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Title: Annual vegetable grower's field day
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095005/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual vegetable grower's field day
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station. -- Horticultural Unit
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Horticultural Unit, Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1964
Copyright Date: 1964
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Cultivated -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plants, Protection of -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Varieties -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: 1964; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1964.
Statement of Responsibility: Horticultural Unit, Agricultural Experiment Station.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00095005
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436873483
lccn - 2009229377

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Full Text




ANNUAL VEGETABLE GROWERS' FIELD DAY
r HORTICULTURAL UNIT
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

May 28, 1964 Gainesville, Florida


DEPARTMENTS AND STAFF PARTICIPATING

Vegetable Crops

F. S. Jamison, Horticulturist and Bead
A. P. Lora, Horticulturist
V. F. Nettles, Horticulturist
A. D. Thompson, Associate Horticulturist
L. H. Halsey, Assistant Horticulturist
M. E. Marvel, Associate Vegetable Crop Specialist
S. J. LUcascio, Assistant Horticulturist
D. D. Gull, Assistant Horticulturist
James Montelaro, Associate Vegetable Crop Specialist
J. M. Stephens, Assistant Vegetable Crop Specialist
W. Loria, Graduate Student

Entomology

L. C. Kuitert, Entomologist and Head
D. H. Habcck, Assistant Entomologist
R. E. Waites, Assistant Entomologist

Soils

F. B. Smith, Microbiologist and Head
J. G. A. Fiskell, Associate Biochemist

Agricultural Engineering

D. T. Kinard, Agricultural Engineer and Head
J. F. Beeman, Assistant Agricultural Engineer


LUNCH SERVED AT 12:00 P. M. AT THE SHED AREA






V. I






SKETCH MAP OF PRINCIrAL VEGETABLE PLOTS
Horticultural Unit 1964


N















2
1
3

4

5

6

7


21 1





20 19 18 17 16


8
9
10

11


13


12


I22


x( Start


Southern Pea Breeding
Cantaloupe Varieties & Breeding
Southern Pea Seasonal Planting
Southern Pea Quality Studies
Southern Pea Varieties
Fertilizer Placement
Mulching and Cultural Studies
Entomology
Southern Pea Herbicides
Watermelon Herbicide
Plot Size Experiment
Watermelon Varieties
Cucumber, Pepper & Eggplant Varieties


Sweet Potato Varieties
Bean Breeding
Tomatoes-Post-Harvest Handling
Tomato Varieties
Tomato Mulching Trial
Pole Beans Prepackaging
Bean Mulching Study
Vegetable Breeding
Physiological Study on Sweet Corn
Cantaloupe Breeding
Lime & Minors with Watermelons
Copper Studies with Watermelons
Lime Placement for Watermelons




S.x


2.



OTHER WORK

Page

A. Standardization of Celery Pack ................. 21

B. Discoloration of Potatoes ...................... 21

C. Effect of Handling Practices on Quality
of Fresh Vegetables ........................... 22

D. Harvesting Machinery ........................... 22

E. Strawberry Culture

I. Fertility ............................. 23

II. Resin Coated vs. Non-Coated
Fertilizers ............................ 23

III. Side-Dressing .......................... 24

IV. Strawberry Herbicide ................... 24

V. Strawberry Bud Nematodes ............... 24











AREA 1 A. P. Lorz

SOUTHERN PEA BREEDING


Southern peas, it varicts #taEga of puritioation of types, are being
subjected to Fusarium wilt infested soil and selected for resistance.
Some better established uniform types are being increased for further
testing and possible ultimate release as new varieties. Demonstration
and seed increase plots (available for inspection but yet immature)
contain the recent releases, Producer, Climax and Topset as well as
two prospective new releases to be named Floricream and Snapea.


AREA 2 and 23 L. H. Halsey

CANTAIOUPE VARIETIES


To evaluate new cantaloupe varieties and breeding
performance in comparison with recognized standards.


lines for


Replicated Trial: (Conducted in
Cooperative Cantaloupe Trials).


cooperation with Southern


Variety


La. 30-C-58
La. 15-22
La. 39
Md. 63-53
Va. 814
V.B.L. 63-37
V.B.L. 63-4
V.B.L. 64-28
V.B.L. 62-27
C-496-A
67
134 F1
Seminole
8x4
Hales Best Jumbo
Edisto

Florida No. 1
Florisun


Name or Number

R. T. Brown


F. S. Stark
T. J. Nugent
C. F. Andrus


B. F. Whitner
It


F. S. Jamison
"I


Source


La. A. E. S.
I

Md. A. E. S.
Va. A. E. S.
S.E.V.B.L.
1"


Fla. A. E. S.



