• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Broward's agriculture
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095011/00001
 Material Information
Title: Broward's agriculture report of county agricultural agent
Physical Description: 15 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Broward County (Fla.) -- Board of County Commissioners
Broward County (Fla.) -- Board of County Commissioners
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Broward County Extension Service
Place of Publication: Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Publication Date: 1960?
Copyright Date: 1960
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural extension work -- Florida -- Broward County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "Broward County Commissioners, Florida Agricultural Extension Service, and United States Department of Agriculture, cooperating."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095011
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436871730

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
Full Text




BROWARD'S AGRICULTURE


20 YEA RS
INCOME IN I/LL//ONS OF
DOLLAR RS


REPORT OF COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT


BROWARD COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE,
and


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATING







































L 3-WAY COOPERATION
Key to Extension Effectiveness

f I Cooperation on three levels-County, State
i t aand Federal-makes possible Agricultural Exten-
sion's educational activities. The result of this co-
operation is accurate agricultural and home mak-
ing information-readily available to all the peo-
* * *** * *** ple of Florida.


/clCC







COUNTY AGENT'S OFFICE


^ -T'sr "wi
65"ta !^ic~a


The office is upstairs 605 S.W. 26th Street, Fort Lauderdale.


You


Will be


Greeted


By


Mrs. Spencer


AUICULIURAI EXIENSION
SiRVIUE

NdR 11C


i








Above are 4 County Agents and the State Staff at
an Area Planning Meeting. From left to right are
L.M. Johnson of Martin County, John D. Campbell of
Dade County, M.U. Mounts of Palm Beach County,
R.S. Pryor of Broward County, Dr. M.O. Watkins,
Extension Service Director, Joe N. Busby, Assistant
Director, and Frank S. Perry, District Agent.

The County Agents are staff members of the
University of Florida, assisted by a State staff of
highly trained specialists. With the help of the
people in the County, they carry out many extension
activities, all of which are related and supplement
each other.


E~i,


COUNTY AGENTS

Robert S. Pryor is in charge of administration,
vegetables, dairy and beef cattle. Frank Jasa is in
charge of the Boys' 4-H Program, commercial citrus,
and poultry. Lewis E. Watson works with nurseries,
sod growers, urban homeowners, spraymen, and
professional lawn maintenance men.


Mrs. Spencer, Mr. Watson, and Mrs. Stutzman,preparing 450 copies
(4 pages each) of Monthly Newsletter for Lawn Maintenance,
Spraymen and Sod Growers.


-`,Aolllllllll







PLANNED EXTENSION WORK CHANGES


IN BROWARD'S AGRICULTURE


The role of the Broward County Extension Service
is in "Helping People to Help Themselves". The
Extension Service is the off-campus educational arm
of the University of Florida, as well as the educa-
tional agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Did you know that your County Agents plan their
work one year in advance? This is called a "Plan
of Work". Simply stated, that is just what it means -
a plan or outline of agricultural work and needs of
the County for the coming year.

In order to prepare this typewritten outline of
work for the coming year, the opinions of various ad-
visory groups and individuals are discussed in con-
ferences. It is then decided what type of work in
each phase of agriculture the Agents will work and
emphasize. Personnel responsibility is thereby de-
termined. The plan is reviewed by the State Staff.
Also included in the "Plan of Work" are requests
for the aid of Specialists in different phases of
agriculture. Notations are made as to the time these
Specialists will be needed and the particular type of
aid wanted.

Then, by means of phone calls, meetings, news-
letters, and home and farm visits, the Agents and
Staff strive to carry out this plan. Since it is not
possible to see each individual with a problem, all
forms of mass communications are used.

The primary core of the Extension Service pro-
gram is communicating information from research
findings and teachings of the U.S.D.A., the Univer-
sity of Florida, and its Experiment Stations, to the
people of Broward County; and, to correlate the
needs of the residents to this information.

The Extension Work consists of all phases of
agriculture related to farming, agri-business, and
homeowners. It is not restricted to rural agriculture.
Urban agricultural problems in Broward County are
many, coming from the homeowner, garden stores,
spraymen, lawn caretakers, and others.
Dairies


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960


Vegetable Farms

No. of Farms


$ 2,193,687
10,045,000
15,000,000
11,500,000
9,500,000
4,900,000
6,200,000


Citrus


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960


$ 210,000
1,000,000
600,000
800,000
1,200,000
2,500,000
2,650,000


$ 50,000
100,000
450,000
1,600,000
2,700,000
2,900,000
2,750,000


Nurseries


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960


$ 85,000
100,000
500,000
2,100,000
3,100,000
3,800,000
4,200,000


No. of Dairies


$ 1,000,000
2,000,000
3,500,000
9,000,000
10,900,000
12,763,451
10,000,000


Beef


$ 50,000
100,000
600,000
900,000
500,000
700,000
750,000


Income


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960


1940
1945
1950
1955
1957
1959
1960











SBROWARD DAIRIES

Dairymen increased and expanded
their dairies to meet the demand made by
the large numbers of new residents mov-
ing into Broward County. Milk production
prices are higher in this area due to the
high cost of shipped feeds, insect prob-
lems, taxes, and hot summer months.

Production per year per cow during
the past 5 years has increased 1200 lbs.
More records are being kept than ever
before. Artificial breeding is being ac-
complished on 80% of the herds. Most
dairymen are now raising a large percent-
age of their own replacements. Up-to-
date operations are found in all Broward
dairy herds. Dairymen have been one of
the first agricultural groups to be ef-
fected by urban expansion some moved
while others increased their herds.


Herds are approximately 1/3 Holstein, 1/3 Guern-
sey, and 1/3 Jersey. Up-to-date operations of all
Broward herds are shown in the pictures.


"r*







BOYS 4-H CLUBS


Our most valuable resource is the school age
youth. The Boys' 4-H Clubs are designed to develop
these boys so that they can take their place as both
leaders and followers in their communities. Various
methods are used to accomplish this training.


Learning Through Demonstrations. The 4-H motto
is "Learn by Doing." Members do just that by dem-
onstrating to others some of the things they have
been taught in their club work.


Dairy Judging Training. 4-H Club members re-
ceive training in many agricultural, home, and other
project activities. Each club meets twice a month
with the major portion of each meeting devoted to
training. This is accomplished through lectures,
discussions, demonstrations, films and other methods
besides project work. All members received some
training in public speaking and method of conducting
meetings. Because many of the boys come from
urban areas, less emphasis is placed on agricultural
projects and more on other activities.


Broward County was one of five in Florida selected
to pioneer a new project "Career Exploration". This
project was designed for older members to help them
decide on a suitable career.


Left to right, Byron Brown, Roger Pollock, Sammy Sauls, and
Harry Stroud, the top judging team for the State 4-H Dairy Show,
1960.

Results of Training. Nearly 20 boys spent several
Saturday learning the principles of dairy cow judg-
ing. The four top boys in the County were selected
to enter the State Contest in Orlando, held as a part
of the 4-H Dairy Show. The earlier training payed
off as these boys placed 1st in this contest and re-
turned with a trophy and a determination to be back
next year.


Sammy Sauls with calf entries in County 4-H Fair.


-~Bt~ i

: i-
9'
.5

-P


AAN6.


J















fIg.,.v


Project Exhibits. Project exhibits are considered
a showcase of 4-H Club Work. Each 4-H member is
urged to exhibit the results of his project work. To
make this possible, the Annual 4-H Show is held
each year in conjunction with the Davie Festival and
Rodeo. Members exhibiting received ribbons and
premiums for their efforts. Besides giving them an
incentive to improve their projects, this gives the
public a better idea of what is being accomplished.


Seminole 4-H Member Receiving Literature. Since
the Dania Tribe has moved into new homes, it has
made it easier to work with the boys and their pro-
jects. Several good gardens were grown during the
Spring. This gave the boys training in caring, not
only for the vegetable gardens, but also ornamental
plants around the home.


-.


A School Club Project at Deerfield Jr. High: Each
club member is required to complete and keep records
on at least one project. In one area where it seemed
difficult for the boys to maintain individual projects,
a group garden project was established on school
grounds.
One of the groups consisted of "slow learning"
students who found this type of activity an effective
way to prove their ability. Whether a club is organ-
ized in school, after school hours, or as strictly a
community club, depends on individual conditions.


4-H Camp Cloverleaf. The 4-H Camp is an im-
portant part of the 4-H Program. With the assistance
of Agents and Leaders, the members plan their camp,
schedule and activities. Those with previous camp
experience are assigned duties such as planning
evening programs, organizing recreational activities
and supervising work details. This gives them valu-
able training which is the main purpose of 4-H
Camps. 29 boys from Broward County, together with
Broward Girls, Martin County and Seminole boys and
girls, and Glades County boys, attended regular camp
August 13. Four boys attended the teen camp which
is designed for older members.







URBAN


Schools: Two formal courses are conducted each
year. One garden course is offered for homeowners
and one horticultural course for professional people.


a ~ ~


HOMEOWNERS


Educational talks are given to many garden clubs
or other interested groups on various agricultural
subjects.

On-the-Job Training type assistance is given to
many groups who have need for special training in
horticultural subjects.


Frank Jasa gives talk on garden topic


Group meetings are often held in the agricultural
auditorium to discuss problems or hear speakers on
special subjects.


A group of school children in new school get on-
the-job training in landscaping.


Advice on how to make the dollar buy more to
keep within the budget is offered. The installation
and maintenance of landscape plants can be an
economical undertaking if wise planning is practiced.


-- 1p7


Many circulars, bulletins, production guides, and
other printed materials pertaining to agricultural
topics are available to the public. These Extension
and Experiment Station publications are available to
residents of Florida.


New practices of renewing lawn grasses are in-
vestigated by commercial lawn maintenance men.
This machine is being demonstrated to show value of
vertical cutting to this dense turf.


Schools need simple landscaping designs such as
the one shown above which serves the purpose nice-
ly. A simple design helps to eliminate maintenance
problems involved in a more elaborate design. Since
school funds are limited, the landscaping of the
school grounds is usually undertaken by the PTA.








(URBAN HOMEOWNERS Cont.)


Management Practices-- The County Agents spend
considerable time in office conferences, telephone
calls, and home visits diagnosing homeowners' prob-
lems, and giving advice on management of landscape
plants. Individual contacts are numerous and produce
results, but our greatest effort is being directed
toward working with commercial spraymen, lawn main-
tenance men, and garden supply dealers. The inform-
ation furnished to these commercial people is
multiplied many times as it is passed on to the
homeowner who uses these services.


o





Mrs. Jack Alien, President of Broward County Federation of
Garden Clubs and Mr. Wm. Brooks, President of FNGA Chapter,
display awards presented to Tropical Broward Beautification
Award Winners.


///


Tropical Broward


Typical Commercial Spraying using insecticide to control chinch
bugs.

Technical Information The County Agent's of-
fice is a clearing house for technical information
from Agricultural Experiment Stations or Commercial
Research Companies. Such information often needs
to be explained to the public.

New materials and practices introduced by various
concerns requires trials or demonstrations to gain
public acceptance.


I I SPONSORED BY I
O Aed euCe e'w-
9Id.d4 Zfte"" 4aud
0c O-W 4 dwcala.


AND


9f.6Maa 7?edoaawa q
On,( &Id








SOD PRODUCTION


" t


Types of Grass Grown There are approximately
5000 acres of land devoted to sod production. About
90% of the grass is the St. Augustine type. Nearly
100 acres of Zoysia grass is being grown and most of
the remainder is Centipede.

Broward County is in a unique position of having
more land devoted to sod production than any other
county of the state. The muck land is very conducive
to good grass production. New homes in the area use
most of this supply.

In the last year or two, many of the better sod
fields have become infested with weeds because of
flooding and other factors. Much effort has been de-
voted in an attempt to keep the weeds under control.
The quality of grass has continued to diminish, in
spite of this effort, due to weed and other undesir-
able grass contaminations.

Recent research conducted in the area shows
promise of a new chemical control of weeds.


'"'~;,~~-,?r~lau- e


Growth of about 3 months on St. Augustine grass which shows
good control of weeds for this period.

L a
















leased by the University of Florida in 1960.


Zoysia grass field showing
sod, and nearly covered area.


recently lifted area, ready to lift


Typical sod field on good muck land with well planned water
control. This growth has developed in about one month. The
planting was treated with pre-emergence herbicide, Simazine.
The control of weed growth is excellent while adjacent fields
were rather heavily infested with several kinds of weeds.


Ralph White and Steve Hoft, Production and Sales Managers,
display quality Bitter Blue Grass at Nursery Trade Show.








WINTER VEGETABLES


Beans are a major crop.


Broward and East Palm Beach winter vegetables are sold to over
100 national buyers.

In Florida, Broward County ranks third in the pro-
duction of winter vegetables. Last year was a good
year for the Broward vegetable farmers for the first
time in 4 years. Over the Pompano Market, $6,200,000
worth of Broward produce was sold primarily to buyers
from chain stores.

Our farmers have become fewer in number, larger
in size, more mechanized, and more scientific. They
are producing a better product for consumption of the
general public. During all of their operations of
planting, fertilizing, and controlling of insects and
disease, they follow recommendations of the Agri-
cultural Extension Service. The County Agent's
office is the local representative of the Extension
Service.

At all times when using insecticides and fungi-
cides, precautions are taken by the Broward vegetable
farmers so that all chemical residues remaining on
the product are safe to the consumer. They follow
strict spray schedules and use correct amounts, ap-
plying at time intervals recommended.

Chain store buyers require uniformity of vegeta-
bles. This has required larger acreage plantings per
day by the farmers. Although, there are fewer farmers,
these farmers have all expanded their operations
during the last few years. This same trend is found
in all agricultural commodities.

The County Agent's office works with Vegetable
farmers by passing down recommendations and
practices from the University and Experiment Sta-
tions. The farmers have responded well, and are
known as one of the most progressive groups in the
United States.


Pepper Production has been curtailed by soil diseases.


A new crop for our farmers is Vine-Ripe Manulucie Tomatoes.


- Pict.Rite


A Broward farmer, Mr. W.B. Brown, is noted for his Vine-Ripe
Tomato Operation.









COMMERCIAL NURSERIES


"CONTEMPLATION"
and Hollywood Nurseryman, Ray


Oglesby, discuss


"PREPARATION"
Progressive Nurserymen adapt modern equipment and materials to
decrease production cost of good plants. The pressure of compe-
tition and labor cost causes nurserymen to seek many labor sav-
ing devices. The use of sterilized soil for pest control is a
common practice.


Neat blocks of
to protection.


"GROWING"
assorted ornamental plants grown and groomed


"SHOWING"
Nurseryman Swedroe introduces new varieties of plants at Annual
Florida Nurserymen and Growers Association Trade Show held in
Fort Lauderdale.


NURSERY
QUALITY PLANT NMERIAL
CO NTI N ER GOWN
IN STERILIZED SOIL
k ANDFULLSUON


"DEALING" "WHEELING"
Danny Mirandas eye-catching display attracts customer at FNGA Trucks and trailers from all parts of the country patronize Broward
Trade Show. Sales ticket is prepared on the spot. County's Nurseries to get the best for less.


County Agent
the situation.


,Ciw t





















"CELEBRATION" Propagation of good quality plant material is easily done all
Members of the Broward County Chapter of Fla. Nurserymen and year long in clear plastic houses under interrupted mist.
Grower Ass'n hear a Fireside report from fellow member. Regular ,
monthly meetings such as this are held to foster friendship and '
discuss business of the association. -


GROWTH ;,
The nursery industry of the county has enjoyed
steady growth in recent years. The total number ot
nurseries has remained fairly steady while the vol-
ume of business has risen. There are at present an
estimated 720 acres of land devoted to nursery pro-
duction. This represents nearly four million dollars
of business annually.


The introduction of new or
different plants for land-
scape use such as dwarf
Carissa (see picture at
right) has helped toadd
interest and improve market
of nursery stock. Other
means to stimulate the
sales of nursery plants are
being explored by cooperat-
ing with Extension special-
ists and Experimenting Sta-
tion Personnel.
Milton Link with new intro-
duction, the Linkii Carissa.


NIURSER Y


/IDz/STR


GROWTH


/O3- /946


BRO/ IRD


COUNTY


T9s/YS0194 V fiAf / Ss/aE' / -v /,9sy ,
70 v0c4- V w//7 0URZERYAier, JoD00),
I/'0 7YfS~rcD '1~8AA ~9Ye8IhM)S


to 1
4


I, l


I I I I


0


"'S'


Is I I







BEEF CATTLE ON YEAR ROUND GRASS


Bruce Remsberg has
an excellent cross-
bred herd west of Ft.
Lauderdale. He sells
500 pound steer
calves to feed lots.


USES CROSSBRED, ABERDEEN


4. 4-"A;-.'
P~
VA .?


ON BRAHMAN AND CROSSBRED COWS--SELLS-STEER CALVES

WHICH ARE MATES TO THIS HEIFER


1:q2


.:
--'-1 -

These heifers are for replacement after strict culling. Pastures
are St. Augustine, Pangola and Bahia.


Most animals are sold to feed lots north of us.
Cattlemen utilize pastures of Pangola, St. Augustine,
and Bahia Grass. They do no, or very little, sup-
plementary feeding. Some of the better cross-bred
herds of the State are in this County.


Broward has a large Aberdeen Angus pure-bred
herd in the Davie area, 2 pure-bred Santa Gertrudis
herds, and quite a large grade Santa Gertrudis herd.
Predominately, the herds are from Brahman breeding
that has been crossed with English type bulls.










t U -* O.. S .


ANU AND. SHO BUL



ANGUS AND SHORTHORN BULLS

ANGUS AND SHORTHORN


-~:. ~L~~~,,; .;;,~







CITRUS


Citrus in Broward County is a minor portion of the
State total but a vital part of the County agricultural
picture. Because this citrus is grown primarily on
muck and mucky sand soil, cultural practices differ
from those on the sandy ridge and coastal areas.
Fertilizer practices must be adapted to meet special
conditions.


--t -.-.- -
*19K

1C~ A; II-


Picking Valencia Crop


The County Agent's Office is cooperating with
the Experiment Station in conducting two fertilizer
experiment and demonstration plots in an effort to
determine suitable fertilization rates. Spray program
also differs from other areas because of the longer
warm period. The County Agents work with citrus
growers and caretakers in trying to increase produc-
tion and reduce costs.


Valencia oranges and grapefruit make up the bulk
of citrus in Broward County. Most of the grapefruit
is marketed through fresh fruit channels, either at re-
tail fruit stands or shipped to Northern markets. The
major portion of the Valencia crop goes to concen-
trate plants. Since these plants are considerable
distance away and fruit volume is not large, the fruit
handlers are in the area only a short time. The
grower normally harvests his fruit while the equip-
ment and labor is in the area, otherwise he may find
it difficult to find a market.


Loading in grove
Harvesting the fruit in the low mucky areas in-
creases costs. The fruit must be handled an extra
time because heavy equipment cannot get in the
groves. Many methods are used. Examples of this
include: Carting fruit out of grove in tractor drawn
"goats"; loading into specially built trucks; and
picking directly into large baskets which are handled
with tractor lift. Each method is used to meet
specific conditions.

The County Extension Agents work primarily with
and through grove caretakers and larger growers.
Periodic visits are made and latest production in-
formation is distributed to the growers as soon as it
becomes available.























Delivery-coming and going







COOPERATING WITH OTHERS


COUNTY AGENT'S OFFICE OR AGENT

1. Work closely with Research Personnel at Plan-
tation Field Laboratory (U.S.D.A.&State) and with
the Everglades Experiment Station.

2. Aid and act as clearing point for information
and Personnel of the Programs of Florida State
Veterinarian and U.S.D.A. which include Brucel-
losis, Screwworm, ticks, etc.

3. Member of County Agent Advisory Committee
on Ornamental Horticulture, University of Florida.

4. Director of the Florida Mango Forum.

5. Secretary of Broward County Migratory Labor
Committee.

6. Secretary of Broward County Cattleman's
Association.

7. Adviser and record keeper of Broward County
Artificial Breeders' Association.

8. Weekly crop and weather report made to
Agricultural Statistician, Orlando, Florida.

9. Work closely with Florida State Plant Board.

10. Counselor Boy Scout Agricultural Merit
Badges.

11. Report periodically to Central & South Florida
Flood Control on flood, cold damage, etc.

12. Work with officers and members of Broward
Chapter Florida Nursery & Growers Association.

13. Judge and clearing house for "Tropical
Broward Beautification Awards".

14. Advisory aid to: City Parks Dept.; County
Parks Dept.; PTA; So. Eastern Milk Marketing Area;
Independent Dairy Farmers Ass'n,; and the Broward
Vegetable Farmers.

15. Work closely with Organizations of Spraymen
Lawn Caretakers.

16. Prepare and give speeches to Garden Clubs,
Civic Clubs, Community Groups, and Business
Groups.


AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM

The purposes of this program include restoring
and improving soil fertility, reducing erosion caused
by water and wind, and conserving water on the land.
To effectuate these purposes, the Agricultural Con-
servation Program offers cost-sharing assistance to
individual farmers and ranchers for carrying out ap-
proved soil building and soil and water conserving
practices on their farms. The Federal assistance
represents only a part of the cost of performing the
practice. The farmer bears the balance of the cost,
50% on the average, and in addition often supplies
the labor necessary to carry out the practice.

