• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 County commissioners
 University of Florida staff
 County agents
 Mrs. Helen B. Mactavish retire...
 Reaching the grass roots
 Lawn maintenance course
 The "at home" show
 Developing farm machinery...
 Four-H'ers serve in hospital
 Irrigation in Dade county
 Planning your retirement years
 Horse pastures
 Soil testing saves dollars
 ENP youth camp
 Four-H winners
 Time study
 Agricultural department
 Back Cover






Group Title: 1969, 1970 report
Title: 1969, 1970 report , Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094993/00001
 Material Information
Title: 1969, 1970 report , Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
Alternate Title: 1969 & 1970 report, Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department
Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department, 1969 and 1970 report
Physical Description: 27 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Dade County (Fla.) -- Agricultural & Home Economics Dept
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: 1970
Copyright Date: 1970
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural extension work -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: This report gives some examples of the various phases of extension work in Dade County.
General Note: Cover title.
Statement of Responsibility: Dade County Agricultural & Home Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094993
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436454427

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    County commissioners
        Page 1
    University of Florida staff
        Page 2
    County agents
        Page 3
    Mrs. Helen B. Mactavish retires
        Page 4
    Reaching the grass roots
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Lawn maintenance course
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The "at home" show
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Developing farm machinery operators
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Four-H'ers serve in hospital
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Irrigation in Dade county
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Planning your retirement years
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Horse pastures
        Page 19
    Soil testing saves dollars
        Page 20
    ENP youth camp
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Four-H winners
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Time study
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Agricultural department
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Page 28
Full Text
f36e DDE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & HOME ECONOMICS DEPT. m FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE


1969
REPORT
1970











CONTENTS


1969 & 1970 REPORT

DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL &

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT


COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ...... .... ..... ..... ............ 1
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STAFF ....... ....... ... .... ... ...... 2
COUNTY AGENTS ........................... .............. 3
MRS. HELEN B. MACTAVISH RETIRES ........ .................... 4
"REACHING THE GRASS ROOTS" .................. ............ 5
"LAWN MAINTENANCE COURSE" ........ ........................ 7
THE "AT HOME" SHOW ....... ........... ................... 9
"DEVELOPING FARM MACHINERY OPERATORS" .... ................ . 11
"FOUR-H'ers SERVE IN HOSPITAL" ............................... 13
"IRRIGATION IN DADE COUNTY" ..... .. ................. ....... 15
"PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT YEARS" ........................... 17
"HORSE PASTURES" ........................... .............. 19
"SOIL TESTING SAVES DOLLARS" ................................ 20
"ENP YOUTH CAMP" ...... ............ .. .............. .........21
FOUR-H WINNERS ....... ............................. .......... 23
TIME STUDY ........ ......................... ............. 25


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27


AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT .



















BOARD OF COUNTY

COMMISSIONERS &

COUNTY MANAGER














EARL J. CARROL SONNY DANSYEAR
COMMISSIONER COMMISSIONER


STEVEN P. CLARK RAY GOODE
MAYOR COUNTY MANAGER


MRS. JOYCE GOLDBERG
COMMISSIONER


ALEXANDER GORDON
COMMISSIONER
i I I


MnuvLuJ t. uncer
COMMISSIONER


HARDY R. MATHESON
COMMISSIONER


HARVEY I. REISEMAN BEN SHEPARD
COMMISSIONER COMMISSIONER










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD & AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE


STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
President, University of Florida


DR. JOE BUSBY
Dean
Cooperative Extension Service


DR. E.T. YORK, JR.
Provost for Agriculture
Institute of Food & Agriculture
Sciences, University of Florida


MRS. OLIVE L. MORRILL MR. FRANKLIN S. PERRY
Assistant Dean District Agent
Home Economics Programs Cooperative Extension Service
Cooperative Extension Service











DADE COUNTY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE

AGENTS IN AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS
1. John D. Campbell, County Extension Director; 2. Mrs. Runette Davis, Extension
Home Economics Agent; 3. Nolan L. Durre, Extension Agent Vegetables; 4. Roy J.
Champagne, Extension Agent Poultry; 5. Seymour Goldweber, Extension Agent -
Fruit Crops, Multi-County; 6. Louis J. Daigle, Extension Agent Ornamentals;
7. Joseph D. Dalton, Extension Agent Soils; 8. Richard M. Hunt, Extension Agent
- Marketing; 9. Ralph W. Moore, Extension Agent Communications & 4-H;
10. Miss Victoria M. Simpson, Extension Home Economics Agent; 11. Mrs. Justine L.
Bizette, Extension Home Economics Agent 4-H; 12. Mrs. Elizabeth D. Clark,
Extension Home Economics Agent ENP; 13. Miss Mary Alyce Holmes, Extension
Home Economics Agent; 14. Miss Dorothy A. Towers, Extension Home Economics
Agent; 15. Mrs. Grace R. Hauser, Extension Home Economics Agent ENP;
16. Mrs. Frances H. Little, Extension Home Economics Agent ENP; 17. Miss
Judy N. Thornberry, Extension Home Economics Agent ENP. 2


1 16 6'


15 1












"MRS. HELEN B. MACTAVISH RETIRES"


Mrs. Helen MacTavish, a native of Ohio,
attended Ohio Northern University, Merril-
Palmer School, and received her B.S. degree
from Ohio State University. She did study at
the graduate level at Michigan State Univer-
sity. Following college graduation, she taught
in the elementary grades and Vocational
Home Economics in Ohio. She served as
county Home Demonstration Agent in Ohio
for three years. In 1953 she joined the Florida
Agricultural Extension Service as Assistant
Home Demonstration Agent in Dade County.


In 1961 she was promoted to Associate Home
Demnostration Agent. In 1962 she assumed
responsibility for the Extension Home Eco-
nomics Program and staff in Dade County
when she was named County Extension Home
Economics Agent.
Mrs. MacTavish has made many contri-
butions through Home Economics programs
for youth and adults. The Extension Home
Economics program under Mrs. MacTavish's
leadership continued to broaden in scope and
depth to effectively serve the urban audience
in Dade County. She developed excellent
leadership among the women in Homemakers
Clubs and involved many other people in the
Extension Home Economics Program. She
worked to develop an effective program
which served specific audiences such as youth,
young families, senior citizens and the
disadvantaged. Numerous creative educational
methods were adapted and developed to serve
the varied audiences in the county. As a result
of Mrs. MacTavish's leadership, the Dade
County Extension Office is recognized within
the county as a center for consumer
information and education.
Mrs. MacTavish is an active member of
several professional organizations including:
Florida Association of Extension Home Eco-
nomics Agents, National Association of Exten-
sion Home Economists, American Home
Economics Association and Florida Home
Economics Association. She is also a member
of several civic and community organizations
and served in a leadership role with these
organizations. She was recipient of the Distin-
guished Service Award of the National Associ-
ation of Extension Home Economists. O





"REACHING THE GRASS ROOTS"








*
C. .
i'



I~ i









Seldom has a new program been initiated
and mobilized any quicker than the Expanded
Nutrition Program (ENP). Within 90 days of
the first announcement, 20 non-professional
Extension Program Aides were trained in
Dade County and then were in the homes of
low income families teaching nutrition. This
was in 1969. In 1970 the program was
expanded further utilizing 10 additional Aides.
ENP Aides were recruited from poverty
neighborhoods where the work is conducted.
Many of them were removed from welfare as
a result of their employment as ENP Aides.
The program is coordinated in Dade
County by two Extension Home Economics
Agents. Aides are first given three weeks of
intensive training in nutrition, acquainted with
the Extension Service, and informed of various
services available to low income people from
both private and public organizations.
This program does not involve helping
many families a little. Rather it involves
helping needy families on a regular and
continuing basis until they are lifted up above
the poverty level.
One way ENP Aides have gained accep-
tance by families is through working with the
children first. In many neighborhoods special
interest groups for youth are being formed.
Two professional Home Economists who will
work with youth from low income areas have
been added to the staff. They will give special
attention to youth in the improvement of
diets, nutrition and personal development.
Since it is felt that nutrition is poverty's
number one problem, the Aides spend more
time helping families prepare nutritious foods
than in any other Home Economics subject
matter. This is reflected in better health,
which in turn means better grades in school,
fewer school dropouts, less unemployment
and reduced medical costs to the county.
Families are referred to free services


which they do not know are available, thus
taking advantage of services that are already
provided.
The ENP Aides teach families how to
store, prepare, and utilize commodity foods.
This reduces the waste and discarding of these
foods and less food is turned down at the
warehouse.
Because of the efforts of the Expanded
Nutrition Program many families now have a
better understanding of their nutritional needs.
They have a more balanced diet, have increased
their consumption of milk, fresh vegetables and
fruits, have improved their shopping practices
and management, have become more con-
scious of sanitary practices in the safe han-
dling of food, have improved the storage of
foods and have become more cognizant of
keeping their homes and yards clean.
The use of non-professional Extension
Program Aides has worked well in Dade
County and has great promise for the future.
As one homemaker says, "From this program
I have learned about budgeting. I am saving
money on my grocery bill. My children are
now eating vegetables that they disliked very
much and my family seems to be more happy
now that I really know what nutrition is and
what it does for us. I am grateful for the
Aides who come to work with us."
Each Aide can work with 100 families.
Initially, 3,000 families are receiving the
benefits of this program in Dade County
reaching a total of 18,000 people.
A new office for the Expanded Nutrition
Program opened in September 1970 at 3100
N. W. 95 Street.
With the continued development and
expansion of the program, many more disad-
vantaged families will have a chance to im-
prove their well-being. One important way will
be through their increased understanding,
acceptance and practice of better nutrition. 0


















-II


-L''I;Lci:




























"LAWN MAINTENANCE COURSE"


The discovery that there is a lot more to
yard work than just cutting grass is very
apparent to 31 boys who graduated from a
12-hour course in lawn maintenance.
The boys ranged from 13 to 15 years old
and are now ready to do custom lawn work.
Sponsored by the Dade County Public
Schools and the county agents office, the
course was held at the Miami School Farm,
10200 N. W. 17 Avenue.
The boys participated in classroom in-
struction and then moved outdoors working
with the equipment necessary to gain prac-
tical experience. The course covered how to
mow and edge lawns, the maintenance of
mowers and edgers, fertilizing and watering,
pruning trees and shrubs, and customer
relations.
Each graduate was issued a wallet size card
certifying completion of the course. OE
A. County Extension Agent Lou Daigle
on the left instructs on how to handle the
lawnmower controls.