Willhite Seed Farms
Kilgore Seed Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
Fla. A. E. S.
It


Field No.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.












Observational Entries


Florida No. 9
Floridew
Smith's Perfect
AAS 64 VO 1
AAS 64 VO lC
AAS 64 V1O
Lucknow Safeda
Pakistan No. 1
Pakistan No. 2
Pajarero
Onteniente
Tendral
No Tendral No. 3
No Tendral No.
Delta Gold
Banana
45 S. J.


Fla. A. E. S.

Kilgore Seed Co.
All America Trials


Kashmir
Is
It
Spain
Is
H



Rueter Seed Co., La.
oI
to
1"
11


Previous Results: Some breeding lines yielded
of Hales Best Jumbo and were considerably higher in


nearly double that
soluble solids.


CANTALOUPE FEEDING


Maintenance of breeding lines, observation of new acquisitions
and selected crosses to improve disease resistance, quality and yield.


AREA 3 L. H. Halsey

SOUTHERN PEA SEASONAL PIJATING


To determine the response of four varieties of southern pea,
representing bush and semi-viny growth habits, to time of planting
from March to August, at one month intervals.

Previous Results: March and July plantings superior to others;
Producer superior to Purple Hull Pinkeye all plantings except April;
Topset superior to Cream 40 early and late.


01.
02.
03.
*14.
05.
06.
07.
68.
09.
010.
011.
012.
013.
014.
015.
016.
017.











AREA 4 D. D. Gull and L. H. Halsey

SOUTHERN PEA QUALITY STUDIES


To develop improved methods for maintaining quality of fresh
shelled southern peas by determining proper shelling techniques,
handling and storage conditions.


AREA 5 L. H. Halsey

SOUTHERN PEA VARIETIES


To evaluate new southern pea varieties and breeding lines for
performance and comparison with recognized standards.


Replicated Trial:
Southern Pea Trials).


Field No.


(In cooperation with Southern Cooperative


Variety Name or Number


Source


La. 19-25 A. C. Miller
Purple Hull Pinkeye "
Ga. 8-102-2 B. B. Brantley
La. 63 A. C. Miller
Floricream A. P. Lorz
Calif. Blackeye Kilgore Seed Company
No. 5
Texas Cream 40 "
Purple Hull Pinkeye M. Meadows


N. La. A. E. S.
It
Ga. A. E. S.
N. La. A. E. S.
Fla. A. E. S.
Gainesville, Fla.


Fla. State Dept. Ag.


Previous Results: In a fall trial Knuckle Purple Hull and
Ga. 8-102-2 (Fla. 133-oo10) were highest in yield of whole-pod peas.
Ga. 8-102-2 and two Florida browneye types were equal to Knuckle
Purple Hull in yield of shelled-out peas and superior to Purple
Hull Pinkeye.

Observational Entries


Field No.


Variety Name or Number Source


82-0812110
345-01110
279-02212310
379-03120
265-02110


A. P. Lorz
it


Fla. A. E. S.
It


Fla.
Fla.
Fla.
Fla.
Fla.












6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.


Fla. 290-312110
Fla. 394-0110
Princess Ann Blackeye
Va. 60-21
Va. 61-5
Va. 61-11
Va. 59-41
Va. 60-29
Va. 60-30
Va. 60-54
Ark. 202
Ark. 203
La. 112
La. 38-3
La. 38-6
La. 38-7
Ga. 9-43


A. P. Lorz
11
W. H. Brittinghmn
i?

tI
n


It

J. L. Bowers

A. C. Miller
t
"I
"I
B. B. Brantley


AREA 6 V. F. Nettles

FERTILIZER PLACEMENT


Purpose: To study the effect of methods of fertilizer application.
To include different types of fertilizer and analysis on the growth and
quality of vegetables.

