Group Title: Computer series Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Title: A Microcomputer program for dilution calculations when injecting solution fertilizers
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095229/00002
 Material Information
Title: A Microcomputer program for dilution calculations when injecting solution fertilizers
Series Title: Computer series Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Alternate Title: SOLUFERT
Physical Description: Archival
Language: zxx
English
Creator: Yeager, Thomas H ( Thomas Henry ), 1952-
Ingram, Dewayne L ( Dewayne Lebron ), 1952-
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1985
Copyright Date: 1986
Edition: Version 2.1.
 Subjects
Subject: Liquid fertilizers -- Application   ( lcsh )
Nurseries (Horticulture) -- Management   ( lcsh )
SOLUFERT (Computer program)   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Summary: SOLUFERT is an interactive computer program that will calculate the dilution ratio needed to obtain the desired concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium in irrigation water. Useful to nursery operators.
Statement of Responsibility: Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram.
System Details: System requirements: IBM PC or compatible; MS-DOS; 64K; monochrome or color display; single disk drive. Optional: printer.
General Note: Description based on: documentation dated January 1986.
General Note: Title on disk label: SOLUFERT.
System Details: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, computer series circular 694
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095229
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20744774

Full Text
January 1986
G14


Disk(s) under separate cover


Circular 694


A Microcomputer Program for

Dilution Calculations

When Injecting Solution Fertilizers


COMPUTER SERIES Central Science
Central Science
Library
Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram
U JAN 30 1990
University of Florida


mmi


101
F6 3 6c itive Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / John T. Woeste, Dean
/ 694



















A Microcomputer Program for

Dilution Calculations When Injecting

Solution Fertilizers




Thomas H. Yeager and Dewayne L. Ingram

Extension Ornamental Horticulturists

Ornamental Horticulture Department

IFAS, University of Florida




Copyright, 1985, IFAS, UF










The authors gratefully acknowledge Jason Goldman, Ivan Milman and

Justine Wetherington for assistance in writing SOLUFERT in BASIC

computer language.


UNIVi.RSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES








INTRODUCTION

Computations that are lengthy, cumbersome, and require several

conversion factors are often required for injecting fertilizer in

irrigation water. Consequently, many nursery operators are

reluctant to use fertilizers applied by irrigation water. The

computer program described below has been developed to perform

these computations quickly. SOLUFERT, Dilution Calculations When

Injecting Solution Fertilizers, is an interactive computer program

(requires user input) that will calculate the dilution ratio needed

to obtain the desired concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or

potassium in the irrigation water. Refer to microcomputer program

"Dilution Calculations When Injecting Dissolved Dry Fertilizers"

(Circular 693) for fertilizers that are purchased dry and dissolved

before being injected into irrigation water. SOLUFERT, as outlined

in Figure 1, is written in BASIC.


CONFIGURATIVE REQUIREMENTS


1. IBM or compatible microcomputer

2. MS-DOS Operating System

3. 64 K Memory

4. Monochrome or color display

5. Single Disk Drive

6. Printer (optional)








HOW TO BEGIN


1. Turn your computer on. Use your regular boot (DOS) disk.

2. Place SOLUFERT disk into the drive unit.

3. Type SOLUFERT (press the return key).


If you wish to view the credits and a brief description of

this program, simply type in the letter C and press . If

you want to start the program, just press the key.


After the credits and abstract have been viewed or skipped,

the following must be obtained:

1. Analysis or grade (example, 8-8-8) of fertilizer. This is the

percent of nitrogen (N), phosphorus pentoxide (P205), and

potassium oxide (K20) in the fertilizer.

2. Parts per million (ppm) nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or

potassium (K) desired in the irrigation water. The irrigation

water may contain naturally occurring nitrogen, phosphorus, or

potassium for which the concentration can be determined by

chemical analysis.

3. Weight/volume ratio for the fertilizer. Solution fertilizers

are commonly sold by the ton and gallons of liquid per ton

varies with the product and temperature. The manufacturer

should be able to provide the weight/volume ratio.