B. Perry A. Sistrunk, Teacher of Voca-
tional Agriculture at the Miami School Farm,
served as coordinator of the course and
provided some of the classroom instruction.
C. Gillum Davis, right, Miami School
Farm, gave instructions on the maintenance
of equipment.
D. Carl Gioia, 495 East 32 Street, Hia-
leah, demonstrates the proper way to start a
lawnmower engine. Safety was stressed
throughout the lawn maintenance course.
E. Gordon Cromer, Miami School Farm
teacher, points out to a student how to
properly operate the lawn edger.
F. Michael Fleming, 1071 N. W. 77
Place, takes his turn running the lawnmower
while his classmates and Associate County
Agent Lou Daigle, left, keep a close watch.
G. It takes know-how to trim shrubbery
and Ulysses S. Glee (white shirt), Teacher of
Vocational Agriculture at the Miami School
Farm, taught the boys how to handle the
shears. E






















































9

































THE "AT HOME SHOW

Each Monday at 6:35 A. M. Dade
County homemakers can hear and see the
latest developments in Home Economics on
the "At Home" show broadcast over
WPLG-TV, Channel 10.
A regular feature of the show emphasizes
shopping hints. Bulletins are usually offered
that the viewer can obtain by contacting the
Extension Home Economics Office.
Subjects that have been covered include
utilizing avocados, limes and mangos, pre-
cautions to take for a hurricane, setting up a
family business center, small home repairs,
small kitchen utensils, and buying bed linens.
The Dade County Extension Home Eco-
nomics Agents rotate responsibility in making
arrangements for the show's programs. Out-


side guests frequently appear.
Some of the guests have been Peggy
Henderson, Home Service Representative
from the Florida Power and Light Company
discussing the selection of portable appli-
ances. University of Florida's housing special-
ist, Carolyn Combrink, talked on house plans
and retirement homes, and food specialist,
Mrs. Beth Walsh, presented Florida sweet
honey and blender and mixer ideas.
Florida State 4-H winners Vera Pergyl,
Jane Franzo and Susan Adams have appeared
on the show discussing 4-H dress review,
nutrition and child development.
With limited resources of time and per-
sonnel, the Dade County Extension Home
Economics Office is "extending" Home Eco-
nomics information into many more homes
by utilizing the mass communication method
of television. O





















-l= : ;- C ->


:"."Ef~Z~BfiC~"~~
R.., :*~r';:-












"DEVELOPING FARM MACHINERY OPERATORS"


In Dade County, with the shortage of
labor leading to increased costs, most of our
agriculturists have been forced into mechani-
zation. As a result, a lack of trained equip-
ment operators exists in our area.
This point is especially emphasized by
the amount of mechanical and maintenance
problems area farmers are having with their
equipment. These problems are directly
related to operators' inefficiency.
With this in mind, a plan was devised to
develop an agricultural equipment operators'
school.
A survey was made of the agricultural
industry as to the need and cooperation that
would be received for such a project.
Receiving encouragement to proceed with
the proposed school, a committee was formed
consisting of fruit growers, vegetable farmers
and equipment dealers. This committee acted
as the advisory committee for the school.
Twelve fruit and vegetable producers
signed statements that if a program of this type
could be inaugurated they would guarantee
jobs for those persons who successfully com-
pleted the program. They would also guarantee
a salary of not less than $2 an hour.
The directors of the Adult Vocational
Education Center of the Dade County
Schools agreed that the school system would
supply a teacher, equipment, and physical
facilities for a class of this nature at the South
Dade High School.
The regional director of the Community
Action Migrant Program (CAMP) agreed to
secure 15 applicants for the school. He stated
he would screen and test all applicants and
present them to the sponsoring farmers after


they had been thoroughly processed.
He would then pay the stipend of the
trainee while in the training program. He also
agreed to carry insurance on the trainee during
the training period and to provide supportive
services such as counseling and health referrals
before and after the training period.
Then the work began. The advisory
committee, personnel from the Dade County
Schools, CAMP's personnel and members of
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service met
to draw up a course outline, the criteria for
completion, and the length of the course. This
was all successfully accomplished with the 30
hours a week course to run for nine weeks.
The advisory committee suggested the
majority of the students should be migrant and
seasonal workers who live in the South Dade
area.
While the course was being held, it
became apparent that succeeding courses
should be only three hours long each session
instead of six since the students became
uninterested in the subjects after a period of
three to four hours.
Eleven graduated from the class. Eight
graduated with high honors and all were
employed immediately by the farmers.
The effect of this project benefits not
only the community and the agriculturists in
the area, but it shows the seasonal and migrant
workers that agriculture is interested in them as
a permanent part of the community.
It is estimated that these students will
save farmers thousands of dollars in reduced
maintenance costs and help to reduce
mistakes in the field in operating highly
expensive equipment. O





"4-H'ers SERVICE IN HOSPITAL"

:


A


V X


;~-~ICILCI*L*C1*.


E(
"-- r~t~







To participate in a 4-H Citizenship and Mu .. A -7r.
Health project a group of 12 girls decided to
temporarily trade their green and white stripe
4-H uniforms for that of the red and white
Candy Stripe uniforms at Jackson Memorial
Hospital.
Upon completion of a special training
session, the girls were assigned duty in all
areas of the hospital.
They now have served a total of 1681
hours performing tasks that included feeding
burned patients, filing medical records, assis-
ting little ones in pediatrics, helping in the
cardiac center, running errands to the blood
bank, and taking patients to X-ray.
In serving others, the real benefit has
come to the girls through a broader under-
standing of human needs and a keener aware-
ness of community concerns. They were on
duty when victims of a plane crash were
brought in. They fed juvenile delinquents who
were burned after setting fire to their mattress
in an escape attempt from Youth Hall. They
saw injured children and the grief of loved
ones upon the death of a patient.
This experience has helped the girls to
mature, in many ways life has a richer
meaning and they are more safety conscious,
they are also giving more serious considera-
tion to their future goals in life and some are, C
looking forward to careers in the medical and
health fields, and they are certainly better
individuals and 4-H club members for this
opportunity to serve. O
A. Kathy Quinn, left, and Bunny Dono-
van, right, makes Lulu Eklor's hospital stay a
little more pleasant.
B. Mrs. Linda Saunders, left, Volunteer
Services Office of Jackson Memorial Hospital
and Carleen Demshok discuss helping with
sales in the gift shop.
C. Susan Correale, left, and Dorothy
Donovan assist in the Pharmacy.
D. Sonia Escobio, standing, and Joan
Verhoven, right, in the children's ward. D































" IRRIGATION IN

DADE COUNTY"


,~,
4- 4j


From seed through the entire life cycle
of the vegetable plant and fruit tree, water is
of primary importance for growth and
production.
To meet water needs growers and grove
owners in Dade County are using irrigation
systems that can supply large volumes of water.
Since vegetable production is at the
highest in the winter months when rainfall is
the least, growers are taking full advantage of
the water table pool just a few feet below the
ground surface.
In the rockland areas irrigation wells are
drilled 15 to 40 feet deep in the oolitic rock.
Casings are not used with portable rigs but are
required for the permanent systems. Many of
the casings are nothing more than a suction
pipe.
Wells are usually about 300 feet apart,
with a portable engine and pump easily
hooking into the wells forcing water through
a continuously rotating high pressure volume
gun, covering a two acre area around the well
site. This equipment has the capacity for
1,000 gallons per minute.
In the East Glades marl where potatoes
are produced, some of the growers use
wheeled irrigation pipes.
Irrigation in vegetables is used to supply
the total water needs, or supplement rainfall
- vegetable crops need from one-half to one
inch of water each week.
A variety of irrigation systems are used
in the fruit groves located mainly in the South
and Southwest portions of the County on the
rock and sand soils. Systems include the over
tree type of portable pipe and sprinklers, the
portable pumps moved from well to well, and
permanently installed irrigation.
More and more permanent systems are
being installed. The Agricultural Conservation
Program provides 50 percent cost sharing on
trenching and laying the main lines.







The installation costs for the permanent
systems run about $1,000 per acre.
Horizontally mounted centrifigul pumps
at ground surface with either diesel or electric
power units are standard. One grower irrigating
500 acres uses turbine pumps submerged about
35 feet below the ground surface. Advantages
include that the turbine pump is always
primed and more efficient. The initial invest-
ment is higher but operating costs run lower.
Most permanent systems are designed to
deliver two-tenths to one-quarter acre inch of
water each hour.
Grove owners are fully realizing the im-
portance of water, especially in the late winter
and spring months when drought conditions
are prevalent. High light intensity, drying
winds, low relative humidity and extremely
low soil moisture levels cause markedly in-
creased needs of fruit trees for water.
Irrigation water, applied either as the
total water supply or to supplement rainfall,
is important to maintain trees in good
condition, prevent the loss of fruit, increase
yields and maintain steady development of
the fruit early maturing fruit benefits from
the initial good market prices.
Due to the very porous limestone rock
and sand having poor water holding capacity,
groves need one acre inch of water each week.
Rain gauges should be kept in the groves to
correctly measure the amount of rainfall and
then determine the irrigation needs.
There have been two methods used to
plant trees in the groves which affects the
irrigation schedule.
The older groves are planted in the
rockland scarified to only six or eight inches
deep. These are known as the flat planted
groves with the entire root system of the tree
growing just underneath the ground surface.
These trees are quite susceptible to uprooting
by high winds.
The newer groves are planted in cross
trenches. A trenching plow is used on heavy