Precision planting of fertilizer accomplished in the following
treatments using USDA, Department of Agricultural Engineering
experimental machines FJ 44 seeded and F 45 transplanter.


Treatment


Placement


Pounds 6-8-8/Acre
Beans Peppers


2k" to one side; 2k" below
II II



It"
t H



i-2." to one side; 2" below and
1'2f" to other side; 6" below
1i t 11o


Fla. A. E. S.
It
Va. A. E. S.
ti
ft


a. A. E S.

I1

Ark. A. E. S.

N. La. A. E. S.

It
It
Ga. A. E. S.


SA
B
C

2A
B
C

3A

B
C


800
1,100
1,400

800
1,100
1,400


800
1,100
1,400


1,200
1,8000
2,400

1,200
1,800
2,400


1,200
1,800
2,400











of total broadcast;
as in No. 2 above
it
'I


in bands
it
11


j-23" to one side; 2k" below
3/4-2k" to other side; 6"
it of


Beans: Contender seeded March 24.
Peppers: Yolo Wonder transplanted April 7.


and
below


800
1,100
1,400


800
1,100
1,400


1,200
1,800
2,400


1,200
1,800
2,400


Crops of cabbage and cucumbers have also been tested with
similar treatments in 1963-64.

Results: Results from two harvests from current bean experiment:

Treatment


202.6 bu/acre
227.8 bu/acre
226.8 bu/acre
200.8 bu/acre
208.5 bu/acre


Yields of beans were also greater with each increasing level of
fertilizer tested. No differences between treatments were found in 1963.

Highest yields of marketable peppers in 1963 were obtained with
Treatments 1 and 3 in comparison to Treatment 5.

Treatments 2, 3, and 4 produced comparable yields of marketable
cucumbers in 1963 and were better than Treatments 1 and 5.

With cabbage, an interaction of fertilizer placement and levels
was obtained. Yields were decreased with high levels of fertilizer
when materials were placed in band or bands near the plant.


AREA 7 V. F. Nettles

MUCHIMNG AND CULTURAL STUDIES


Watermelons
1.
2.
3.


Check
ENEAP
ENCAP


No herbicide
Dacthal (8f/acre)


4A

B
C

5A

B
C










4. ENCAP
5. ENAP
6. ERAP
7. ENCAP
8. ENCAP
9. Field seeded-black plastic
10. Transplanted-peat pots
11. Transplanted-peat pots and
hot caps
12. Transplanted-black plastic
and peat pots


Alanap 3 (4#/acre)
Vegedex (6#/acre)
Diphinamid (*3/acre)
Ambien
Banvel D (1#/acre)


Cantaloupes


1. Check
2. ENCAP
3. ENCAP
4. ENCAP
5. ENCAP
6. Field seeded-black plastic
7. Transplanted-peat pots
8. Transplanted-peat pots and
hot caps
9. Transplanted black plastic
and peat pots


No herbicide
Dacthal (f/acre)
Alanap 3 (l1/acre)
Vegedex (6#/acre)


Charleston Gray watermelons seeded February 25. Florida #9
cantaloupes seeded February 26. All herbicides applied as pre-emergence
treatments. ENEAP applied in an 8" band over the seed row, using about
16 gallons per acre for the treatment of watermelons on 9' rows. All
plots, except those with black plastic, hoed 30 days after planting
as heavy weed growth occurred on most plots. Best herbicidal control
with Vegedex and Diphinamid.

Results-1963: Largest early and total marketable yields of
watermelons were obtained by seeding or transplanting in combination
with black plastic or transplanting and hot caps. Highest early yield
of cantaloupes obtained from plots with black plastic using transplants
followed by yields from plots field seeded and covered with black
plastic or ENCAP. Yields were 255, 170 and 169 crates per acre,
respectively.










AREA 8 D. H. Habeck and R. E. Waites

ENT01OIDGY

Insecticide residue studies of carbaryl (Sevin) on snap beans and
dimethoate (Cygon) and tomatoes are underway at this time. Two other
experiments, which are just beginning, concern the control of corn
earworm on sweeteorn and the control of corn earworm and armyworms on
peppers. A late planting of sweet corn will be used for an experiment
on the control of budworms.

