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Group Title: Computer series Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Title: A Microcomputer program for dilution calculations when injecting dissolved dry fertilizers
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095261/00002
 Material Information
Title: A Microcomputer program for dilution calculations when injecting dissolved dry fertilizers
Alternate Title: FERTDRY
Physical Description: 1 computer disk : ; 5 1/4 in. +
Language: zxx
English
Creator: Yeager, Thomas H. ( Thomas Henry ), 1952-
Ingram, Dewayne L. ( Dewayne Lebron ), 1952-
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1985
Copyright Date: 1986
Edition: Version 2.1.
 Subjects
Subject: Fertilizers -- Application   ( lcsh )
Nurseries (Horticulture) -- Management   ( lcsh )
FERTDRY (Computer program)   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Summary: FERTDRY is an interactive computer program that will calculate the weight of dry fertilizer to dissolve in irrigation water to the specified volume. Useful to nursery operators.
Statement of Responsibility: Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram.
System Details: System requirements: IBM PC or compatible; MS-DOS; 64K; monochrome or color display; single disk drive. Optional: printer.
General Note: Description based on: documentation dated January 1986.
General Note: Title on disk label: FERTDRY.
General Note: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, computer series circular 693
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095261
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20744813

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text
IU I


January 1986


Disk(s) under separate cover


Circular 693


A Microcomputer Program for

Dilution Calculations

When Injecting Dissolved Dry Fertilizers


COMPUTER SERIES

Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram


I


Centra; Science
Library
JAN 30 1990
University of Florida


Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / John T. Woeste, Dean


1.-.-ia


























































Trade names are mentioned with the understanding that no discrimination is intended nor endorse-
ment implied by the Cooperative Extension Service.

















A Microcomputer Program for

Dilution Calculations When Injecting

Dissolved Dry Fertilizers




Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram

Extension Ornamental Horticulturists

Ornamental Horticulture Department

IFAS, University of Florida




Copyright, 1985, IFAS, UF










The authors gratefully acknowledge Ivan Milman and Justine Wetherington

for assistance in writing FERTDRY in BASIC.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES







INTRODUCTION

Computations that are lengthy, cumbersome, and require several

conversion factors are often required for injecting fertilizer in

irrigation water. Consequently, many nursery operators are reluctant to

use fertilizers applied by irrigation water. The computer program

described below has been developed to perform these computations quickly.

FERTDRY, Dilution Calculations When Injecting Dissolved Dry Fertilizers,

is an interactive computer program (requires user input) that will

calculate the weight of dry fertilizer to dissolve in irrigation water to

the specified volume. Refer to the computer program "Dilution

Calculations When Injecting Solution Fertilizers" (Circular 694) for

fertilizers purchased as solutions and injected into nursery irrigation

water. FERTDRY, as outlined in Figure 1, is written in BASIC.


CONFIGURATIVE REQUIREMENTS



1. IBM or compatible microcomputer

2. MS-DOS Operating System

3. 64K Memory

4. Monochrome or color display

5. Single Disk Drive

6. Printer (optional)


HOW TO BEGIN



1. Turn your computer on. Use your regular boot (DOS) disk.

2. Place FERTDRY disk into the drive unit.

3. Type FERTDRY (press the return key).






If you wish to view the credits and a brief description

of this program, simply type in the letter C and press

. If you want to start the program, just press the

key.


After the credits and abstract have been viewed or skipped, select

option A or B. Option A is used when dissolving blended dry fertilizers.

Examples of fertilizers used for option A are Peters' 20-20-20 and

Miller's 20-20-20. Option B is used when dissolving individual

fertilizer compounds to supply specific nutrients for injection into

irrigation water. Examples of fertilizers used for option B are ammonium

nitrate and calcium nitrate.


Enter option (A or B)

Enter letter A then to select option A.


OPTION A



Before using option A, you must obtain the following:

1. Analysis or grade (example, 8-8-8) of fertilizer. This is the

percent of nitrogen (N), phosphorus pentoxide (P205), and potassium

oxide (K20) in the fertilizer.

2. Parts per million (ppm) nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or potassium

(K) desired in the irrigation water. The irrigation water may

contain naturally occurring nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium for

which the concentration can be determined by chemical analysis.






3. Dilution ratio(s) of the injector. A dilution ratio indicates how

much the injector or proportioner will dilute the fertilizer

concentrate. For example, a dilution ratio of 1:1000 will result in

999 gallons of water being mixed with one gallon of fertilizer

concentrate. Some injectors have variable dilution ratios.

4. The total volume of solution (water and fertilizer) in the mixing

tank.



