• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Purpose
 Chapter I: Jacob and Esau
 Chapter II: Brokmakachista
 Chapter III: Joobel
 Chapter IV: Lime and Spoon
 Chapter V: Bicycle Hoop Race (Roal...
 Chapter VI: How Green Are You?
 Chapter VII: Kik di Pan
 Chapter VIII: Kungo Dong di...
 Chapter IX: Landan Brij
 Chapter X: Who Do You Love
 Chapter XI: Tambran Seed Chroa
 Chapter XII: One, Two, Three
 Chapter XIII: Marbles (Maabl)
 Chapter XIV: Miss Jennery...
 Chapter XIV: Miss Jennery...
 Back Cover






Title: Traditional games of Belize
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095145/00001
 Material Information
Title: Traditional games of Belize
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28 cm. +
Language: English
Creator: Manzanares, Myrna
National Kriol Council of Belize
Donor: Myrna Manzanares ( endowment )
Publisher: National Kriol Council
Place of Publication: Belize City, Belize
Publication Date: 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Subject: Games -- Belize   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Belize
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by Myrna Manzanares.
Language: In English and Belize Kriol.
General Note: "This publication of the National Kriol Council is supported by UNICEF."
General Note: ISBN from label on t.p. verso.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095145
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Belize National Library Service and Information System (BNLSIS)
Holding Location: Belize National Library Service and Information System (BNLSIS)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 424672743
lccn - 2009458658
isbn - 9789769521513

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    Foreword
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
    Purpose
        Page vi
    Chapter I: Jacob and Esau
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Chapter II: Brokmakachista
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter III: Joobel
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter IV: Lime and Spoon
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Chapter V: Bicycle Hoop Race (Roal Huk)
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Chapter VI: How Green Are You?
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Chapter VII: Kik di Pan
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Chapter VIII: Kungo Dong di Road
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Chapter IX: Landan Brij
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Chapter X: Who Do You Love
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Chapter XI: Tambran Seed Chroa
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Chapter XII: One, Two, Three
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Chapter XIII: Marbles (Maabl)
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Chapter XIV: Miss Jennery Jones
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Chapter XIV: Miss Jennery Jones
        Page 38
        Unnumbered ( 49 )
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



TRADITIONAL GAMES
of bEUL ZE
(Volume 1)


Compiled by: Myrna Manzanares


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TRADITIONAL GAMES
of BELIZE
Volume 1
Compiled by: Myrna Manzanares







ITis Publication
of the
NationaCXriol CounciC
is supported by
unicef








TRADITIONAL GAMES of BELIZE


Composition and Format: Myrna Manzanares
Editors: Silvana Woods, Glenda Jones, Yvette Herrera,
Paul & Cindy Crosbie
Photos on cover and pages 11,15,18,24,28,31,33 are by Phyllis Butler
and Efrain Craig. All other photos by Myrna Manzanares.


This book has been produced under the auspices of:
SNational Kriol Council
House of Culture Compound
Regent Street
I P.O. Box 2447
Belize City, Belize
I Phone: 207-0329
E-mail: kriolk@yahoo.com

in conjunction with:

BL Bileez Kriol Projek
f: 00 P.O. Box 2120
S Belize City, Belize
/RWLAWY6\



CopyrightO 2006
National Kriol Council


ISBN:
978-976-95215-1-3
Printed by
BRC Printing Ltd







TABLE OF CONTENTS


FOREWORD by Dr. Corinth Morter-Lewis.............................. ii
ACKNOW LEDGEMENTS ........................................ ........... .. iv
INTRODUCTION .................................................. ................. v
PURPO SE ...................................................... ........................... vi
I. Jacob and Esau .............................................. ..................... 1
II. Brokmakachista ................................................ .......... ..... 3
III. Joobel ............................................................. ................. 5
IV. Lime and Spoon............................. ................... .............. 9
V. Bicycle Hoop Race (Roal Huk).................................... ..12
VI. How Green You Are ........................ ............ ........... ... 14
VII. Kik di Pan ................................................ ...................... 16
VIII. Kungo Dong di Road............................................... ... 18
IX. Landan Brij.............................. .................. ........... .......21
X. W ho Do You Love............................ ............................. 24
XI. Tambran Seed Chroa............................................... ... 26
XII. One, Two, Three....................... .............. ........... .... 28
XIII. Marble (Maabl)....................................... .......... ... 29
XIV. Miss Jennery Jones..................... ........... .......... ... 36









FOREWORD



It is an honour and privilege to be able to comment on this book of
Traditional Games ofBelize. These games have roots in our history, and they
go back several generations to a time when children in Belize spent countless,
wonderful hours of fun, enjoying each others' company whenever time
permitted. They were played at recess, between lunchtime and the start of
classes in the afternoons, and in the evenings before running home from
school. They were played on weekends and during the holidays when school
was out, and these games are still relevant and important today in 21st
Century Belize with all of its high-tech games.

These are all outdoor games, played in the City, towns and villages of Belize;
in school-yards, back-yards, front-yards, on streets and in alley-ways, on
grassy patches, in fields and on sandy beaches, wherever there was space; in
sunlight and under the shade of overhanging branches of trees. They were all
played with little ones, big ones old and young; while those who could not
play, looked on, sometimes cheering as the situation demanded. Those were
wonderful days.

Today, many people may regard the games in this volume, such as Kungo
Dong Di Road and Tambran Seed Chroa, as frivolous pastimes, while they
may regard certain other games such as internationally known Chess and
Bridge as valued, according respect to those who master them.

In this volume, the author has filtered out in the selected games, through her
own research, a treasure trove of precious and relevant nuggets in a friendly
and playful way. They entertain the reader while simultaneously providing
parents, teachers, youth workers, social and community activists with
elements of cognitive and social psychology and story-telling. To really
appreciate the importance of these games beyond their value as sheer fun, it
is important that you also see them from these points of view.








It is my hope that this book will be read by grandmothers and grandfathers,
mothers and fathers, uncles and aunts, for reliving some of the most
wonderful growing up experiences of their childhood. I hope too that they
will share it with and give copies to their grandchildren, children, nephews
and nieces, and that they will share this joy with them.

Lastly, I will leave you, the reader, whoever you are, as you thumb through
the pages of this book, to read the games and view the accompanying
pictures, to conjure up mental images of children of yesteryear, of today and
of tomorrow; images of children of all ages, shapes and sizes, running and
jumping, skipping and hopping, swaying and spinning, laughing, singing and
clapping, and in this way experience vicariously the joy of Traditional
Games ofBelize.

Dr. Corinth Morter-Lewis
President of the University of Belize








ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


It was not difficult to get a response from people when asked to share the
games they played as children. As a matter of fact, it was a fun experience
trying to remember the specific details of the games. I want to thank those of
you from Gales Point, Belize City, and everyone else who shared the games
you remembered from childhood. Special thanks go to Sir Colville Young for
his detailed description of the playing of marbles in Belize, and for all of his
other suggestions; and to Patricia Bennett for helping to identify the
developmental skills in the games. I would also like to thank Carol Codd for
the game "Kungo Dong di Road," and Evalee Skeen for "Kik di Pan."
Particular thanks go to the children of All Saints Primary School and to all
other children featured in this book.

Thanks also goes to Silvana Woods, Yvette Herrera, Paul and Cindy Crosbie
of the Bileez Kriol Projek for editing the manuscript; to Glenda Jones for
formatting the original manuscript; to Phyllis Butler for the photographs
taken at the House of Culture.

I would also like to take this opportunity to give special thanks to the Belize
Tourist Board, who saw the cultural merit in sponsoring the production of
this book.

Space will not allow me to mention each person or group who shared in the
experience of producing this book, so I will just say again, "Thank you!"









INTRODUCTION

At one time in Belize, children's group games were played everyday and in
almost every community. They were played at school during recess, and
before and after school. They were played at home and in the neighborhoods.
Television was not in existence, so children spent more time with each other,
developing much-needed social, group and locomotive skills. Self-esteem,
the ability to deal with jealousy and rejection, the ability to follow directions,
language development, listening, and courtship were some of the skills these
games taught.
In all of this there was the ever-present laughter and enjoyment of a stress-
free childhood.
Although most of the games were in Kriol, the language most spoken in
Belize, their origins were both English and African, which was representative
of the Belize Kriol population. These games were played by many of the
other ethnic groups, and some form of these games was played throughout
the English-speaking Caribbean. Today one can still see some of these games
being played in one form or another in both the village and urban areas of
Belize.
This book is a first attempt to document these games which were so vital to
the development of our children, but which over the years, seem to have lost
their importance. Perhaps if these traditional games had been encouraged and
had remained as popular as they were in the earlier days, children may have
been spared many of the problems and heartaches with which they are
struggling today.








PURPOSE


Belize is traditionally an oral society. Consequently, some of our historical
information is irretrievably lost because it was not written down. This has
begun to change with spelling systems being popularized for native
languages, like Kriol and Garifuna. It is good to hear individuals talk about
the good old days or about the things they used to do, but as time goes on and
they grow older, memories fade and the best memories can be lost. The
purpose of this book is to document some of the games which we heard so
much about from grandparents and older relatives. It is also to capture some
of the games that were played by the not so old, but which are not being
played today.

It is hoped that these healthy children's games will be reintroduced into the
Belizean society and that teachers and counselors will use them as tools to
teach some of the much-needed life skills.







I. Jacob and Esau

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Name of Game: Jacob and Esau
Type of Game: Ring game
Minimum/maximum number of players: 10-30
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night in
dry season
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: Material for blindfold
Origin: English/Biblical
Skill: Listening/Following birections/Locomotor skills







Play/Rules of Game:


The participants of the game form a ring. Two people are chosen
to be Esau and Jacob. It doesn't matter whether they are male or
female. Esau is blindfolded. The object of the game is for Esau
to find Jacob by direction of his voice. Jacob answers Esau when
he is called but does not remain in the same place. Esau has to
figure out where Jacob is.
Jacob can only move three times. After the third response Esau
must find him. Whether Jacob is identified or not, two other
children will then be chosen by the Jacob and Esau to go in the
ring. Children who already had a turn should not be chosen again in
the same game.
Dialogue:
Esau: Jacob, Jacob?
Jacob: Yes, Esau.
Esau: Where are you, Jacob?
Jacob: Here I am, Esau. (Tauntingly as he moves to another
location.)
Esau: Jacob, Jacob? (Goes toward voice trying to touch.)
Jacob: Yes, Esau
Esau: I still can't find you. Where are you?
Jacob: I am right here, Esau. (Moves again, but at no time is he
allowed to move outside the boundaries of the ring.)
Esau: Jacob, where are you
Jacob: I am right over here, Esau.
(Jacob cannot move again and Esau must follow the
direction of his voice and identify him. The game ends
here and two other people take over.)








II. Broamaaachifta


Name of Game: Brokmakachista
Type of Game: Ring game
Minimum/maximum number of players: 10-30
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night in
dry season
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: none
Origin: African
Skill: Listening and following directions/skipping/running








Play/Rules of Game:
All participants form a circle. One person is chosen to be outside
the ring. Participants sing and clap to the rhythm of the game song
and the person outside follows the instructions.

Instructions with Brokmakachista Song:
Wan Mis/Mista (name ofa person)owt a ring (sung 3 times)
(One Miss/Mr. of the ring)
While this verse is being sung, the person chosen will be skipping
to the rhythm of the song outside around the ring.
Oapm da gayt ahn let ahn een
(Open the gate and let him/her in)
At this point the person will come in the circle and select a
partner by going in front of him/her and begin to dance with the
next verse
Brokmakachista, brok ih bak
Brokmakachista, brok ih bak
Oapm da gayt ahn let ahn een
The person chosen will then be the one to go outside the ring.
Brokmakachista uses dance-like movements: hands on hips, both
feet together, partners face each other as they shuffle back and
forth to the rhythm of the song on alternate sides of each other.





























Name of Game: Joobel
Type of Game: Ring game
Minimum/maximum number of players: 10+
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night in
dry season
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: None
Origin: English/African
Skill: Skipping/wheeling/dancing/locomotion


III. Jookei








Play/Rules of Game:
The main object of this game is for the person outside the ring
to come inside, select a partner and do the actions together.
Participants form a circle with one person outside the ring. The
players in the circle sing and clap in tune with the rhythm of the
song. The player outside also skips around the outside of the
circle to the rhythm and follows the instructions of the song.


Instructions with Joobel Song:
Owtsaid Joobel chroo da winda
Player outside skips to rhythm.
Eensaid Joobel chroo do winda
Player enters circle and skips around circle to rhythm.
Raiz Joobel
Player selects a partner. Both reach up and hold hands and rise up
on tiptoes alternately to the rhythm of the song.
Shakalaka Joobel
With hands still clasped, partners do a fast pedal-like movement in
one place to the rhythm using a 1-2-3-4 beat.
Daans Joobel
Players dance to the rhythm. Here they can choose their own form
of dance.








Weel Joobel
Players hold each other by the wrist in a grip-type hold for the
wheel. The singing becomes faster as players wheel. They should
not let go of hands until the singing stops.
All throughout the game the other participants are clapping and
singing.
Joobel

Owtsaid Joobel chroo da winda
Owtsaid Joobel chroo da winda
Owtsaid Joobel, chroo da winda
Chra-la-la-la-la-la
Den eensaid Joobel chroo da winda
Eensaid Joobel chroo da winda
Eensaid Joobel chroo da winda
Chra-la-la-la-la-la
Den raiz Joobel, chroo da winda
Raiz Joobel chroo da winda
Raiz Joobel chroo da winda
Chra-la-la-la-la-la
Den shakalaka Joobel chroo da winda
Shakalaka Joobel chroo da winda
Shalakala Joobel chroo da winda
Chra-la-la-la-la-la

Den daans Joobel chroo da winda
Daans Joobel chroo da winda
Daans Joobel chroo da winda








Chra-la-la-la-la-la


ten weel Joobel chroo da winda
Weel Joobel chroo da winda
Weel Joobel chroo da winda
Chra-la-la-la-la-la










IV. Lime and Spoon


Name of Game: Lime and Spoon
Type of Game: Race
Minimum/maximum number of players: 2-10 per game
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night in
dry season
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space







Equipment needed: Limes and spoons
Origin: English/African
Skill: Running/eye-hand coordination/concentration
Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is to reach the designated finish line
first. If there is a large number of players, the game can be run in
heats with the winner of each heat competing in the final heat to
become the overall winner. A player can win his heat but not
necessarily win the overall competition. A variation of the game
can also be conducted as team relay.

Instructions:
Two lines are drawn at a designated distance apart. One line
is the starting line and the other is the finish line. There
can be up to 10 competitors in each game depending on the
number of overall players.
Each player is given a lime and a tablespoon or teaspoon.
The limes should all be about the same size. The lime should
be held in one hand and the spoon in the other.
Players should stand on the starting line with a space
between each player. Example:
x x x x x x x x
At a pre-determined sound, or the age old instruction of
"Get ready! Get set! Go!" players must then put the lime in
the spoon, position themselves, and move off in that order.
During the race, players must not hold the lime or steady
the spoon with the other hand. If the lime drops, the player
must go back to the starting line and begin again. Or, it can







be decided at the beginning of the game that, if the lime
drops, players can just pick it up, put it in the spoon, and
then continue.
* The player who gets to the finish line first is the winner.
* A player can be disqualified if he/she keeps holding the lime
with the other hand. Only one hand is allowed to carry the
lime and spoon.




























...,
~ --.44- :


Name of Game: Bicycle Hoop Race (Roal Huk)
Type of Game: Running
Minimum/maximum number of players: Unlimited
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night
when dry
Playing areas/boundaries: Outside
Equipment needed: Hoop made from wood or used bicycle rim, a
stick
Origin: English/African
Skill: Running/coordination/manipulation


V. lelclt Hoop Race (Roal ulA)







Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is to reach the designated finish line
first. If there is a large number of players, the game can be run in
heats with the winner of each heat competing in the finals to
become the overall winner. A player can win his or her heat but not
necessarily win the overall competition. A variation of the game
can also be conducted as team relay (similar to the "Lime and
Spoon Race").
Instructions:
Some of the instructions to this game are similar to those of the
"Lime and Spoon Race."
Two lines are drawn at a designated distance apart. One line
is the starting line and the other is the finish line. There
can be up to 5 competitors in each game depending on the
number of overall players.
Each player should have a hoop and a piece of stick to move
and guide the hoop.
Players should stand with hoop and stick on the starting
line with a space between each player. Example:
x x x x x x x x
At a pre-determined sound, or the age old instruction of
"Get ready! Get Set! Go!" the hoopers begin rolling the hoop
to see who can reach the finish line first. A variation of this
game is for the hoopers to turn back and continue rolling
the hoop back to the home base at which time the person
who reaches there first is declared the winner.






























Name of Game: How Green You Are
Type of Game: Hide and Seek
Minimum/maximum number of players: 10-30
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night
Playing areas/boundaries: Inside
Equipment needed: Object to be hidden
Origin: English
Skill: Listening/auditory discrimination


-sssssesan


VI. How Grten You Are








Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is to find the hidden object.
All players decide on an object to be hidden. One person is chosen
as "IT," then sent out of the room. Someone guards the door to
ensure that "IT" does not look into the room or hear what is being
said. The rest of the players decide on a suitable place to hide the
object.
After the object is hidden, "IT" is brought back into the room to
look for the object. The players begin to sing as "IT" looks for the
object. The farther away from the object the louder the singing.
The closer to the object the softer the singing. Once the object
is found, someone else has a turn to be "IT" and the game is
played again.
Players decide when to end the game. This game can be adapted
for outside with players following "IT" and singing until he/she
finds the object.

How Green You Are
How green you are
How green you are
How green you are
How green

How green you are
How green you are
How green you are
How green









VII. Ka C1 Pan

Name of Game: Kik di Pan
Type of Game: Hide and Seek
Minimum/maximum number of players: As many as can be
accommodated
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Any time
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space with surrounding areas to
hide
Equipment needed: Middle-sized empty can
Origin: Afro-Caribbean
Skill: Kicking/running/dodging

Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is for the players to come out of hiding
and kick the pan before the keeper of the pan can find out where
they are hiding.
Keeper of the Pan is selected. His job is to guard the pan.
A pan (tin) is placed in the middle of the open area where the
game is to be played. All participants should find a suitable hiding
place in close proximity to the pan where they cannot easily be
seen by the Keeper. The players should try to sneak out from
their hiding place without being seen by the Keeper. If the Keeper
sees where a person is hiding then the Keeper must hit the pan
loudly to signal that someone has been seen. He/she will then call
out the player's name and where the person is hiding. E.g. "Joan di
haid bihain di mango chree". "Joan" will then be out of the game.







If the Keeper's back is turned and the player manages to sneak
out of his hiding place without the hiding place being seen, he or
she can try to reach the pan and kick it before the Keeper can
reach it. If the Keeper reaches the pan first, the player becomes
the Keeper. If the player reaches the pan first, then the Keeper
has to keep on being the Keeper until he/she sees someone in
their hiding place or until he/she reaches the pan before the
player.
Players determine when they want the game to end or how they
want to change the Keeper of the pan.








VIII. Kungo Dong di Road


... 1... .


Name of Game: Kungo Dong di Road
Type of Game: Circle
Minimum/maximum number of players: As many as can be
accommodated
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Any time/day
or night/indoors or outdoors
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space, flat surface
Equipment needed: Rock
Origin: African/Caribbean
Skill: Manipulation/rhythm/teamwork







Play/Rules of Game:
The object of the game is for the players to pass objects around
the circle in a continuous way to the rhythm of the song without
touching the hand of the person to whom the objects are being
passed.

Instructions:
All players sit in a circle with both feet pointed toward the
inside of the circle.
Each player should hold a rock in the right hand.
The left hand should be kept idle on the ground beside the
player at all times.
As players begin to sing, when they reach the words "Wi
gwehn brok dehn...," each person passes his/her rock to
the person on their right, placing it on the surface in front
of them. Then using the right hand, each person picks up
the rock that has been passed and continues passing it to
the right without breaking the flow of the rhythm. (It is
only when the round starts that players wait until the words
"Brok dehn..." are sung to begin passing. After that, the
song is repeated and the passing is continued until that
round ends.)
You cannot touch the person's hand to whom you are passing
the object or you will be out of the game until a new game
begins. Once someone breaks the flow, he/she moves out of
the circle, the circle is reformed, and the next round of
singing begins.








* The song is sung faster as the number of players in the
game decreases, and even faster when the last two persons
are playing.
* The winner of the game is the last person to be left in the
game.


Kungo Dong di Road
Kungo dong di road, bwai ahn gyal
Fi goh brok rakstoan
Brok dehn wan by wan
Brok dehn too bai too

Finga mos noh krai
Memba da play wi di play
Brok dehn wan by wan
Brok dehn too bai too








IX. L-andan Brij


Name of Game: Landan Brij
Type of Game: Singing and tugging
Minimum/maximum number of players: As many as can be
accommodated
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Any time
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: None
Origin: English
Skill: Following/listening/pulling







Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is for the strongest team to win at "Tog
ahn Waar" (Tug of War).

Instructions:
There are two leaders in the game. They decide ahead of time if
they are going to use a color or fruit for the game. Once that
decision is made, each picks a color or fruit. The rest of the
players should not know who has what color or fruit.
Leaders stand facing each other, hands above head with
their finger tips touching or hands clasped to form a bridge.
The rest of the players form a line, and as the song begins,
they pass under the bridge and go around the leaders
alternately.
When the song comes to "shayk it op wid saalt ahn pepa,"
whoever is passing under the bridge at that time is
captured. The player is swayed back and forth.
The two leaders step with the player away from the rest
where he/she is asked which of the two colors or fruit is
preferred. The player has to go behind the leader whose
color or fruit is chosen. All efforts should be made so that
the rest of the players do not find out which leader has
what.
The game continues this way until every player is behind a
leader.
A line is then drawn on the ground and each group with their
team members holding each other around the waist stand
behind the line. Each leader is facing the other.








*Leaders reach over the line and clasp each other's hand
securely, and on the count of three, begin to pull; each team
will try to pull the other over the line. The leader who wins
is the leader who can pull his opponent on the other side of
the line. The game ends here.


London Brij
Landan brij iz faalin dong
Faalin dong, faalin dong
Landan brij iz faalin dong
Mai fayr laydi
Shayk it op wid saalt ahn pepa
Saalt ahn pepa, saalt ahn pepa
Shayk it op wid saalt ahn pepa
Mai fayr laydi.








X. Who Do You L ov


Name of Game: Who Do You Love
Type of Game: Courtship
Minimum/maximum number of players: 20-30 is best; equal
number of boys and girls
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Any time
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: None
Origin: English
Skill: Social

Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is to discover the person who chose your
name. (This is an indication that the person who chose your name
likes you.) This game is usually played under the supervision of a
teacher or an adult, if played in the evening.
Instructions:
Before the game begins the teacher or adult must lobby each of
the players to find out which girl or boy they like. He/she has a
list of the players' names, separated into girl's names and boy's
names. Beside each name will be the girl's or boy's name that was
given.
Players randomly form two equal lines one line of boys and
one line of girls.
The lines should be facing each other.







* Each person in the lines should be numbered. Half of the
numbers will be on one side and the other half will be on the
other side.
* To begin the game, the teacher will call a number, and the
person whose number is called must go to the opposite line
and bow or curtsy to the girl or boy they think has chosen
their name.
* If it is the wrong name, the person should turn away, but if
it is the correct name, then they get to stand beside each
other.
* The teacher/adult continues to call alternately a girl's
number and then a boy's number until the class period is up
or until he/she decides to end the game.








XI. Tarmbran Seed Chroa


Name of Game: Tambran Seed Chroa
Type of Game: Throwing game
Minimum/maximum number of players: 2-6
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: bay or night in
dry season
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space
Equipment needed: Tambran (tamarind) seeds or small flat
objects about 10 per player
Origin: African
Skill: Throwing/fine muscles/balance

Play/Rules of Game:
The object: The player to get the most tambran seeds or coveted
objects at the end of the game wins.

Instructions:
Each player should have about 10 tambran seeds, or flat objects
with which to play. In the villages children used to play with
cashew seeds, whereas in the city with tambran (tamarind) seeds.

braw a box with six squares on the ground.
Write numbers randomly between zero to eight in the
squares. The box should always have an eight in one of the
squares and a zero in another.
Draw a horizontal line about 3 yards from the edge of the
box.







Players will stand behind this line.
Each player will get a turn to throw a seed into the box.
Wherever the seed lands, the other players must each give
that player that number of seeds.
The game ends whenever the players are ready to end it.


Example:








XII. One, Two, Three

Name of Game: One, Two, Three
Type of Game: Ring
Minimum/maximum number of players: As many as can be
accommodated
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space/indoors or outdoors
Equipment needed: None
Origin: English
Skill: Counting
Play/Rules of Game:
The object of this game is not to be left alone in the ring without
a partner.
Instructions:
The players form a circle with one person in the middle.
The song begins and as it gets to one and twenty" the
person in the middle pulls someone in and takes their place.
The game continues this way with the person in the middle
choosing someone else and taking their place.
The singing gets increasingly faster the closer it gets to
the end of the song.
When the song gets to one hundred, the person who is in
the middle remains for the next game.
The game ends whenever the group decides.







One Two Three


1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10
11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19-20
One and twenty, two and twenty
Three and four and five and six and twenty
Twenty seven, twenty eight, twenty nine, thirty.
One and thirty, two and thirty
Three and four and five and six and thirty
Thirty seven, thirty eight, thirty nine, forty
One and forty.............
One and fifty.............
One and sixty...............
One and seventy.........
One and eighty............
One and ninety, two and ninety,
Three and four and five and six and ninety,
Ninety seven, ninety eight, ninety nine,
One hundred.










XIII. Markes (M3aafl)


-*T ';
_2E


Name of Game: Marbles (Maabl) Traditional Belize style
Type of Game: Ring
Minimum/maximum number of players: Two-six
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space/outdoors
Equipment needed: Marbles
Origin: Roman
Skill: Manual dexterity/fine motor








Play/Rules of Game:
The object of the game is to knock the opponents' "taa" (shooting
marble) out of the ring and collect the most marbles.

Instructions:
Draw a circle on the ground approximately 5 feet in
diameter.
The order in which individuals will play is determined by a
method called "Gots" in which a straight line is drawn a few
paces from the ring. All the players line up in the middle of
the ring and toss their "taa" (shooter marble) toward the
line (gots). The player whose "taa" lands nearest to the
"gots" plays first, second nearest second etc. If two or
more marbles fall exactly in the "gots," that constitutes a








tie. The first player who shouts, "Fos-a-tai," gets to play
first.
If in throwing to the "gots" a player's "taa" knocks
another's, the whole process begins again.
* In the most popular version of marbles, the players "set di
ring" which means that each player places a stake of one or
two marbles anywhere near the inside edge of the ring.
* To begin the game the first player selects an opponent's
marble and tries to knock it out of the ring. To do this, the
player takes a position outside the ring, opposite from the
marble selected. The player can kneel and flick the "taa"
between the thumb with knuckles on the ground, or flick it
from the hip position.
If the player knocks the opponent's marble out of the ring,
the player gets to keep that marble. Then the person plays
again, starting from where the "taa" landed after it hit the
opponent's marble. If the first player fails to knock the
marble, the second player has a turn, etc.
* During the course of the game, a player can make different
calls in order to facilitate hitting the opponent's marble
(see 'Terms' at the end of these instructions).
* The game ends when the last marble is knocked out of the
ring. At the end of the game, the person with the most
marbles wins.
* In the way the children play marbles today, there is a
challenge play called "tek weh shenks" which can be used if
one player wants to challenge another player who has won
many marbles. On his/her turn, the challenger will attempt







to knock the opponent's taa out of the ring. If the
challenger does that successfully then he/she would get all
the marbles from that player. "Tek weh shenks" can occur
during any part of the game when a player wants to get
another player's marbles. If the challenger misses, then
play goes to the next person in line. No other penalty occurs
if the challenger misses because it is just an option from
which a player can choose. The options are to play in the
regular manner, or to challenge someone with many marbles
in order to increase your amount.

Terms used in playing traditional Marble in Belize
Big dubz: oversized glassy.
Bonks-chrai (bounce-try): a call empowering the caller to aim at
any other player's taa.
Dubzi: dark, drab glassy, probably from "dun" meaning dark and
dusty
Fos-a-tai (first-of-tie): shouted when two players are both
exactly in the guts. The first to shout it gets first. If in the
throwing to the 'gots' a player's 'taa' knocks another's, the whole
process begins again.
Ful ops (fill up): a call enabling the player to fill up any hollow in
which a marble at which he is aiming may be. (The marble can be
lifted up and dirt, etc. can be place directly under it.)
Glaasi (glassy): general name for any marble made of glass.







Gots (guts): straight line a few paces from the ring. Play begins
with each player standing in the ring and throwing for the "gots"
or order of play.
Jraps (drops): a call enabling a player to toss his 'taa' rather
than spinning it normally.
Kwaiyan: shining metal marble, valued as a "taa," because it
combines small size, making it hard to hit, with great weight,
giving it the power to smash a "siks" or a "glaasi" easily.
Laas-fos (last-first): a call enabling the caller to be last or firs1
in tossing to the 'gots' at the start of the game.
Noklz Dong (knuckles down): a call forcing a player to spin his
marble with his knuckles in contact with the ground, however
awkward this may be.
Piks (picks): a call enabling the player to clear the ground of bits
of stone, wood etc. that would make his play more difficult.
Play-too-taim (play-two-times): a call made when a 'taa' stops
rolling in contact with another marble. It enables the caller to pla)
twice.
Pus aiy/Fish aiy: marble made from glass, colored to suggest the
eye of a cat or a fish.
Ring: a circle drawn on the ground in which most of the action
takes place.
Set di ring (set up the ring): Each player places a stake of one or
two marbles anywhere near the inside edge of the ring in
preparation to begin the game.
Siks: marble made of clay.







Spinz-tu-yu-naybl (spin-to-your-navel): a call enabling a player
whose 'taa' is in an awkward spot to play from in front of his navel
instead of on the ground.
Taa (taw): each player's laying or shooting marble with which he
tries to hit others.


Tek weh shenks (take away shanks):
player challenges another player who
knocking that opponent's "taa" out of
all of that player's marbles.


an optional play in which one
has won many marbles, by
the ring, and thereby winning









XIV. MAiss Jennjry Jo1nes
jlt !! r;' l l~l II I


Name of Game: Miss Jennery Jones
Type of Game: Ring
Minimum/maximum number of players: any number
Time of year/day/night game is usually played: Day or night
Playing areas/boundaries: Open space/outdoors
Equipment needed: none
Origin: English
Skill: locomotive/coordination/listening/following directions







Play/Rules of Game:
The object of the game is for participants to do all the actions
mentioned in the game and in the end avoid being caught by Miss
Jennery Jones.

Instructions:
Participants form a circle. One person, identified as Miss
Jennery Jones, is in the middle of the circle.
The group begins to sing, "I've come to see Miss Jennery
Jones."
Miss JJ answers and says what she is doing.
The group will perform the actions of whatever Miss JJ
says she is doing.
In the last verse of the response which says she is rising,
participants run away because Miss JJ will try to catch one
of them. Whoever gets caught sits out the next game or
becomes Miss JJ.
When the game begins again, there will be a new Miss JJ in
the ring.
The game ends when the children are tired of playing the
game.








Miss Jennery Jones


Participants sing:
I've come to see Mis Jennery Jones,
Miss Jennery Jones, Miss Jennery Jones
I've come to see Miss Jennery Jones
And how is she today.

Miss Jennery Jones' response:
Miss Jennery Jones is washing
Is washing, is washing
Miss Jennery Jones is washing
So come another day.
Different actions are substituted each time for washing, e.g
ironing, sweeping, dusting, fishing, dancing. The last three actions
are
Miss Jennery Jones is sick.
Miss JJ is dying.
Miss JJ is rising...
At this point the children prepare to run because Mis JJ will
chase them.
Participants can decide ahead of time which actions will be used,
and in which order.










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