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Group Title: Computer series Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Title: Know your man-made fibers
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095243/00002
 Material Information
Title: Know your man-made fibers
Physical Description: Archival
Language: zxx
English
Creator: Hackler, Nadine
Heaton, Linda
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1987
Copyright Date: 1987
Edition: Version 1.00.
 Subjects
Subject: Textile fabrics, Synthetic   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Summary: A practice computer program to educate individuals, especially youth, about man-made fibers. The program focuses on the characteristics, uses and care of man-made fibers.
Statement of Responsibility: Nadine Hackler and Linda Heaton.
System Details: System requirements: IBM PC or compatible, PC-DOS or MS-DOS version 2; 64K RAM.
General Note: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, computer series circular 711
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095243
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20751266

Table of Contents
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Back Cover
        Page 13
        Page 14
Full Text
I 1(
F3"c

March 1987


Disk(s) under separate cover


Circular 711


Know Your Man-Made Fibers


COMPUTER SERIES


Central Science
Library


JAN 30 i990


Nadine Hackler and Linda Heaton


University of Florida


101 'P.r. lntUon i s I IneltI of Food and Agri thurm al dt I/ Univwty of Florlid / John T. Wum, Dan
F636c
711
guide














KNOW YOUR MAN-MADE FIBERS


Know Your Man-Made Fibers is a practice computer program to educate
individuals, especially youth, about man-made fibers. The program is designed for
Apple He microcomputers and IBM PC microcomputers (and their compatibles).
Textile products in today's world often confuse individuals both young and old.
Many people lack the necessary knowledge about textile fibers to make appropriate
decisions in selecting apparel and home furnishings. The Know Your Man-Made
ibers computer program will aid people of all ages who want to learn more about
textiles. The program focuses on the characteristics, uses and care of man-made
fibers.
A dictionary of the terms used in the program appears as a part of the screen
menu. To enhance learning, program participants should begin by experimenting
with the dictionary and become familiar with the textile terms before using other
parts of the program.
Accompanying the program is a pre- and post-test to evaluate the degree of
learning (Appendix A). These instruments were used in the pilot testing of the
computer program. The pre-test should be administered prior to the introduction of
the study on man-made fibers. The post-test should be administered after the
program is completed.
The computer program should be an integral part of the educational unit on
man-made fibers. Evaluations from two pilot tests indicated the program would
serve as a good tutorial method for students (junior high through college), as well
as for volunteer leaders in Extension.


Objectives


After completing the Know Your Man-Made Fibers computer program,
participants will be able to better.

understand the characteristics of man-made fibers as they relate to
everyday textile products.

know the uses of certain man-made fibers as they relate to everyday
textile products.

apply appropriate care to man-made fiber textile products.

interpret man-made fiber labeling.

recognize the difference between generic and trademark labeling.













Before You Begin


The following assumptions have been made about the use of the Know Your
Man-Made Fibers computer program.

The program will be used as part of an educational program on fibers
or fabrics.

Participants should have an interest and desire to learn about man-made
fibers.

The person operating the program can read and follow directions.

Individuals will first read the dictionary and general information before
using the sections on individual fibers.

Individuals should complete all fiber information before selecting the
review questions.

Individuals will study the fibers in alphabetical order.

Program participants do not need previous computer experience to use
the program.




Booting Up or Starting the Program


Aoole lie User's Instructions


An Apple lie (or a compatible) computer with at least 64K bytes of random
access memory and an 80 column capacity, and Apple Pascal software is needed. To
start the program follow these specific steps:

Turn on the computer.

Place the Know Your Man-Made Fibers disc in drive 1.

The program will automatically execute and begin.









IBM PC User's Instructions


An IBM PC (or a compatible) computer with at least 64K bytes of random
access memory is needed.

Turn on the computer and then boot up the system using PC-DOS
(MS-DOS) version 2 disk in drive A. See PC-DOS (MS-DOS) manual
for additional information.

Remove disk.

Insert the Know Your Man-Made Fibers disk into drive A.

At the A prompt, e FIBERS and press the RETURN key.

The program will automatically load and execute.



