IOD) ";C3
2340 IF C$="Z" THEN GOTO 2360
2350 GOTO 1450
2360 PRINT
2370 PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
2380 END
s______________





































































This public document was promulgated at a cost of $606.10, or 60.6 cents per copy, to provide infor-
mation on a microcomputer application of an economic analysis of field corn as a cattle feed. 01-1M-84


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL
SCIENCES, K. R. Tefertiller, director, In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this Infor-
matlon to further the purpose of the May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and Is authorized to provide research, educa-
tional Information and other services only to Individuals and Institutlons that function without regard to race, color, sex or
national origin. Single copies of Extension publications (excluding 4-H and Youth publications) are available free to Florida
residents from County Extension Offices. Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers Is available from
C. M. Hinton, Publications Distribution Center, IFAS Building 664, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Before publicizing this
publication, editors should contact this address to determine availability.




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