SAMPLE RUN FOR OPTION A


An abstract is given to explain the purpose of the program when used

without this publication. The information in the abstract is given above

so you may elect not to read the abstract. If so, enter the letter N for

no. The following inputs as outlined above will be used for the sample

run.

1. 20-20-20

2. N

3. 300

4. 10

5. 200

6. 50

Letters or numbers in quotes are entered by the user. Quotes are

not entered. Phrases in boxes are viewed on the screen.






1. What is your fertilizer analysis? (Press return after

each number)


"20"

20 "20"

20 20 "20"


The first number is percent nitrogen (N), the second, percent phosphorus

pentoxide (P205), and the third potassium oxide (K20).


2. What element do you want to base the calculations on?

Enter N for Nitrogen

P for Phosphorus

K for Potassium.

"N"


3. What concentration in parts per million (ppm) of

NITROGEN do you desire?

"300" ppm NITROGEN


Nitrogen was selected in question 2 as the element in which to base the

calculations, so question 3 asks for the nitrogen concentration. If

phosphorus or potassium were entered in question 2, question 3 would have

asked for the concentration of phosphorus or potassium, respectively.

If phosphorus or potassium had been chosen in question 2, the

concentration entered in question 3 (the desired concentration) is the

elemental concentration of phosphorus and potassium and not the

concentration of the oxides (P205 and K20, respectively).

4







Note: ppm P205 x .436 = ppm elemental phosphorus

ppm K20 x .83 = ppm elemental potassium



4. What ppm nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are

naturally in the irrigation water?

Enter the number 0 if not known.

"10" ppm NITROGEN

"0" ppm PHOSPHORUS

"0" ppm POTASSIUM


Values entered for question 4 must be elemental concentrations and not

oxides. If you do not know the concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or

potassium naturally in the irrigation water, enter 0, but naturally

occurring nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium will increase the

concentration applied above that desired in question 3. For this

example, it has been determined by chemical analysis that the irrigation

water contains 10 ppm nitrogen. The irrigation water did not contain

natural phosphorus or potassium.

Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium naturally in

the irrigation water may vary frequently, so it is important to

frequently monitor their concentration in order to apply precise

concentrations. It is possible that the irrigation water contains a

higher concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium than you want

to inject; consequently that elements) would not be required in the

fertilizer.





5. What is the dilution ratio of your injector?

Your setting 1: "200"


6. What will be the total number of gallons (water and

fertilizer) in the mixing tank?

"50" gallons


The computer uses the above inputs and calculates the amount of

fertilizer dissolved in water to the specified volume. The following

message is displayed.


Dissolve 120.9 pounds of 20-20-20 in irrigation water to

make 50 gallons of solution (water and fertilizer). Stir

while filling mixing tank with water. When using an injector

setting of 1:200, the irrigation water will contain:

300 ppm NITROGEN

126 ppm PHOSPHORUS

240 ppm POTASSIUM.






CAUTION: The amount of 20-20-20 that can be dissolved

depends upon the concentration of natural salts in the

irrigation water. The concentration of natural salts varies

with water source; therefore, you must determine if 2.4 pounds

of the 20-20-20 will dissolve in irrigation water brought up

to a volume of one gallon. If the 20-20-20 does not dissolve,

you may select a fertilizer with greater water solubility to

achieve 300 ppm of NITROGEN in irrigation water or elect to

inject a lower concentration of NITROGEN by:

1) adding more irrigation water to the mixing tank or,

2) decreasing the injector dilution ratio.


When the answer is displayed, other pertinent information for the

injection process is also viewed on the screen. Thus you may use "print

screen" for a hard copy of the information needed for the fertilizer

injection process.


OPTION B
Before using option B, you must obtain the following:

1. The fertilizer compound you intend to use.

2. Parts per million (ppm) of specific nutrient to be applied. The

irrigation water may contain a naturally occurring concentration

of the nutrient to be applied, which can be determined by

chemical analysis.

3. Dilution ratio(s) of the injector. A dilution ratio indicates

how much the injector or proportioner will dilute the fertilizer







concentrate. For example, a dilution ratio of 1:1000 will result

in 999 gallons of water being mixed with one gallon of fertilizer

concentrate. Some injectors have variable dilution ratios.

4. Total volume of solution (water and fertilizer) in the mixing

tank.


SAMPLE RUN FOR OPTION B


An abstract is given to explain the purpose of the program when used

without this publication. The information in the abstract is given above

so you may elect not to read the abstract. If so, enter the letter N for

no. The following inputs as outlined above will be used for the sample

run.

1. 2

2. 34

3. 300

4. 10

5. 200

6. 50

Letters or numbers in quotes are entered by the user. Quotes are not

entered. Phrases in boxes are viewed on the screen.






Select from list below the

into irrigation water.


NUMBER

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14


fertilizer compound you will inject


FERTILIZER COMPOUND

Ammonium chloride

Ammonium nitrate

Ammonium sulfate

Borax

Calcium carbonate

Calcium nitrate

Calcium sulfate

Copper chel ate

Copper sulfate

Diammonium phosphate

Iron chelate

Iron sulfate

Magnesium nitrate

Magnesium sulfate


NUMBER

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27


1. Enter the number preceding the fertilizer compound you want

to use.

"2"



2. Enter the percentage NITROGEN in AMMONIUM NITRATE you will be

using.

If not known, enter the common percentage of 34.

"34"


FERTILIZER COMPOUND

Manganese chelate

Manganese sulfate

Monoammonium phosphate

Potassium chloride

Potassium diphosphate

Potassium monophosphate

Potassium nitrate

Potassium sulfate

Sodium molybdate

Sodium nitrate

Urea

Zinc chelate

Zinc sulfate






3. What concentration in parts per million (ppm) of NITROGEN do

you desire?

"300" ppm NITROGEN


4. What ppm NITROGEN is naturally in the irrigation water?

Enter the number 0 if not known.

"10" ppm NITROGEN


5. What is the dilution ratio of your injector?

Your setting 1: "200"


6. What will be the total number of gallons (water and

fertilizer) in the mixing tank?

"50" gallons


The computer uses the above inputs and calculates the amount of

fertilizer dissolved to the specified volume. All calculations are based

on the elemental content of a fertilizer compound, not the oxides.



Dissolve 71.1 pounds of AMMONIUM NITRATE in

irrigation water to make 50 gallons of solution (water

and fertilizer). Stir while filling mixing tank with

water. When using an injector setting of 1:200, the

irrigation water will contain:

300 ppm NITROGEN.






CAUTION: The amount of AMMONIUM NITRATE that can be

dissolved depends upon the concentration of natural salts

in the irrigation water. The concentration of natural

salts varies with water source; therefore, you must

determine if 1.4 pounds of AMMONIUM NITRATE will dissolve

in irrigation water brought up to a volume of one gallon.

If the AMMONIUM NITRATE does not dissolve, you may select

a fertilizer with greater water solubility to achieve 300

ppm of NITROGEN in irrigation water or elect to inject a

lower concentration of NITROGEN by:

1) adding more irrigation water to the mixing tank or,

2) decreasing the injector dilution ratio.


When the answer is displayed, other pertinent information for the

injection process is also viewed on the screen. Thus you may "print

screen" for a hard copy of the information needed for the fertilizer

injection process. You may elect to repeat either of the options or end

the program.


COMPUTATIONAL FORMULAS


The basic formula for computations of options A and B follows:

gl = ((((ppm-nat) yrset)/1000) (100/wt))

gl = calculated amount of fertilizer in grams that will yield the

desired ppm in 1 liter of solution

ppm = parts per million of element desired

nat = naturally occurring ppm of element in irrigation water






yrset = your injector dilution

wt = percentage of element in fertilizer

For option A, the percentage of phosphorus pentoxide and potassium

oxide in the fertilizer is multiplied by 0.436 and 0.83, respectively, to

obtain the percentage of phosphorus (wt) and potassium (wt) in the

fertilizer.

For both options, gl is multiplied by 0.1335 to obtain the ounces of

fertilizer dissolved to a volume of one gallon (ozgal). Ozgal is divided

ozgal = gl 0.1335

by 16 to obtain pounds per gallon if ozgal is greater than 16. Ozgal is

multiplied by final volume of fertilizer solution (mixer) to obtain the

total amount of fertilizer (amtfert) to dissolve.

amtfert = ozgal mixer





Figure 1. Fertilizer dilution program flow chart.


Yeager, Ingram





































































This publication was produced at a cost of $216.21, or $1.08 per copy, to provide guidance for person performing
fertilizer dilution computations. 2-2M-86


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, K.R. Tefoertiller,
director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further the purpose of the May 8 and U
June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and Institu-
tions that function without regard to race, color, sex or national origin. Single copies of Extension publications (excluding 4-H and Youth publica-
tions) are available free to Florida residents from County Extension Offices. Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers is
available from C.M. Hinton, Publications Distribution Center, IFAS Building 664, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Before publicizing this publication,
editors should contact this address to determine availability.




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