In 1959, cost-shares in the amount of $22,881.00
were earned by 23 Broward County farmers. There
are 29 farmers participating in the 1960 Broward
County ACP, and funds in the amount of $41,425.00
have been allocated to them.

The Agricultural Conservation Program is ad-
ministered by five Committeemen who must be bona-
fide farmers, and elected each year by farmers in the
county. Committeemen elected to serve this year are:
Henry D. Perry, Bruce Remsberg, Martin G. Wood-
ward, Russell Daniel, and John I. Whitworth.

The day-to-day activities of the program is con-
ducted by a County Office Manager, Martha H. Roberts.
who is hired by the County Committee.


Mrs. Martha H. Roberts, County Office Manager, is in charge of
the A.S.C. Program in Broward County. With her above is Mr. J.N.
Fichter, District Fieldman.


1

L


H





~psp~










SUMMARY OF ALL EXTENSION ACTIVITIES


Land Use & Expected Changes in Acres 1958-75

1958 + and-Change 1975


Changes in Agricultural Practices by:

Farm families
Rural non-farm families
Urban families

Breakdown of Extension Activities

No. People Visiting Office (with problems)
Phone Calls
Farm & Home Visits by Agents

Letters:
Individual
Circulars 93 with copies of

Bulletins Distributed

Miles Traveled by 3 Agents

Meetings held by 3 Agents
with Attendance of

Days Devoted to All Work (3 Agents)
(Breakdown of 7372 days below)

Extension Organization & Planning

In Service Training

Crops

Livestock

Marketing, Distribution & Service

Soil & Water Conservation

Planning & Management of Farm Business

Farm Buildings & Farm Mechanical

House, Surroundings, & Equipment

Family Life Child Development

Safety

Comm. Development & Public Affairs

Days Other than above


260
1,190
57,000



1,915
8,164
2,207


2,851
17,819

8,883

40,170

228
5,928

737/2


65

17

335

85

31'/

25

232

22

391/2

612

2

18/2

31/2


Total Land Area

C. &S. Fla. Flood
Controls

Urban

Water

Total Agri Lands

Cropland

Pasture & Range

Forest & Woodland

Other Land


779,520 0 779,520


471,680

71,457

3,332

232,651

41,301

67,965

51,169

72,216


0

126,770

8,438

135,208

10,778

43,140

35,009

46,281


471,680

198,227

11,770

97,443

30,523

24,825

16,160

25,935


BROWARDS AGRICULTURAL INCOME


Citrus
Winter Vegetables
Sod
Milk
Dairy Cows for Beef
Beef Cattle
Poultry
Nurseries
Others









Citrus
Winter Vegetables
Sod
Milk
Dairy Cows for Beef
Beef Cattle
Poultry
Nurseries
Others


1958-59

$ 2,500,000
4,900,000
2,900,000
11,513,451
1,250,000
700,000
900,000
3,800,000
410,000

Total $29,180,451




1959-60

$ 2,650,000
6,200,000
2,750,000
8,858,580
1,141,420
750,000
750,000
4,200,000
400,000

Total $27,700,000









BROWARD'S AGRICULTURE

W/OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES


FIRST

FIRST

SECOND

THIRD

21st

ALSO RATE

POULTRY


in DAIRY

in SOD

in ORNAMENTALS

in VEGETABLES

in CITRUS

in BEEF CATTLE

and TROPICAL FRUITS


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

BROWARD COUNTY
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA


GEORGE C. PETERSEN,
Fort Lauderdale Dist. No. 1

H. V. SAXON
Pompano Beach Dist. No. 2

JOHN W. BELL, Chairman
Fort Lauderdale Dist. No. 3


FRANK C. ADLER
Dania Dist. No. 4

J. HERBERT BURKE
Hollywood Dist. No. 5

JOHN U. LLOYD, Attorney


COUNTY AGENT'S OFFICE
605 S. W. 26th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida


ROBERT S. PRYOR,
County Agent


LEWIS E. WATSON,
Assistant County Agent


FRANK J. JASA,
Assistant County Agent




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs