• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Front Matter
 In capsule form
 Mass communications
 Dairy plant seminar
 For better for worse
 Finance seminar
 What can I do?
 Career scholarships
 Extension cares that coconut grove...
 A successful grove is born
 4-H camp
 4-H winners from Dade county
 Time study
 Agricultural department
 Dade county agri-council organ...
 New homestead office construct...
 Errata
 New homestead office construct...
 Back Cover






Title: Helping others help themselves
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094994/00001
 Material Information
Title: Helping others help themselves
Alternate Title: 1968 annual report, Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department
Physical Description: 26 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Dade County (Fla.) -- Agricultural & Home Economics Dept
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: 1968
Copyright Date: 1968
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural extension work -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: This report gives some examples of the various phases of extension work in Dade County.
General Note: Cover title.
Statement of Responsibility: Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department, Florida Agricultural Extension Service.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094994
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436452902

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Front Matter
        Front matter
        Front matter
        Front matter
    In capsule form
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Mass communications
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dairy plant seminar
        Page 5
        Page 6
    For better for worse
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Finance seminar
        Page 9
        Page 10
    What can I do?
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Career scholarships
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Extension cares that coconut grove cares
        Page 15
    A successful grove is born
        Page 16
    4-H camp
        Page 17
        Page 18
    4-H winners from Dade county
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Time study
        Page 21
    Agricultural department
        Page 22
    Dade county agri-council organized
        Page 23
        Page 24
    New homestead office construction
        Page 25
    Errata
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    New homestead office construction
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
Full Text
r42 &ot


HLIN STER HELP















FOIA ARCLUAL XESO EVC


b.

















CONTENTS


1968 ANNUAL REPORT
DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL &
HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT



IN CAPSULE FORM (John D. Campbell) ........................... 1

MASS COMMUNICATIONS (Staff) ............ ...... ........... 3

DAIRY PLANT SEMINAR (Bill Moore) ......... .................. 5

FOR BETTER FOR WORSE WHICH SHALL IT H (Mrs. Justine L. Bizet'tl) .... .. 7

FINANCE SEMINAR (Richard M. Hunt) .......... ....... ... ........ 9

WHAT CAN I DO? (Miss Mary Alyce Holmes) ........ ............. .. . 11

CAREER SCHOLARSHIPS (Roy J. Ch.~mpJgne) ..... ... ...... ...... 13

EXTENSION CARES THAT COCONUT GROVE CARES (tMiss V.M. Simpson) ....... .15

A SUCC ESSFUL GROVE IS BORN (Seymour Goldweber) ....... .... ... ... 16

4-H CAMP (Mrs. Betty Clark) ........... ...... .. .............. 17

4-H WINNERS FROM DADE COUNTY ............ .... . .. . . 19

TIME STUDY ................. .............. ............

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT ........................ 22

DADE COUNTY AGRI-COUNCIL ORGANIZED ................. .. 23

NEW HOMESTEAD OFFICE CONSTRUCTION ....................... 25















BOARD OF COUNTY

COMMISSIONERS &

COUNTY MANAGER


CHUCK HALL
Mayor


ALEX S.GORDON
Vice Mayor
I


PORTER W. HOMER
County Manager


HAROLD A. GREENE


K. HARDY MATHESON


ARTHUR PATTEN, JR. BEN SHEPARD


THOMAS D. O'MALLEY


EARL M. STARNES





















UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
President, University of Florida


DR. E.T. YORK, JR.
Provost for Agriculture
Institute of Food & Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida


DR. MARSHALL O. WATKINS
Dean
Agricultural Extension Service


DR. BETTY JEAN BRANNAN
Assistant Dean
Home Economics Programs
Agricultural Extension Service


MR. FRANKLIN S. PERRY
District Agent
Agricultural Extension Service










DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & HOME
ECONOMICS AGENTS
1I John D. Campbell, County Agent; 2 Mrs. Helen B.
MacTavish, Extension Home Economics Agent; Associate
County Agents: 3 Nolan L. Durre, 4 Seymour
Goldweber, 5 Roy J. Champagne, 6 Louis J. Daigle,
and 7 Joseph D. Dalton; 8 Richard M. Hunt,
Assistant Marketing Agent; 9 Bill Moore, Assistant
County Agent; Assistant Extension Home Economics
Agents: 10 Miss Victoria M. Simpson, 11 Mrs. Justine
L. Bizette, 12 Miss Patricia A. Helms, 13 Mrs.
Elizabeth D. Clark, 14 Miss Mary Alyce Holmes. 2


4


9 A


S t 12


13 *, 14


3


\
-fr


7











IN CAPSULE FORM
For the sake of brevity you will find on the next
few pages a number of short statements denoting
particular activities and accomplishments during
1968. These statements were contributed by staff
members of the Agricultural and Home Economics
Department of Dade County. They indicate some
of the accomplishments and project activities in
which these Florida Agricultural Extension Service
representatives in Dade County were involved.
Extensive salinity surveys and tests were made.
Farmland and drainage ditches that indicated serious
salt intrusion problems near the
coast have greatly improved
with the cooperation of the
S Dade County Agricultural and
Home Economics Dept., Water
Control Division, Public Works
Department, Central and South
SFlorida Flood Control District, U.S.
Geological Survey, and the Agricultural Research
Service. The Agricultural and Home Economics
Department has expanded its
mass media education pro-
gram by more than 25 percent
releasing 1,684 news items,
5,311 radio broadcast _
releases, and over 410,800 ,,
bulletins and publications '"' 7
on agricultural and home
economics subjects. The Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, has
commended the department on its communications
program which has brought numerous responses
from the Caribbean Islands and from states as
far distant as Oregon and Washington.
The Dairy Plant Seminar, sponsored by the
Agricultural and Home Economics
III IIII Department trained over 100 em-
1 ployees from 14 milk processing
= bAlY plants. The seminar offered eight
- SEMl tA dairy technology subjects for the
students attending the two-night training seminar.
The Agricultural and Home Economics Department
has continued to emphasize the career potential and
subjects related to agriculture and home eco-
nomics. It is worth noting at this point
that the Agricultural Council of the
Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce
awarded nine $250 College
scholarships to outstanding Dade County youth.


The Agricultural and Home Economics Department
_cooperated with the
(g// Agricultural Division
__ .ylU Tf- of the Miami-Dade
S :-- Chamber of Commerce
in presenting the
annual Agricultural
Tour and County Agricultural Products Luncheon.
The Caribbean fruit fly control program received
assistance and cooperation from Dade County which
enabled several research and control /
test measures to be undertaken in
Dade County during the year.
The new Homestead Agricultural Center is nearing
completion. The Homestead office of the Agricul-
tural and Home Economics Department is scheduled

I- ,111 --

T -MIM

to move to the new facility at 18710 S.W. 288 St.
on February 8th, 1969. By the coordinated )
effort of the Agricultural and
Home Economics Department, cgQ "
news media, and many farmers a Xg 2
the "U-Pick-Um" effort has
greatly expanded. This has n
benefitted many urban 1N
families by giving them a
source of fresh vegetables for the table, for canning
and for the freezer, coupled with a farm outing for
the family. It brings profits to the farmer, and has
helped to reduce thefts of produce from the fields.
"Personal Protection" was the timely subject of the
annual Homemakers Seminar
Held in September 1968, at
( il Dadeland. By request the
Snseminar will be repeated
Sin Hialeah in January 1969
by the Extension Home Economics Division of the
Agricultural and Home Economics Department.
The Extension Home Economics Division, Agricul-
tural and Home Economics Department conducted
a four-session course for
newlyweds on "Family
Values", "Home Manage-
ment and Family Econom-
ics", "Housing and Home
furnishing", and "Meal
Planning, Marketing
and Preparation".











Over 3,000 entries were made by the 4-H youth in
the Eighteenth Annual Dade County
Youth Fair. The 4-H Club programs
are under the supervision of the
Extension Service personnel of the
Agricultural and Home Economics
Department who work in cooperation
with the Dade County Youth Fair Association.
Dade County 4-H youth won County, State and
National recognition in 1969.
Outstanding project work
accounted for 14 young people
receiving training at the National
Citizenship Short Course at
The Nation's Capital. Three
went to the National 4-H
Congress in Chicago; two others
attended the National 4-H
Conference in Washington,
D.C. In addition to the
trip awards, several also received scholarships.
The Home Economics Division
of the Agricultural and Home cq
Economics Department expanded g
its consumer education program B
and is using all avenues to reach
more people with authentic
consumer information and to
assist the homemaker and others in making deci-
sions in buying, evaluating advertising, in budget-
ing and managing money and other resources.
Home Economics Agents conducted 30 training
meetings for group leaders
who in turn gave monthly
r educational programs in
SZP homemaking and family
Living for 21 Extension
SHomemakers Clubs, with
rr a membership of about
'. 700, throughout the County.
The Dade County Extension Homemakers Council
assisted the Home Economics Agents in extending
training for family and community living. The
council held quarterly County meetings, sent two
delegates to the State
Council meeting in
Gainesville, nine
delegates to
the National Council meeting in San Juan, Puerto
Rico, and two delegates to the international meet-
ing in Michigan. The council sponsored programs
in citizenship and international relations.


Homemakers through the Extension Homemakers
Council, have participated in the safety programs
of the Dade County Citizen's Safety
Council, and the work of the Women's
Division of the Dade County Crime
Commission. The Home Economics
Office had an exhibit at the Mental
Health Fair and My Fair Lady (The
Greater Miami Council for the Con-
tinuing Education of Women, Inc.).
Educational publications, the quarterly; "Focus on
Children", "Clothesline to You"
and "Soundoff for Home-
makers", written by Dade
County's Extension Home
Economics Agents bring
helpful and timely informa-
tion based on research to
about 5,000 homemakers,
teachers, professional and
business people. -.,l -
Training has been given special interest
groups such as: student nurses, special
_! education classes, ADC mothers,
young marrieds, credit union
managers, users of donated foods,
volunteer teachers in "Coconut Grove
Cares" project, disadvantaged teens and others.
Patch the Pony, a program
on child molestation not
based on fear tactics, was
introduced into Dade
County by an Assistant
Home Economics Agent
and has received
broad support from pre-school teachers, Parent
Teacher Association, mothers, police officials, the
Crime Commission of Greater Miami and others.
Special 4-H pilot projects
were conducted with youth
in a public housing area and
will be expanded to other
low-income areas in 1969. The
4-H program provided camping
# experiences for 300 members.
The proceeding statements have reported to you in
brief some of the work of the Agricultural Exten-
sion staff members of your Dade County Agricul-
tural and Home Economics Department.
Throughout the remainder of this report you will
find articles that expand on some of the subjects
and activities summarized in these statements.


















































"MASS COMMUNICATION"


To disseminate agricultural, home economics, and re-
lated information to the people is the purpose of the
mass communications program of your Dade County
Agricultural and Home Economics Department.
The process of carrying out this simply stated
purpose is involved and complex.
The broad areas of the communications program
include:
1. Production technology of agricultural
commodities.
2. Agricultural marketing, management,
economics, and outlook.
3. Ornamental horticulture.
4. Housing.
5. Family health.
6. Family stability.
7. Community Resource Development.


8. Consumer education.
9. Four-H and youth.
10. Meeting announcements and follow-up
releases on information presented at
meetings.
11. Community and public affairs as related to
agriculture and home economics and the
interdependence of rural-urban areas.
12. Cooperation with agriculture and home
economics related organizations and
businesses private, semi-public, and public.
Eight methods are utilized in carrying out the
communications program.
News Releases-A total of 50 newspapers, radio
and television stations receive from three to 12 news
releases each week. Special requests for information




















made by letter, telephone or office calls are filled
continually for newspaper personnel, free lance
writers, and magazines.
Radio-The agents at the Homestead office
broadcast five days a week with a five-minute
program at 7:07 A.M. on Will. Betty Clark, Lou
Daigle, Nolan Durre and Seymour Goldweber are
regular guests on the WKAT, "At Your Service",
program aired from 11:05 to 11:50 A.M.
Special radio appearances are made from time to
time, and at least ten informative spots from ten to
sixty seconds in length are mailed weekly to the
public service director of 32 radio stations. In
addition, both spots and news are phoned in and
taped by the station for broadcasting.
Television-Lou Daigle's "Tropical Gardener" on
WTHS-TV, channel 2 has won widespread acclaim
and has a large dedicated group of viewers. To date
this program has been sponsored by the Broward and
Dade Chapters of the Florida Nurserymen and
Growers Association.
Richard Hunt broadcasts a livestock and produce
marketing report four mornings a week at 6:58 A.M.
over WCKT-TV, channel 7.
Five days a week the Homestead agricultural
agents phone in South Dade farm news to News
Director Lee Phillips, which he uses on his WCIX-TV,
channel 6 news broadcasts.
Durre and Goldweber participate four times
yearly on WTHS-TV, channel 2 explaining the
preparation and use of native fruits and vegetables.
Goldweber has completed several programs dealing
with various fruit crops and their hybridization,
propagation and botany these programs are now
being televised to school science classes throughout
the Country.
Television spots, both live and recorded by the
use of TV tape or colored slides, are frequently made.
Commodity Newsletters-Beef, dairy, horse,
marketing, ornamental horticulture, poultry, salt-line
reports, sub-tropical fruit, swine and vegetable letters
are mailed directly to growers and producers
containing the latest information important in the
production of food and fiber.
Educational Publications -Semi-monthly or
quarterly publications cover timely information in
the areas of clothing and textiles entitled,
"Clothesline to You," consumer education "Sound
Off for Homemakers", and child development,
"Focus on Children".
Special Publications -Bulletins, leaflets,
mimeographs, annual reports and others are sent.
Feature Articles-Appearing in local, State,
regional and National publications, agents have
contributed copy to over 30 magazines and trade


papers.
Tours-Coordinated by Nolan Durre, tours of the
agribusiness complex of Dade County are carefully
planned and conducted for public officials,
consumers, agricultural commodity buyers,
educators, students, and national and international
visiting groups. Homemakers on tours observe
agricultural production and marketing, garment
manufacturing, meat packaging, courts-in-session,
newspaper printing, and other areas of interest.
Some releases are picked up by wire services. We
have received inquiries from the States of Washington
and Oregon and from the Bahama Islands wanting
more information about a particular subject of a news
release.
When announcing the availability of a new
bulletin, it is common to receive hundreds of calls
requesting the bulletin, "Goodbye Mr. Roach"; over
1,200 requests for the fruit fact sheets on mango,
avocado and sapodilla; over 800 requests for the rose
bulletin; nearly 1,000 requests for a recent landscape
bulletin.
The National Vista Award was awarded a feature
article on donated foods.
Reports and response from all areas of the
community clearly indicate that large listening
audiences hear radio and television broadcasting
information from this office on numerous occasions
often during prime time.
In the some 40 minutes allowed for the "At Your
Service" live program over WKAT agents handle from
15 to 30 telephone calls. Calls are received from as far
distant as the Bahama Islands, and many calls are
received at the office following the program. For
example, 178 calls were received following a program
on weight control.
The shows are taped and rebroadcast several
times.
With the TV Market News Report the latest
private rating bureau lists 95,000 people viewing this
program in Greater Miami, and estimates an equal
number in outlying areas. Favorable comments have
been received about this program from hotel food
buyers, airlines for their food supplies, grocery stores,
restaurant owners, livestock people, fruit and
vegetable interests, consumers and others.
Requests for agricultural tours are so numerous
that a selective screening procedure has to be
practiced.
Education is a repetitive process. Dade County,
with a population exceeding 1.2 million people with
over 300,000 homeowners, requires the fullest use of
mass communication media to beam agricultural,
home economics, and related information to the
people.






































Henry Pilgrim, plant manager of McArthur's Miami plant, served as
chairman for the Dairy Plant Seminar.


"DAIRY PLANT SEMINAR"


Over 100 employees from 14 milk process-
ing plants attended the 1968 Dairy Plant
Seminar held in Miami.
The Seminar offered eight different dis-
cussion topics with each student having a
choice of attending four different subjects
throughout the school's two evening sessions.
The courses offered including their discus-
sion leaders were: "Pure Pak Operations" -
Miami based Tex Horton of Excello Corpora-
tion and Gus Willett of International Paper;
"Preventive Maintenance" Edward L.
Floyd, Jr. and Dave Eden, Creamery Package
Division, St. Regis Paper, Atlanta;
"Leucocytes" Hugh Butner, Florida State
Board of Health; "Flavors of Milk" Howard
Young, University of Florida; "Ice Cream"
W. A. Krienke, University of Florida.
"Clean-In-Place Systems" Bob Griffin,
Klenzade Products, Miami; "Processing Fluid


Milk" Sam McDugald, T.G. Lee Dairy,
Orlando; and "The Legal Aspects of Milk" -
Dick Jolly, Florida Department of Agri-
culture, and Austin Graham, Florida State
Board of Health.
Dairies represented from West Palm Beach,
Fort Lauderdale, and Miami included Alfar,
Borden's, Dade County Dairies, Farm Stores,
Foremost, Home Milk, McArthur, Expert
Dairy Service, Puritan, Sealtest, Super Brand,
Velda Farms, Howard Johnson, and Inde-
pendent Dairy Farms Association.
Serving on the planning committee with
Chairman Henry Pilgrim were D.A. Hatcher,
Bruce Weatherford, J.T. Hammock, Dick
McCreanor, Dick Antel, Dale Graddy, Wayne
Gathers, Gordon B. Certain, Jr., Henry Cline,
Reed Heatharington, Henry Perner, Russ
Hlavsa, and Russ Sheffield.





































Hugh Butner, Florida State Board of Health, led the discussion on Leucocytes at the Dairy Plant Seminar.


Four front row participants during the general session at the dairy plant seminar were from left: Bob
Griffin, Klenzade Products; W. A. Krienke, Dairy Science Department, University of Florida; Dick Jolly,
Florida State Board of Health; and Howard Young, Extension specialist in Dairy Technology. Shown
second row right is Dick Holtzclaw of Diversey Corp.
















"FOR BETTER,

FOR WORSE-WHICH

SHALL IT BE?"

The Dade County Extension Home Eco-
I nomics Office brought the reality of marriage
into focus in a series of classes and discussions
for prospective brides, grooms, and newly-
weds.
The first session on "Establishing Family
Values" set the stage and included discussions
on the roots of a good marriage; in-laws; the
family life cycle; expectations of marriage;
and the valleys of life. Other sessions included
family economics and home management;
housing and home furnishings; meal planning,
preparation, and serving.
As the series progressed, it became evident
these young people felt confident of making
the personal adjustments in building a good
marriage but were more concerned with the
down-to-earth every day business of making
decisions and making ends meet. Many ques-
tions dealt with housing needs and family
economics such as:
"Should we rent a furnished or unfurnished
apartment?"
"We'd like to buy a home. Is it better to
make a small down payment and take a long
term mortgage or make a large down payment
and a short term mortgage?"
"With so many demands in setting up
housekeeping, can we afford to save?"
"We expect to be transferred in two to
Three years, would a mobile home be our best
solution?"
"How much should we spend for food?"
All sessions gave practical guidelines and



















ii


factors to be considered in making the best
decision.
At the end of the series, the couples
evaluated the series. Some of the comments
were:
"We think every couple should have this
opportunity. Next time, advertise on campus,
University of Miami, Dade Junior College and
Barry."
"It's more important to know how to
decide these things than what pattern to
select in china and crystal."
Suggested topics for further sessions in-
cluded family records; filing income tax
returns; the cost and maintenance of auto-
mobiles; home care, repair, and remodeling.
It goes without saying, the second annual
course for brides and grooms is in the
planning stage.
Roger Post and Patty Patterson, graduates of the
Newlywed Course became Mr. and Mrs. Roger Post in
the summer of 1968. These pictures depict skills they
learned in the course.
1. Patty beams with pride at the job Roger has done
refinishing their table to help reduce the cost of
furnishing their apartment.
2. Patty designed and made her wedding gown. Here
she shows it converted to a lovely after 5 or special
occasion dress.
3. The Post s avoid monthly ills from unpaid bills by
practicing their good money management skills.
4. What's cooking? The Post s realize the value of
good nutrition in the preparation of family meals.
5. From This ... To This . Roger demonstrates
how to correctly fold a contour sheet.


~ji~ a la;uci


tS




4















5














JORDAN MARSH AUDITORIUM


PRESIDING

Richard M. Hunt
Assistant Marketing Agent


10:00 A.M. ......... .......... .. ......... .


WELCOME


FACTORS AFFECTING PRODUCTION COST
OF VEGETABLES


Nolan L. Durre ..--


Associate County Agent


INTERRELATIONSHIP OF AGRICULTURAL
PRODUCERS, PROCESSORS AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES

Jack Cornelius ............... Grower, Processor, Businessman



FACTORS AFFECTING COST OF POULTRY
AND EGG PRODUCTION

Roy J. Champagne ................... Associate County Agent



SOURCES OF CREDIT

C. Ellis Clark
Vice President and Agricultural Consultant
First National Bank
Miami



12:00 Noon ................ .......................... .... LUNCHEON










Courtesy

Dade County Farm Bureau


PRESIDING

F. S. Perry
District Agent
Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida


1:00 P. M..


-...--......... ...-.......... RECONVENE


THE ROLE OF CAPITAL IN A HIGHLY
CAPITALIZED AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY

Dr. K. R. Tefertiller
Chairman, Department of Agricultural Economics
College of Agriculture
University of Florida


ECONOMIC TRENDS IN THE SUBTROPICAL
FRUIT INDUSTRY

Seymour Goldweber
Associate County Agent


FINANCING NEEDS IN AGRICULTURE'S
ALLIED INDUSTRIES

Henry R. Pridgen
Executive Vice President and Manager
F. E. C. Fertilizer Company

AVAILABILITY OF FINANCING FOR AGRICULTURE

PANEL

Charles B. Long, Jr.
Manager of Miami's Production Credit Association
and Federal Land Bank Association


Patrick H. Hannan
Vice President
D. R. Mead Company


C. Ellis Clark
Vice President
Agricultural Consultant
First National Bank of Miami


MARCH 5, 1968


MIAMI, FLORIDA










Dade's agriculture is an important segment of the
County's total economic growth. Production value
each year is around $65 million and by the time the
products reach the consumer the value has increased
to approximately $225 million. More than 22,000
residents work in agriculture or one of agriculture's
allied industries. Over $50 million is spent by our
local farmers and growers purchasing goods and
services from agricultural business firms.
With the advent of improved technology and
mechanization, capital has become a very important
segment of the agricultural industry, making agricul-
ture in the last decade a highly capitalized industry.
Realizing this, the Dade County Agricultural
Department initiated, with the support of agricultural
and financial leaders in the community, an Agri-
culture-Agribusiness Finance Seminar.
The objective of this seminar was to bring together
individuals from the agricultural, agribusiness and
financial worlds to a meeting in which each group
could discuss their methods of doing business and
relate to each other the problems that exist. It was
hoped that through this exchange of ideas a better


"In my opinion, however biased it may be, no
other business requires basic knowledge in so many
fields as does today's farming. The successful farmer
of today must have a working knowledge of horti-
culture, plant pathology, agronomy, entomology,
meteorology, machinery (including use and mainte-
nance), organizational ability, labor procurement,
cost accounting and modern bookkeeping. He must
also have a knowledge of marketing and processing
his crops so they will be acceptable to our major food
chains that are staffed by young college graduates
who aren't very sympathetic to the many hazards
that affect the quality of our products, but only
know they want the very best obtainable at a price
leaving room for a profit."
Ellis Clark, Vice President and Agricultural Con-
sultant of the largest bank in Florida, the First
National Bank of Miami, elaborated on the sources
of agricultural credit and he listed the three "C's" of
credit: character, capacity, and collateral. He also
covered in detail the many sources of credit not only
with banks but with insurance companies, life insur-
ance companies, Production Credit Associations,


FINANCE SEMINAR


understanding and working relationship could be
developed among these three groups. Most of all it
was hoped that an awareness of financial opportu-
nities and programs that are available could be
brought to their attention.
Jack Cornelius, who is a producer, banker and has
interests in many allied industries, made the following
comments at the seminar:
"Agriculture has changed so radically in Dade
County within the last 20 years that it would be
unrecognizable to someone who knew it only as it
was then and before. Mechanization has replaced
manpower in every way possible making full use of
technology and resources of many of America's
largest corporations as well as some of our greatest
universities. We believe that the next 20 years will see
changes as radical and progressive as the past 20
years. Men in agriculture and agribusiness believe that
we can, and must, keep for America that which is one
of this Country's greatest heritages, a bountiful food
supply at reasonable prices. Cost squeeze is a way of
life with us and we either prevail or fall by the
wayside. There is no room in agriculture for incom-
petents to survive financially. Only the very best
survive, and the very best who are willing to work
harder, plan more thoroughly, and execute those
plans without hesitation can possibly have a history
of progress and profit.


Farm Credit Administration, Federal Land Bank and
many other outlets.
He quoted figures showing that Florida banks paid
much less in agricultural loans when compared with
banks in the rest of the Nation. Mr. Clark also went
into some detail as to what farmers need to know
when applying for credit with a financial institution.
"Bankers have an opportunity to provide leader-
ship in stabilizing sound, physical responsibility in
agricultural credit," said Henry Pridgen, Vice Presi-
dent and Manager of the Florida East Coast Fertilizer
Company.
It was generally felt by all present that the
information covered in this seminar will greatly
enhance the cooperation between these various
segments of our agricultural community. As one
producer said, "We now have more of an under-
standing of the problems that our financial people
encounter, and I am sure that now they understand
more of our problems. Maybe with this greater
understanding and knowledge, we can produce a
more efficient system of transacting business between
us."
The Dade County Agricultural Department is
planning to hold more of these type seminars in the
future so that all involved can be informed of each
other's programs and keep up to date in this
everchanging world.














'WHAT


CAN


I DO?'


.... OVER 300 ATTEND


People are asking, "What can I do?"
The crime rate in the city of Miami increased 16
percent during the first six months of 1968 according
to F.B.I. statistics. Firearms were used in 61 percent
of all known robberies, as compared to 34 percent for
the same period in 1967 according to the report of a
prominent Miami newspaper.
"Safety from Crime", was an appropriate theme
for the Annual Homemakers' Seminar which at-
tracted some 300 persons to the Dadeland Jordan-
Marsh Auditorium. The women were there to obtain
information which might help them to avoid bur-
glary, robbery, or personal attack. It was the aim of
the home economics staff to provide a greater feeling
of personal security when in the home or on the
streets of cities.
A policewoman from the Miami Police Department
urged women to be prepared in advance. She.stressed
the point that anyone might be a potential victim.
Loud screaming is a woman's best weapon if out
alone at night, a loud whistle might be carried in case
a woman is too frightened to scream, since carrying
defense weapons is dangerous because an attacker
may use them against a woman. Also included were
tips for driving alone, what to do if actually attacked,












and safety ideas for women living alone.
A detective discussed the various types of burglars
and their mode of operation. He itemized careless
habits which invite burglary. It was shown that many
locks and windows are easily opened. For example, a
chain lock can be opened quietly with a paper clip,
rubber band, and an adhesive-type tape.
Outdoor protective lighting was presented by a
home economist from Florida Power and Light
Company. Services of the company were offered for
planning lighting for the individual homeowner
through consultation with a home economist at the
home site.
A lock expert of Allied Security Services, Inc.
pointed out that the burglar's greatest fears are light,
noise, and time. These factors were considered in his
elaboration on locks, alarms, and timing devices. An
exhibit included various types of dead bolt locks,
protective grills, sliding glass door locks, and burglar
alarms.
Printed material was made available to supplement
the program and provide for further study. The
presentation provided a variety of knowledge for the
individual homemaker to use to help protect herself
and her family in a specific environment.


Policewoman Terry Hunter talked about safety while
driving, when walking, in the home, and personal
appearance and behavior.


Dead bolt locks, alarms, protective screening and grills are demonstrated
by David M. Weinstein, (left) President of Allied Security Services.
Looking on are Policewoman Terry Hunter; Peggy Henderson, Florida
Power and Light; and Detective Sergeant John Dowda, Miami Police
Department.







Over the past ten years 52 scholarships of $225.00
each totaling $11,800.00 have been awarded 44 first
time winners and eight repeat winners. Awarded to
Dade County graduating high school seniors, the
applicants expressed a desire to pursue college study
in agriculture, home economics, and related fields.
Having been sponsored for ten years by the
Agricultural Council of the Miami-Dade Chamber of
Commerce, the program will be continued by the
newly organized Dade County AGRI-Council.
Cooperating agencies include the Agricultural Exten-
sion Service, Dade County Youth Fair, and the
Vocational Agriculture and Home Economics De-
partments.
In order to qualify for a scholarship the applicant
must meet the following requirements: (a) be a high
school graduate from a Dade County School, (b) be
scholastically worthy, (c) in need of financial aid, (d)
show a desire and interest in entering some field
related to agriculture and home economics based on
extra-curricular activities, letters of recommendation,
scholastic endeavors, and personal desire.
The value of the scholarship program is reflected
by the following examples of scholarship winners
who have made effective use of the awards toward
achieving their chosen career.
Harry Womack, a winner in 1964 is now attending
Auburn University in Alabama, pursuing a Doctorate


in Agriculture."
Marie Heon is at present a sophomore student at
Barry College. She is specializing as a dietitian. Marie
won two scholarships, Dade County Agricultural and
Florida Dietetics Association Scholarship, November
1968.
Jon Rackley, a student at Miami-Dade Junior
College attended Broward County Junior College for
one-half year. He plans to graduate from Miami-Dade
Junior College with an Associate Degree then enter
the University of Florida in the fall and continue his
education in ornamental horticulture.
Anthony Battillo attended Miami-Dade Junior
College for one year. His comments are, "I truly
appreciate the scholarship, but I feel that many
students aren't aware of this type of program."
Ira T. McClure, at present in the U.S. Army,
attended Miami-Dade Junior College and Broward
Junior College. Plans to re-enter school with further
education in the Army in meat inspection, or other
related fields of agriculture.
Marcia Swan, a 1964 winner, attended Purdue
University for four years, received her Bachelor of
Science degree in Home Economics. Presently she is
employed as a Home Economist for Anheuser-Busch,
Inc. She says, "The scholarship was of great benefit
to me both for the money and the interest of the
Chamber of Commerce in my field. I have often felt


"CAREER SCHOLARSHIPS"

in Poultry Parasitology. He attended Miami-Dade there is a great lack of public and agriculture-career-
Junior College, University of Georgia and now is student knowledge of what is really happening in
attending Auburn University. He received numerous agriculture and the people in it." She emphasized that
awards and honors and commented that scholarships greater public relations and education is needed to let
most definitely benefited him in reaching his present students know how, when, and where these scholar-
status as a graduate student. He states, "I hope you ships are available.
continue your practice of giving these scholarships to Susan Bea Brown, a 1964 winner, attended Florida
worthy and needy students. I received your assistance
at a time when it was sorely needed and intend to
repay the confidence you have shown in me by a
career in research of problems related to the poultry
industry."
Margaret Cross, a 1961 winner, attended Florida
State University for four years and received the
Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics. She
commented that scholarships do benefit in reaching
goals in education. She is presently employed as a
department manager in fashion merchandising. She
states that she became acquainted with the scholar-
ship program through her Home Economics agent.
Richard Cahill, a 1967 winner, attended Miami-
Dade Junior College for one year and at present is
attending Lake City Junior College and Forest Ranger
School.
Maurice Ennis attended two years at the University
of Florida, but did not continue his education in
agriculture. He received other training in the U.S.
Army. At present he is an Insurance Agent in
Gainesville. His comments were, "If I had continued
my college education it would have been for a degree







State University two years and University of Georgia
two years. She attained a Bachelor of Science of
Home Economics in Education and attended Loie's
School of Modeling and Coronet Modeling Academy.
She is presently employed as a Home Economics
teacher in Atlanta, Georgia. Plans to begin work on
her masters degree in the summer.


Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Jr., a 1960 winner and a
repeat recipient, attended the University of Florida
and Auburn University for seven years. He received
his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, graduated "Cum
Laude", and was a recipient of Auburn University
President's Award for most outstanding student in
the school of Veterinary Medicine, the Merck Veter-
inary Award for outstanding work in the school of
Veterinary Medicine and was on the Dean's list six
times. Phi Zeta Honorary, Dr. Franklin is now in
private practice as an equine practitioner in Dade
County. He commented that the scholarships he
received were definitely a help to him in reaching his
present position in life.
Donald P. Kinnan, a 1959 winner, attended four
years of college, and received a Bachelor of Science
degree in Livestock Production and Meats. Other
education at Ursinus College, Loyola College of
Baltimore and University of Maryland in Social
Studies. His comments were, "It was because of
scholarship funds that I was able to achieve my
degree." At present he is serving in Viet-Nam as a
Captain in Military Intelligence.
Charlene Bogert Csinicsek won in 1961. She
received a Bachelor of Science degree in Home
Economics and achieved Gamma Alpha Chi National
Honorary. Further training was received with Allied
Stores Executive Training. Although she is not at


present employed, she rates the field of agriculture in
very high esteem.
Ondina Dale, a 1958 scholarship winner and a
Home Economics major is now teaching in the Dade
County Public School System.
John Womack, a 1959 winner and a repeat
recipient is now employed by the U.S. Department of


Agriculture as a statistician for the U.S. Census
Bureau.
Michael Michelson, a 1960 winner and a graduate
major in Pesticide Residue is completing his Doctor-
ate degree toward a career in agriculture to help
protect the health of people all over the world.
Harry Howard Samol, a 1961 winner is now
employed as an Entomologist with the U.S. Sugar
Corp., Clewiston, Florida.
Alvin E. Helms, Jr., a 1959 winner, was employed
as a statistician for the Market News Bureau in
Orlando, Florida, at last known address.
In 1968 there were twenty-one applicants and ten
scholarship winners. These are listed below and the
college they are now attending.
Carole Rebecca Burr, Florida State University
Mary M. Hudak, Miami-Dade Junior College
Audrey Jo Wildman, Miami-Dade Junior College
Alice Louise Kershaw, Miami-Dade Junior College
Gary DeVon Cason, Miami-Dade Junior College
Paul Andrew Miller, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural
College, Tifton, Georgia
Raymond W. Bishop, University of Florida, Gainesville
Robert L. Goode, University of Florida, Gainesville
Michael G. Miller, Miami-Dade Junior College
Susan Joyce Masso, Miami-Dade Junior College,
and entered Florida State University, Tallahassee
in December, 1968.











COCONUT GROVE CARES: Training for Volunteer Teaches Course Outline


I. Home Making Top Interest for Women
Science and Management Applied -
(1) Being well dressed
(2) Test for Money Manager
(3) Filmstrip "How to Save 30 Minutes A
Day"
(4) Making Decisions Describe Process or
Steps
(5) Assemble Packet
I. Personal Management
(1) Time and Energy
(2) Money and Budgets Filmstrip -
"Your Money and You"
(3) How to Buy Filmstrip "Be A Good
Shopper"
(4) Demonstration and Folow up practice
(5) Attire and Grooming
m. Housekeeping Skills
A. Home Care Schedule and Methods
Demonstrations and Filmstrip -
(1) Living Area Dry Suds & Upholstery -
Filmstrip: "4 Steps to Carpet Beauty"
(2) Sleeping Area General Steps "Making
the Bed"
(3) Kitchen & Dining Cleaning Steps Range-


Refrigerator, etc. "Setting the Table".
B. Bathrooms
IV. Home Care
Miscellaneous:
A. Floor Care and other surfaces
B. Use of equipment
C. Special home problems: Metals, Furn-
iture Care, etc.
D. Home Laundry
V. Homemaking Specials
1. Home Care of the Sick and Aged
2. Child Care
A. Baby sitting
B. Special Problems: Exceptional children
at home. Elderly persons at home.
3. Home Safety and First Aid
VI. Miscellaneous
1. Understanding Social Security
2. Evaluation
(1) Some type check list OR
(2) Write short description of most profit-
able experience
3. Discussion
Plans to use training


"EXTENSION CARES THAT COCONUT GROVE CARES"


Extension Home Economics is enlisted to explore
"Coconut Grove Cares" resources and to become
involved in a training program to implement the plans
and work of the committee on employment.
"Coconut Grove Cares" represents a group of
dedicated community leaders, citizens and residents
who have recruited an impressive list of nineteen
cooperating organizations and churches of the area,
one of the oldest in the County, to develop and
support an active program for the improvement of
living conditions within this defined area.
The broad scope of their concern encompasses
education, employment, law and order and legal
problems.
Education for improved personal living is the
goal, and to provide for the development of
marketable skills among young women in this special
project. Consideration is given to the needs of school
drop-outs, those with limited formal training and
those who need to increase or supplement their
finances.
The approach to meeting these needs resulted in
a comprehensive Extension course for volunteer
teachers. This course was outlined to provide
methods and information which these volunteers
would use as an instructor's guide with their future
classes.
Eleven women enrolled for the initial class of
volunteers subsequently making up the corp of


volunteer teachers for "Coconut Grove Cares"
coordinated by Mrs. Van Jones, also a volunteer.
The teacher's course was divided into six
two-hour sessions, held in the Home Economics
classroom and laboratory of the Carver High
Community School. Suggested teaching methods
were presented as well as information and other
materials to be used in effective teaching. Each
teacher session provided materials to be organized by
the teacher for that topic into three or four shorter
classes for their enrollees.
After an evaluation, certificates were presented
to nine volunteer teachers who had successfully
completed the Extension Home Economics Course in
cooperation of the community project; "Coconut
Grove Cares".
Their first class for young women of the area
began with an enrollment of fourteen interested
youngsters. As their work continued, space was found
to include other topics as suggested by the girls to
meet their needs.
The dedicated efforts of the volunteer teachers
and their coordinator have aroused an awareness of
the need for such training and have also fulfilled a
need for community action.
The continued involvement of Extension Home
Economics as a community resource with help and
support for this special community project shows
that "Extension Cares that Coconut Grove Cares".


Il I a



































"A SUCCESSFUL

GROVE IS BORN"


In 1947 Captain Malcolm Drake and his wife,
Margaret, started planting avocado seeds as the
beginning of an avocado grove. Captain Drake is a
well-known fishing boat skipper.
Of ten acres in South Dade purchased in 1947, he
planted five acres the following year after having the
land properly scarified and cross trenched to receive
the trees. The initial planting was of grafted trees of
the varieties: Lula, Booth 7 and 8, Pollock, Waldin,
Hall, Choquette and Simmonds. He has since
topworked the Lulas to Black Prince and the Booth
7's and 8's to Pollocks.
Beginning in 1951 and for the first few years,
Captain Drake sold his fruit to local outlets in Miami
and on Miami Beach. For a while after the Avocado
Marketing Order went into effect in 1954, he sold all
his fruit to local handlers. Today he handles the
marketing of all his fruit through a New York broker.
In 1960 with the help of the County Extension
personnel, Captain Drake began a program of
fertilizing with high nitrogen materials along with tree
pruning for better management and production.
A few years later on recommendation of the
Extension personnel, he increased his applications of
nutritional sprays with emphasis on the use of zinc.
The additional zinc was recommended because
varieties such as Waldin were decreasing in yield with
some rosetting of terminals, but more important was
an increased number of misshapen fruit.
In 1964 Captain Drake planted the remaining five
acres of his ten-acre block with the varieties of
Monroe, Hall and Black Prince. Trouble developed in
this young planting and resulted in moderate to
severe iron deficiency symptoms on about 50 percent


of the young trees. Following our recommendation to
use chelated iron and ammonium sulphate, the
problem cleared up and the trees have been growing
well since.
Captain Drake side dresses his initial planting
two or three times annually with ammonium
sulphate. His overall average yield is better than three
bushels per tree per year. This is considerably higher
than the 2.5 bushels per tree per year average that
most growers would be pleased to have.
The Drakes have a vertically integrated operation.
They do not use any outside labor. With his wife,
Margaret, and his mother, Mrs. Walter Drake, doing
most of the packing, the captain does all of the
picking. The family operates as a completely
self-sufficient producer, handler and shipper;
marketing all their fruit through the one broker in
New York.
Captain Drake's selection of varieties was not
only for his own convenience, since he is completely
tied up with his profession during the winter months,
but he has most of his fruit harvested prior to the
peak of the hurricane season.
















4-H CAMF CLOVERLEAF
BOYS f GIRLS
Building Tomorrows
Leaders Thlrouh 4-H
















Dade County 4-H boys camped this past
year with Broward and Palm Beach Counties.
Seventy-five percent of the campers were
from 9 through 12 years of age, and for most
it was their first experience of being away
from home and parents.
One of the greatest values of camping lies
in helping one live and get along with others.
Camping emphasizes the value of coopera-
tion and supplements the training that boys
and girls get at home, in school, and through
their local 4-H clubs.
Dade County boys and girls are given the
responsibility for their own camp planning.
They come to realize all the things that they
must do and the time needed to do them. For


"4-H CAMP"

example, they clean their sleeping quarters,
make their beds, assist in the serving of meals,
and wash dishes after meals.
The normal camp functions of craft
classes, swimming, campfire, flag raising, sing-
ing and playing of games for just plain fun is
as much of 4-H Camp as in any other camp.
Many of the Dade County boys responded
to training and received their Intermediate
Swimming Card from the Red Cross. Others
took classes in judo, karate, and self-defense.
And a special feature this year was a class in
photography where the campers were taught
how to take pictures, actually developing
negatives in a make-shift darkroom and then,
using photographic equipment and chemicals,
made the photographic print from the
negatives.
A camp counselor system where older 4-H


members stay in the cabins and are respons-
ible for 4-H activities is an invaluable ex-
perience in learning how to work with people
and understand group dynamics. This year
three older Dade County 4-H boys, with a
number of years of 4-H camp experience
literally ran the camp for an entire week. It
showed that the boys had learned their
lessons well over the past few years.
Dade County 4-H girls filled three weekend
spring camps in Broward County at Hugh
Taylor Birch Park on the ocean. In addition,
there were almost as many to attend four
days during the summer at 4-H Camp
Cloverleaf.
It was an inspiration -as well as marvelous
entertainment to see and hear the skits by
cabins following twenty-four hours notice of
a common theme.
The 4-H club girls listened attentively to
personal experiences related by a Safety
Officer of The Florida Highway Patrol, each
hearing a lesson in personal protection.
One delightful dinner was the individually
prepared kabob of Florida seafood and
vegetables sponsored by the Board of
Conservation.
Demonstrations were highlighted by one
member who properly packed sixty-four
items for camp in a makeup kit. To top it all,
when she removed them one by one, fellow
members chanted, "Pack them back in, pack
them back in!" She accepted the challenge
and replaced them though she had learned
only one hour earlier the method to use.
Campers represented 4-H clubs from all
areas of the County including the Miccosukee
Indian Club. It is hoped more will take
advantage of the privilege next year.











DADE COUNTY'S NATIONAL 4-H WINNER


GAIL HAMILTON


Gail Hamilton is a national 4-H winner in the 4-H Home Economics-Consumer
Education Program awarded at the National 4-H Club Congress in Chicago.
The award is a (,0.00 scholarship provided by Montgomery Ward.







...At Sfaeca Salute to ade Ceout 4-'W tember


Who Atre 1968 FSrida StaAte 4-D WSiner...


SPECIAL AWARDS


MARGARET ROLANDO JAMES BERNECKER
National 4-H Conference National 4-H Conference
Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C.


MARY HUDAK
Banker's Scholarship


WINNERS TO NATIONAL 4-H CLUB CONGRESS AT CHICAGO
'Z;' "


GAIL HAMILTON


RICHARD REECE


ROSEMARIE ROLANDO


OTHER AWARDS


THERESA FRANZO JANE FRANZO


ANN WILEY MICHAEL HUDAK


FOOD & NUTRITION TEAM THERESA AND JANE FRANZO
EGG JUDGING TEAM MARGARET AND ROSEMARIE ROLANDO, EVELYN FRANZO, AND ROBERT ANDERSON
ELECTRIC & LAMP PROGRAM MICHAEL HUDAK
VETERINARY SCIENCE ANN WILEY PUBLIC SPEAKING JAMES BERNECKER
POULTRY JUDGING MARGARET ROLANDO























TIME STUDY

DAYS DEVOTED TO HELPING
PEOPLE MAKE DECISIONS


Agricultural Production, Management, and
Natural Resource Development
Farm Business, Organization Development and Man-
agem ent . . . . . . . . . . .
Prevention and Control of Plant and Animal
Diseases, Insects, Weeds, and Other Pests . . .
Soil and Water Management, Conservation, Natural
Disasters and Civil Defense . . . . . .
Management of Crops, Livestock, Poultry, Equip-
ment and other capital items . . . . . .
Agricultural and Horticultural Problems of home-
owners and part-time farmers . . . . . .
Other activities concerning production, manage-
ment and resource development . . . . .
Sub-total ...... ... .... ... ..

Marketing and Utilization of Farm Products
Marketing principles and methods . . . . .

Grading, packing, storing and quality maintenance
of agricultural products .. . ..........
Development and improvement of marketing
organizations, firms and facilities . . . . .
Consumer information on agricultural commodities
Other activities concerning marketing and utilization
Sub-total .......... ........

Home Economics
Foods and nutrition .. . ............
Clothing and textiles ........
Housing, household equipment and furnishings .
Human relations and child development . . .
Home management and home industry . . .
Health, safety and civil defense .. .......
Other family living and home economics subjects .
Sub-total . . . . . . . .


177

308

271

311

242

110
1,419


85


83

102
18
91
379


1,378


Resource Development and Public Affairs
Organizing and working with resource development
organizations, agencies and other groups . . 86
Work with State, county and local government
groups on resource development and public affairs 123
Planning and preparation of resource development
and public affairs material and supervising and
administering public affairs programs ...... .. 83
Sub-total ................... 292

Days Devoted to:
Adult Work . . . . . . . ... 2,903
Youth Work . . . . . . ..... 565
In-Service Training (Staff) . . . .... .. 191
TOTAL DAYS WORKED 3,468


Studies of Problems and Opportunities
Field Trials, Tests and Demonstrations
Consultations Providing Information to


1,077
858


Individuals


and Families . . . . . . . .. .. 55,639
Consultations providing Information to Organiza-
tions and Agencies ................. 35,515
News Articles . . . . . . . .... 1,684
Radio Programs . . . . . . . ... 5,328
Television Programs . . . . . . ... 1,046
Publications Distributed . . . . . .... 410,808
Direct Mail Distributed . . . . . .... 463,896
Meetings to plan and develop programs . . . 388
Attendance . . . . . . . ... 8,026
Training Meetings for Leaders . . . .... .. 184
Leaders trained . . . . . . ... 4,569
Other meetings and activities at which County
Extension information was presented ...... .. 3,136
Attendance . . . . . . . ... 232,087
4-H Club members . . . . . . ... 1,136
Other Youth involved in Direct extension training
programs . . . . . . . .. . ... 88,845
4-H Club Project Work:
Individuals with agricultural projects . . 311
Individuals with other 4-H projects ...... .. 1,822
Youth reached through special teen-age nutri-
tion programs . . . . . . . .... 328
Adult Leaders working with youth programs . 283








AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Develops and provides
agricultural information of
interest to the general
public, homeowners, busi-
ness and tourists. Dis-
seminates public affairs
information that is close-
ly related to agriculture
in cooperation with coun-
ty, state and federal gov-
ernments.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCA-
TION AND ADVISORY
SERVICES

Provides a planned pro-
gram of agricultural edu-
cation and advisory serv-
ices to the people includ-
ing activities in all
pleases of production, pro-
c- sing 9fid marketing of
a, ricultural products.


YOUTH PROGRAMS- YOUTH PROGRAMS-
BOYS GIRLS


YOUTH PROGRAMS OFFICE

Character development and good
citizenship are long range goals of
the youth program in urban ,sub-
urban and rural areas. Provides
training to youth in agriculture,
home economics and related areas.
Mental, physical, social and spirit-
ual growth is emphasized. Coordi-
nates 4-H Club projects and activi-
ties. Gives career guidance and
other assistance to youth interested
in agricultural and home economics
subjects.


HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION

Extension Home Econom-
ics develops and provides
a planned program to help
people in all areas of
family living Consumer
Education, Home Manage-
ment, Family Economics,
Family Life Education,
Health and Safety Educa-
tion, Foods and Nutrition,
Clothing and Textiles and
related areas. Assists
with problems related to
subtropical living. Pro-
vides opportunities for
personal growth and de-
velopment of leaders.


HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Serves as a resource for
Home Economics Informa-
tion. Cooperates with re-
lated community agencies
for improvement of health,
safety and recreation.
Keeps homemakers In-
formed on matter of local
interest, government and
public affairs pertaining
to families, and encour-
ages the exercise of citi-
zenship responsibilities.


OFFICE OF THE COUNTY AGENT

Formulates and interprets policies and procedures
and has administrative responsibility for planning,
developing and carrying out a coordinated Agricul-
tural Extension Service program in cooperation with
the University of Florida and U. S. Department of
Agriculture. Technically supervises the agricul-
tural program.


AGRICULTURAL OFFICE

Provides information and educational services to
all areas of agricultural and horticultural interests
--production, processing, marketing, supply and
service. Services extend to commercial producers,
agri-business firms, homeowners and governmental
agencies. Provides youth training and guidance in
agriculture. Initiates surveys and studies and pre-
pares reports to encourage development of agricul-
tural resources.


EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS OFFICE



The office provides advisory and edu-
cational information in all phases of home eco-
nomics related to family living, through interpreta-
tion and application of this information.


I











DADE COUNTY AGRI-

COUNCIL ORGANIZED
The Dade County AGRI-Council was orga-
nized this year following the reorganization of
the Dade County Chamber of Commerce
which dissolved the old agricultural division.
The AGRI-Council will serve to unite the
growers, researchers, professional agricultur-
ists, suppliers, and all others allied in agri-
culture. .
Will sponsor and encourage a better under-
standing among all those in agriculture,
promote educational programs, and sponsor
programs and activities that will be of general
benefit to all phases of agriculture. .
Will work for the development, improve-
ment, and prosperity of agriculture and the
people in Dade County. .
And will assist and promote, by the united
efforts and cooperation of the council mem-
bers, the social, educational, moral, and
cultural development of Dade County,
Florida.
A few scenes from the charter luncheon are
pictured here.


Dr. E.T. York, Jr., left, Provost for
Agriculture, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences,University of
Florida is presented a plaque by
Dade County Agent, John D.
Campbell, providing honorary
membership in the AGRI-Council.


Charles Wakeman displays a copy
of the AGRI-Council charter.


Ed Mitchell, left, prominent Dade County grove owner holds Dade County
AGRI-Council honorary membership plaque presented to Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture Doyle Conner, center. At right, Art Calvert, regional director for the
Department of Agriculture's Miami office served as charter president of the newly
formed AGRI-Council.






























Dr. York was one of the main
speakers.


Bill Krome during a
thoughtful moment.


State Senator Lee Weissenborn, left, and Ellis Clark, Vice-President, First
National Bank of Miami shared a table during the charter luncheon.
















Abney Cox, Dade potato
grower and Miss Sunflavor.




MARSTON SCIENCE LIBRARY


, Due


SCENES FROM GROUND
BREAKING CEREMONIES
AND CONSTRUCTION OF
SOUTH DADE AGRICUL-
TURAL CENTER.......






"R I-- Wo RA
DADE
AVA t COUNTY
Dade -County sVicii turi6 *-44t of the o6onomy, of''tho- cbunty" State and Nation. The
leads in the _$tateof-'F h
le:PrOL, imes, avocados,, mmgoes, tomatoes and pole beans
fo r fresh market. AccordiAif fiy. e,, ttpn received 'Vl'e"Jt _,.Jojjja Dade County tank-ed nationally as follow : fourth
in tomatoes and s all vegetables
MW V I L tenth in -Value-of ornapentals, 37th in
highest pdtato All film-products sold. About W,00,WO is received annually by.
-'fwm f eof I then A W t6 --b6*ev thjjLiS
farmers he-W eti only a portion of, thie bv,04 value of agriculture to
Dade, C644ty-',s tqWeqoIWr4y..,.I Ja -,of dollors are genetated each througb the arketing and.
dist4bu46n if gikul6il m
In addition, farmers purchageLgoods and services from agri-
$40,000,00 annually. More:than 23,M residents of Dade Co", ty-
busiams'fims i6,O=egiof,
work in engaged 'n agrie- idtar, Appraximatel y 9,0P0,migrant workers. we -seasonal produc,:
ion andMarketiog operation.
tJVLTfJAAL IKXPCPIM rWr ST T1049 ArRICV.TURAL EXTENSION SKRYME
COLLE4r ACPKULT04t A SCROOL. Or FdRE4"y
INSTITUTE FOOD AND AGRICULTWRAL ScIENC
DADECOUf4TY AGMCULTURAL AGENT'S OFPICE ...:FLORID.A.-AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION: S t RVIC E.






CHART I

1944-64, PRODUCTION VALUES

DADE COUNTY MkICULTURE


F1 VE YEAR AVERAGE$
49-54 59-64

41000) ($1000)


vegetabi as 20, zu! 30,171
"'A
F ruit 1, 79 1, 3 190

Dairy 9,628 2,3411"


Hortlvl ture 2,558


8411 :t 4,107
,z

L ivest Qrk "2

oilm



Total 36, 114,' 5Z


limo, cmj iiqoos; rodt"'btho fiv, t
I'mc I ud 0 s hate herics,' st*rting In *0,6060 of jqV6 $7.












N


coci3w$ukivE gx-rrK3JI0N WpMtt IN XQPtIcuLTTjMK AND 140ME GCO140MICS.
A rATK o rtopeivA toL- tag or AGttttjL.TuwE, YMWR8II'v ft"M I A,
IJUITXD STATE$ DtPARTK4tMT air AGUICULTURE. A%0 I 60A.K08,10P COWN-ry
C"PERATIP(4






CHART

AADE COUNTY", VECETABLE CROPS,

Al"Ev ANDf"W I VALIK

1964 65, OW,, YEAR


VA LUE



Torn woo*,, rosh i 0
P to COSS i nq 14,926

Potatoes, 5, 9 6

Palo 44*ns' 4,663

"WoA 1,674
St t rw" rri 0 s Jr
1,$93

Cocumbors 1,356

Sweet C*M 1,2ft

1,274

Snap Bows 0

'26 1
Ccgbbog*

Poo$, 17

Okra
-4,
M3


Total 33,9W

UJ#S lit"a b4kms, conto 0 escomfe,
lettuce cret",

OU RCES FOR THIS PU00 tlOtf,
V,"&D.A.'Fl6rid Cie and Livostoz
p k, *po"ing
tmvlc o, Orlando, Flord("
C",ty A iculturclAgent's OM 6
)ok)Aprk*tjn4 Ot"irs, &IV 1 13. t I
I ,4






CHARTm 1964 65 SEASON

TOTAL
FRUIT VALUE




L I imas


*Specigity frivit

tofh citrvg,





'Includes lychoo borhd$S, qv OF plop9l"s
sopo I d Mas.
Inthodas tnqelos doo

'TO Log

ANNUAL PRODUCT]" 4,4

QRt4An TAL'Ji"TIC:m111SE
5"

26 Fjoi**


A
FFL

4
F
4,736,$13
A
Ddiry on 4 d top"
Is Sqj 2.82 00

kT

ond goo all

FBMJTS (Cb--
(Shj" M 907 OW
3 30
A;66 2TH Cg6k 4tw
r '500
F6R;M Et4TKRft1j9J%$,
T6 4% OUCTIFOH V'At igg 'm
T4,L C $ 57,






CHARiT IM

FRITS VEGETABLES


SEAS V6EG ETARL
ENDING ACRAGE YALUB


1944-49 .44756
1949-54 *25-4




1961 26





1.965 s

Y.-QYa~r Aveip Y


A Z LT'V 4 -: .

* .. .i : .'... -.Ii
v


a AIvY.".
SEASON

VALE.


1944-49 *6,9i
19.4? 5 4 *9,


92,6 1


19.62' 2,211
1,63 ~~ 243.-l30
1964. 2.2 9Sj

r965 2,802072
* 5 yorn .Vevug*























































VIA ) AVERAGI

7i:r











































/ \X\/-\


I' YL-Lr-,


SI1


METROPOLITAN
DADE COUNTY
HOMESTEAD
AGRICULTURAL CENTER
A&lCuLTUi..L LhLtF r.iT[r
IPULI C W15 DE 0 Ill s
B(.L1IE1TURAL O1-1i'ljh


*..
$ .
," ..




.. . '. .
* :: .. ^**^'


\1 ",


A-, w


S77


*i A


orl\Z \-Z XdX


--+-~u;:E




































MIAMI OFFICE 2690 NAV 7 Avenue 3,3127
AGRICULI URE 635-1387
HOME ECONOMICS 635-8566
441 OFFICE 034-4400

HONIESTLA 1) OF FICE 187 10 SAV. 28S St 33030
ACRICULTURE 248-3-111
HOME ECONOMICS 24v,-3060




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs