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 Table of Contents
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Group Title: Computer series
Title: Making beef cattle management decisions using microcomputer aids
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095227/00002
 Material Information
Title: Making beef cattle management decisions using microcomputer aids
Physical Description: 1 computer disk + : ;
Language: English
Creator: Prevatt, J. Walter ( James Walter ), 1953-
Kunkle, William, 1947-
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1984
Copyright Date: 1984
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Economic aspects -- Computer programs   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: J.W. Prevatt and W.E. Kunkle.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 13.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "October 1984."
General Note: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Computer Series circular 641
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095227
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15204905

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    Abstract
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text
i01

C.2
October 1984



Making Beef


Floppy disc included with this
item has been shelved separately.
Consult LUIS or ask circulation
staff for assistance.


Circular 641


Cattle Management Decisions


Using Microcomputer Aids


I COMPUTER SERIES


J.W. Prevatt and W.E. Kunkle


101 operative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultotal Sciences / University of Florida / John T. Woaste, Dean
F636c
641
guide


























INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE IBM-PC VERSION OF
"MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS"




This program was ori gina Iy written for the. TRS--80
model III111/4. It is now available for- the IBM--PC; the
enclosed documentat-ion was ,written for the TRS-80; however',
it is useable for the IBM-PC version.

To access tie dir ectort'y of the ,lM version of this poyr'am,
insert the program disk in drive A and type OIR. You should
then see the fol ow ng di rectory:

DEHORN COM
IMPLANT COM
REPLACE COM
FEEDRBUL COM
BREAKEVEN COM
DEWORM COM

There is no main menu from which to run the program, as there
is for the TRS-80 version. To run a desired program, simply type
the name of the program you wish to run: EXAMPLES

A>DEHORN


A>IMPLANT








TABLE OF CONTENTS


ABSTRACT ...............................................................ii

INTRODUCTION ................................................. .........1

MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAMS .............................................. 2

DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS .......................................4

IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS .....................................5

FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS ...................................6

DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS .....................................7

FEEDER CALF BREAK-EVEN PRICES ......................................8

REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS ..................................11

SUMMARY ..................................................... ....... 12

REFERENCES ............................................................13

APPENDIX A: PROGRAM LISTINGS .........................................14






























UNIVRITY"









ABSTRACT


Several microcomputer programs are presented to evaluate beef cattle

management decisions. Beef cattle producers, agribusiness operators,

accountants, and appraisers can use these microcomputer programs to determine

if these beef management practices are profitable and warrant performing the

practices. The programs prompt users for necessary data (production

coefficients) and based on these coefficients, the appropriate analysis is

performed and results are reported.






Key words: dehorning, deworming, implanting, break-even prices, feeder

bulls, feeder steers, replacement heifer requirements, costs, returns.







MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS

USING MICROCOMPUTER AIDS




J. W. Prevatt and W. E. Kunkle




INTRODUCTION

Management decisions in beef cattle operations have probably never been

as important as they are today. Most cattlemen have a substantial amount of

capital invested in their beef cattle operations. For many, it has been a

long time since their margin of profit per pound of beef produced has been so

narrow. In light of these financial conditions, many cow-calf operators are

taking a hard look at their production practices and resulting cash-flows to

make some tough economic decisions affecting their beef management practices.

Numerous production practices exist from which to sort out.those that pay

profitable dividends[3]. Many of these alternatives are as old as the

cattle business itself, but in times of frequently fluctuating input and

output prices these options need to be re-evaluated in addition to some of the

more recent practices to determine what management alternatives are profitable

under the current conditions.

This effort focuses on some of the performance oriented practices that

may be utilized to improve profits. A good place to start is with the calf

and evaluate what practices can improve either its performance or

marketability. Presently, for many cattlemen, dehorning, dewor-ing,



J. W. Prevatt is an Associate Professor Extension Farm Management
Economist, Food and Resource Economics Dept., Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center Bradenton; and W. E. Kunkle is an Associate Professor
- Extension Beef Specialist, Animal Science Department, Gainesville;
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.








implanting, castrating, accurately calculating the number of replacement

animals needed, and estimating break-even costs are short-term money makers.

The beauty of implementing several of these management practices is that

they can be done during-the routine working of the cow herd at relatively

minimal cash cost. Further evaluation of these practices with "Making Beef

Cattle Management Decisions Using Microcomputer Aids" will help you determine

if these are profitable practices for your operation.


MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAMS

The microcomputer programs contained in "Making Beef Cattle Management

Decisions Using Microcomputer Aids" require little previous experience with

microcomputers and no programming skills. The programs, which are listed in

the appendix, run on a Radio Shack Model III or Model IV microcomputer. For

information'on ordering the programs for these or other microcomputers, please

contact:

Farm Microcomputer Support Group
c/o Dean John T. Woeste
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
1038 McCarty Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611

The following start-up instructions and printing instructions refer to

the Radio Shack version. They may differ for other machines, but the program

operation will be much the same on all microcomputers.