A black light trap is being operated at the Hort. Unit in
connection with an experiment elsewhere to control corn earworm on
sweet corn by trapping the adult moths. All earworm moths collected
are examined to determine their reproductive status.

In addition, work on control of pickleworm on squash is being
done at the main station.



AREA 9 S. J. Locascio

SOUTHERN PEA HERBICIDES

No. Herbicide Lbs./A.A.

1 Check cultivated
2 Dacthal 75% 8
3 Trifluraline & Dymid 10 & 40 WP 1 & 4
4 Dymid 80 WP 4
5 Dymid 80 WP 6
6 Trifluralin 4 EC 2
7 Trifluralin 4 EC 4
8 Prometryne 80 W 2
9 Prometryne 80 W 4
10 DNBP 3
11 052H T.H. 50 WP 4
12 052O T.H. 50 WP 8
13 Tillam 6 EC 3
14 Tillam 6 EC 6
15 Tenoran 50 W 2
16 Tenoran 50 W 4
17 CIPC 4 EC 5
18 CIPC 20% ADM 5
19 CIPC 20% 5
20 Amiben 4
21 Amiben 2 EC 6
22 TH 073H 50 WP 3
23 TH 073H 50 WP 6
24 Unhoed Check






10.


Floricream southern peas were planted on March 16 and the herbicides
were applied on March 18.

Early growth was slightly retarded by Dacthal and Dymid probably
due to excess water (10").




AREA 10 S. J. Locascio

WATERMELON HERBICIDE

To evaluate several pre-emergence herbicides applied pre- and
post-emergence to Charleston Gray watermelons. Planted March 16,
1964.

Date Applied
3/16* 4/16**
Herbicide Lbs./A.A. Treatment No.

Cultivated Check 1 16
Alanap 4 2 17
Dacthal 8 3 18
Dacthal 12 4 19
Dymid 4 5 20
Dymid 6 6 21
Vegedex 8 7 22
T. H. 052 H 4 8 23
T. H. 052 H 8 9 24
R 4461 8 10 25
R 4461 12 11 26
Casoran 4 12 27
EPTC 4 13 28
Amiben 6 14 29
Unhoed Check 15 30

* Hoed 4/22
** Hoed 4/15

Results: Pre-emergence applications of Alanap and Vegedex
provide fair weed control for about 3-4 weeks without plant injury.
Of the material tested, R 4461 offers the most promise for pre-
emergence application.

Post-emergence applications were tolerated by the watermelons
except 052 H and Amiben.







11.


AREA 11 S. J. Locascio

PIOT SIZE EXPERIMENT


This experiment is designed to
plot size for watermelon research.
hill basis. The hill unit data wil:
plots for analysis and will indicate


obtain information on the optimum
Yields will be recorded on a per
L be combined into various size
e the optimum plot size.


AREA 12 V. F. Nettles

WATERMEIDN VARIETIES


Southern Cooperative Watermelon Trials (Initial planting March 14)

Replioated


Charleston Gray
Crimson Sweet
VBL 60-27
NC 62 C 2M
VBL W x 9


Observational


6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


NC 62
NC 62
VBL W
VBL W
VBL W


C 5M
C 7M
1003
x 8
x 10


VBL W
VBL W
VBL W
Texas


x 11
x 12
x 13
Round Gray


Other Observational Varieties


Charleston
Charleston
Charleston


Gray
Gray
Gray


Jubilee
AA 63 V 17
Hybrid 107
Seedless #72
Yamato Improved
Harris Earliest


(sib)
(Fla)
133


24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.


Golden Midget
New Winter
FI Hybrid #100
F1 Hybrid #101
Honey Cream
Sugar Baby
Rhode Island Red
Hybrid 103


The results of the 1963 Southern Cooperative test showed that
Charleston Gray, Crimson Sweet and several North Carolina breeding
lines dominated the list submitted by the cooperators.


15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.











AREA 13 V. F. Nettles

CUCUMBER VARIETIES SLICERS

Southern Cooperative Cucumber Trials (planted March 14, 1964).

Replicated


Ashley
Polaris


3. Saticoy Hybrid
4. SC 59


Observational


Hybrid
8B 2-3
8 2-3
9B 2-3
9B 2-3


153
x Ashley
x SC 59
x Ashley
x SC 59


10. Texas 6
11. FI Hybrid #8
12. 64 V 06


No cucumber trial conducted in 1963. Report from chairman of
the Southern Cooperative Trial and other observation would indicate
that more attention will be paid to hybrids. Entry 3 in replicated


trials and entries 6-9 in observational
seed will retail at a higher price than
evaluation will have to be made to seed
is warranted.


PEPPER VARIETIES Southern Cooperative
April 1, 1964)


trial are all hybrids. These
regular seed and close
if the difference in cost


Pepper Trials (Transplanted


Replicated


1. Yolo Wonder L
2. Yolo Wonder Imp B
3. Idabelle
4. Resistant Fla. Giant
5. XP 106
6. XP 300


7.
8.
9.
10.
11.


111 1003-205
Delaware Belle
Yolo Wonder B
Pacific Belle
Keystone Resistant Giant


Observational


12. AA 63 V 11
13. AA 63 V 13C 2
14. Piminto Blanco
del Pais
15. AA 63 V 08
16. Chili-Kashemeri


17. Early Wonder
18. Yolo Wonder Type #633F

19. Yolo Wonder 59L
20. Yolo Wonder 58 L
21. Nose Gay







13.


EGGPLANT VARIETIES

Replicated

1. Florida Market 1 5. XP 6
2. Florida Market 2 6. XP 8
3. Florida Market 3 7. XP 10
4. XP 5 8. Florida Market 4

Observational

9. Rosita 13. Pusa Purple
10. Puerto Rico Beauty 14. Morden Midget
11. No. 25 Fl 15. White Midget
12. No. 29 Fl

Trial in 1963 indicated that lines as FI hybrids 25 and 29
gave excellent yields but tip-over was observed on most all lines
late in the season. Trial in this year planted to obtained yield
records from replicated trials and to further observe reported
resistance to tip-over of some of the Florida Market strains.




AREA 14 V. F. Nettles

SWEET POTATO VARIETIES

Observational

1. NC 172
2. Nugget
3. Goldrush
4. Centinnel
5. NC 180
6. NC 210
7. Georgia Red
8. Unit No. 1 Porto Rico

Georgia Red and Unit No. 1 have been satisfactory performers in
past years. However, entries 5 and 6 will be closely watched in this
trial to determine if they can be used both for fresh and processing
use.











AREA 15 A. P. Lorz

BEAN BREEDING

Pole and bush snap bean selections (now mostly overmature) are
being established as pure lines with selection emphasis on white-
seeded prolific round podded Tendergreen and bush Blue Lake types
and on pole types with large, smooth, dark green, stringless pods.
Rust and mosaic resistant stocks are being used wherever possible.
The pole bean phase is cooperative with the Gulf Coast, Sub-Tropical
and North Florida Stations. Hybrid material from crosses involving
non-commercial bean species is being explored for whatever these
species may be able to contribute to lima and snap bean improvement.




AREA 16 B. D. Thompson, D. D. Gull, L. H. Halsey

TOMATOES POST-HARVEST HANDLING

Three varieties, Homestead 24, Manapal, and STEP 434 are being
studied to determine the relationship between maturity and post-
harvest handling temperature. Fruit will be harvested 30, 36, 39
and 42 days after anthesis, held 6 days at 400, 550, or 700 before
ripening at 70.

Results last year showed fruit harvested 21 days after anthesis
failed to ripen at any temperature, and that harvested 30 days or later
colored in direct proportion to holding temperature before ripening.
Analysis showed some changes with maturity but none precise enough
to be used as a measure of maturity.




AREA 17 L. H. Halsey

TOMATO VARIETIES

Observational Entries

Field No. Entry Breeding Line No. Source

1 Rutgers Lot No. 53805 Asgrow, Conn.
2 Nemared 27-1-1 H.B. Cordner, Okia
3 STEP 413 3317-55-6 C.F. Andrus, SEVBL










STEP
11

It



it
if
It
'I

"t


C. F. Andrus, SEVBL
it
A.L. Harrison, Texas
It
P.A. Young, Texas
Andrus & E.V. Wann,SEVBL

11
11


415
416
422
423
428
439
440
441
442
443
444

445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458


3416
3421
Y115
Y398
CP 1951-42
3291 A-2-1
3291 A-2-M4
3419
3425-6-5
3426-1-1
63B254

63B739
63B752
63B755
Y23
Y91
Y135
L68
L86
L125
sc 626-A-l-k
SC 799-2---1N
SC 799-2---2N
sc 807-1--1N
CAVT V 18-D2-D8-
D3-3-5-Bk
CAVST W 103-D4-
1-FPBK-DBK


II

A.L. Harrison, Texas
1t
I1
T.P. Hernandez, La.
11
ot
W. Sitterly, S.C.
ft

it
J.W. Strobel and
J.M. Walter, Fla.
1i


CAST W 557-3-D2-B-Bk "
AST W 656-5-Bk-Bk- R.A. Conover and


FPI-Bk
CAPST W 123-FP2-
FP2-FP2-Bk
CASTM W 479-6-
Bk-l-Bk-Bk
CAVST W 86-D2-D1-
4-Bk
Mo. 22-St-5
Au 22
280-6-1-1
309-7-1-2
3414-3-1-3
All America Strain
it
11


J.M. Walter, Fla.
N.C. Rayslip and
J.M. Walter, Fla.

J. M. Walter, Fla.
J.W. Strobel and
J.M. Walter, Fla.
V.N. Lambeth, Mo.
W.H. Greenleaf, Ala.
M.C. Fuqua, Texas
if
It
W. Ray Hastings, Pa.
it
it
11


R. Webb
P.I.
'i


& D. Davis,
Sta., Md.


" 459


460
461


" 462

" 463

i 464


It
II
It
If
it
AAS
11
It
1,


465
466
467
468
469
64 V03
64 vo3C
64 Vo4
64 V08









44 T. Sakata 1 9672 F, T. Sakata, Japan
45 T. Sakata 2 3119
46 3 4247 "
47 4 3807 ""
48 5 4705 "
49 6 4706 "
50 7 5280 "

Breeding Lines for Selection

Field No. Breeding Line Number

1 60-054-Gl-1-BkBk-BkB
2 60-054-Gl-1-Bk-Bk-l
3 60-054-Bk-Bk-GBk-l-1
4 CASTW 298-D1-1-Gl1-1-1-1-
5 CASTW 298-Dl-1-Gl-2-Bk-Bk-1
6 CASTW 418-FP2-4-G1-21-1-1
7 CAVSTW 18-D2-D8-Bk-D3-3-G1
8. AVW-R22-Dl--Bk-Bk-G
9 AVW-R22-Dl-Bk-Bk-GBk
10 CASTW 709-FP3-Bk-G1
11 VASTW 2-D1-5-Bk-0Bk
12 VASTW 2-D2-5-GBk
13 CAVSTW 103-D4-2-GBk
14 CAVSTW 103-D4-2-Gl
15 CAVSTW 103-D4-2-G2



AREA 18 W. Loria and V. F. Nettles

TOMATO MULCHING TRIAL

An experiment designed to test the value of the use of black
plastic mulch or sawdust in the production of vine-ripened tomatoes.

Treatment No.

1. Floralou Unmulched
2. Black plastic mulch
3. Sawdust
4. Manapal Unmulched
5. Black plastic mulch
6. Sawdust










AREA 19 B. D. Thompson

POLE BEANS PREPACKAGING AT (ROWER LEVEL

Dade variety grown to study all aspects of packaging materials,
temperature and post-harvest treatments on prepackaged beans.

Results last year showed Dade variety far out-yielded Ky-191
and McCaslan and was about 3 days earlier. Several types of shrink
and non-shrink films are available for package wrapping. Too low a
temperature resulted in chilling injury and too high in excessive
decay. Careful and complete grading to remove defective beans before
packaging is essential.



AREA 20 V. F. Nettles

BEAN MUNCHING STUDY

Three plantings of Contender beans were planted at 10-day
intervals to observe the effect of ENCAP (petroleum mulch) in comparison
to unmulched treatments. All plantings damaged by cold. No increases
in yields were found in this season or in 1963 from the use of this
material with beans.



AREA 21 A. P. Lorz

VEGETABLE BREEDING

Endive-Escarole-Chicory: New accessions and breeding materials
are being further bred and screened for improvements in plant type
which involves characters of leafiness, freedom from colored midribs,
slow-bolting, self-blanching, heading tendency and disease resistance.
The material is mostly now in seed stalk formation.

Dwarf Tomatoes: From repeated backcrosses of extreme dwarf
types to commercial varieties, fruits of near commercial size are
being established on dwarf plants with a high fruit to plant ratio
and with a low center of gravity of the fruit load in this effort
to develop stocks for use in breeding varieties for mechanical
harvesting.

Minor studies involving some breeding and evaluation of new
plant accessions extend to consideration of chayotes, squash and
self-pollinating watermelons.












AREA 22 V. N. Schroder and W. K. Robertson

PHYSIOLOGICAL STUDY ON IOANA SWEET CORN

Objectives: To determine the effect of various growth regulators
on tillering, growth and maturity and yield of sweet corn.

Procedure: Growth regulators were applied either as foliar
sprays or as soil applications.

Material Concentration Applied As

Gibberellic Acid 0, 10, 25, 50 100 ppm Foliar spray, 1 to 3
applications

2, 4-D plus iron sulfate 0, 10, 100, 300 Foliar spray, single
1000 ppm application

B-995 2500, 5000, 10,000 ppm Foliar spray, single
application

C. C. C. 10 to 20 grams per Water solution poured
30 foot row on soil

Last year's data indicated that gibberellic acid retarded growth
of tillers for a time after application. This was correlated with
rate and time of application, but there was no significant yield
correlation. The C. C. C. and Verdan treatments last year were not
effective.

This year the experiment was extended:
1. Additional rates and times of application of gibberellic
acid were used to extend control of tillering.

2. Application of C. C. C. was changed from a foliar
spray to a soil treatment because it is more effectively taken up
by the roots than through the leaves.

3. B-995, a new regulator, which stimulates flowering
and inhibits stem elongation in several plants, was added to
treatments.

4. 2, 4-D plus iron was also added.

Gibberellic acid stimulated height growth and differences of
12 inches or more often occurred within 1 week. After 3 or 4 weeks
differences in height between treated and untreated plants were no
longer apparent. Tiller counts indicate a reduced number of tillers.
No data on yields are available.


18.












AREA 24 S. J. Locascio and J.G.A. Fiskell

LIME AND MIIOR ELEMENT STUDIES WITR WATERMELON

Main Plot Treatments: Lime applied November 1963.

No. CaCo lbs./A Visual Ratings H
S4/20 5 325 515
1 1600 3.9 2.7 2.7 5
2 3200 5.3 3.9 4.6 4.7 4.7
3 6400 5.9 4.6 5.9 5.0 5.2

Sub Plots: Treatment materials added to calcium free
fertilizer which was applied at the rate of 1600 pounds per acre.
The fertilizer was formulated from diammonium phosphate, ammonium
nitrate, potassium sulfate, and potassium chloride.

No. Treatments Visual Ratings


1 Check 5.0 3.1 3.1
2 3 Ibs/A Cu EDTA (.4#/A Cu) 5.1 4.0 4.9
3 650 lbs/A Gypsum 5.6 4.3 4.3
4 10 lbs/A Frit 503 5.3 4.3 5.6
5 25% N from Chicago Sludge 4.2 3.0 4.2

Plant growth has increased with increased rates of lime.

During early growth, more damping-off was observed in the plots
where natural organic were applied.

Presently, Treatments l.and 3 are showing reduced rates of
growth when compared with the other treatments that contain either
Cu, Frit or organic. The former treatments are showing chloratic
areas on the older leaves. Internodes are shortened and older leaves
growing in a rosette.



AREA 25 J.G.A. Fiskell and S. J. Locascio

COPPER SOURCE AND RATE STUDIES WITH WATERMELONS

Two sources of copper, CuSOk and Cu EDTA, at several rates were
added to commercial 6-8-8 fertilizer (No organics. In addition to
these treatments, calcium free fertilizer with and without CuEDTA











were used. These plots were limed in November at the rate of 3200
pounds per acre. Fertilizer was applied in a split application at
the rate of 1600 pounds per acre. After seed emergence an additional
ton of lime was applied. Present pH is 5.3

Copper Visual Ratings
Treatment No. Source Rate 5/15

1 Cus04 0 8.7
2 .2 4.7
3 .4 8.0
4 .8 4.7
5 1.6 5.7
6 Cu EDTA 0 7.0
7 .2 6.3
8 .4 6.7
9 .8 4.7
10 1.6 7.7
Calcium Free Fertilizer
11 0 1.7
12 .4 6.7

At this stage of growth, the differences between copper rates
and sources are not great where commercial fertilizer was used.
However, where the calcium free (high analysis) fertilizer was
used, a definite response to copper in the fertilizer is evident
(Treatments 11 and 12).




AREA 26 J.G.A. Fiskell and S. J. Locascio

LIME PLACEMENT FOR WATERMELONS

Purpose: To determine if the entire area need be limed to get
optimum plant growth and yield.

Treatments; Lime was broadcasted at the rate of 3200 pounds
per acre on beds in the widths as follows: 0, 1', 2', 4' and 8'.
Also, the 1' rate was applied in a band 2" wide with the fertilizer.
Lime was applied February 21, 1964, rate-tilled in and Charleston
Gray watermelon were planted on February 26, 1964. Fertilizer used
was a commercial 6-8-8 formulated with super-phosphate and applied
in two applications in two bands at the total rate of 1600 pounds
per acre.








21.



Band Width Plant Vigor Ratings
3725 5155
1 2.0 1.5 3.6
2" (1' rate) 3.0 3.7 4.2
1' 7.0 7.1 4.0
2' 6.0 8.5 4.0
4' 6.5 9.3 4.1
8' 5.5 9.0 4.3


Germination and early growth were very poor where the lime
was not broadcast. Banded lime resulted in only slightly better
growth.

It is apparent that the presence of lime has allowed growth
even though the pH is 4.0.




OTHER WORK

A. STANDARDIZATION OF CELERY PACK D. D. Gull

In cooperation with the Florida Celery Advisory Committee,
stalks of celery from the major production areas of the state were
measured to determine the variability within and between packs.
Evaluation of data indicated that packers on the celery harvesters
were incapable of selecting stalks of uniform size.

From the data thus obtained it was determined that a much
more uniform pack of celery could be obtained by mechanical means
such as sizing by weight. A suggested size range for the various
classifications has been established.




B. DISCOLORATION OF POTATOES D. D. Gull

When newly-dug potatoes are exposed to high temperatures
and humidity, discoloration of skinned areas frequently occurs.
This condition is accentuated in the red varieties. Studies have
been initiated to determine the cause of this desiccation and
oxidation, to predict periods when this discoloration can be
expected to occur and to devise modified harvesting and handling
methods of operation during this period of time.













It was found that extreme drying conditions, low humidity and
wind, was the prime cause of this discoloration. Temperature was
secondary. Studies will continue on this problem.

Internal discoloration was widespread in Florida potatoes this
year. From samples received at this station it appeared to be the
early stages of blackheart probably caused by oxygen stress. However,
short periods of oxygen stress in the laboratory did not cause this
condition in other potatoes. This problem will receive additional
attention.




C. EFFECT OF HANDLING PRACTICES ON QUALITY OF FRESH
VEGETABLES D. D. Gull

Shelf-life and color retention of southern peas was greatly
enhanced by the use of sulfur dioxide. Duration of exposure and
concentration of sulfur dioxide will be worked out this year.

Current work on onion curing involves the evaluation of
fertility plots from the Indian River Field Laboratory as to
curability and keeping quality. Chemical analysis is currently
being conducted to determine if fertility level has an effect
upon pungency or flavor of the onions.




D. HARVESTING MACHINERY J. F. Beeman

A new cooperative project between the Agricultural Engineering
and Vegetable Crops Departments was initiated this past year. The
primary objectives of this project are to establish functional
specifications or guide lines for the design and development of
vegetable harvesting machines.

During the past year, photographic studies have been conducted
on cucumber and celery harvesting. Basic information on plant
dimensions and profiles has been obtained for celery in the Zellwood
area. Time and motion studies have been conducted on the celery mule
trains in operation in Belle Glade. The results of these studies
have not as yet been completely analyzed.




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