track-type tractors to plow trenches that are
14 to 20 inches wide and 18 to 20 inches
deep. The trenches are plowed in two direc-
tions at right angles to each other making the
grove site appear like a grid.
After the plowing is completed the
trenches are backfilled and the trees are
planted at the intersection of the trenches.
This provides additional root depth and better
anchors the tree.
An understanding of the difference
between a flat planted and trenched grove
leads to a difference of time intervals in
applying irrigation water.
The basic principle that we are working
with here is that water should moisten the soil
only through the entire depth of the root
zone whether the grove is flat planted or
trenched. Any additional water is wasteful,
more costly, and leaches nutrients to an
unavailable level below the root zone.
Thus in flat planted groves water should
be applied every three to four days twice a
week at the rate of one-half acre inch per
application. In trenched groves one acre inch
of water can be applied once each week.
Other considerations for a grove irrigation
program is that oil sprays should not be applied
to any trees suffering from the lack of water.
And there should be adequate soil
moisture before applying fertilizer in the
grove to prevent root damage from the
fertilizer salts due to poor entrance of the
fertilizer into the soil solution.
Weeds and ground cover use more water
than any other item in the grove. Water and
dollars can be saved with proper ground cover
maintenance.
Additional uses made of irrigation in Dade
County are for fire protection and freeze pro-
tection. One of the benefits of the permanent
system is providing adequate frost protection.
Without a doubt irrigation is a very
important segment in the cultural production
of vegetables and fruits in Dade County. 0



































"PLANNING YOUR

RETIREMENT YEARS"

Extension Home Economics is an educa-
tional program for the family. It reflects the
needs of contemporary living, with emphasis
on family stability, consumer competence,
health, housing and community development.
The Extension Home Economics Agent
reaches individuals and families with an
educational program designed to meet their
needs at different stages of the family life
cycle. In planning the program, the County
Extension Home Economics Agent consults
with community leaders to learn their views
on local problems and needs.


___ __I__ ____
_~3~1_ __ __







Thus, the program varies from place to
place, from one age group to another, and
from one income group to another, depending
on the problems to be solved.
Through this program planning process a
need was expressed by a number of
individuals for information that would be of
benefit to the retired man and woman.
"Planning Your Retirement Years",
therefore, received primary emphasis for the
annual Fall Seminar of the 1969 Extension
Home Economics Program.
The planning of this program came in
response to comments such as the following:
. ."We would like to sell our large home
and buy a small retirement cottage. Our income
is limited. Should we make this purchase before
or after retirement? What about taxes? What
about mortgage redemption insurance?"
... "We have a friend who recently payed
$3,000 to settle an estate in probate. What is
probate? How are the rates determined? Can
we avoid probate? How? How can we find out
about probate laws that affect us from one
state to another? We're from 'up North'."
... "What financial resources can we
count on after retirement?"
.. "We would like to rent. Is a lease a
protection for the tenant? What is the legal
difference between 'security' and 'last
month's rent' on a lease?"
... "We were told to eat chicken legs for
arthritis. Is this true?"
. ."Of how much value are the
so-called 'health foods,' 'wonder foods,'
'miracle foods,' and 'organic foods?' "
The two hour seminar was held on two
different nights, one at the Metropolitan
Senior Center and the second at the Ida M.
Fisher Junior High School.
"Health Protection" was a subject dis-
cussed by Wilhelmina M. Lombardi, Consumer
Specialist, Food and Drug Administration, De-
partment of Health, Education and Welfare.
Richard Hayes, Program Director, Metro-


politan Senior Center talked on "Services of
Our Senior Centers," and J. R. Greenman, Pro-
fessor, Agricultural Economics, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, outlined "Financial Resources and
Estate Planning."
"Where Will You Live: Legal Protection
for Home Owners and Renters," was pre-
sented the first night by The Honorable
Robert L. Shevin, Florida Senate, and the
second night by Leonard Helfand, Senior
Attorney, Senior Citizens Center.
Some of the handout material included,
"Shopping for a Mobile Home," "Owners and
Renters Responsibilities," "How to Find a Qui-
et Apartment," and "Making a Will in Florida."
Results of the seminar included reports of
people having a will made who had never had
one. Others, as newcomers to Florida, learned
that they should find out whether or not their
out of state will met Florida requirements.
They were also provided with comprehensive
material to help them evaluate their will.
The speaking attorney, Leonard Helfand
of the Economic Opportunity Legal Services
Program, reported having opportunities to
help additional people as a result of the
seminar and during the weeks immediately
following the program.
Mr. Hayes pointed out that many people
told him that previous to the seminar they did
not know about the existence and services
provided by the Dade County Senior Centers.
The seminar stressed personal emotional
preparedness and understanding of family
members of this stage of the life cycle. One
woman said, "This program has made me real-
ize that this is the happiest time of my life."
Three women said they would be more
considerate of older people in their homes.
As a result of the seminar, nearly 400
people received information on health protec-
tion, services provided by our senior centers,
legal protection, financial resources and estate
planning for home owners and renters n









































HORSE PASTURES...