4. Dilution ratio(s) of the injector. A dilution ratio indicates

how much the injector or proportioner will dilute the








fertilizer concentrate. For example, a dilution ratio of 1:

1000 will result in 999 gallons of water being mixed with one

gallon of fertilizer concentrate. Some injectors have variable

dilution ratios.

Utilizing the inputs outlined above for your situation, this

computer program will calculate the dilution ratio needed to

achieve the desired concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or

potassium. If the dilution ratio does not equal the one you

selected, the program will indicate how to dilute the concentrated

fertilizer before injection or will give the analysis of solution

fertilizer needed to achieve the desired concentration of nitrogen,

phosphorus, or potassium, to be applied by irrigation water.



SAMPLE RUN


The following inputs as outlined above will be used for the

sample run.

1. 10-5-15

2. N

3. 150

4. 10

5. B

6. 11.69

7. 1000

Letters or numbers in quotes are entered by the user. Quotes

are not entered. Phrases in boxes are viewed on the screen.






















The first number is percent nitrogen (N), the second, percent

phosphorus pentoxide (P205), and the third potassium oxide (K20).



2. What element do you want to base the calculations

on?

Enter N for Nitrogen

P for Phosphorus

K for Potassium.

"N"



3. What concentration in parts per million (ppm) of

NITROGEN do you desire?

"150" ppm NITROGEN



Nitrogen was selected in question 2 as the element on which to base

the calculations, so question 3 asks for the nitrogen

concentration. If phosphorus or potassium had been entered in

question 2, question 3 would have asked for the concentration of

phosphorus or potassium, respectively.

If phosphorus or potassium had been chosen in question 2, the


1. What is your fertilizer analysis? (Press return
after each number.)


1"

10 "5"


10 5 "15"
10 5 "15"








concentration entered in question 3 (the desired concentration) is

the elemental concentration of phosphorus and potassium and not the

concentration of the oxides (P205 and K20, respectively).

note: ppm P205 x .436 = ppm elemental phosphorus

ppm K20 x .83 = ppm elemental potassium


4. What ppm nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are

naturally in the irrigation water?

Enter the number 0 if not known.

"10" ppm NITROGEN

"0" ppm PHOSPHORUS

"0" ppm POTASSIUM



Values entered for question 4 must be elemental concentrations and

not oxides. If the concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or

potassium naturally in the irrigation water is not known, enter 0,

but naturally occurring nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium will

increase the concentration applied above that desired in question

3. For this example, it has been determined by chemical analysis

that the irrigation water contains 10 ppm nitrogen. The irrigation

water did not contain natural phosphorus or potassium.

Natural concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium

in the irrigation water may vary frequently, so it is important to

monitor frequently their concentration in order to apply precise

concentrations. It is possible that the irrigation water contains

a higher concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium than








you want

required


to inject. Consequently, that elements) would not be

in the fertilizer.


5. You must either provide the weight/volume ratio of

the concentrated fertilizer or choose to accept a

default of 10 pounds/gallon (200 gallons/ton).

Enter A for gallons/ton

B for pounds/gallon

C for the default.

"B"



The fertilizer distributor says the 10-5-15 weighs 11.69 pounds per

gallon of fertilizer, so "B" is entered to select the appropriate

units for computation. Selection of the default can result in

erroneous answers.



6. What is the weight/volume ratio? (enter the number

10 to default)

"11.69" pounds/gallon


The numerical weight obtained from the fertilizer distributor

is entered. The units following the number were selected in

question 5.

The computer uses the above inputs and calculates the injector

setting needed to achieve desired concentration of fertilizer

element in the irrigation water. The following message is

displayed.








7. An injector setting of 1: 1000 is required to

supply 150 ppm NITROGEN in the irrigation water

using the 10-5-15 fertilizer. Please enter the

closest setting that you can supply such that the

setting is less than or equal to the setting

needed. If this is not possible, then input the

next higher setting.

Your setting 1: "1000"


The setting or injector dilution ratio entered is equal to injector

dilution ratio calculated by the computer. Thus, the irrigation

water applied to plants contains 150 ppm nitrogen or the desired

concentration.

Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium concentrations in the

irrigation water are displayed as follows:


When using an injector setting of 1:1000 and the

10-5-15 fertilizer, water applied to plants

contains:

150 ppm NITROGEN

30.5 ppm PHOSPHORUS

174.3 ppm POTASSIUM.


The 10-5-15 fertilizer contains three elements.

Suppose you had entered a number for your injector setting

that is less than the dilution needed to obtain 150 ppm nitrogen.

Note the following example:








Your setting 1: "100"


The irrigation water would contain 1410.7 ppm

NITROGEN when using the 1:100 dilution ratio and

the 10-5-15 fertilizer. Do you wish to use a

mixing tank to obtain 150 ppm NITROGEN in the

irrigation water? Enter Y for yes or N for no.

"N"


When using an injector setting of 1:100 and the

10-5-15 fertilizer, water applied to plants

contains:

1410.7 ppm NITROGEN

305.3 ppm PHOSPHORUS

1743.9 ppm POTASSIUM.


A mixing tank is used to dilute and mix the concentrated fertilizer

prior to injection. Suppose you entered "Y" instead of "N" for the

last entry.


What will be the total number of gallons (water

and fertilizer) in your mixing tank?

"50" gallons








To make a 50 gallon solution of water and

fertilizer, take 4.9 gallons of the 10-5-15

fertilizer and add irrigation water up to 50

gallons. The 50 gallon solution in the mixing

tank is injected into the irrigation water using a

1: 100 dilution ratio.

Water applied to plants contains:

150 ppm NITROGEN

30.5 ppm PHOSPHORUS

174.3 ppm POTASSIUM.


Suppose you had entered a number for the injector setting that is

larger than the dilution needed to obtain 150 ppm nitrogen.

Note the following example:


Your setting 1: "2000"


The following message would be viewed.


Using the 1:2000 dilution and the 10-5-15 fertilizer,

the maximum NITROGEN concentration in the irrigation

water will be 80 ppm. If 150 ppm NITROGEN are desired,

a 19.9 percent NITROGEN fertilizer must be used.


If the calculations were based on phosphorus or potassium, the

percentage needed in the fertilizer would be given as the oxides,

P205 and K20, respectively.








When an answer is displayed, other pertinent information for

the injection process is also viewed on the screen. The function

"print screen" may be used for a hard copy of the information

needed for the fertilizer injection process.

You may elect to repeat or end the program.


COMPUTATIONAL FORMULAS

The following formula is used to calculate the parts per

million of an element (ppmexp) in irrigation water for a specific

injector setting.

ppmexp = nat + ((wt*rat*1198.26)/yrset)

nat = naturally occurring ppm of element in irrigation water

wt = percentage of element in fertilizer

The percentage of phosphorus pentoxide and potassium oxide in

the fertilizer is multiplied by 0.436.and 0.83, respectively,

to obtain the percentage of phosphorus (wt) and potassium (wt)

in the fertilizer. /

rat = weight/volume (lb/gal) ratio of the solution

fertilizer

1198.26 mg-gal/lb-liter = 453.59 g/lb *1000 mg/g 1 gal/3.78

liter 1/100

yrset = your injector dilution

If the injector setting used is smaller than needed to obtain

the desired ppm of element, the solution fertilizer can be dil'-ted

before injection. The following formula is used to calculate the

dilution factor (dfact).

dfact = (ppmx/yrset)/(ppm-nat)








ppmx = wt rat 1198.26

ppm = ppm desired

The gallons of fertilizer (gfert) diluted to a specified volume

(mixer) prior to injection are then calculated.

gfert = mixer/dfact

If the injector setting used is larger than needed to obtain

the desired ppm, fertilizer with a higher analysis of the desired

element must be selected. The percentage 1) nitrogen concept) 2)

phosphorus pentoxide, or 3) potassium oxide of the fertilizer

analysis is obtained using the following formula.

concept = (ppm nat) yrset/(rat 1198.26)

1 concept = %N

2 concep/0.436 = %P205

3 concep/0.83 = %K20

A flow chart for the fertilizer dilution program is provided

on the following page.














Figure 1. Fertilizer dilution program flow chart.


YES




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