• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 To our Dade County citizens
 Extension home economics faces...
 Seeing the unseen
 Patch to the rescue
 Grain sorghum - a new opportunity...
 What's going on?
 The citizenship in action...
 4-H contributes to the urban...
 Dade County's market news...
 Focus on consumer services with...
 Progress is the key to potato production...
 Faces of fashion
 It gives us something to do - it's...
 What 4-H has done for me
 Dade's national 4-5 winner / Pat...
 State 4-H winners from Dade...
 4-H thanks you
 Brucellosis certificate
 What and how much?
 Personnel chart
 Organizational chart
 Agriculture department
 Errata






Title: Yesterday today & tomorrow
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094996/00001
 Material Information
Title: Yesterday today & tomorrow Dade County, Florida, agricultural agents & extension home economics agents
Alternate Title: Yesterday today and tomorrow
Dade County, 1967 agricultural extension report
Physical Description: 34 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Dade County (Fla.) -- Agricultural Dept
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Dade County Agricultural Department
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: 1967
Copyright Date: 1967
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural extension work -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: This report gives some examples of the various phases of extension work in Dade County.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "Nineteen sixty seven."
General Note: "The Dade County Agricultural Department represents the Florida Agricultural Extension Service of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, and the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture."--P. 1
Statement of Responsibility: Dade County Agricultural Department.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094996
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436452855

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
    To our Dade County citizens
        Page 1
    Extension home economics faces the future
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Seeing the unseen
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Patch to the rescue
        Page 7
    Grain sorghum - a new opportunity crop for Dade County
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    What's going on?
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The citizenship in action program
        Page 13
        Page 14
    4-H contributes to the urban community
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Dade County's market news program
        Page 17
    Focus on consumer services with extension home economics
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Progress is the key to potato production in Dade County
        Page 21
    Faces of fashion
        Page 22
        Page 23
    It gives us something to do - it's fun. We're learning
        Page 24
        Page 25
    What 4-H has done for me
        Page 26
    Dade's national 4-5 winner / Pat Craven memorial scholarship fund
        Page 27
    State 4-H winners from Dade County
        Page 28
    4-H thanks you
        Page 29
    Brucellosis certificate
        Page 30
    What and how much?
        Page 31
    Personnel chart
        Page 32
    Organizational chart
        Page 33
    Agriculture department
        Page 34
    Errata
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text
























CHUCK HALL
Mayor


BOARD OF

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

& COUNTY MANAGER


ALEX S. GORDON JOSEPH A. BOYD, JR.
Vice Mayor


HAROLD A. GREENE


R. HARDY MATHESON


EARL M. STARNES


THOMAS D. O'MALLEY


LEWIS WHITWORTH, JR.


AK I UK Al I tN, JK.


PORTER W. HOMER
County Manager































UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
President, University of Florida


DR. J. WAYNE REITZ
President, University of Florida
1955- 1967


DR. BETTY JEAN BRANNAN
Assistant Director
Home Economics Programs
Agricultural Extension Service


DR. E. T. YORK, JR.
Provost for Agriculture
Institute of Food & Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida


MR. FRANKLIN S. PERRY
District Agent
Agricultural Extension Service


DR. MARSHALL O. WATKINS
Director
Agricultural Extension Service


MISS HELEN D. HOLSTEIN
District Extension Home Economics
Agent, Agricultural Extension Service














2---------' :


COUNTY


Al





i ;


TO OUR DADE COUNTY CITIZENS


YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW is
the 1967 annual report of the Dade County Agri-
cultural (Extension) Department. In it staff mem-
bers are comparing changing Extension Service
programs with those of yesterday, those we know
today, and those we expect to know in the future
with the rapid increase and application of knowl-
edge and technology.
The Dade County Agricultural Department
represents the Florida Agricultural Extension
Service of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida, and the Federal
Extension Service, U. S. Department of Agri-
culture.
As faculty members of the University of
Florida, the Extension Service agents in Dade
County are employed under a cooperative educa-
tional program of the county, state, and federal
governments to help people in agriculture, home
economics, and their related fields.
With the increasing population and growth of


Dade County agriculture, highly efficient agri-
cultural production and marketing are empha-
sized.
Consumer educational work in all phases of
home economics programs and most agricultural
programs is also emphasized.
Youth programs have been rapidly changing
to more adequately provide the badly needed
training and educational experiences for many of
the youth of Dade County.
This report gives some examples of the
various phases of Extension work in Dade Coun-
ty. It will give you some ideas of the continually
changing agricultural and Extension home eco-
nomics programs that can help all of us be better
prepared for tomorrow.U



John D. Campbell
Dade County Agricultural Agent


_- -_- I-


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EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS FACES THE FUTURE...


Homemaking is as old as the hills but for-
ever young and as challenging as the Space Age.
It's a never-ending educational process to keep
up with the technological advances that affect
the home. However, technical knowledge is not
the only answer. Extension Home Economics
stresses the need to establish basic family
values to make a stable family.
This year serious problems were recognized
in the areas of FAMILY STABILITY, CONSUM-
ER COMPETENCE, HEALTH, HOUSING, AND
COMMUNITY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT.
Because of programs by Extension Home
Economics agents, many people in Dade County
have a better understanding of FAMILY VALUES,
COMMUNICATING WITH YOUTH, PROTECTING
CHILDREN, CLOTHING THE FAMILY, NEW
FABRICS THEIR USE AND CARE, HOSPI.
TALITY IN THE HOME, FOOD STORAGE AND
WASTE DISPOSAL, FREEZING FOODS, PREP-
ARATION OF FLORIDA SEAFOOD, NUTRI-
TION AND WEIGHT CONTROL, LAUNDRY AND
SANITATION, PEST CONTROL, PERSONAL


HEALTH AND GROOMING, HOME CARE OF
THE SICK, THE USE OF CREDIT, CARPET
AND FLOOR COVERINGS, DEFENSIVE DRIV-
ING AND NEW TRAFFIC LAWS, CONSUMER
SERVICES, AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOP-
MENT.
Home Economics information and training
has been a vital part of Extension work since it
was established under the Smith-Lever Act by
Congressmore than 54 years ago.
A special effort is being made in Dade Coun-
ty to reach large numbers of people, from young
homemakers to the elderly, with consumer infor-
mation. Assistance is given families who find it
increasingly difficult to manage limited family
resources. Extension programs help youth ac-
quire skills and leadership through 4-H projects.
They help communities to develop resources
more fully.

EXTENSION'S FOCUS IS -----
THE FAMILY
in the community and the nation.s






















































1. Making clothes for the Miccosukee Indians
from drapery samples.
2. Homemakers show interest at Achievement
Day.
3. Nutrition questions and answers: WKAT radio.
4. March of Dimes chairmen, Maria Lamdry (right)
and a friend prepare for a benefit Baby Shower.
5. 4-H'ers bring cheer to Youth Hall.
6. 4-H'er Bob Anderson speaks out for better
nutrition at SONS' Conference, youth state
organization on nutrition.
7. Sanitation training for Visiting Nurses.
8. Valentine party at low-income housing project.
9. 4-H'er Audrey Wildman demonstrates Making
Homemade Mayonnaise.
10. Libby Anderson models a dress she designed.
11. Citizenship.
12. Table settings.
13. Dining table fashions and their care.


(Continued on next page)













































16






















14. Crocheting rugs.
15. Preparing vegetables for the home freezer.
16. Pre-school nutrition.
17. Leader training in clothing construction



























"SEEING THE UNSEEN"


Soil testing started in Dade County, Florida,
approximately 25 years ago with a Colormetric
Soil Testing Kit. About 13 years ago an agent
was employed to develop a soil testing labora-
tory. The present more complete facilities have
been in operation for the past nine years serving
the growers of Dade County.
With the increasing amount of correlation
data being gathered by the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations, it is of importance that the
plant or leaf analysis be added as a tool for de-
termining the needs of crop growth. This will
more adequately insure the grower more precise
knowledge of what is in the soil and also what
is in the plant. As competition becomes more
acute and as land values increase in Dade Coun-
ty, growers need more accurate diagnostic infor-
mation to assure maximum production.
With the Agricultural Agency's move to a
new building, plans have been formulated to in-
clude the necessary equipment for plant anal-
yses. The future of Dade County crop production
will require more precise techniques such as the
newest analytical techniques as well as com-
puter techniques to more accurately correlate
methods with production and returns.
Since man's eyes cannot see the tiny atoms
necessary for plant 'growth, it has been neces-
sary to find other means to detect these atoms--
even after they were found to be necessary for
plant growth. It has only been slightly more than
300 years since John Baptista Van Helmont, a
citizens of Brussels, conducted his classical
experiment in which he planted a five pound
Willow tree in 200 pounds of oven-dried soil,
added water as required and allowed the tree to
grow for five years. When he removed the tree
from the soil he found that it weighed 169 pounds
3 ounces, and discovered that the soil when
dried had lost only two ounces. Since nothing but
water had been added, he came to the conclusion


that plants were made entirely of water.
Some 150 years later, an English landlord
and a graduate of Oxford, Jethro Tull, felt that
Van Helmont had been deceived in his observa-
tion. Tull held that earth was the true food of
plants when he said, "Every plant is earth and
the growth and true increase of a plant is the
addition of more earth." The task in maintaining
the productivity of the soil, according to Tull,
was that of pulverizing it to the point where its
particles were made fine enough to permit its
being taken in by plant roots.
By the time another 50 years had passed,
considerable doubt had arisen as to the adequacy
of tillage as a means of maintaining a high level
of productivity of land. During this period, Arthur
Young was conducting pot tests in an effort to
find substances that when added to the soil
would improve the yields of the crops growing on
it. He did in fact learn that some materials such
as poultry dung, niter, and ashes did greatly in-
crease the yields of his plants.
Modern agricultural chemistry did not come
into the picture until the beginning of the nine-
teenth century when Saussure Day of Switzerland
became interested in this problem. He began
quantitative studies of component gases in rela-
tion to plant growth and reached the conclusion
that they made up the major portion of the plant.
However, he pointed out that the ash of the plants
was derived from the soil. To this man more than
any other, we owe the first clear concept veri-
fied by quantitative experiment as to the specific
contribution of air, water and soil to plant
growth.
Little more than 100 years ago a scientist
named Liebig clarified the problem of plant nu-
trition and from that time on primary considera-
tion has been given to analyses of the ash of
plants in relation to the mineral content of the
soils on which they were grown.
The presently known and widespread meth-
od of soil testing followed a discovery of soil
exchange capacity by an English scientist by
the name of Thomas Way approximately 86 years
ago. Less than 40 years ago the present method
of soil extraction was finally accepted. The
development of soil chemistry followed the de-
velopment of basic chemistry.
Soil and plant testing were in their infancy
86 years ago. Today these areas of science are
highly developed and are valuable tools of agri-
culture. What the future for these scientific
areas will be can be told by today's new born
infant when he reached the age of 86. The ad-
vances that he experiences would likely stagger
the imagination of today's adult.
The soil and plant analyses of the Dade
County and Florida Agricultural Extension Serv-
ice is allowing the grower through chemical
techniques to "see the unseen" needs of the
growers' crops.s

















PATCH THE PONY SAYS
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PATCH TO THE RESCUE...


Growth of large metropolitan areas often"
brings with it an increase of undesirable social
problems. Child molestation and abuse have be-
come topics of debate and inquiry, as cases of
ill-treatment have increased in Dade County.
Various programs have developed to train
the youngster to protect himself. However, until
recently, there was no program for the pre-school
or early elementary age. "Patch the Pony" came
to the rescue. "Patch" is the hero of an educa-
tional program based upon known principals of
child development. Activities center around a
story which the children like to hear again and
again. In the story, the pony instructs the chil-
dren. Thus, they are taught by repetition, elimi-
nating the problem of nagging.
The red and white pony appeals to the im-
agination of young children, who often find the
world of make believe more fascinating and alive
than the real world. As an imaginary creature,
he is a 24-hour-a-day companion that helps re-
lease the children from undue fear.
The Extension Home Economics Office in-
itiated the program by conducting a pilot study
which was held in one pre-school, with 17 chil-
dren attending. Most of the children were 51-6
years of age. The lowest age was four -- the
highest, eight. Five sessions were held. Ses-
sion one included telling the story and giving
the children a picture of the pony to color.
During the second session, the story was
told with the children helping at intervals. The
story was followed by making a bulletin board
with a large picture of "Patch" in the center. A
wagon for each child was put on the board in
which each one placed magazine pictures of
gifts he would like to give to "Patch" if he were
in the story. The children chose the pictures and
cut them out.
In session three, the story was "acted out",
with children taking turns with different parts.
Each child held an object to show which part he
was pantomiming. This was followed by giving
the children art paper and crayons for drawing a
picture from the story; drawings were kept for
future reference.


Session four involved acting out the story to
give as many children as possible opportunity
to play different roles. Then one question was
asked: "If you had to make the story as short as
possible, what would you say?" Answer was,
"Nay, nay, from stranger's cars, stay away."
The final session began with a discussion
period with pertinent questions as follows:
1. What do you like about "Patch"?
2. Of all the things we did, what did you
like the best?
The "Patch the Pony Program" was begun
for pre-school teachers and directors by sending
two introductory letters and one letter announc-
ing training meetings. The series included five
meetings held in different parts of the county.
The meetings involved a potential for reaching
approximately 1,683 pre-school children through
a pre-school program by school personnel.
The meetings were divided into 2 sections.
Section one was covered by a detective from the
Dade County Public Safety Dept. It included 1)
situation in Dade County, 2) types of sexual per-
version, 3) current education program by the Safe-
ty Department in elementary schools, 4) relation-
ship of "Patch the Pony" to current program,
and 5) need for program for pre-schoolers and
early elementary beginning at age 4-4/2.
Section two was conducted by an Extension
agent. It included 1) the story of "Patch the
Pony", 2) unique qualities of the program as
related to child development, (a) "Patch" as a
24-hour-a-day companion, (b) teaching aids for
parents, (c) plans for Patch as safety symbol;
3) explanation of pilot study activities and re-
sults as related to educational methods; and 4)
use of printed materials and discussion of future
evaluation.
The program has also been introduced to the
home economics teachers of Dade County and
several other groups.
It is known that pre-school children walk
alone to and from their kindergarten or other
school. With the practical help of "Patch the
Pony," they will be equipped for emergencies.
Twelve cases of escape have proved it.E









































BUT DADE COUNTY,


GRAIN SORGHUM

A NEW OPPORTUNITY CROP FOR DADE COUNTY


In Dade County the year 1967 marked the
beginning of a sorghum grain industry traditional-
ly considered a western-plains endeavor. Prior
to 1967, a common variety of sorghum had been
planted at the end of the regular vegetable sea-
son as a cover crop and subsequently plowed
under.
Grain sorghum, or milo, is a substitute for
corn in poultry and livestock rations. Many
poultry and livestock farms formulating rations
use over 100 tons per week of feed grain, mostly
corn.
One can conclude from this figure that a
feed grain produced in Dade County could be of
great importance to South Florida when the high
cost of freight importation from midwest grain
bins is computed.
In April of this year J. W. Campbell of
Goulds, Florida, planted 80 acres of hybrid grain
sorghum with the intention of harvesting it as a


marketable grain crop. The planted acreage grew
to 2,977 acres before the year was out. The total
summer crop harvested was 677 acres. The re-
maining 2,300 acres were planted in the fall.
This first successful production and har-
vesting of hybrid grain sorghum in Dade may very
well revolutionize the whole concept of farmland
utilization by putting into production much of the
land which had previously lain idle during the
summer and other periods of the year.
Think of the number of other benefits that
will come about as a result of the new in-
dustry. It will create an additional cash crop for
the farmer. It will extend the work season for
some laborers. And it will create a much more
attractive landscape for tourists, with fewer
weed fields.
Poultry and livestock farmers will certainly
benefit from a nearby supply of feed grains, and
these fields will even furnish a source of food
for bird life.m


NUT KANS 5AS,


FLORIDA Ml

























































1. Not Kansas, but Dade County, Florida! This com-
bine can harvest between 25 and 35 acres of grain
sorghum per day.
2. Grain being transferred from harvester to bulk
truck.
3. Tom Skinner, Extension Agricultural Engineer,
explaining the operation of a grain sorghum dryer.
On the left, J. W. Campbell, grower and Roy J.
Champagne, Associate County Agent. On the
right, FPL electrician and Charles Garett, fore-
man for Campbell Farms.
4. Grain dryer has a perforated floor and large elec-
tric fan which blows hot air from gas jets into
the grain.
5. This large fan reduces moisture of grain to 13%
for better storage.


(Continued next page)


























































6. John Vernon, drying foreman, shows the electri-
cal connections and controls necessary to oper-
ate this grain dryer.
7. Vernon testing a sample of grain sorghum for
moisture content which takes only minutes, at
the dryer. Testing to determine harvesting time
must be done in the field.
8. These trucks serve a multiple purpose--- carry-
ing fertilizer, transporting harvested grain to
dryer and transferring dried grain from dryer to
storage bin.
9. A 1200-ton storage tank where grain is stored
after it leaves the dryer and prior to loading in
box cars for shipment. This tank also contains
a fan, and the grain can safety be stored for a
year.m


L -- --" i






























WHAT'S GOING ON ?


Questions to county agents change through
the years. For example, in 1917 it was "How
much corn should I feed to my mule each morning
and night?"
Fifty years later, in 1967, it was "How
can I rid my St. Augustine lawn of chinch bugs?"
By 1997 who knows what it will be?
How to feed the mule properly was an impor-
tant question in 1917, but this is no problem to
the suburbanite dweller today.
By the end of this century the words St.
Augustine grass and chinch bugs could have
little meaning.
The question might be "How can I extend
the wearing ability of my synthetic outdoor
carpet?"
When the Extension Service came into being
fifty-three years ago, agriculture was just past
the toddling stage. The major problem then was
the matter of stepping up the pace of food pro-
duction. In laboratories, on trial field plots and
in livestock feed lots a vast amount of knowl-
edge was developed.
Government leaders, then as now, realized
that this scientific knowledge would not be fruit-
ful until farmers could understand and put into
use these new discoveries.
The Agricultural Extension Service was de-
veloped to satisfy this need. Educational meth-
ods that had been so effective in training doctors,
teachers, lawyers, engineers and ministers did
not accomplish the task that had to be done now.
Young farmers and young homemakers were not
in the classrooms. They were already in the fruit
orchards, dairy barns, vegetable gardens and
poultry plants.
New methods were needed. Extension meth-
ods operate on the federal, state and county
levels. Many means were developed to impart


this new knowledge that must be used daily on
farms throughout the nation.
Factual information developed by experts on
various subjects was made available to farmers
by means of easy-to-understand bulletins. News
articles about current projects and problems ap-
peared in local newspapers.
Answers to specific questions were written
by agricultural agents. Many questions are an-
swered daily by means of the telephone.
Newspapers, television and radio are excel-
lent medias to channel information to those who
can use it.
Organizing advisory committees and teach-
ing courses are effective.
Assisting with conventions and conferences
by appearing on special subject matter panels is
another effective way to reach the public. Fairs,
exhibits, field trips and workshops are reliable
Extension methods. By employing a variety of
these methods the agent is able to work closely
with his people who need this scientific informa-
tion.
Beautiful parks, public areas and home
grounds are desired by thousands here in Florida.
Thousands seek help from the Agricultural De-
partment. They want to know the latest as to the
when, where, how and why of growing beautiful
ornamentals in the Dade County area. The alert
agent keeps up with the times by reading books,
bulletins, magazines and Experiment station pro-
ceedings.
As the future unfolds, we recall the words,
"The towers of tomorrow are built upon the foun-
dation of today." Tennyson declared that "the
future has never been---it remains for man to
make it."
Extension is helping to make Florida's fu-
ture brighter.m
































2





























1. 4-H members participate in television program
on gardening.
2. Mr. Floyd Dickey, president, Dade County 4-H
Youth Foundation, presents a "Service to Youth
Award" to Miss Mary Lennon, Assistant Feature
Events Director, Burdines Department Store, in
appreciation of their support and cooperation to
the 4-H Program.
3. 4-H'ers demonstrate commodity foods.






































THE CITIZENSHIP IN ACTION PROGRAM...


In meeting the needs of urban youth, the
Dade County 4-H Club program has gained re-
gional and national attention for its Citizenship
in Action program.
Excerpts from a report made at the Southern
Association of Agricultural Workers Conference
in Louisville, Kentucky are as follows:
"Citizenship in Action." It all began in
1964 when a team from Dade County representing
Florida as one of nine states participated in the
Citizenship Education Laboratory. Citizenship
has always been a vital part of the 4-H program
but to see this team of youngsters realize the
value and to take the initiative in setting up a
county program of action was most stimulating.
Citizenship was stressed at all levels from de-
veloping individual responsibility to group acti-
vities. Shortcourses were held, workshops for
officer training set up; a Citizenship-Leadership
Camp was conducted; and soon an "epidemic"
was on. It was the kind of contagious program
that gives new meaning to everything and puts
life into what sometimes is a stagnant program.
Annual participation in the National Citizen-
ship Shortcourse has given enthusiastic support
to the program and afforded continuity of leader-
ship from the youth themselves.
In 1966, the county 4-H council, working as
a close unit with the district and state council,
received one of the first Citizenship in Action
grants, sponsored by the National 4-H Founda-


tion and the Readers Digest.
$285.00- the sum of the grant isn't a large
amount of money but it provided the impetus to
conduct an awareness program to involve others,
and to bring into focus the many facets of citi-
zenship.
The proposed project was to help low in-
come and underprivileged youth to become useful
and responsible citizens, with the aid of portable
kits and equipment that could be used on a rota-
tion or loan basis by leaders, junior leaders, and
members.
Groups to be reached included: public hous-
ing tenants, migrants, Indians, Cubans, special
education groups, and the resident population or
detainees of Dade County Youth Hall.
A variety of teaching techniques was neces-
sary. The use of slides, filmstrips, tours, and
demonstrations added much, but the "Learn by
Doing" method afforded through use of the port-
able kits provided learning experiences for both
social and technical skills.
Teaching kits included:
1. Citizenship materials for group learning ex-
periences. Flag sets, democracy games, slide
sets, and resource literature such as the Ci-
tizenship Handbook, etc.
2. Food demonstration kits
3. Electric kit
4. Home Repair kit
(Continued next page)








5. Home care kit included inexpensive home-
made preparations and directions for washing
walls, furniture care, silver and metal polish
and stain removal.
6. Tools for beautification of home grounds.
7. Clothing kits Individual sewing boxes with
equipment and supplies.
8. Health and grooming kits given to members
included: soap, washcloth, toothbrush, etc.
Leadership was provided by volunteer 4-H
leaders, and Junior Leaders who recruited others
to assist.
To encourage group action, club awards
were established in Citizenship, Community
Beautification, and Health and Safety.
Staff leadership was used in some of the
special youth projects of short duration.
Support of the program came from Extension
Homemakers Clubs and other community and
civic groups and has resulted in the formation of
the Dade County 4-H Youth Foundation, pat-
terned after the National and State Foundation.
The example set by the youth has so inspired
others-- and in particular the adult Extension
groups-- that they too are placing greater em-
phasis on making citizenship come alive.
Church, school, and community groups have
also come under the influence of these youth.
4-H'ers have taken roles of leadership in the
Dade County Youth Council, the Student Traffic
Council, and the county Teen-Age Division of
National Foundation which concentrates on Re-
search and Birth Defects. A pilot project in co-
operation with the Miami Police Department was
developed for the raising of German Shepherd
puppies for police work. Their community serv-
ice projects range from swimming instruction for
the blind, crippled, and retarded, to community
beautification; from serving as Candy Stripers
and Hospital Aids to researching, designing, and
constructing clothing for the Crippled Children's
Society; from holding a "No Baby-Baby Shower"
to provide layettes and equipment for indigent
mothers of the maternity wards to the usual good
cheer holiday baskets and visits to needy fami-
lies and convalescent and children's homes; from
making bath benches, lap boards, and hand mits
for wheel chair patients, to tagging Christmas
trees with safety rules; from reproducing and
distributing a list of new traffic laws to motor-
ists within a week after they were voted in, to
working with United Fund Agencies on special
events. They put real meaning into 4-H Sunday
and National 4-H Week. There's excitement too
when they participate in the Miss Universe and
Junior Orange Bowl parades. You name it and
some 4-H'er is already doing it. The Council
President and State Citizenship winner assisted
with a Citizenship Short-course in another county.
In a day when greater understanding of indi-
vidual responsibility is so vital, 4-H is taking
the lead and doing its part.


The skills, knowledge, and attitudes learned
in 4-H for a satisfying home and family life com-
bined with leadership opportunities has contri-
buted greatly to the personal development of
these older youth.
Results- What happens to people reached
through this program?
Response of delinquents at Youth Hall in
writing essays on "What Can I do for My
Country" and their comments that the 4-H pro-
gram "does with, not for, individuals," that 4-H
leaders "talk with" not "preach to," is indica-
tive of the new attitude shown by these delin-
quents after participating in the program for a
few weeks.
To quote verbatim one girl wrote the follow-
ing: "There are many things which I can do for
my country. First and foremost, I can become a
better citizen and be more patriotic. A good way
to do this is to respect the law a little bit better.
If I would stay out of trouble and learn to face up
to my responsibilities instead of running away
from them, I would be a lot closer to becoming a
better citizen. The second best thing for me to
do is get a good education. If I finish high
School with good grades and then attend a school
which will train me in a certain trade or job, I
can help to support my country both morally and
financially. If every person in the world would
work at these two main points, plus doing little
extra things, such as helping the sick and the
unfortunate, they would be helping their country
immensely. But I must learn to practice what I
say before I try to expect it of other people. The
first thing I had better do is get out of Youth
Hall and stay out."
The recipients of such a program benefit,
the community benefits, but perhaps those who
learn the satisfaction of individual responsibility
through giving and serving benefit the most.
Like the rainbow, complete achievement can
never be reached- though each accomplishment
brings a new challenge, there are disappoint-
ments and obstacles to overcome.
It's a never ending battle to educate the ci-
tizenry of Dade County to the fact that 4-H can
and does meet the needs of urban youth. The rural
image is difficult to overcome in the sophisti-
cated society of Dade County, and continued re-
cruitment and training of leaders to do the job is
still of great concern.
The time staff members can devote to 4-H
is limited with the ever increasing demands of
an expanding program.
May I leave you with these thoughts? To-
day's youth are tomorrow's leaders and we all
have an investment in their future and our future.
Are we doing everything possible to protect this
investment? Are we giving youth the opportuni-
ties they need to develop their own potential and
consequently the potential of their communities
and their country in this challenging age?m





















































4-H CONTRIBUTES TO THE URBAN COMMUNITY ...


Dade County 4-H Club members are raising
four German Shepherd male pups for the Canine
Detail of the Miami Police Department.
Heinrich, Rommel, Rudolph and Conrad are
becoming "socialized" while being raised by
Sandra Jenkins, Patricia Gitto, Donna Stengel
and Debra Demby.
A dog's general makeup and temperament de-
pend a great deal on the care he receives when
he is a pup.
With the 4-H family the pup enjoys love and
attention. He learns to like people and have con-
fidence in them. He also gets used to walking
up and down stairs and on slippery floors.
The pup becomes acquainted with everyday


noises, autos, and unusual occurrences. When
the pup is ready for training, he knows family
life. He is sound and well-experienced. Besides,
he is not afraid of every little thing as he might
be if he were raised in a pen or cage.
The 4-H members give each of the pups a
lot of handling. The idea is to raise a completely
healthy and well-experienced dog, which will
prepare him for his future job.
Cooperating with the Agricultural Extension
Service and the Miami Police Department are the
German Shepherd Club of Greater Miami, Ralston-
Purina, Company, Dr. Robert P. Knowles-veteri-
narian, Ray Salas- 4-H Club leader, and the
families who are raising the pups.m





































16
*I









-"a
































DADE COUNTY'S MARKET NEWS PROGRAM


Thanks to the cooperation between trades-
men, the mass media, federal and state agencies,
Dade Countians have the world's best market
news programs. Today the Dade County Farmer
and Marketer has the latest and most up to date
market information available to him through
various market news channels.
This information has helped Dade County's
million dollar marketing complex to become more
efficient and economical.
How did this come about?
This year agriculturalists, brokers, institu-
tional buyers, and consumers requested of our
office timely information concerning prices, sup-
plies trends, and consumer tips on buying.
As a result of these requests, an early morn-
ing television show with the prior day's closing
prices on livestock and produce was launched.
In addition to price information, supply trends
and buying tips were incorporated into the format
of this program. Many weeks of planning and
coordination between Channel 7 WCKT Televi-
sion, the Federal-State Market News Service,
and the county agent's office went into setting
up the format for this early morning program.
Timely marketing knowledge has become an
important integral part of every American busi-
ness, particularly the agricultural industry. Many
of the products handled in the agricultural mar-
keting systems are extremely perishable. Pre-
cise planning, handling and timing are needed
to insure that the consumer is able to purchase
the freshest and highest quality fruit, vegetables
and meats possible.
Market news is of vital importance to farm-
ers, buyers, sellers and consumers and needs to


be made as widely available as possible. All
parties concerned agreed that the county agent's
office prepare a program to meet the many re-
quests received.
After reviewing the latest survey on viewer
audience, it was decided that a two-minute show
from 6:58 to 7:00 in the morning would reach the
maximum amount of people. It was estimated
that over 150,000 people would be viewing this
program at this time of the morning. This time
was also recommended as the most satisfactory
bymany of the hotels, restaurants, dining rooms,
and airline buyers. It also met favorable re-
sponse from the produce and livestock producers
in the surrounding area.
The program is sandwiched between Exten-
sion's "Sunshine Almanac" which begins at
6:45 a.m. and the "Today Show" at 7:00 a.m.
The program runs five days a week.
Channel 7 periodically shoots film of live-
stock, carcass meat and produce, coordinating
this film with the voice of the reporter. Each re-
port is phoned in the preceding day between the
hours of 5:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m., assuringthe
latest information for the next morning's report.
The big job of carrying out an effective pro-
gram to provide valuable up-to-date information
to anyone producing, marketing or buying agri-
cultural products is possible only through con-
tinued and even better cooperation between every
facet of the economy.
Each and every segment of society, whether
manufacturing, tourism, public service or agricul-
ture, is interdependent. None could exist without
the support from the greatest agricultural indus-
try in the world.m



































FOCUS ON CONSUMER SERVICES WITH EXTENSION


HOME ECONOMICS...


Nationwide attentionhas been focused on the
"consumer" since 1962. The consumer has the
right to safety, to be informed, to choose, and to
be heard.
But "helping families get the most value for
their money spent" has received continuous em-
phasis over the years in Dade County's Exten-
sion Home Economics programs. Consumer edu-
cation was taught when Home Economic Agents
conducted programs on how to buy everything
from canned meat to window curtains, or life in-
surance for the family.
Today, scientific discoveries and technolo-
gical advances have increased the number and
variety of consumer choices. Sparkling arrays of
goods and a variety of services tempt and con-
fuse the consumer. Easy credit and general af-
fluence have further contributed to this confusion,
so if people are to make the best consumer deci-
sions for greater satisfaction, they must be in-
formed.
Dade County's Extension Home Economics
office has highlighted each educational program
to emphasize its resources in providing consumer
helps which include -
pointing out what to look for in buying
household appliances, how long they can be ex-
pected to last and how to fit their purchases into
the family budget -
research and recommendations on floor and
carpet care -
standard for height of work surfaces -
storage areas in the home - and many
others.u














HOME ECONOMICS INFORMATION SERVICE




S DADE COUNTY EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS OFFICE


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


2690 N.W. 7th Avenue

Miami, Florida 33127


1116 North Krome Avenue

Homestead, Florida 33030


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA -INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES





DDES SOUND OFF((
CONSUMER FOR MODERN HOMEMAKERS
EDUCATION om o r
CENTER 269 '* 7. Avtnu, MI*MI, ii27 6"--s66
it1116 N. KnOME AVENUE, HOMESTEAD. 3 Il30 247-3037
4-H CLUB OFFICE. 2690 N. W. 7TH AVE. Min 3-127 634-4460




Better Living- Through


Greater Knowledge















Extension Home Economics Week

May 21-27, 1967










FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA -INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCEt


"FOCUS ON CHILDREN"
oomommmooooooO.Oo0.fooom0O44OOO000OOiohI0.....40OO.A...O


PETS IN THE PRE-SCHOOL

SYNOPSIS: A brief discussion of
possible role of pets in pre-school
environment, types of pets, care,
and feeding.


POSSIBLE ROLE OF PETS
When evaluating the pre-school curr-
culum, the director and teacher must give
prime emphasis to consideration of those
experiences which help the child to de-
velop o growing participation in family
and community living.
Some children, for example, have dif-
ficulty with the transition from indivduol,
to porollel, to group ploy. A pet con often
foaclitote the transition
Consider the experience of a four-year.
old who will be referred to as Nin.
Nina's parents noticed Ihot the child
played almost entirely by herself, so they
enrolled her in o nursery school, where

When Johnny became ill and was ab-
senl for several -rees, Nm, became
morose and quiet She began to follow
the teacher around the room and al-
tempted to behove and tolk as an adult.


Every day she would ask the teacher if
she could help her, and all attempts to
divert her attention to various activities
or to play with another child or children
were fruitless.
A guinea pig and white rao were
brought to the school as pets. At first
Nino played alone with the pets Eventu-
ally, she played beside other children
.ith one or the other of the onamals
Then she began to ploy with other chil-
dren, but hod on onimol nearby or with
her The lost and final step was taken
when she was able to forget the animals
and ploy with children without added
support.
When Johnny returned to school, she
was no longer dependent upon him for a
ploy partner.
What might have happened to Nina if
she hod entered the first grade with its
academic demands, without hoavng mode
such a necessary social odustment'
Oovelopment of social behavior dur-
iog the early years is important for the
estoblshment of positive mental health
and ability to communicate in the adult
world in o complex society.


"AN INFORMED DRIVER IS A SAFER DRIVER"

------Twelve New Laws AfeMoton
Twelve New Laws Affect MOtOriStS In FlOrida...


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Illustrations here show how Extension Home Economics met consumer information demands during 1967


Hoo EcOOr.eeC O--CES F
2690 N. e. 7Te AVI.Ul, tAM. 33127 63-t1665 1I16 N. -KoM. AE.UI, HOo.ST*re, t030 3 247-4O017

IOLIIAY ISSUE. 1967.
Dear Reader:

Here's your holiday issue of Cloth. line To Yo. Neyet was there more elegant holiday
season demonsttrtig the midis touch All that glitters is not gold, but It Is ashrion

S FESTIVE FABRICS
New metallcs in gold, silver, copper glisten on youthful go
Smetrics, checks. stripes with kicy, young look, and because
the fashions that best display the richness of the fabrc are
simple, they're no problem for a seamstress of any age.
Metallic fabrcs usually require an underlining to stabilize the
S fabnc against seam slippage, lining is recommended Use a
lining fabric for facings Avoid snug-fitting patern styles.
Needles, pins, and shears should al be sharp. Pin only in the
seam allowances. For machine stltchng, use a fine needle
S(sie 11) and 12 stitches to the inch. A three-coned leather
needle will cut down fiction withetallc threds. Since these
threads are apt to cut thread, strong synthetic thread is pre
fe-ed over mecerred cotton Heo looely wmith tpe.
Big, bld nd bright that's the look of mAy of the beautiful
prints you'll choose for exctig holiday hearing. Pnt designs
may he soft d blurry, or ultra sharp and defined. Their


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1. Picking up potatoes in the field after they have
been dug by a two-row mechanical digger.
2. Planting seed potatoes with a two-row mechani-
cal planter in a South Dade field.

3. Mechanical harvesting, digging and loading pota-
toes into bulk bin trucks in a South Dade field.







PROGRESS IS THE KEY TO

POTATO PRODUCTION IN DADE COUNTY


The marl soils of Dade County are well
adapted for the production of Irish potatoes dur-
ing the winter and early spring months. Potato
production in this area has been a major crop for
about forty years.
In the late twenties, a small area of the marl
soils was devoted to potato production and in-
vestigation. Experiments to determine the best
varieties, fertilizer requirements, pesticide pro-
grams and proper cultural practices were con-
ducted by the Sub-Tropical Experiment Station
staff and by individual growers. The individual
growers were the first experimenters. Their ef-
forts did not produce the rapid results obtained
by the professional researchers when the Experi-
ment station was established in 1930.
The Sub-Tropical Experiment Station staff
relied on Mr. C. H. Steffani, former Dade County
Agent, to hold grower meetings and make reports
to the growers on research results and progress.
The SES still adheres to this policy. The County
Agent's staff cooperates in grower meetings,
newsletters and radio broadcasts to disseminate
the latest information on the growing, packing
and marketing of potatoes.
The acreage increased very rapidly. Hand
labor and horses were replaced by mechanical
equipment and tractors. Dade County produced
7,500 acres of potatoes in 1934.
We have approximately the same potato acre-
age this year. Large fields devoted to the crop
had to be planted with mechanical planters and
cultivated with tractor operated cultivation
equipment. The planting season is only two
months long in this area.
The mild winters were ideal for insects, dis-
eases and weeds to thrive and cause troubles
for the growers. Costs of equipment, materials
and labor have increased rapidly since the late
forties. Equipment for these jobs has become
larger and larger so that less time and greater
efficiency produces about the same size crop
today for about the same cost.
Little, if any, hand labor is used today to
produce a crop of potatoes. This was not true
during the thirties. Seed was cut to the right
size for planting by hand, the seedpieces were
placed by hand in an open furrow and sometimes
the row was even covered by hand. Weeds were
killed byhand or by cultivators pulled by horses
and mules. Today we use two or four row culti-
vators pulled by tractors. In the future we will
probably use chemicals to destroy or prevent
weeds from growing in the fields. Cultivation
will all be done with chemicals.
Harvesting the crop after it was grown was
also a hand labor job. Potato rows were opened


by mule-drawn plows. Each potato was separated
from the soil and picked up by hand and depos-
ited in a box or bag. The boxes and bags were
loaded by hand onto trucks and transported to
the packinghouse. This method was followed by
mechanical diggers that scooped up the potatoes
and soil and shook the potatoes free of the soil
but returned theri to the field. Still hand labor
had to be utilized to gather the crop from the
field. Recently the growers have mechanized
another hand operation and they now use a me-
chanical harvester that digs, separates the pota-
toes from the soil, and loads the potatoes into
bulk-bin trucks.
The potatoes were sold unsized as "new"
Florida potatoes in fifty-pound bags. Then sizing
machinery was added and U. S. grades were used
to improve the quality of the product to be sold.
Washers and driers were the next step toward im-
provement and modernization. Todaythe potatoes
are unloaded into water to avoid bruising, and
clod eliminators remove clods of soil and any
other foreign objects before the potatoes are
washed, dried, sized and graded.
The packing houses now are equipped to
weigh and pack five- and ten-pound consumer
packs automatically. Other mechanization in the
packing house reduced the need for large num-
bers of people to handle, weigh, pack, seal and
move the product within the packing facility.
In the future we may see even more automa-
tion in the production of potatoes. Mechanical
seed cutting and handling equipment will become
even more refined and planters will be six and
eight row planters instead of two and four row
planters.
Insect and disease control will be accom-
plished with new materials that will give better
control. Ultra low volume sprays will be used
with these new materials and larger areas can be
sprayed in less time because of the decreased
volume of spray and the time factor involved in
mixing materials for the spray.
Chemical control of weeds will eliminate
considerable time that is now consumed in culti-
vating the crop. One application of the chemical
weed control will last for the entire crop.
Considerable progress has been made in
potato production here in Dade County since the
first potatoes were grown by pioneers in the in-
dustry. Messrs. D. P. Blake, Jr., Luther Chandler,
F. M. Dolan, J. H. Estes, J. M. Holferty, F. C.
Peters, W. J. Vick, H. L. Cox and many others
saw a future for winter potatoes in Dade County
and pioneered the growing of this crop here.
Their enthusiasm and determination has borne
fruit and will continue to be felt for many years.m















































FACES OF FASHION






22








Fibers, fabrics, and fashion are changing as
quickly as modern technology can produce new
ones. The year 1967 brought durable press, the
mini skirt, textured hose and new improved wash-
day miracles and paper fabrics.
How can the modern homemaker keep up with
this change? Through the Extension Home Eco-
nomics program, she can learn about the care,
selection and use of the modern fabrics.
Miss Victoria Simpson, and Miss Patricia
Helms, assistant home economics agents, shared
a program on "Laundry Know-How." Miss Simp-
songavebasic information on laundry procedures,
especially spot removal and laundry equipment.
Miss Helms explained the use of laundry aids,
detergents, soaps, bleaches, fabric softeners,
water conditioners, and sanitizing agents.
Modern living has created a new laundry
problem for the homemaker. Gone is the day
when her family lived in isolation and she boiled
her family's clothes. As the population becomes
more dense, and we become a more socialized
group, we expose our families to all sorts of
disease.
Apartment living, with its laundry center
used by many families, and the popularity of the
neighborhood laundromats have exposed families
to new bacteria. Many flu epidemics, uncon-
trolled staphylococcus infections, and new un-
named virus infections that run through nursery
schools, neighborhoods, and metropolitan cities
have been traced to the home laundry.
Cold water detergents can remove light soil,
can save on wash-day wear of clothes, and are
gentle to colors and synthetic fibers. But they
can't do the job as far as stopping the spread of
bacteria.
Research has shown that a suitable disin-
fectant used during laundering can prevent or re-
duce the spread of bacterial infections by cloth-
ing and household textiles. Modern homemakers
who use community laundry facilities should use
a sanitizing agent. Periodically, home laundry
equipment should be sanitized, especially in
case of illness.
New fashion trends have made shopping a
problem. Parents with teenagers have problems
understanding new styles. Adults have trouble
selecting appropriate styles, since they are not
familiar with new style trends. Clothes have be-
come more than a covering to protect us from the
elements. Clothes are a way of leaving a hum-
drum existence, a way of rebelling, a way of ac-
ceptance in a group, and a way to show indivi-
dualism.
Homemakers owe it to themselves and their
families to stay in step with fashion. By using
rules of good design and adapting today's style
trends to the figure type, homemakers can be
well dressed.
If parents and youth leaders can understand
the reason for teenage fad, it might point up a


much more important problem than the superficial
one of dress.
Extension Homemakers and 4-H leaders
were brought up-to-date on fashion by Miss Patri-
cia Helms in August training meetings. Fads
were discussed as a part of our charging times.
Adults were reminded of the Flapper Era when
the shirts were short, and the boyish "bob" was
the haircut that separated the "girls" from the
ladies.
Modern fabrics with texture, color, and de-
sign changes have given designers a whole new
way to express themselves. Vinyls and paper
fabrics have left their mark. Soon we may see
instant fashion from a spray can.
"Patterned After You" training meetings for
both 4-H club and extension homemakers club
leaders gave training on selecting commercial
dress patterns, taking accurate body measure-
ment, and making pattern alterations.
Women are sewing more to save money, to
satisfy creative needs, and to get a custom fit.
Selecting the right pattern and making alterations
to insure individual fit are the combination that
will make a smart fashionable outfit and a very
pleased and satisfied home sewer.
Miss Helms increased the mailing list of
"Clothesline To You" to over 2,000 copies this
year. This Extension publication is printed four
times a year and sent to department stores,
homemakers, other professional home economists,
dry cleaners and fabric stores.


"Clothesline To You" gives up-to-date in-
formation on new fabrics and fabric finishes, new
fashions for the whole family, sewing techniques,
good grooming, household fabric selection infor-
mation, and laundry know-how.
Other communication methods are used to
reach the consumer. Over 100 live radio programs
were done on selection and care of clothing and
household textiles. Weekly news releases and
radio spots were mailed to radio, television, and
newspapers.
To keep the consumer well informed, Exten-
sion has used exhibits, formal instruction, publi-
cations, and mass media to do the job.u


































"IT GIVES US SOMETHING TO DO"


"It gives us something to do...."
"It's fun."
"We're learning...."
Ten boys, ages 7 to 15 years, were busy
putting together the pieces of a lamp. They were
using their hands and their heads to create some-
thing functional.
The youngsters live in the Larchmont Hous-
ing Project with 437 apartment units centered at
N. W. 84 Street and 5 Avenue. At Larchmont the
Dade County Extension Service launched a pilot
project on how the 4-H Program might beadapted
to reach low-income youth.
Nine weekly meetings have been completed.
During the first four meetings, 10 boys con-
structed the 4-H electric lamp. During the fifth
and sixth meetings they made a three-piece wood
knick-knack that serves as a card or letter hold-
er. During the last three meetings, eight other
boys constructed the electric lamp.
After an electric management firm offered
$45.00 to assist in purchasing the lamp kits, and
after consultation with the housing project leader
Mrs. Jean Sperbeck, it was decided to ask the
boys to pay any amount they could up to $2.25,
to cover half the cost of the $4.50 kit.
Eight boys paid the $2.25, one paid $1.50,
five-$1.00, two-80 cents, one-50 cents, and
one did. not pay anything.
Some observations after working with the
low-income youth:
...A minority of those living in the housing
project drink up what money they have and let
their children suffer.
...The majority of the people in the project


are very good people and are kept busy constant-
ly trying to make a living.
...We feel certain the boys who paid 50 cents
and 80 cents gave up just as much, if not more,
than the boys paying $2.25.
...The boys are intelligent and eager to
learn.
...The majority of fathers work two jobs to
support their family. After a man works 16 hours
a day, he does not feel much like working on a
volunteer basis helping out.
...In the summer, many of the children are
chased out of the house early in the morning and
not allowed to come back into the house, even
for a drink, until dark.
...The "good" programs must be active and
rapid fire in order to compete with the active and
rapid fire "bad" activities that naturally go on
in the project area.
...Extension people are the only ones who
have come to help them and remained with them
any length of time.
What are some of the results of this low-
income Extension project?
...It appears to be directing their energies
in a constructive direction.
...One potential woman-leader failed to fol-
low through, three potential men-leaders fizzled.
...Boys continually remark about presenting
their mothers with the completed lamp-this is
mainly a fatherless area and I sense that the
boys are "keenly aware without depth of under-
standing" of the hardships carried by most of
their mothers.
...Confidence of boys was extremely easy


































"IT'S FUN." "WE'RE LEARNING..."


to obtain-one must be very cautious to always be
"shooting square" with them. I think just the
fact that I came back after the first meeting,
seemed to mean a lot to them.
...Need three age groups: 7-9, 10-12 and
13-15.
...Introduced the unison reciting of the 4-H
Pledge the second meeting. The atmosphere im-
mediately crackled with the "sense of belong-
ing." Boys quieted down more than previously.
One Spanish boy could not read the pledge on
the banner (he only speaks English) but made
sounds anyway. He was expending a great deal
of effort to be part and parcel of the group.
...The housing project leader stated that
this is the first time they have tried to do some-
thing for the boys and not had a discipline prob-
lem. The boys have been very well behaved.
Perhaps the "learning by doing" makes the dif-
ference.
...Some of the older boys finished their lamp
construction before the others. At this point the
older boys were very receptive and served as
junior leaders by working with the younger boys
in showing them how to finish putting together
their lamps.
...We have not formed a 4-H club as is gen-
erally conceived. All we have accomplished is
getting to do something tangible-put together a
lamp. The 4-H Pledge has been worked in as an
aside. And, one of the boys is now taking the
responsibility of listing the attendance in writ-
ing. The boys express, "the 4-H meeting," but
our approach has been 100 percent project work.
Then we work in other items by degrees when we


feel the boys might be ready for them.
...After hand-sanding wood for about 15
minutes, one boy said, "This is fun." Another
echoed, "Yeah, it gives us something to do." He
was very sincere in his statement.
...Since this is a pilot project to explore
program possibilities with low-income youth, the
following inferences resulted from this experi-
ence:
The limiting factors are: time, adequate per-
sonnel, program material, meeting facilities, and
equipment.
These are good boys reacting adequately to
help. Their ages range from 7 to 15 years, and
they are at the age they need to be shown the
other side of the coin.
Very little chance for internal leadership to
develop immediately and quickly. Outside people
are needed to coordinate, set up, and follow
through in carrying out a program of substantial
length.
We do not expect written material to do the
job. Actual items on display for motivation, and
the actual construction of these items or projects
appear to get the best results.
It would appear that tours to other areas,
such as to milk plants, newspapers, a farm, or
any place available to show them the other side
of the coin, would be a good motivating force to
help these young people decide to become
adequately self sufficient.
A 4-H camping experience with all the cam-
pers from low income homes would be an ideal
setting to expose the boys to wholesome and in-
formal classes, activities and recreation.u




























Bob Anderson (left) helps Dale Nichols
of Homestead with his 4-H poultry pro-
ject.


"WHAT 4-H HAS DONE FOR ME"


Bob Anderson, as told to Bill Moore

"I will never forget the day I found my first
egg. I ran into the house screaming with joy and
the whole neighborhood knew that one of my
chickens had laid her first egg. That was seven
years ago."
This is the way 17 year old Bob Anderson of
9301 S. W. 108 Street begins to reflect on his
4-H experiences.
"Dad always stood behind me and gave me
encouragement. Having parents express an inter-
est, take part, and provide active support is a
very important phase of 4-H Club work.
"When I first came into 4-H, an older 4-H
member was very helpful to me and I followed his
example. Still another older member in the poul-
try project gave me my first equipment.
"I received valuable experience raising the
chicks.
"A different type of experience was gained
when the chickens started to lay.
"I weighed and candled all the eggs and
then went selling door to door around the neigh-
borhood working up egg customers.
"Yes sir, soon I had my own business sell-
ing eggs to customers and chicken manure to my
father, which he used around the yard and flower
beds.
"Since Dad financed me the first year, the
money I received was used to pay back my father,
handle current operating expenses, and provide a
small amount in reserve for future expenses.
"I put some of the money I made into im-
provements.


"However, money was not plentiful. Just to
buy essential items, I had to look around for bar-
gains and make a selective purchasing decision.
"Improvements made a better project the next
year and in turn made more business. I have
automatic watering devices now and other labor
saving items which makes the project much
easier.
"So I've actually experienced the phenom-
ena of business expansion along with increasing
efficiency in a production operation.
"Another important phase of my poultry pro-
ject was learning how to keep records and under-
standing their importance in turning a profit.
"Although I've never made enough money to
pay income tax, about one-half of my annual pro-
fits are in the bank. This will assist Dad in sup-
porting me in school.
"You know, Dad and I are a great team in
partnership with each other.
"But 4-H is so much more than just a pro-
ject. A young person gets introduced to 4-H
through the tangible project. Pretty soon a lot of
intangible satisfactions begin to develop.
"For example, 4-H has given me a sense of
responsibility.
"Too, when I first joined, I wouldn't talk to
individual people much less groups. But through
attendance at club meetings, then the annual
4-H camp, followed by other county, district and
State activities, I've learned to gain confidence
in myself.
"Four-H taught me how to meet and talk to
people and be comfortable in groups, in strange
places, and when meeting people. "



















DADE COUNTY'S NATIONAL 4-H WINNER

Margaret Ann Rolando is a national 4-H
winner in the 4-H Home Management Program.
The award, a $500 scholarship provided by
Tupperware, was made at the National 4-H Club
Congress in Chicago.
MARGARET ANN ROLANDO






FELLOW 4-H MEMBERS ESTABLISH THE

Pabtric M. Craven -
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Patrick M. Craven, 1951-1967, at the date of his untimely death in an auto-
mobile accident, was a vibrant and dynamic Dade County 4-H Club Member.
Pat was a member and Vice-President of the West Flagler 4-H Club. He served
at many meetings in the position of President.
Pat had completed three years of 4-H Club work taking vegetable gardening
and beef projects. He had just purchased a calf to raise, care for, and train for the
1969 Dade County Youth Fair Fat Stock Show and Sale.
Pat had begun to lay plans for following a career in Animal Husbandry. With-
in a week of his tragic death Pat had remarked to his 4-H Leader and close friend,
William Grubbs, that he was really going to try and "go all the way" in 4-H.
Pat was a member of the 1967 Dade County 4-H Livestock Judging Team, served as a camp counselor and was
voted a close second as the best boy camper. He had completed participation in the 4-H Junior Training Course. He had
enrolled to compete for a position on the 1968 County 4-H Dairy Judging Team.
He was always ready to talk to prospective members and parents about 4-H, and was quick to inspire his fellow
club members to more effort and higher goals.
Pat was active in the youth fellowship of the Coral Way Methodist Church, participated in golf and football at Mi-
ami Springs Senior High School, and was a member of the Florida Amateur Golf Association.
Pat's quiet yet stately manner enveloped a distinction of excellence in personal and social traits. He practiced re-
spect for others. He was interested in people. He possessed a deep sense of dependable responsibility.
Pat's strength of mind and spirit had beneficial quality reflected in virtuous conduct based on integrity and honor.
His standards of both character and personality were at a level for others to attempt. Indeed his traits, attitudes,
and habits closely approached the theoretically ideal 4-H member in Head-Heart-Hands and Health.
In short, Pat was all around wholesome and healthy. He was at the threshold of becoming a creative adult.
Through the force of Pat Craven and in keeping with his capacity to act, the "Memorial Scholarship" is launched.

CONTRIBUTIONS MAY BE MADE TO THE "PAT CRAVEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND" C/O DADE COUNTY
4-H YOUTH FOUNDATION, INC., 2690 NORTHWEST 7 AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33127.







...4 Speaedl Satute to Dade eowtya 4-q Mtemede


W'o Are 1967 F4ltida State 4-q Winsen.,.


SPECIAL AWARDS












TOM GORMAN GAIL HAMILTON TERRI DIAL MIKE CAIN
Chilean Nitrate Award National 4-H Conference Canadian U.S. Banker's Scholarship
Washington, D.C. Exchange

WINNERS TO NATIONAL 4-H CLUB CONGRESS AT CHICAGO


James Bernecker
Horticulture


Theresa Franzo Mary Hudak
Nutrition Home Economics


LZX', I.' IIIIII1
Margaret Rolando Kate Reilly Mike Cain
Home Mgmt. Citizenship Leadership


OTHER AWARDS


JEANE MADSON MIKE HUDAK
Dairy Foods Electric


ANNE WILEY
Dog Care & Training









WITH YOUR SUPPORT...

4-H... 'LEARNING FOR LIVING'

SINCE 1914









DADE COUNTY CITIZENS
METRO DADE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
DADE COUNTY YOUTH FAIR ASSOCIATION
DADE COUNTY 4-H VOLUNTEER LEADERS,
PARENTS, & ALUMNI



THE 4-H PROGRAM
Y Young people from 10-19 years of age who learn by doing.
O Oriented to interests, resources, concerns of the family.
U Understands and recognizes needs of youth.
T Teaches skills, knowledge, attitudes.
H The 4-H's-HEAD, HEART, HANDS, HEALTH for club, community, and country.
*

PROVIDES FOR
D Decision making and wise use of resources, time, money, energy, talents.
E Effective youth-adult relationships built upon mutual respect.
V Values and establishment of personal standards.
E Experiences for learning progressing from simple to complex.
L Leadership development of, both, adults and youth.
0 Opportunity for community service, citizenship training, and democratic group action.
P Purposeful living and appreciation for a satisfying home life.
M Maturity physical, mental, emotional, social.
E Evaluation of objectives and achievements in relation to life's goals.
N Natural resources conservation, recreation, and appreciation of nature.
T Training of volunteer leaders and junior leaders.





























































Brucellosis (contagious abortion) commonly called
Bang's Disease infects livestock and can be
transmitted to man in the form of undulant fever.
In cooperation with Federal, State, and local
agencies, Dade County cattlemen petitioned the
Florida Division of Animal Industry to blood test
all of our cattle not already on test through the
dairy program. Only six reactors were found.
They have been eliminated. With less than 1% of
the cattle and less than 5% of the herds reacting,
Dade County is now designated as a modified
certified brucellosis free area.m


30


























WHAT AND HOW MUCH?


Days Devoted to:
Adult Work ........................ .......... ....... 2,681
Youth Work ..................................... ............ 677
In-Service Training (Staff) ......................... 165




DAYS DEVOTED TO HELPING PEOPLE MAKE
DECISIONS

Agricultural Production, Management, and
Natural Resource Development


Farm Business, Organization Development
and Management ............................
Prevention and Control of Plant and
Animal Diseases, Insects, Weeds,
and Other Pests ..... ............................
Soil and Water Management, Conservation,
Natural Disasters and Civil Defense ....
Management of Crops, Livestock, Poultry,
Equipment and other capital items ........
Agricultural and Horticultural Problems of
home owners and part-time farmers ........
Other activities concerning production,
management and resource development..
Sub-total 1


Marketing and Utilization of Farm Products

Marketing principles and methods ............
Grading, packing, storing and quality
maintenance of agricultural products ....
Development and improvement of marketing
organizations, firms and facilities ........
Consumer information on agricultural
comm odities ..........................................
Other activities concerning marketing
and utilization ..................................

Sub-total


Home Economics

Foods and nutrition .................................
Clothing and textiles ..................................
Housing, household equipment and
furnishings .........................................
Human relations and child development ....
Home management and home industry ..........
Health, safety and civil defense ...............


Other family living and home economics
subjects ......................... ......................

Sub-total

Resource Development and Public
Affairs

Organizing and working with resource
development organizations, agencies
and other groups .....................................
Work with State, county and local govern-
ment groups on resource development
and public affairs ...............................
Planning and preparation of resource de-
velopment and public affairs material
and supervising and administering
public affairs programs ..........................

Sub-total


TOTAL DAYS WORKED .............................


362

1,531


77


66




124

267


3,523


Studies of Problems and Opportunities ............ 764
257 Field Trials, Tests and Demonstrations.......... 573
Consultations Providing Information to
111 Individuals and Families .......................... 51,758
,344 Consultations providing information to
Organizations and Agencies ................... 21,878
News Articles ........................... .................... 1,541
Radio Programs ........................... ..................... 2,887
77 Television Programs ..................................... 1,022
Publications Distributed ................................. 275,684
95 Direct Mail Distributed ................................... 249,487
Meetings to plan and develop programs .......... 311
97 Attendance ............................................... 5,781
Training Meetings for Leaders ....................... 284
29 Leaders trained ......................................... 4,896
Other meetings and activities at which
83 County Extension information was
presented ............................................. 3,231
381 Attendance .............................................. 197,616
4-H Club members .......................................... 1,379
Other Youth involved in Direct extension
training Programs ...................................... 66,765
323 4-H Club Project Work:
211 Individuals with agricultural projects ........ 351
Individuals with other 4-H projects ............ 2,427
182 Youth reached through special teen-age
151 nutrition programs ................................... 180
194 Adult Leaders working with youth
108 programs ........................................ 180













DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


PERSONNEL CHART



FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


JOHN D. CAMPBELL
Extension Chairman, and
County Agricultural Agent



COUNTY AGENT'S STAFF


*NOLAN L. DURRE
Asso. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
*SEYMOUR GOLDWEBER
Asso. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

ROY J. CHAMPAGNE
Asso. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

LOUIS J. DAIGLE
Asso. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
*JOSEPH D. DALTON
Asso. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
*RICHARD M. HUNT
ASST. MARKETING AGENT

BILL MOORE
ASST. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT


SECRETARIES AND TECHNICAL AIDES MAINTENANCE


MISS MARGARET M. HUTTON
DEPT. ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY
*MRS. LENA COWART
CLERK-STENO 2

*MRS. LINDA H. LOWRY
CLERK-STENO 1

MRS. BETTIE A. GAY
CLERK- STENO 1
MRS. T. EDITH OWENS
CLERK-STENO 1

MRS. O. MARIE GIBSON
CLERK-TYPIST 1
*MRS. REBECCA C. MURRAY
CLERK-TYPIST 1

*CHARLES WELSH
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN
WILLIAM C. MATTILA
TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATOR


*EDWARD H. VAEREWYCK
BUILDING MAINTENANCE &
SPECIAL SERVICES

LESTER B. BALDWIN
BUILDING MAINTENANCE &
SPECIAL SERVICES


MRS. HELEN B. MACTAVISH
Extension Vice Chairman, and
Home Economics Agent

HOME ECONOMICS STAFF

MISS VICTORIA M. SIMPSON
ASST. EXTENSION HOME EC. AGENT
MRS. JUSTINE L. BIZETTE
ASST. EXTENSION HOME EC. AGENT
**MISS PATRICIA A. HELMS
ASST. EXTENSION HOME EC. AGENT

MRS. ELIZABETH D. CLARK
ASST. EXTENSION HOME EC. AGENT

MISS MARY ALYCE HOLMES
ASST. EXTENSION HOME EC. AGENT


SECRETARIES

MRS. DOROTHY T. MARTIN
CLERK-STENO 2
**MRS. MARY JANE TRENT
CLERK-STENO 1

MRS. AGATHA B. KIRKPATRICK
CLERK-STENO 1

MRS. PATRICIA O. HARPER
CLERK-TYPIST 2

MRS. BETTE S. McGRATH
CLERK-TYPIST 1


OFFICES

Miami Office
2690 N.W. 7 Avenue

*Homestead Office (Agriculture)
1102 N. Krome Avenue

**Homestead Office (Home Economics)
1116 N. Krome Avenue










ORGANIZATIONAL CHART


U


U. S. Government |




U. S. Department
of Agriculture







Federal Extension
Service
I.


State of Florida


Metropolitan Dade County
Board of County Comm.



County Manager


University of Florida
(Land-Grant University)


Institute of Food and
S Agricultural Sciences
(Provost for Agriculture)
I


Florida Agricultural
Extension Service
University of Florida


College of Agriculture
University of Florida


Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations
University of Florida


Dade County Agricultural
Department


a


School of Forestry
University of Florida










AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


OFFICE OF THE COUNTY AGENT

Formulates and interprets policies and procedures
and has administrative responsibility for planning,
developing and carrying out a coordinated Agricul-
tural Extension Service program in cooperation with
the University of Florida and U. S. Department of
Agriculture. Technically supervises the agricul-
tural program.


HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Develops and provides
agricultural information of
interest to the general
public, homeowners, busi-
ness and tourists. Dis-
seminates public affairs
information that is close-
ly related to agriculture
in cooperation with coun-
ty, state and federal gov-
ernments.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCA-
TION AND ADVISORY
SERVICES

Provides a planned pro-
gram of agricultural edu-
cation and advisory serv-
ices to the people includ-
ing activities in all
phases of production, pro-
cessing aid marketing of
agricultural products.


YOUTH PROGRAMS- YOUTH PROGRAMS-
BOYS GIRLS


YOUTH PROGRAMS OFFICE

Character development and good
citizenship are long range goals of
the youth program in urban,sub-
urban and rural areas. Provides
training to youth in agriculture,
home economics and related areas.
Mental, physical, social and spirit-
ual growth is emphasized. Coordi-
nates 4-H Club projects and activi-
ties. Gives career guidance and
other assistance to youth interested
in agricultural and home economics
subjects.


HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION

Extension Home Econom-
ics develops and provides
a planned program to help
people in all areas of
family living Consumer
Education, Home Manage-
ment, Family Economics,
Family Life Education,
Health and Safety Educa-
tion, Foods and Nutrition,
Clothing and Textiles and
related areas. Assists
with problems related to
subtropical living. Pro-
vides opportunities for
personal growth and de-
velopment of leaders.


I

HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Serves as a resource for
Home Economics Informa-
tion. Cooperates with re-
lated community agencies
for improvement of health,
safety and recreation.
Keeps homemakers in-
formed on matter of local
interest, government and
public affairs pertaining
to families, and encour-
ages the exercise of citi-
zenship responsibilities.


cn

0)
11 z
U)
0
o r




I
0
m


AGRICULTURAL OFFICE

Provides information and educational services to
all areas of agricultural and horticultural interests
--production, processing, marketing, supply and
service. Services extend to commercial producers,
agri-business firms, homeowners and governmental
agencies. Provides youth training and guidance in
agriculture. Initiates surveys and studies and pre-
pares reports to encourage development of agricul-
tural resources.


EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS OFFICE

The County Extension Home Economics Agent
assists with development of the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service program and technically supervises
the Extension Home Economics. program for youth
and adults. The office provides advisory and edu-
cational information in all phases of home eco-
nomics related to family living, through interpreta-
tion and application of this information.


.







DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURE
Dade County ranks high as an agricultural county and is an important segment of the economy of the County, State and
Nation. Agriculture is Florida's number one income producer. The more than one billion dollars in farm products reach the
retail market with a value of more than four billion dollars--a figure that exceeds both the income value of tourism and of
all other manufacturing. Dade County plays a major role in Florida's agriculture by generate about $60,000,000 an-
nually by farmers from the sale of their products. Dade County ranks fourth in the State in value of all farm products sold
and 60th in the nation. Dade leads all Florida counties in the production of limes, avocados, mangos, tomatoes and pole
beans for fresh market and also ranks fourth in the nation in fresh tomato production and sixth in the value of
vegetables This is onl) a portion of the overall .,alue of agriculture to Dade County's total economy. Millions
of dollars are generated each year through the marketing and distribution of agricultural products. In ad-
ii tion, farmers purchase goods and ser ices from agribusiness firms in excess of $40,000,000 annually.
More than 21,000 residents of Dade County Aork in agriculture. Approximately 7,000 migrant workers
are engaged in seasonal production and marketing operations.
C L E : E I.: L T M ; hI,.. L iL. L t 1. r i. I:.1L rT 11L . C n Q l > Ir.' I I:: L .r 'ORESTRY
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT'S OFFICE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE








1944-65 PRODUCTION VALUES

DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURE



One Yr.
FIVE YEAR AVERAGES Total
1944.49 49.54 54 59 59.64 64-65

(S1000) il1000o l I1000) 1510001 ($1000)


Vegetables

Fruir

Daory,

Ornamental
Hor tc culture

Poultry


Other
Livestock

Other Form
Enterpr-ses


12,756

S955

6.955



1,470

530



500


20.254

* 1,791


9.828



2,558

841



842


35,117

"3,276

4,717



4,835

S3,111



1,055



1,665


30,171

3,190

2.341



10.922


: 4,107



1,314



304


33,907

5,187

2,820



10,472

3,413



1,100



500


Total 23,166 36,114 53,776 52,349 57,399



* Includes avocados, limes, and mangos; not "other fruit."

t Includes hatcheries, starting in season of 1956-57.

t No figures available.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS,
STATE OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS, COOPERATING








DADE COUNTY

VEGETABLE CROPS ACREAGE,

& PRODUCTION VALUE

1965-66 CROP YEAR


VEGETABLES


Tomatoes Fresh
Processed

Potatoes

Pole Beans

Squash

Bush Beans

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Cucumbers

Cabbage

Okra

Peas

Cuban Vegetables

*Other Vegetables


ACREAGE
PLANTED
(acres


19,000



6.800

5,700

3,300

1,100

700

2,830

1,800

500

600

550

1,200

600


1*


TOTAL
PRODUCTION
110001


3.044 crt.
808 ct.

1,045 cwr

1,303 bu.

432 bu.

89 bu.

6,233 Ibs.

333 crt.

370 bu.

198 crt.

72 bu.

96 bu.




43 cwt


VALUE
(51000)


14,440
687

4,755

4,847

1,555

342

2,431

832

1,369

376

288

505

1,050

246


TOTAL 44,680 33.723


* Includes lima beans, cantaloupes, eggplant, escarole,
chicory, lettuce, green peppers.

SOURCES FOR THIS PUBLICATION
U.S.D.A. Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting
Service, Orlando, Florida
Dade County Agricultural Agent's Office.
Milk Marketing Orders Division, Federal Order No. 13.







1965-66 SEASON


Total
Subtropical p ,;,. Total
Subtropical Acreage Production in Value
fruit bushelsalue

(acres) (1000) ($1000)

Avocados 5,100 1 101 1,136

L.mes 3,300 630 1,606

Mangos 1,540 180 720

Spcc.alry frul 430 330

Other citrus 380 267


Total 10,750 4,059


I/Hurricane Betsy

* Includes lychee, barbados cherries, guavas, papayas and
sapodillas.
+ Includes oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, tangelos and
lemons.


TOTAL ANNUAL PRODUCTION VALUE

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 1966
565 Nurseries and Flower Growers $11,880,000
POULTRY 1966
25 Forms 275,000 layers, including Breeder Farms
4,500,000 dozen eggs produced $1,945,000
200,000 birds sold for meat 50,000
5 Hatcheries 10,027,000 1.842.000 $ 3,837,000
DAIRY 1966
5 farms 3,917 cows and calves
3,011,246 gallons of milk sold $1,700,000
Dairy animals sold for beef 130,000 $ 1,830,000
OTHER LIVESTOCK 1966
75 Farms plus non-farm livestock owners
Beef cattle, horses, hogs, sheep and goats
*6,800 animals $ 756,000
FRUITS $ 4,059,000
VEGETABLES $33,723,000
ALL OTHER CROPS AND
FARM ENTERPRISE 1966 $ 500.000
TOTAL PRODUCTION VALUE $56,585,000
*Adjusted from census figure previously used.







FRUITS & VEGETABLES


F R U I T S VEGETABLES
SEASON
ENDING ACREAGE VALUE ACREAGE VALUE
PLANTED ($1000) PLANTED ($1000)

1959-60 16,60 1,952 40,565 22,921
1960-61 16,000 1,817 40,158 28,156
1961-62 13,595 2,955 37, 540 30,643
1962-63 13,500 4,032 ..:41,625 31,782
1963-64 13,020 5,196 49,170 37,354
1964-65 10,690 5,187 5Z250 33,907
1965-66 t1,7,50 4,059 44,680 : 33,723



DAIRY-POULTRY &

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE


ORNAMENTAL
DAIRY POULTRY HORTICULTURE
SEASON
ENDING NO.
VALUE OF VALUE VALUE
151000) FARMS ($1000) 1(1000)

1944-49 6,955 530 1,470
1949-54 9,828 2 841 2.558
1954-59 4,717 3,111 4.835
1960 2,684 63 4,610 13,100
1961 2,166 62 5,005 11,800
1962 2,211 39 3,760 10,886
1963 2,431 33 3,450 9,300
1964 2,215 32 3,711 9,525
1Q65 2,820 26 3.413 10.472
1966 1.830 25 3,837 11,880

* 5-Year Average






TOTAL FARM PRODUCTION
? DADE COUNTY


MIL. OF DOLLARS


1944
1949


I


I


5 YEAR AVERAGE


L02 N1.
M90 N.































49
54


:I-I


VV. 7t,































54
59


ONE YEAR
TOTAL
I


Ae.































59
64


SMi































64
65


SRVIC
a.id, Fl
ami, F1































65
66


"m


S.


I


1975




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