What You Will See


The first computer screen will be the title page followed by the second screen
which will be acknowledgements. Then, the disclaimer followed by the main menu
will be displayed.
Each time you begin the program, you will be asked to tvre in your name
after the credit screens and dictionary. If you make a mistake while typing, use
the backspace key <-- } or left cursor key to go back and correct it.
The format is the same for all parts of the program. After you make a
selection from the menu. one or two screens of information will be followed by a
series of questions.
Each section of the program on man-made fibers contains a variety of
questions, i.e. true/false, multiple choice, labeling, and/or matching, from the total
230 in the program. The computer keeps a count of correct answers for each
section. (See Appendix B for the tally sheet relating to the questions.) The
computer gives an "up" sound for correct answers, and a "down" sound for incorrect
answers. In addition, if an incorrect answer is given, the correct answer will
appear on the screen to assist in learning.


Getting Out of the Program

ADDnle Ie-and IBM PC

To exit the program:

Type 0 for Quit when the program prompts you on the screen.

When the red disk access light goes off, remove the Know Your
Man-Made Fibers disk from drive A (IBM PC users) or drive 1
(Apple users).

Turn off the computer.










Authors

Nadine Hackler, Professor, Extension Clothing Specialist, Home Economics
Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611.

Linda Heaton, Associate Professor, Clothing and Textiles Specialist, Kentucky
Cooperative Extension Service, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506.

Acknowledgements

Man-Made Fiber Producers Association for partial funding.

Bill Summerhill, Associate Professor, Program Evaluation Specialist who developed
the pre-test, post-test and reaction questionnaire that was used in the testing, and
who also prepared the written evaluation of the pilot testing.

Paul Sinclair, student programmer for Apple lie.

Dennis Suppe, student programmer for IBM PC.

Karen Mettling, former IFAS Software Communication and Distribution Coordinator.

Lois Derrick, technician.

Selected References

Know Your Man-Made Fibers is based on information from the following
selected references:

_Editors of American Fabrics and Fashions Magazine, Ency-
clopedia of Textiles. Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice Hall, 1980.

Giocello, Debbie A., Understanding Fabrics: From Fiber to Finished Cloth, New
York, Fairchild Publications, 1982.

Hollen, Norma and Jane Saddler, Textiles, New York, Macmillain Publishing
Inc., Fifth Edition, 1979.

Lyle, Dorothy S., Modern Textiles. New York, John Wiley and Sons, Second
Edition, 1982.

Tortora, Phyllis, Understandina Textiles. New York, MacMillian Publishing Co.,
1978.

Wingate, Isabel B. and June F. Mohler, Textile Fabrics and Their Selection,
Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, Inc., Eighth Edition, 1984.










Limitation of Liability


The University of Florida (UF), Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS), and Florida Cooperative Extension Service (FCES) shall have no liability or
responsibility to cooperator or any other person or entity with respect to any
liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly by programs
released by IFAS for sale or cooperative use including but not limited to any
interruption of service, loss of business, or anticipatory profits or consequential
damages resulting from use of operation. And in no event shall FCES be liable for
loss of profits, indirect, special, or consequential damages arising out of any breach
of the agreement or obligations of this contract.


Condition of Release or Sale

All computer software distributed by IFAS or FCES are on an "AS IS" basis
without warranty. Distribution or resale without written permission of the
department of origin is not permitted.


Use of Brand Names

The use of tradenames is for educational purposes only. It does not imply
product endorsement.


For Additional Information

For information on how to obtain this computer program, Know Your
Man-Made Fibers, write or calk

IFAS Software Communication and Distribution
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
203 Old Dairy Science Bldg.
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
904-392-7853










PRE-QUIZ

Computer Assisted Instruction on
Characteristics and Uses of Man-Made Fibers

To help us make this program better, as well as determine its impact, please
take a few minutes to answer the following questions. Thank you!

A. Answer true (T) or false (F).

1. Short fibers are called denim.

2. Man-made fibers absorb water easily.

3. White garments of acetate and triacetate may yellow after washing.

4. Acrylics and modacrylics are flame-resistant.

5. Aramid is similar to nylon.

6. Grease and oil stains are difficult to remove in nylon garments.

7. Olefin comes in a limited range of colors.

8. Polyester is the strongest fiber.

9. With high temperatures rayon will melt rather than scorch.

10. Draperies made of glass fabrics will burn.


B. Select the best answer by circling.

1. Which of these fibers would be most like cotton?

a. nylon
b. rayon
c. polyester

2. Killing occurs because of abrasion and

a. incorrect laundering
b. strong fibers
c. inexpensive fabrics

3. Which garment would be a good use of acetate?

a. party dresses
b. jeans
c. pleated skirts










4. Acrylics

a. shrink when washed
b. stretch out of shape during wearing
c. do not dye well

5. Aramid is used in blankets and curtains surrounding high speed machinery
because

a. it is strong
b. it is flame retardant
c. both a and b

6. Which of these fibers can be made to feel like silk?

a. nylon
b. modacrylic
c. polyester

7. A good description of olefin is

a. it has excellent wicking ability
b. it absorbs water
c. it is made from coal

8. Because polyester is so strong, it can be blended with cotton for blue
jeans to

a. prevent knees from wearing out
b. allow jeans to stretch as you grow
c. wash better

9. If you had a pair of polyester/rayon blend pants, you could expect
them to be

a. heavy
b. soft and comfortable
c. limited in color range

10. Spandex is a good choice for bathing suits because it

a. absorbs body oils
b. stretches for comfort
c. both a and b



This concludes the Pro-Quiz. Thank you!









POST-QUIZ

Computer Assisted Instruction on
Characteristics and Uses of Man-Made Fibers

Now we would like for you to try your hand again at answering the questions
that were in the pre-quiz. In addition, we would appreciate your reactions to the
program in general.

A. Answer true (T) or false (F) in the blanks provided.

1. Short fibers are called denim.

2. Man-made fibers absorb water easily.

3. White garments of acetate and triactetate may yellow after washing.

4. Acrylic and modacrylics are flame-resistant.

5. Aramid is similar to nylon.

6. Grease and oil stains are difficult to remove in nylon garments.

7. Olefin comes in a limited range of colors.

8. Polyester is the strongest fiber.

9. With high temperatures rayon will melt rather than scorch.

10. Draperies made of glass fabrics will burn.


B. Select the best answer by circling.

1. Which of these fibers would be most like cotton?

a. nylon
b. rayon
c. polyester

2. Pilling occurs because of abrasion and

a. incorrect laundering
b. strong fibers
c. inexpensive fabrics

3. Which garment would be a good use of acetate?

a. party dresses
b. jeans
c. pleated skirts









4. Acrylics

a. shrink when washed
b. stretch out of shape during wearing
c. do not dye well

5. Aramid is used in blankets and curtains surrounding high speed machinery
because

a. it is strong
b. it is flame retardant
c. both a and b

6. Which of these fibers can be made to feel like silk?

a. nylon
b. modacrylic
c. polyester

7. A good description of olefin is

a. it has excellent wicking ability
b. it absorbs water
c. it is made from coal

8. Because polyester is so strong, it can be blended with cotton for blue
jeans to

a. prevent knees from wearing out
b. allow jeans to stretch as you grow
c. wash better

9. If you had a pair of polyester/rayon blend pants you could expect
them to be

a. heavy
b. soft and comfortable
c. limited in color range

10. Spandex is a good choice for bathing suits because it

a. absorbs body oils
b. stretches for comfort
c. both a and b



This concludes the Post-quiz. Thank you.






TALLY SHEET


Know Your Man-Made Fibers


General Information
What Are Fibers?
More About Fibers

Common Properties
of Man-Made Fibers
Length/Denier
Abrasion Resistance/
Heat Sensitivity
Absorbency/Care/
Chemicals/Moth/
Fungi/Sunlight

Fiber Types
ACETATE/TRIACETATE
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses
Care/Trademarks

ACRYLIC/MODACRYLIC
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses
Care/Trademarks

ARAMID

GLASS
General/Good
Limiting/End Uses/
Care/Trademarks

NYLON
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses/Trademarks
Care

OLEFIN
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses
Care Trademarks


# Correct (circle number)

1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10



1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19


1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25 26


8

19 20 21


4 5


4 5
9 10


1 2 3 4
6 7 8 9
14 15 16
19 20 21


11 12 13




11 12 13
18
23


5
10 11 12 13
17 18
22 23 24 25 26
















POLYESTER
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses/Trademarks
Care

RAYON
General/Good
Limiting
End Uses
Care/Trademarks

SPANDEX
General/Good
Limiting/End Uses/
Trademarks


REVIEW


1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
19 20 21 22


1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
19 20 21 22


2 3 4 5 6 7
10 11 12 13


11 12 13
18
23 24



11 12 13
18
23 24 25


23456789


Total Possible Score: 230

Your Score: ?


26


8
































































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Know Your Ma-Mads Fiber computer Program. 4-.2M-87


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