After completing the start-up format of the operating system and entering

the BASIC language, simply insert the program diskette in drive I (top drive)

and type RUN "MAIN". From this point on, the program will respond to your

selections and request data, perform the analyses and report the results. If

a hard (paper) copy of anything on the screen is desired, simply turn the

printer on and depress the shift, down-arrow and asterisk (*) keys all at







once. If printing does not occur, check to insure the printer is operational

and depress the three keys all at once again. You are now ready to run the
programs. After typing the command RUN "MAIN", the following information will

appear on the screen:


MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS USING MICROCOMPUTER AIDS

1. DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS
2. IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS

3. FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS DECISION ANALYSIS
4. DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS
5. FEEDER CALF BREAKEVEN PRICES
6. CALCULATE REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS

7. END PROGRAMS
MAKE SELECTION (1-7)?


Pressing the appropriate number (1-7) followed by the enter key will
allow you to view one of the six decision aids or will end the execution of
the decision aid package.


MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS USING MICROCOMPUTER AIDS

(VERSION 3.35)
--- (C) COPYRIGHT 1984 --

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

REVISION DATE: 03/15/84


PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE?


K


/








DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS

The first program is the dehorning decision analysis which evaluates

whether or not it would pay to perform the dehorning practice. This practice

contributes to making a group of cattle more uniform, easier to handle, and

relieves the buyer's mind about animals with horns roughing or injuring

animals at the feed bunk and other areas.

Dehorning, while performing other management practices on a calf already

in the chute, is an inexpensive practice to perform and can be done with

minimal equipment and time. Therefore, if horned cattle or calves are

discounted in the market, estimate the magnitude of the discount. For

instance, if horned animals generally sell for $1.00 per hundredweight less

than polled or dehorned animals and it costs $1.00 per head to dehorn, then

you could earn an additional $3 to 5 per calf marketed. The following

is a sample of the dehorning decision analysis which requests input

information from the user as denoted in bold type and presents the results of

the analysis.


DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

COST TO DEHORN ONE ANIMAL ($) ? 1.00
VALUE ADDED FOR DEHORNED ANIMALS ($/CWT)-? 1.00
MONTHS FROM DEHORNING TO MARKETING ? 2
INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%) ? 14
AVERAGE WEIGHT OF ANIMALS AT MARKETING (CWT) ? 4.0
NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE DEHORNED ? 100


DEHORNING RESULTS

RETURN OVER COST IS $2.98 PER ANIMAL

RETURN OVER COST IS $297.67 PER GROUP

RETURN ON DEHORNING INVESTMENT IS 290.88%

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N) ?
\^ /







IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS

Implanting is generally a high payoff investment. Implanting'once will

increase calf weaning weights approximately 15 to 35 pounds[21 Calves
marketed at $60 per hundredweight results in returns over costs of $7 to $19

per calf sold. Thus, this practice will either help you earn money or lessen
your losses. In addition, the opportunity to implant more than once is an

option for most producers depending on the length of time between birth and

marketing. Therefore, one could easily double the returns from implanting as

previously mentioned. The following is an example of the implanting decision

analysis.


IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:
COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR FIRST IMPLANT ($) ? 2.00
POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM FIRST IMPLANT (LBS) ? 15
MONTHS FROM FIRST IMPLANT TO MARKETING ? 6

COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR SECOND IMPLANT ($) 2.00
POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM SECOND IMPLANT '(LBS) ? 15
MONTHS FROM SECOND IMPLANT TO MARKETING ? 3

INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%) ? 14
NUMBER OF ANIMALS IMPLANTED ? 100
SELLING PRICE OF ANIMAL ($/CWT) ? 55.00



IMPLANTING RESULTS
RETURN OVER COST OF IMPLANTING IS $10.03 PER ANIMAL

RETURN OVER COST IS $1,002.68 PER GROUP

RETURN ON IMPLANTING INVESTMENT IS 154.9%

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)?







FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS

Castrating feeder calves is often a controversial practice. Research

has documented that bulls gain faster than steers (approximately 5 to 8%),

while market prices have occasionally denoted discounts on bulls, especially

when sold at heavier weights. Let's look at an example. Suppose that the

average weight of bulls is 7% more at weaning (430 pounds) than the average

weight of non-implanted steers (400 pounds), and assume that an average

response is observed for each of two implants which results in 30 pounds (15

pounds per implant) of additional gain (for a total of 430 pounds). Assume

that the cost of implants and castration cost is $5 (2 implants at $2 each and

$1 for castration). The results indicate that a bull and steer implanted

twice would weigh 430 pounds'each. Net returns at $60 per hundredweight, if

you assume a $2/CWT price discount for the bull, would reveal an extra $3 ($8

- $5) for each steer marketed.

Therefore, better than minimal responses to implants and discounted market

prices for bulls will result in much higher payoffs. Furthermore, recent work

at several universities indicated that the later the time of castration, the

more stress the calves go through and the more weight gains are adversely

affected. Thus, earlier castration and implanting results in healthier and

heavier calves at weaning. The following is a sample of the feeder bulls or

steers analysis:








FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS

WHICH IS THE MOST PROFITABLE TO PRODUCE?

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:
BULLS ARE HOW MANY POUNDS HEAVIER AT
WEANING THAN NON-IMPLANTED STEERS (LBS) ? .30
WHAT WEIGHT ARE BULLS MARKETED (LBS) ? 430
SELLING PRICE OF BULLS ($CWT) ? .53
SELLING PRICE OF STEERS ($/CWT) ? .58

INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (Z) ? 14.0
COST TO CASTRATE ONE ANIMAL ($) ? 1.00
MONTHS FROM CASTRATING TO MARKETING ? 6
NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE CASTRATED ? 100
DO YOU WANT TO IMPLANT STEERS (YIN) ? T

COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR FIRST IMPLANT ($) ? 2.00
POUNDS OF,GAIN REALIZED FROM FIRST IMPLANT (LBS) ? 15
MONTHS FROM FIRST IMPLANT TO MARKETING ? 6

COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR SECOND IMPLANT ($) ? 2.00
POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM SECOND IMPLANT (LBS) ? 15
MONTHS FROM SECOND IMPLANT TO MARKETING ? 3


RESULTS OF FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS

RETURN OVER COST IS $16.22 PER ANIMAL
RETURN OVER COST IS $1622. PER GROUP

RETURN ON INVESTMENT IS 307.2%

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)?


DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS
Deworming calves may offer additional revenue in your cow-calf operation.

A simple approach to determine if this practice will pay is to estimate (from
previous experience or published material) the following:

1. Cost to deworm
2. Selling price of calves

3. Pounds of additional gain due to deworming







Let's review a brief example. If the cost of deworming a calf is $2.07,

the average additional gain of the calf is 10 pounds, and the selling price of

the.calf is $55/cwt., then an additional $3.43 per calf of net revenue would

be realized. The following deworming example will further describe the.
evaluation of this practice:

DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

COST OF LABOR & MATERIALS TO DEWORM ONE ANIMAL ($) ? 2
POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM DEWORMING (LBS) ? 10
MONTHS FROM DEWORMING TO MARKETING ? 3
INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%) ? 14
SELLING PRICE-OF ANIMAL ($/CWT) ? 55.00
NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE DEWORMED ? 100

DEWORMING RESULTS

RETURN OVER COST OF DEWORMING IS $3.43 PER ANIMAL

RETURN OVER COST OF DEWORMING IS $343 PER GROUP

RETURN ON DEWORMING INVESTMENT IS 165.7%

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N) ?

FEEDER CALF BREAK-EVEN PRICES

Calculating break-even prices is the first step in practicinggood beef

cow management. Evaluating break-even prices will allow estimation of the

impact that certain management practices will have on your operation. For

instance, the effect of increasing the pounds of calf weaned and percentage of

saleable calf crop on break-even prices can be seen in Table 1.

Tightening up management practices could reduce break-even prices by more

than one might think. Some on-the-farm results have shown that certain

producers, by effectively using certain management practices, have increased
the pounds of calf weaned per cow by more than 300 pounds. For example,







looking at the break-even prices for feeder calves in Table 1, and using the

percentage saleable calf crop of 50%, you can readily see that increasing the

average calf weight from 2.5 to 5.0 hundredweight reduces the break-even price

to cover production costs from $132 to $66 per hundredweight ($132-$66=$66).

Of course, there is probably going to be a cost for increasing weaning

weights, but if you could increase the weights at the right price, you should

realize a profit. For instance, 2.5 and 5.0 hundredweight calves sell for

about $80 and $60 per hundredweight, respectively. That amounts to $200 for

the 2.5 hundredweight calf and $300 for the 5.0 hundredweight calf.

Therefore, net returns will be greater as long as costs are less than $100 per

calf to increase weaning weight by 250 pounds. Likewise, looking at

increasing the percentage saleable calf crop from 50% to 80% indicates that

break-even prices for a 2.5 hundredweight calf decreased $49.50 per

hundredweight ($132-$82.50=$49.50). Now, if you have 50 calves at 2.5

hundredweight, and if you increased the percentage saleable calf crop to 80%,

you.would have 80 calves at the 2.5 hundredweight. Assuming a market price of

$80.00 per hundredweight that amounts to $10,000 and $16,000 for the calves at

the percentage of saleable calf crop of 50% and 80%, respectively. Therefore,

if you can increase the percentage of saleable calf crop from 50% to 80% for

less than $6,000, then you can generate some additional net revenue. In

addition, if you can accomplish both increasing the average calf weight and

the percentage of saleable calf crop, you could reduce the break-even price

necessary to cover your production costs from $132 to $41.25 per

hundredweight. Commonly, however, improving both percentage saleable calf

crop and average calf weight will require additional expenditures. But, if

you can improve a 100-head cowherd with 50 saleable calves averaging 2.5

hundredweight at a market price of $80 per hundredweight ($10,000 gross

revenue) to a production level of 80 saleable calves averaging 5.0

hundredweight at a market price of $60.00 per hundredweight ($24,000 gross.








revenue)* for- less than $14,000, then net returns will be increased.

Attempting to get this job done may seem a bit ambitious, but implementing

sound management practices that economically accomplish these objectives can

mean higher net returns for many cow-calf producers. The following example of

feeder calf break-even prices will provide some insight into this situation:

FEEDER CALF BREAK-EVEN PRICES

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION.

TOTAL PRODUCTION COST OF COW-CALF ENTERPRISE ($) ? 20,000

VALUE OF CULLED ANIMALS ($) ? 3500

NUMBER OF COWS EXPOSED TO BULLS ? 100

NUMBER OF STEER CALVES MARKETABLE ? 45

AVERAGE WEIGHT OF STEER CALVES MARKETABLE (CWT) ? 4.50

NUMBER OF HEIFER CALVES MARKETABLE
(DO NOT INCLUDE REPLACEMENTS, FREEZER, ETC.) ? 30

AVERAGE WEIGHT OF HEIFER CALVES MARKETABLE .(CWT)
(DO NOT INCLUDE REPLACEMENTS, FREEZER', ETC.) ? 4.00


OPTION ONE:


FEEDER CALVES (STEERS & HEIFERS) ARE SOLD TOGETHER AS A GROUP.

BREAK-EVEN PRICE OF STEERS AND HEIFERS SOLD TOGETHER AS A
GROUP IS $51.16 PER CWT.

PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ?


OPTION TWO:

BREAK-EVEN PRICES FOR FEEDER CALVES USING VARIOUS
AVERAGE CALF WEIGHTS AND PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP.


THE PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP SHOULD BE INTERPRETED AS THE PERCENTAGE
OF CALVES SOLD FROM THE TOTAL NUMBER OF COWS EXPOSED.

PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ?


(/1









TABLE 1. BREAK-EVEN PRICES FOR FEEDER CALVES


AVERAGE ***PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP (%)***
CALF WT. 50 55 60 65 70 75 80
--------------------------- -------------------------- -------
2.5 132.00 120.00 110.00 101.54 94.29 88.00 82.50
3.0 110.00 100.00 91.67 84.62 78.57 73.33 68.75
3.5 94.29 85.71 78.57 72.53 67.35 62.86 58.93
4.0 82.50 75.00 68.75 63.46 58.93 55.00 51.56
4.5 73.33 66.67 61.11 56.41 52.38 48.89 45.83
5.0 66.00 60.00 55.00 50.77 47.14 44.00 41.25
-- ----------------- ---------------------------------

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N) ?



REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS

Estimating the number of replacement heifers to save from each calf crop

to maintain a certain herd size (stocking rate) that can efficiently utilize

your forage resources often results in some costly guessing. For instance,

saving too many replacements can easily reduce your net income $150 or more

carrying cost per year as well as the net returns from a productive cow. On

the other hand, saving too few replacement heifers can reduce your total .net

revenue and net revenue per calf since ownership costs (depreciation,

interest, insurance, taxes, etc.) will be spread over fewer animals. A simple

rule of thumb to follow is to keep enough replacement heifers to account for

the mature cows you cull annually, mature cow death loss annually, replacement

heifer death loss (if this is a factor) and the number of replacements that

you may need to cull prior to their entering the cow-herd. The following

replacement heifer requirement example illustrates the information necessary

to more closely estimate the number of replacement heifers needed.









CALCULATE REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS

ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

HERD SIZE TO BE MAINTAINED (HD) ? 1000

PERCENTAGE OF HERD CULLED ANNUALLY (%) ? 15

PERCENTAGE DEATH LOSS OF COW-HERD ANNUALLY (%) ? 2

REPLACEMENT HEIFER AGE AT TIME OF CALVING (2 OR 3 YRS) ? 2

PERCENTAGE REPLACEMENT HEIFER DEATH LOSS NORMALLY
EXPERIENCED BETWEEN WEANING AND ONE YEAR OF AGE (Z) ? 2

PERCENTAGE REPLACEMENT HEIFER DEATH LOSS NORMALLY
EXPERIENCED BETWEEN ONE AND TWO YEARS OF AGE (%) ? 1

PERCENTAGE OF REPLACEMENT HEIFERS CULLED JUST
PRIOR TO ENTERING THE COW HERD (%) ? 10

RESULTS

IN ORDER TO ENSURE SULF7CIENT REPLACEMENTS UNDER THE GIVEN CONDITIONS, 195

HEIFERS SHOULD BE SAVED AT WEANING TIME. THIS WOULD ALLOW 170 HEAD OF THE

BREEDING HERD TO BE REPLACED ANNUALLY.

DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N) ?


SUMMARY

There are certainly other practices that cow-calf operators can evaluate

to determine enterprise adjustments which might help their overall financial

position. The best tocd available to see.just how good or bad your situation

may be is cash flow budgeting. This exercise will give you a much better

feel about the timing of costs and revenues in your operation. Presently

facing high interest rates, variable market prices and low production

performance (pounds of marketed beef per cow), many producers may be committed

beyond their ability to meet the cash flow requirements. If, in fact, this is

the case, recognize it in time to make the necessary adjustments that can make

your operation more profitable.







REFERENCES

1. Prevatt, J. W. Cash-Flow Analysis: A Farm Management Technique.

Circular 488. Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida,

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville. 20 pp.

2. Sand, R. S. A Total Cattle Management Plan. Cooperative Extension

Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural

Sciences. Gainesville. 4 pp.

3. University of Florida. Florida Beef Production Guide. Cooperative

Extension service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and

Agriculture Sciences. Gainesville. 400 pp.







APPENDIX A: PROGRAM LISTING


1 CLS
2 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
10 PRINTSTRING$(44,"*"*)
19 PRINT "* MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS
20 PRINT "* USING MICROCOMPUTER AIDS *"
21 PRINT"* (VERSION ";
22 PRINT"3.35)";
23 PRINTSTRING$(13," ");"*"
25 PRINT"* ---> (C) COPYRIGHT 1984 <--- *"
26 PRINT"* UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA *"
27 PRINT"* INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL *"
28 PRINT"* SCIENCES *"
30 PRINT"* REVISION DATE:";
31 PRINT "06/15/84";
32 PRINT"
33 PRINTSTRING$(44,"*")
34 PRINT
35 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ";Z$
36 RUN "MENU"





100 CLS
110 PRINT:PRINT
120 PRINT "MAKING BEEF CATTLE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS USING MICROCOMPUTER AIDS:"
130 PRINT
140 PRINT "1. DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS"
150 PRINT "2. IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS"
160 PRINT "3. FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS DECISION"
170 PRINT "4. DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS"
180 PRINT "5. FEEDER CALF BREAK-EVEN PRICES"
190 PRINT "6. CALCULATE REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS"
200 PRINT "7. END PROGRAMS"
210 PRINT
220 INPUT 'MAKE SELECTION (1-7) ";S
230 IF (S<1 OR S>7) THEN GOTO 220
240 ON S GOTO 250,260,270,280,290,300,310
250 RUN DEHORNN"
260 RUN "IMPLANT"
270 RUN "BULORSTR"
280 RUN "DEWORM"
290 RUN "BRKEVEN"
300 RUN "HFR/REP"
310 PRINT
312 CLS
314 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
320 PRINT "END OF PROGRAMS."
325 PRINT:PRINT "HAVE A NICE DAY. GOOD BYE
327 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
328 PRINT:PRINT:







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CLS
PRINT DEHORNING DECISION ANALYSIS !"
PRINT:PRINT:PRINT: PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT -
PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION"
PRINT
INPUT "COS'" TO DEHORN ONE ANIMAL ($) ";C
INPUT "VALUE ADDED FOR DEHORNED ANIMALS ($/CWT) ";V
INPUT "MONTHS FROM DEHORNING TO MARKETING ";M
INPUT "INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%) ";I
INPUT "AVERAGE WEIGHT OF ANIMALS AT MARKETING (CWT) ";W
INPUT "NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE DEHORNED" ;N
LET Y=(I/100*.08333*M*C) + C
LET R=(W*V)-Y
LET E=R*N
LET E=INT (E*100+.5)/100
LET P=(R/Y)*100
LET R=INT(100*R+.5)/100
CLS:PRINT DEHORNING RESULTS I"
PRINT:PRINT: PRINT
PRINT "RETURN OVER COST'IS $";R;" PER ANIMAL"
PRINT
PRINT "RETURN OVER COST IS $";E;"PER GROUP"
PRINT
LET P=INT(100*P+.5)/100
PRINT "RETURN ON DEHORNING INVESTMENT IS ";P;"1"
PRINT:PRINT: PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N) ";A$
IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
IF A$="NN THEN GOTO 320
PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY I OR N WILL WORK."
GOTO 260
PRINT
PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
RUN MENU.







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275
276
277
278
279
280
290
294
295
297
30(C
310
320
330
340
350
360
370
380


INPUT "MONTHS FROM SECOND IMPLANT TO MARKETING'
PRINT
INPUT "INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%)'";I
INPUT "NUMBER OF ANIMALS IMPLANTED";N
INPUT "SELLING PRICE OF ANIMAL ($CWT)";P
LET Z=(I/100*.08333*M*C)+C
LET Y=(I/100*.08333*N*S)+S
LET W=Z+Y
LET R=P*((G+H)/100)
LET Q=R-W
LET E=(R-W)*N
LET V=((R-W)/W)*100
LET Q=INT(Q*100+.5)/100
CLS
PRINT IMPLANTING RESULTS I"
PRINT
PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
PRINT "RETURN OVER COST OF IMPLANTING IS $";Q;"
PRINT
PRINT "RETURN OVER COST IS $";E;"PER GROUP"-
LET V=INT(V*100+.5)/100
PRINT


PER ANIMAL"


PRINT "RETURN ON IMPLANTING INVESTMENT IS" ;V;"%"
PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 360
PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK."
PRINT
PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
RUN "MENU"


CLS
PRINT IMPLANTING DECISION ANALYSIS !"
PRINT:PRINT: PRINT: PRINT:PRINT:PRINT: PRINT:PRINT
PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION"
PRINT
INPUT "COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR FIRST IMPLANT ($)"
INPUT "POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM FIRST IMPLANT (LBi
INPUT "MONTHS FROM FIRST IMPLANT TO MARKETING" ;M
PRINT
INPUT "COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR SECOND IMPLANT ($)
INPUT "POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM SECOND IMPLANT (LI


;C
3)";G

";S
BS)":H


I;N







105 PRINT FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS"
110 PRINT
115 PRINT WHICH IS THE MOST PROFITABLE TO PRODUCE ?"
120 FOR 1=1 TO 6:PRINT:NEXT I
130 PRINT
140 PRINT "ENTER 'HE FOLLOWING INFORMATION"
150 PRINT
160 .PRINT "BULLS ARE HOW MANY POUNDS HEAVIER"
163 INPUT "AT WEANING THAN NON-IMPLANTED STEERS (LBS)";H
165 INPUT "WHAT WEIGHT ARE BULLS MARKETED (LBS)";Q
170 INPUT "SELLING PRICE OF BULLS ($/LB)";D
180 INPUT "SELLING PRICE OF STEERS ($/LB)";P
183 PRINT
185 INPUT "INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%)";I
190 "COST TO CASTRATE ONE ANIMAL ($)";C
195 INPUT "MONTHS FROM CASTRATING TO MARKETING" ;M
200 INPUT "NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE CASTRATED";NU
210 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO IMPLANT STEERS (Y/N)";A$
220 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO- 400
230 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 250
240 PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK."
250 LET Y=D*Q
255 LET Z=P*(Q-H)
260 LET F=(I/100*.08333*M*C)+C
265 LET T=Z-F-Y
270 LET A=T*NU
275 LET V=(T/F)*100
280 LET T=INT(T*100+.5)/100
285 LET A=INT.(A*100+.5)/100
290 LET V=INT(V*100+.5)/100
295 CLS:PRINT RESULTS!": PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
300 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST TO CASTRATE IS $";T;"PER ANIMAL"
305 PRINT
310 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST TO CASTRATE IS $";A;"PER GROUP"
315 PRINT
320 PRINT "RETURN ON CASTRATING INVESTMENT IS";V;"%"
330 PRINT:PRINT: PRINT: PRINT:PRINT
340. INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
350 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
360 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 700
370 PRINT INCORRECTT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK"
380 PRINT
400 PRINT
410 INPUT "COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR FIRST IMPLANT ($)";E
420 INPUT "POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM FIRST-IMPLANT (LBS)";J
4.30 IPUT "MONTHS FROM FIRST IMPLANT TO MARKETING";N
<.0 ??.INT
4r5 ??UT "COST OF LABOR & IMPLANT FOR SECOND IMPLANT ($)";U
460 INPUT "POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM SECOND*IMPLANT (LBS)";K
470 INPUT "MONTHS FROM SECOND IMPLANT TO MARKETING" ;W
480 PRINT






490 PRINT
500 LET L=(I/100*.08333*N*E)+E
510 LET B=(I/100*.08333*W*U)+U
520 LET Q=L+B
530 LET R=P*((J+K)+(Q-H))
535 LET Y=D*Q
538 LET F=(I/100*.08333*M*C)+C
540 LET X=R-0-F-Y
545 LET NX=X*NU
550 LET S=(I/(0+F))*100
560 PRINT
570 CLS
575 PRINT RESULTS "
580 PRINT FEEDER BULLS OR STEERS ANALYSIS "
583 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT
585 LET X=INT(X*100+.5)/100
590 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST IS $";X;"PER ANIMAL"
593 PRINT
595 LET NX=INT(NX*100+.5)/100
610 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST IS $";NX;"PER GROUP":PRINT
622 LET S=INT(S*100+.5)/100
626 PRINT "RETURN ON INVESTMENT IS";S;"%"
630 PRINT
640 PRINT:PRINT: PRINT
650 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
660 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
670 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 690
680 PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK."
690 PRINT
700 PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
710 RUN "MENU"







110 PRINT DEWORMING DECISION ANALYSIS !'
120 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT
130 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
140 PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION"
150 PRINT
160 INPUT "COST OF LABOR & MATERIALS TO DEWORM ONE ANIMAL ($)";C
170 INPUT "POUNDS OF GAIN REALIZED FROM DEWORMING (LBS)";G
180 INPUT "MONTHS FROM DEWORMING TO MARKETING";M
190 INPUT "INTEREST RATE ON OPERATING FUNDS (%)";I
200 INPUT "SELLING PRICE OF ANIMAL ($/CWT)";P
205 INPUT "NUMBER OF ANIMALS TO BE DEWORMED';N
210 LET Z=(I/100*.08333*M*C)+C
220 LET U=P*(G/100)
230 LET R=U-Z
240 LET V=((U-Z)/Z)*100
245 LET GRC=R*N
246 LET R=INT(R*100+.5)/100
247 LET V=INT(V*100+.5)/100
248 LET GRC=INT(GRC*100+.5)/100
250 PRINT
255 CLS
260 PRINT
262 PRINT DEWORMING RESULTS 1"
265 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
270 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST OF DEWORMING IS $";R;"PER ANIMAL"
275 PRINT
280 PRINT "RETURN OVER COST OF DEWORMING IS $";GRC;"PER GROUP"
285 PRINT
290 PRINT "RETURN ON DEWORMING INVESTMENT IS ";V;"%"
300 PRINVT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
310 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
320 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
330 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 350
340 PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK."
350 PRINT
360 PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
370 RUN "MENU"






100 CLS
105 PRINT
110 PRINT FEEDER CALF BREAK-EVEN PRICES
120 FOR I=1TO 9:PRINT: NEXT I
130 PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION."
135 PRINT
140 INPUT "TOTAL PRODUCTION COST OF COW-CALF ENTERPRISE ($)";C
150 PRINT
160 INPUT "VALUE OF CULLED ANIMALS ($)";V
170 PRINT
180 INPUT "NUMBER OF COWS EXPOSED TO BULLS";E
190 PRINT
200 INPUT "NUMBER OF STEER CALVES MARKETABLE" ;S
204 PRINT
208 INPUT "AVERAGE WEIGHT OF STEER CALVES MARKETABLE (CWT)";SW
210 PRINT
220 PRINT "NUMBER OF HEIFER CALVES MARKETABLE"
230 INPUT "(DO NOT INCLUDE REPLACEMENTS,FREEZER,ETC.)";H
234 PRINT
237 PRINT "AVERAGE WEIGHT OF HEIFER CALVES MARKETABLE (CWT)"
238 INPUT "DO NOT INCLUDE REPLACEMENTS,FREEZER,ETC. ) ";HW
239 PRINT
243 PRINT
270 LET M=(S*SW+H*HW)/(S+H)
280 LET T=S+H
290 LET A=((C-V)/T)/M
315 LET A=INT(A*100+.5)/100
330 CLS
335 PRINT
340 PRINT "OPTION ONE
345 PRINT
350 PRINT "FEEDER CALVES (STEERS & HEIFERS) ARE SOLD"
355 PRINT "TOGETHER AS A GROUP."
360 PRINT
370 PRINT: PRINT
380 PRINT "BREAK-EVEN PRICE OF STEERS AND HEIFERS "
390 PRINT "SOLD TOGETHER AS A GROUP IS $";A;"PER CWT."
393 FOR I=1TO 6:PRINT:NEXT I
395 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE";AA
400 CLS
405 PRINT "OPTION TWO
406 PRINT
408 PRINT "BREAK-EVEN PRICES FOR FEEDER CALVES USING VARIOUS"
410 PRINT "AVERAGE CALF WEIGHTS AND PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP."
412 PRINT
415 PRINT
418 PRINT "***"
420 PRINT "THE PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP SHOULD BE INTERPRETED"
421 PRINT "AS THE PERCENTAGE OF CALVES SOLD FROM THE TOTAL NUMBER"







422 PRINT "OF COWS EXPOSED."
423 PRINT
424 INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO CONTINUE ";AA
425 CLS
430 Zi$-"TABLE 1. BREAK-EVEN PRICES FOR FEEDER CLAVES"
432 Z2$="AVERACE ***PERCENTAGE SALEABLE CALF CROP(%)***
434 Z4$="CALF WT."
436 PRINT TAB(INT((64-LEN(Z1$))/2))Z1$
440 GOSUB 1000
45 PRINT Z2$;
455 PRINT Z4$;
460 Z5=12:Z6=50
465 FOR X=1 TO 7:PRINT TAB(Z5)Z6;:Z5=Z5+8:Z6=Z6+5
467 NEXT X
470 GOSUB 1001
472 PRINT ($/CWT.)"
475 FOR AW=2.5 TO 5 STEP .5
480 Z5=8:PRINT TAB(2);USING "#.#";AW;
482 FOR: P=50 TO 80 STEP 5
484 BE&(C-V)/(E*(P*.01)*AW)
486 IF P=80 THEN PRINT TAB(Z5);USING "####.##";BE:GOTO 500
490 PRINT TAB(Z5);USING "####.##";BE;
495 Z5=Z5+8
500 NEXT P
510 NEXT AW
520 GOSUB 1000
700 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
710 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
720 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 740
730 PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR N WILL WORK."
740 PRINT
750 PRINT "END OF PROGRAM."
760 RUN "MENU"
1000 FOR X=1 TO 63:PRINT "-";:NEXT X:PRINT"-":RETURN
1001 FOR X=1 TO 63:PRINT "-";:NEXT X:RETURN






105 PRINT:PRINT
110 PRINT CALCULATE REPLACEMENT HEIFER REQUIREMENTS
120 FOR I=1TO8:PRINT:NEXT I
140 PRINT "ENTER THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION."
150 PRINT
160 INPUT "HERD SIZE TO BE MAINTAINED (HD)";H
170 PRINT
180 INPUT "PERCENTAGE OF HERD CULLED ANNUALLY (%)";HP
190 PRINT
200 INPUT "PERCENTAGE DEATH LOSS OF COW-HERD ANNUALLY (%)";HD
210 PRINT
220 INPUT "REPLACEMENT HEIFER AGE AT TIME OF CALVING (2 OR 3 YRS)";Y
230 PRINT
240 PRINT "PERCENTAGE REPLACEMENT HEIFER DEATH LOSS NORMALLY"
250 INPUT "EXPERIENCED BETWEEN WEANING AND ONE YEAR OF AGE (%)";LO
255 PRINT
260 PRINT "PERCENTAGE REPLACEMENT HEIFER DEATH LOSS NORMALLY"
265 INPUT "EXPERIENCED BETWEEN ONE AND TWO YEARS OF AGE (%)";LT
270 PRINT
275 IF Y > 2 THEN 500
280 PRINT "PERCENTAGE OF REPLACEMENT HEIFERS CULLED JUST"
285 INPUT "PRIOR TO ENTERING THE COW HERD (%)";RC
290 PRINT
300 LET J= H*((HP+HD)/100)
310 LET K=(1-RC/100)*(1-LO/100)*(1-LT/100)
320 LET NT=J/K
.330 ELT NT=INT(NT+.99)
340 CLS
350 PRINT
360 PRINT RESULTS
370 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
380 PRINT "IN ORDER TO INSURE SUFFICIENT REPLACEMENTS UNDER"
385 PRINT "THE GIVEN CONDITIONS ";NT;" HEIFERS SHOULD BE SAVED"
390 PRINT "AT WEANING TIME. THIS WOULD ALLOW ";J ;" HEAD OF "
395 PRINT "THE BREEDING HERD TO BE REPLACED ANNUALLY."
400 FOR I=1TO 5 :PRINT:NEXT I
470 GOTO 630
500 PRINT "PERCENTAGE REPLACEMENT HEIFER DEATH LOSS NORMALLY"
505 INPUT "EXPERIENCED BETWEEN TWO AND THREE YEARS OF AGE (%)";LR
510 PRINT
520 PRINT "PERCENTAGE OF REPLACEMENT HEIFERS CULLED"
525 INPUT "JUST PRIOR TO ENTERING THE COW HERD (%)";RCR
530 LET J=H*((HP+HD)/100)
540 LET Q=(1-RCR/100)*(1-LO/100)*(1-LT/100)*(1-LR/100)
550 LET NR=J/Q
560 LET NR=INT(NR+.99)
570 CLS
580 PRINT
585 PRINT RESULTS








590 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT
595 PRINT "IN ORDER TO ENSURE SUFFICIENT REPLACEMENTS UNDER"
600 PRINT "THE GIVEN CONDITIONS ";NR;" HEIFERS SHOULD BE SAVED"
605 PRINT "AT WEANING TIME. THIS WOULD ALLOW ";J ;" HEAD OF "
610 PRINT "THE BREEDING HERD TO BE REPLACED ANNUALLY."
620 FOR I=1T04.PRINT:NEXT I
630 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO RUN THIS PROGRAM AGAIN (Y/N)";A$
640 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 100
650 IF A$="N" THEN GOTO 670
660 PRINT "INCORRECT ENTRY. ONLY Y OR" N WILL WORK."
670 PRINT "END OF PROGRAM"
680 RUN "MENU"






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This publication was produced at a cost of $75.20, or 2.51 cents per copy, to provide information on making beef
cattle management decisions using microcomputer aids. 10-30-86


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, K.R. Tefertiller,
director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further the purpose of the May 8 and
June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to Individuals and institu-
tions that function without regard to race, color, sex or national origin. Single copies of Extension publications (excluding 4-H and Youth publica-
tions) are available free to Florida residents from County Extension Offices. Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers is -""""" .
available from C.M. Hinton, Publications Distribution Center, IFAS Building 664, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Before publicizing this publication,
editors should contact this address to determine availability.




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