Pleasure horses are moving to South Dade
County causing more than 1,000 acres of new
pasture to be established on rockdale soils.
The rockdale soils do not lend them-
selves to pastures where vegetative grass
plantings are used to establish the pasture.
Seed must be used. The land is disked, leveled
and rolled prior to planting.
A mixture of hulled common bermuda


and Paraguayan, Strain 22 bahia grass is used
to seed the pastures. Satisfactory pastures
using these recommendations are now sup-
porting a horse for every three acres.
The pleasure horse population in Dade
County is one of the most rapidly developing
phases of agriculture. Requested information
and assistance indicates that within the next
year or two the pasture acreage will be increas-
ed by three to four thousand acres and that
breeding farms and boarding pastures may in-
crease the acreage even beyond this amount. O

19
































"SOIL TESTING SAVES DOLLARS"


The county soil testing program at the
Homestead Agriculture Center has been suc-
cessful in helping growers achieve better yields
and grow multiple crops from one fertilizer
application. The testing program was used to
help increase the yields and to help establish a
multiple cropping system by placing the neces-
sary fertilizer under a plastic mulch.
In addition to increasing crop yield the
soil testing program shows that relatively little
of the fertilizer under the plastic was being
removed by the crop or leached by rainfall. As a
result the grower established a multiple crop-
ping system.
After establishing soil problems by use of
soil test techniques, one strawberry grower's
yield was increased approximately 62%. Using
an average crop value of approximately $2600,
the use of improved methods of fertilizer place-


ment and timing could increase the crop value
to approximately $4200 per acre with no
added investment. For the approximately 500
acres of strawberries grown in the county the
crop value could be increased by approx-
imately $800,000.
Overall the new system used on various
crops increased production from 90 percent
to 270 percent above the average yields for
the county. A 100 percent increase in yields
could increase the total crop value by
approximately $24,000,000.
Four to eight crops have been grown
successfully on the plastic mulch without
additional land preparation or additional
fertilization.
This new system of production shows
great promise in increasing the crop yield per
unit of area. O



































ENP YOUTH CAMP...


Poverty, malnourishment, ignorance -
these are common problems in our world, in
our nation, and in our own Dade County. We
care, and we are trying to do something about
these problems.
Last summer the 4-H club office of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service conduc-
ted Expanded Nutrition Program (ENP) Youth
Camps for many of the disadvantaged children
of Florida. From Dade County, 58 boys and 62
girls, plus ENP Aides and junior leaders, at-
tended the ENP Youth Camp held for five days
at 4-H Camp Cloverleaf near Lake Placid.
It was a week of learning and under-
standing, meeting new friends of all racial and


religious backgrounds, participating in many
different group activities, and having fun.
The central theme and primary objective
of the camp was to utilize a variety of
teaching methods to create a wider under-
standing and promote a better and lasting
level of nutrition among the campers. One of
the group activities was a class teaching
nutrition as the sole subject matter. Then the
threads of nutrition principles were interlaced
throughout the entire camp program that
dealt with the normal camping activities of
swimming, recreation, craft classes, vespers,
campfire, flag raising and lowering. Citizen-
ship was a very strong subject conducted











throughout the camp and classes were given in
good grooming and health hygiene.
One of the highlights of the camp was
the participation of Eddie Mitchell from the
Miami Police Department. Mitchell attended
the camp in civilian clothes the first four days
and became thoroughly acquainted with the
campers. Then on the fifth day he appeared in
his policeman's uniform. The purpose was to
demonstrate to the campers that policemen
are human beings just like everyone else.
Mitchell says of the camp, "I feel it is
one of the greatest camps one can give as a
way to show how true Americans should live. It
was wonderful the way the kids handled them-
selves. They had total respect for each other.
They were eager to learn about health hygiene,
and the campers were really interested in learn-
ing how to achieve good diets and good nutri-
tion by eating the proper foods."
What did the campers have to say about
this experience? Perhaps Myra Acosta sum-
med it up for all the campers when she wrote
on her evaluation paper, "Next year I would
like everything just the same, because I
thought this was a great camp."
Rickie Haugabook said, "I liked to swim
in the lake and I liked my counselor." Several
remarked how well they liked their counselor.
"The most fun was making new friends,"
reported Ben Smalley.
"I liked almost everything," said Bob
Baker. A significant number said that they
liked the nutrition classes.
Remarks made by other campers were...
"They gave me dinner and even gave me
my breakfast ..."
"I liked the clean towels and sheets ..."
"I liked to wash the table ..."
"I liked to wash the silverware ..."
"I liked cleaning up in the kitchen ..."


"I liked all of it .. ."
"Liked everything. Just have the same
thing next year."
Of course there were some dislikes. One
said he didn't like the grits and eggs, another
didn't like his spinach, and one didn't care for
the chicken.
The camp has sulphur water so for next
year most all wanted better tasting water and
also to get rid of the bugs and gnats.
To teach improved nutrition was the
main purpose of the camp and this objective
was achieved. In addition the evaluation
sheets showed a strong feeling among the
campers about their citizenship training. This
is best summed up by the words written by
cabin nine's Helen Reed on the subject of,
"What the American Flag Means to Me:"
"The American Flag means that our
country has lived through many wars. It
stands for courage, justice, liberty. We should
be proud of our flag, everyone. The American
flag means to me that someday and everyday
I will live free, think free and be free. Many
people have died for me and many other
people to be free. The flag symbolizes peace
and happiness. If we all put our nation's flags
together we would have a peaceful world and
nation. I love my flag and always will. The
flag means to me that we will always win. We
have never lost and to me will never lose. I
know our flag will and must wave. It will
never die. And another thing, when I say the
Pledge of Allegience, I stand at attention
because this is a time to honor my country
and flag. I think that everyone should love
their flag. Because it is precious to everyone
who loves it. A lot of people don't take pride
in their flag. I personally think that the
American Flag is the best in all the world." m







... A SPECIAL SALUTE TO DADE COUNTY 4-H MEMBERS
WHO ARE 1969 FLORIDA STATE 4-H WINNERS...


WINNERS


TO NATIONAL 4-H CLUB CONGRESS AT CHICAGO.



l-clkAf O "'B--


GAIL HAMILTON EVELYN FRANZO
Achievement Automotive


MICHAEL HUDAK
Electricity


JEANNE ADAMS ROMONA EWING
Health Home Economics


SECOND PLACE (ALTERNATES)


SUSAN ADAM;
Child Developme


RICHARD REECE GAIL HAMILTON
First In Overall Records


S JUSTINE BIZETTE
nt Home Improvement
SPECIAL AWARDS


ROSEMARIE ROLANDO
American Youth
Leadership Camp
Camp Miniwaca, Michigan
Danforth Foundation Award


/ERA PERGYL
Dress Revue


JUSTINE BIZETTE BETSY BRENNAN
First In General Demonstrations








... A SPECIAL SALUTE TO DADE COUNTY 4-H MEMBERS
WHO ARE 1970 FLORIDA STATE 4-H WINNERS...

WINNERS TO NATIONAL 4-H CLUB CONGRESS AT CHICAGO.


SUSAN ADAMS VERA PERGYL
Child Development Dress Revue

SPECIAL AWARDS


GAIL HAMILTON RICHARD REECE
Home Economics National 4-H Conference
Washington, D.C.


JANE FRANZO
Food & Nutrition


JEANNE ADAMS
National 4-H Conference
Washington, D.C.












TIME STUDY

AGRICULTURAL & HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT

EXTENSION AGENTS

1969* 1970*
Total Total
Office Assignments:
Days in Office .. . . ............................ .. 1,857.5 1.764
Office Visitors . . . . ..................... 10,243 10,520
Official Government Visitors .. . . . . . . ..... .. 401 521
Phone Calls .. . . ............................. .. 52,405 84,073
Circular Letters Composed .. . ........................ 9,664 11,952
Number of Pieces Mailed . . . . . . . .............. 97,262 233,530
Individual Letters Mailed .. . ......................... 7,040 7,953
News Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,006 1,033
Publications Distributed .. . ........................ ..657,724 653,404
Field Assignments:
Days in Field .. . . ............................ .. 1,493 1,498
Meetings & Conferences .. . .......................... 2,882 2,599
Total Attendance ......................... . . . . 237,253 675,265
Number of Leaders Trained ..................... ... .... . .. 1,258 1,774
Visits & Consultations ....................... . . ..... .. 13,390 10,302
Radio Broadcasts.......... .................................. 4,832 5,008
T. V. Broadcasts . . . . ........................ .888 627
Special Projects .................. .. ............ 1,311 751
Days Spent On:
Adult Work .. . . ............................. .. 2,721 2,583.5
4-H and Other Youth Work ........... ... . . . ..... 553 522.5
Days Spent by Subject Areas:
Agr. Production & Management .. . ...................... 876 740.5
Pub. & Homeowner Agr., Conser. & Recreational Prob . . . . . . .... 326 413
Marketing & Utiliz. of Agr. Products .. . ................... 324.5 385.5
Resource Develop. & Public Affairs .. . .................... 322.5 356.5
Ext. Org., Planning & Training .. . ...................... 491.5 375.5
Foods & Nutrition ........... . . . . . . .. 420.5 456.5
Clothing and Textiles ......................... .. ..... . .. 113 90.5
Housing, Equip., & Home Care . . ....................... 171.5 119
Home Management & Family Economics .. . ................. 146.5 134
Human Relations & Child Develop . . . . . ...........97.5 98.5
Health & Safety .... . ... . ............ 61 92.5
4-H Club Members .. . . ............................. .. 1,031 1,015
Other Youth involved in direct Extension Training Program . . . . . . . ... 87,280 82,142
4-H Club Project Work:
Agricultural Projects .. . . ........................ .. 407 760
Home Economics Projects .............................. 1,561 1,362
Other Projects .... . . . ........................ .. 4,243 3,393
Volunteer Adult Leaders working with youth programs .. . ............. 168 228
Leaders of other youth serving organizations assisted or trained . . . . . . ... 335 630
Oct. 1 Sept. 30.












DADE COUNTY

PLANNED & EXPENDED TIME BY EXTENSION ELEMENT

Fiscal Year 1970-

Man Days Planned Man Days Expended**

IMPROVING FARM INCOME ................ 1029 1580
Animal and Animal Products ............ 219 244
Fruit Crops and Products ............... 187 335
Ornamentals and Turf ................. 217 390
Vege. Crops and Products .............. 151 272
Gen. Crops and Crop Products ........... 133 238
Facilities & Supplies .................. 40 27
Farm Management, Agr.
Credit and Tenure ................. 82 74

SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION ......... 53 100

MARKETING, DISTRIBUTION & UTILIZ. ..... 196 315

IMPROVED NUTRITION ................... 305 704
Health ................ .. .... ...... 78 107
Low Income ........................ 227 597

IMPROVED FAMILY LIVING ............... 886 688
Consumer Competence &
Family Economics ................. 233 243
Housing, Equip., Furnishings
& Textiles ........................ 437 236
Human Development .................. 216 173
Home Environment Safety and
Family Health .................... 36

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT & 4-H PROGRAM .... 827 656

PESTICIDE EDUCATION & EMER. PREP. ..... 32 11

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 87 67

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 48 27

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT 11 19

TOTAL 3474 4167

* SEMIS State Extension Management Information System -
Fiscal Year July 1, 1969 June 30, 1970
** Academic staff time expended converted to 8-hour day.





V '


AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


COUNTY EXTENSION DIRECTOR

Formulates and interprets policies and procedures and
has administrative responsibility for planning, devel-
oping and carrying out a coordinated Agricultural
Extension Service program in cooperation with the
University of Florida and U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture. Technically supervises the agricultural program.


HOME, COMMUNITY
AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS


AGRICULTURAL
EDUCATION AND
ADVISORY SERVICES


YOUTH PROGRAMS
OFFICE


HOME
ECONOMICS
EDUCATION


HOME, COMMUNITY
AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS


Develops and provides ag- Provides a planned pro- Character development Extension Home Eco- Serves as a resource for
ricultural information of gram of agricultural edu- and good citizenship are nomics develops and pro- Home Economics Infor-
interest to the general cation and advisory ser- long range goals of the vides a planned program mation. Cooperates with
public, homeowners, busi- vices to the people in- youth program in urban, to help people in all areas related community agen-
ness and tourists. Dissemi- cluding activities in all suburban and rural areas. of family living Con- cies for improvement of
nates public affairs infor- phases of production, pro- Provides training to youth summer Education, Home health, safety and recre-
mation that is closely cessing and marketing of in agriculture, home eco- Management, Family Eco- ation. Keeps homemakers
related to agriculture in agricultural products. nomics and related areas. nomics, Family Life Edu- informed on matter of lo-
cooperation with county, Mental, physical, social cation, Health and Safety cal interest, government
state and federal govern- and spiritual growth is em- Education, Foods and and public affairs pertain-
ments. phasized. Coordinates 4-H Nutrition, Clothing and ing to families, and en-
Club projects and activi- Textiles and related areas. courage the exercise of
ties. Gives career guidance Assists with problems re- citizenship responsi-
and other assistance to lated to subtropicalliving. abilities.
youth interested in agri- Provides opportunities for
cultural and home eco- personal growth and de-
nomics subjects. velopment of leaders.


II


AGRICULTURAL DIVISION

Provides information and educational services to all
areas of agricultural and horticultural interests -
production, processing, marketing, supply and
service. Services extend to commercial producers,
agri-business firms, homeowners and governmental
agencies. Provides youth training and guidance in
agriculture. Initiates surveys and studies and prepares
reports to encourage development of agricultural
resources.


HOME ECONOMICS DIVISION


The division provides advisory and educational in-
formation in all phases of home economics related to
family living, through interpretation and application
of this information.

-F






























11All OFFIC17F 2090 N.W. -I Av e n u e 3 3) 12
A (' R I U I T I j R F, 0,35-1387
1 IMIF FCONOMIC 6,15-8,500
4-11 OFFICI.: (),')4-4400

011-1 ICII" 18,710 S.w. 288 St, 33030
AGR I Cu I T UTIN) I", '-) is --3311
HOME FCONOVICS 2,18-3000




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs