• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 To the people of Dade county
 Golden goodness of eggs
 Extension lends a hand to...
 Water container-grown plants this...
 Home economics extension -- in...
 Does is pay to advertise?
 Operation 4-5
 Extension and the Miccosukee...
 A desire to learn
 Protecting our perishable foods...
 Plastic mulch allows multiple cropping...
 County statistics
 Personnel chart
 Agricultural department chart
 Organizational chart
 Back Cover






Title: Subtropical agriculture and family living
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094992/00003
 Material Information
Title: Subtropical agriculture and family living annual report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Metropolitan Dade County (Fla.) -- Agricultural Office
Metropolitan Dade County (Fla.) -- Agricultural Office
Metropolitan Dade County (Fla.) -- Home Demonstration Office
Publisher: Dade County, Florida Agricultural Office
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: 1965
Copyright Date: 1964
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural extension work -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Genre: local government publication   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1963-
General Note: Title varies slightly.
Statement of Responsibility: Agricultural Agent's Office ; Home Demonstration Agent's Office.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094992
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 34239734
 Related Items
Preceded by: Subtropical agriculture

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    To the people of Dade county
        Page 1
    Golden goodness of eggs
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Extension lends a hand to VISTA
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Water container-grown plants this way
        Page 6
    Home economics extension -- in a changing world!
        Page 7
    Does is pay to advertise?
        Page 8
    Operation 4-5
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Extension and the Miccosukee Indian
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A desire to learn
        Page 13
    Protecting our perishable foods from farm to consumer
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Plastic mulch allows multiple cropping from one fertilizer appilcation
        Page 16
        Page 17
    County statistics
        Page 18
    Personnel chart
        Page 19
    Agricultural department chart
        Page 20
    Organizational chart
        Page 21
    Back Cover
        Page 22
Full Text


1q65


2i>i


SUBTROPICAL AGRICULTURE & FAMILY LIVING

1965 ANNUAL REPORT
DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT'S &' EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS AGENT'S


rAT042


t,


7


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION REPORT 1965




Page

To The People of Dade County (Campbell) ............................................... 1

Golden Goodness of Eggs (Champagne) ................................................. 2

Extension Lends a Hand to VISTA (Bizette) .............................................. 4

Water Container-Grown Plants This Way (Daigle) ......................................... 6

Home Economics Extension -- In a Changing World! (MacTavish) ......................... 7

Does It Pay to Advertise? (Durre) ........................................ ............ 8

Operation 4-H ............................................ ...................... ... 9

Extension and the Miccosukee Indian (Reece) ............................................ 11

A Desire to Learn (Simpson) ........................................................................... 13

Protecting Our Perishable Foods from Farm to Consumer (Hunt) ............................ 14

Plastic Mulch Allows Multiple Cropping from One Fertilizer Application (Dalton) ............. 16

County Statistics ........... ........ ............ ......... ......... .............. 18

Personnel Chart ............................................. ..................... 19

Agricultural Department Chart ........................................ ................ 20

Organizational Chart ............................................ .............. 21




















iVESIIT Of fLORIDA

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


w -
DR. E. T. YORK, JR. DR. MARSHALL 0. WATKINS
Provost for Agriculture Director
Institute of Food & Agricultural Agricultural Extension Service
Sciences, University of Florida


MR. FRANKLIN S. PERRY
District Agent
Agricultural Extension Service


DR. J. WAYNE REITZ
President, University of Florida


DR. BETTY JEAN BRANNAN
Assistant Director
Home Economics Programs
Agricultural Extension Service


MISS HELEN D. HOLSTEIN
District Extension Home Economics
Agent, Agricultural Extension Service








Board of County Commissoners


and


County manager


CHUCK HALL
Mayor


ALEX S. GORDON
Vice Mayor


JOSEPH A. BOYD, JR.


HAROLD A. GREENE


R. HARDY MATHESON


THOMAS D. O'MALLEY


ARTHUR PATTEN, JR.


LEWIS WHITWORTH, JR.


PORTER W. HOMER
County Manager


EARL M. STARNES
























TO THE PEOPLE OF

DADE COUNTY:


"SUB-TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND FAMILY
LIVING" is the annual report of the AgriculturalAgents
Offices and the Home Economics Agent's Offices of
Dade County. These offices locally represent the Flor-
ida Agricultural Extension Service, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences' of the University of
Florida, and the Federal Extension Service of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture. The County Agent's and
Home Economics Agent's Offices are the two divisions
of the Dade County Agricultural Department, Metropoli-
tan Dade County.
This, the 1965 Annual Report, brings together
certain selected examples of typical Extension work
being carried on in Dade County by staff members of
the Agricultural and Home Economics Agents' Offices.
Extension Service Agents are primarily concerned
with helping people to help themselves by providing a
broad program of education in the many fields of agri-
culture and home economics. Extension's best work
comes largely as the result of volunteers, community
leaders and laymen who have been inspired to help
themselves and others through the resources of the
University of Florida.
In this report we have included articles and exam-
ples to illustrate the broad influence of some of our
more significant programs and services. We have in-
cluded just a few of the examples of the type of work
being done throughout Dade County to assist people to
achieve better living, whether they are on a farm, in
the suburbs, or a part of our urban complex.
May I take this opportunity to thank the many
hundreds of volunteers who help make our work possible
and who certainly make our work effective. I wish also
to express appreciation to the many cooperating organi-
zations, agencies and governmental divisions with whom
we have had the pleasure of working during the past
year.



John D. Campbell
Dade County Agricultural Agent








"GOLDEN GOODNESS OF EGGS"

Good Planning + Action = Success


Florida's Golden Goodness of Eggs program got
off to a great start using this formula Good Planning
+ Action = Success.

The Dade County Agricultural Extension Service
joined industry leaders in Lakeland and Atlanta early
in 1965 to plan the statewide Golden Goodness cam-
paign. Roy J. Champagne, of the Miami Extension of-
fice, was named coordinator for the Dade area.

Chain store buyers and executives, food editors
and poultry industry leaders were invited to an "All-
Florida Breakfast" in May. Dade County Mayor Chuck
Hall was speaker and further plans were made for the
Dade area.

In July, a luncheon was heldat the First National
Bank Building. John Cripe, Manager of the Florida Egg
Commission; Extension Marketing Agent Richard Hunt;
Extension home economist Elizabeth Clark; Extension
Agent for Poultry and Eggs Roy J. Champagne; food
editors and TV people completed plans for a September
"Kick-off".


"The Golden Goodness of Eggs" luncheon and planning
meeting with Extension Personnel, Food Editors, and
the Florida Egg Commission in the Executive Suite of
the Penthouse of the First National Bank Building.

1. to r.: Mrs. Bertha Hahn, Food Editor, Miami Daily
News; Richard Hunt, Marketing Specialist, Dade County;
Mollie Turner, Public Service Director, WLBW; Mrs.
Elizabeth Clark, Assistant County Extension Home
Economics Agent; Mrs. Levina Phillips, Nutrition Con-
sultant, Dade County Public Health; Mrs. Maude Reid,
Supervisor, Adult Education, Lindsey-Hopkins Voca-
tional School.
Standing: John Linn, Agricultural Representative, First
National Bank; C. Ellis Clark, Vice President and Agri-
cultural Consultant, First National Bank; Roy J. Cham-
pagne, Assistant County Agent, Poultry and Egg
Specialist, Dade County.


In the following weeks contacts were made with
TV stations, chain stores, and food editors.

The manager of the Florida Egg Commission ap-
peared on Channel 7. Photographs of "Miss Golden
Goodness" were taken and released to local and na-
tional news media. United Press International News
Service carried the photo of "Miss Golden Goodness"
taken with "Flipper", the famous porpoise.


Marcia Perkins, Miss Golden Goodness and Flipper, the
porpoise, were the top attractions during the month-long
campaign.

\ -/


Fo- Modern Monemakers
Offces 'Phone-
AUGULT 1965 2690 N. W. 7th Avenue-. Miami. 33127 633-8566
AUGUST, 1965
S 1116 N. Kme Avenue, Homstead, 3330 247-3037
i"fy l, n to G..ne.s 1:31, find,
( "God crated.... eyery wnged fowl.,.,'. In
,& *^ ^^ ' ^ 1:22, the command i 1 given to leI lowl multiply
hIn te earth (Fowl multiply by producing bhtch-
mg SSeg..) This -a" during h fifth day. On
the ne- day cale -nd oer be ...= d finally
mn were re..td. Elehebe the Bible i, rod-
ited with te statement hb.u thou.ad yeur
re but day. It appear, therefore, that poultry
ie dhe old- f .11 -e.-k od th., hbey
even precede by 1000 yer or o, d oth
the hic cme before the egg.
he supposed .sie of Eden ds near the
norh end of he P.ersi. Gulf .nd near UR, the
home of Abahm. It would have been compara-
rively easy for owl to be carried by a.des to
India ad Malay. There, in the jungle., Gilll
benkiv ezdr in he wild s dte nd isthou.ght o be he -anesr of m of r modem bed
of .puly. > \U" """ ^a
D.de Co unty

26,000 "Sound Off' brochures, featuring poultry and
eggs, were distributed during the month-long campaign.






A Sound-off Bulletin on "Eggs" was written and
26,000 copies were printed. Copies with a personal
letter were sent to 4,000 friends of Extension, inviting
them to visit and see the Egg Caravan on September 2.
The USDA leaflet "Eat a Good Breakfast" was included
in each letter. In connection with the Golden Goodness
caravan, 5,000 Sound-off's were included in glassine
bags with hard-cooked eggs. Twelve thousand were
distributed in egg cartons in more than 120 stores.

Mayors of both Miami and Dade County were con-
tacted and asked to proclaim September as the "Golden
Goodness of Eggs" month.

Finally the Big Day came.
A caravan with a mechanical talking chicken
mounted atop a car moved about to strategic centers in
the county. During the tour of the caravan more than
5,000 hard-cooked eggs were given away at four loca-
tions.

The egg promotion continued in high gear when
the Golden Goodness proclamations were presented.


Proclamations were presented by County and City offi-
cials, declaring September as the Golden Goodness of
Eggs Month for Dade County. From left to right, Molly
Turner, Channel 10; Bill Amlong, General Manager,
Miami-Dade County Chamber of Commerce; Marcia Per-
kins, Miss Golden Goodness; and Commissioner Joe
Boyd.

There was TV coverage for the occasion from all three
commercial channels and prime TV time on the 6:00
P.M. newscast for two days. TV shorts on Golden Good-
ness ran from five to fifteen minutes.

Newspaper coverage was outstanding. The Miami
Herald ran a photograph of "Miss Golden Goodness"
presenting University of Miami Coach Charles Tate with
a basket of eggs. Agnes Edwards of the Miami News
featured the Egg Caravan in a Sunday edition of the
paper. Virginia Amendt, of the News Leader, wrote a
column on the event and called it "Egg Tasting- Good,
Plain or Fancy". Virginia Heffington, Herald Food
Editor, featured egg recipes


These newspaper stories released during the campaign
are indicative of the great success of the Golden Good-
ness of Eggs Campaign in Dade County.

Egg promotion kept sky-rocketing as food stores
and some restaurants tied in their advertising with the
Golden Goodness program. Distributors' trucks carried
posters boosting eggs. Local egg men ran special
prices on their eggs. Photographs of egg production
and proper egg care were shown.
John Cripe had said, "The Golden Goodness of
Eggs program will be the largest promotional and sell-
ing campaign ever put on a single agricultural product
in Florida".

This is exactly what it was. Extension is proud
to have contributed to its success.

This type of promotional campaign brings the
poultry industry closer to the consumer. The consumer
becomes better acquainted with the value of the product
as a food. Consequently, he knows that it isa bargain
in his food budget. The industry benefits by the ex-
panded horizons.

The need to expand the industry in order to meet
the demands of these educated consumers leads to ac-
tion programs that stress what is to be done in the fu-
ture.

To Dade County an action program under the
DARE (Developing Agricultural Resources Effectively)
Program will emphasize the steps needed to reach the
following goals for 1975:

a. 1,250,000 laying hens, producing table eggs.
b. 3,000,000 broilers produced and dressed.
c. Hatching of over 15,000,000 baby chicks.
d. Producing the bulk of eggs for local hatcheries (a
new segment of the industry, just starting this year
with one farm now in operation).
e. Poultry breeding farms established to select chick-
ens for tropical conditions.
f. Vigorous action in new building construction.
g. Availability of trained labor.

The Extension agent can help to coordinate the
steps to achieve these goals, furnishing information,
providing guidance and acting as liaison among the seg-
ments of the poultry industry and between the industry
and governmental officials.


























EXTENSION


LENDS A HAND


TO VISTA


*V


The Dade County Agricultural Extension Office
accepted a request this fall to teach Volunteers in
Service to America (VISTA) to teach others the skills
of better homemaking.
VISTA was working with 437 families in Miami
Housing Authority's Larchmont Gardens Project. Wom-
en head 122 of these families. The average income at
Larchmont Gardens is around $2,500 a year. Most of
the tenants are of high-school level education. Some
are Spanish-speaking.
Extension was asked to offer an educational pro-
gram in good housekeeping practices. Some tenants
were threatened with lease cancellations if housekeep-
ing was not brought up to minimum standards, so there
was an immediate need for help.
The Larchmont tenants needed help desperately
in managing their time, energy, and money, and they
needed it now.
There are 1,433 children in the 437 families.
Many of the tenants were working mothers. Some were
school drop-outs, with little or no training in skills and
an unwillingness to accept responsibility.
The homemakers lacked knowledge and know-how
in using surplus commodity foods.
With these problems identified, Extension home
economists went to work with VISTA, demonstrating
homemaking skills to them.
One of the first classes was instruction in gen-
eral home management.
Such basic demonstrations as the care, use and
maintenance of the gas range and the electric refriger-
ator were given to VISTA. They were taught how to










































clean and wash walls and to clean and line garbage
containers.

The home economists instructed VISTA in kitchen
storage, insect control, cleaning and organizing kitchen
cabinets, cleaning and waxing kitchen floors.
Next came demonstrations and training in the
cleaning and care of the bedroom. Information on de-
odorizing and treating mattresses for stains was given.
Protective measures to avoid damage were recom-
mended.

Bed-making was taught, with the class learning
how to miter sheets at the corner of the mattress, for a
smooth fit.

Bathroom care was taught, with special attention
given to keeping walls, shower curtains, tubs, showers,
lavatories, toilets, medicine cabinets, clothes hampers,
diaper pails, and floors spic and span.

VISTA was shown how to clean and care for furni-
ture, lamps, lamp shades, lighting fixtures, screens,
Venetian blinds, windows, and mirrors.

Laundry techniques, including care of diapers,
the proper use of detergents, and ironing were taught.

Throughout the training, the most economical and
practical method of getting the job done was stressed.







WATER CONTAINER-GROWN NURSERY
PLANTS THIS WAY

Even though nature provides over sixty inches of
rain to South Florida each year, plants that are grown
in containers need more water, because of the restricted
root system in a limited amount of soil.

So nurserymen must provide for overhead irriga-
tion or water these container-grown plants by hand.
Ditch irrigation and sub-irrigation are practiced
in some agricultural areas on a large scale. One of our
leading nurserymen, Mr. Bill Hofmann, has adapted
these practices for his nursery operation with great
success. The principle is used in his nursery opera-
tion--to pump water into and out of concrete irrigation
slabs that contain the plant containers. Holes are pro-
vided in the bottom of each container so water can
enter. These irrigation slabs, measuring 10 feet by
50 feet with a 4-inch apron, have brought about not
only a change in his watering practicing but most all
other cultural practices as well.
By changing from overhead watering to sub-
irrigating many benefits are evident. Leaves remain
dry at all times. Customers who walk through the
nursery appreciate this. Instead of muddy pathways,
customers now walk on clean gravel.


Clean Walkway


A smaller volume of water does a better job. This
method prevents iron rust or calcium deposits on plants.
Soluble fertilizer can be easily applied to all
plants. Dr. J. D. Dalton, Assistant County Agent, has
recommended solutions that will supply both major and
minor elements. Rates to use are based on soil tests
and plant response. Less fertilizer is needed because
only the plants are fertilized. Overhead sprinklers wet
every square inch of surface, including walk-ways,
weedy areas, etc.

6


Weeds, Weeds, Weeds

Fewer weeds grow inside of the container be-
cause the top two inches of soil remain drier. No
weeds can grow in the bin in the inter-spaces between
the cans. Damage caused by excessive concentration
of herbicide in low spots, as is sometimes the case in
uneven ground beds, is eliminated.
Insecticides will remain on the leaves for a
longer time to effect residual action. Frequent over-
head sprinklings would wash off this material. Sys-
temic insecticides can be applied easier and more
economically, since this material must enter the plant
through the roots.
Foliar diseases are reduced because leaves can
be kept drier day and night (except for normal rainfall).
Residual fungicides can remain on the plants for a
longer time.
Because plants are on a concrete slab, soil-borne
nematodes can not get to these plants. By using only
sterilized potting soil nematode problems are reduced
to a minimum.

This method provides frost protection. Three
inches of moving water all night reduces cold hazard.

Container plants managed this way grow faster
by being watered more adequately. They are easier to
keep clean since dust or mud never collects in the
walkways.

In addition to savings of water and fertilizer, the
greatest all-round advantage is the labor-saving that
this system affords.
This system would be as practical for a smaller
nursery operator as for a larger operation.
Just 30 years ago Bill and Bob Hofmann culti-
vated a strawberry patch and sold the berries at a road-
side stand on the site of their major nursery block.
They are certain that the change from the overhead
sprinklers to this system is a significant improvement
in their over-all operation.





HOME ECONOMICS

EXTENSION

IN A CHANGING WORLD
The names may change, the faces may change,
but it's the same "education for better living" program
that began in Florida about 1912. The first woman
agent was a "County Agent." Then the name was
changed to "Home Demonstration Agent." Now it is
"Extension Home Economics Agent." The seldom-
thought-of-definition of "agent" is "one to whom some-
thing valuable is entrusted." Club groups were once
called Home Demonstration Clubs. They now are known
as Extension Home Economics Clubs.
Newcomers to the area may ask about Home Dem-
onstration, or Extension, or Home Bureau, but all are
referred to one of Dade County's "Extension Home
Economics Offices" at Miami or at Homestead.
Homemaking is the largest and most important
business in the world. In 1900, the average farmer pro-
duced enough for four people. In many cases this pro-
duction was accomplished through the direct assistance
of the farmer's wife. Home Economists in Extension
helped families with production and home preservation
as well as the use of food. They organized "tomato
clubs" and helped to setup community canning centers.
Today, one farmer produces enough food for 33
people. Farming has become a technical, specialized


VITAMINS
ABCDWXYZ


The homemaker's business is not only providing
daily meals for the family. Today's consumer needs
working knowledge in ever-widening fields from cloth-
ing technology to the use of credit, to child guidance
in a world where problems keep pace with advances of
knowledge.
No one department or group can doit all. Exten-
sion cooperates with other groups to make for better
family life in homes, in communities, and in the nation.
Today's Home Economics Agents work with an
audience that has changed from a relatively homogen-
eous one to a widely heterogeneous one of many more
people. The Extension staff does not increase in pro-
portion to the increase of a county's population. So
the methods of reaching people have had to change.
Instead of a visit to one home, the Home Economics
Agent may enter thousands of homes via radio or tele-
vision.

The program is the same, but the approach is
different, with new emphasis and audiences. It all
adds up to education for maximum use of family re-
sources, for happy family living, and for optimum
growth and development of each family member. No
group is overlooked, although the educational methods
used vary.
Extension's philosophy is still, "People can be
helped to help themselves."


business. Instead of helping the farmer's wife with
gardening and food preservation, the Extension Home
Economics Office now offers both rural and urban home-
makers help on buying, not only the food once produced
at home, but all home and family needs.
Today's world is a "consumers' world" with a
million items from which to choose. How to make a
wise choice is the daily problem facing today's home-
makers. This requires a knowledge of modern tech-
nology, and the job of the Extension Home Economist
is to help people to get information, based on research,
and training in all areas of management in homemaking.
The questions may be, "Which can of tomatoes is the
best buy for my use? What do grades mean? How is
the nutritive value preserved?"























View of in-store advertising of new potatoes and tender
green beans from Dade County.


DOES IT PAY TO ADVERTISE?
"How can we sell more fresh potatoes?"
The potato producers of Dade County asked
themselves this question this year.
The producers were aware that for many years
the consumption of potatoes has been relatively stable
at an average of 100 pounds per person.
After considerable thought and discussion with
the people who advocated advertising, the producers
decided to try promoting Dade County new potatoes
locally and nationally on a restricted basis. Why re-
stricted? Because the cost of a promotion campaign
that must be borne by the growers is expensive.
The Dade County Potato Growers Association
organized a promotion campaign, sponsoring the en-
deavor through their affiliation with the Florida Fruit
and Vegetable Association and the National Potato
Council. The Florida Agricultural Extension Service


00




Model display of new Florida potatoes to be used for
in-store advertising.


and the State Department of Agriculture cooperated in
promoting the sale of new potatoes.
The Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association pre-
pared the advertising material to be used in stores
during the harvest season and arranged for distribution
of the material through the Florida Development Com-
mission and marketing service of the State Department
of Agriculture.
Locally, the Extension Service prepared televi-
sion, radio and news articles to spotlight the harvest
of Dade County potatoes and to encourage local con-
sumers to utilize potatoes in their daily diet. The local
educational television station was utilized for two pro-
grams showing the preparation of potatoes together with
information on culture of the crop. These programs
were aired four times locally and were made available
to educational stations in other cities of the state.
After a year, the promotional program was ana-
lyzed again, and it was decided that even though price
prospects looked good, it was desirable to continue the
promotional program and to keep the public informed
about potatoes and to encourage using them in a bal-
anced diet. The County Extension staff again assisted
in the promotion of the potatoes with news articles, in-
formation furnished to the Florida Development Com-
mission on available food, and live television shows.
Has the advertising campaign paid off? Mr. Web-
ster Williams, one of our local producers, says, "I'm
confident that advertising Dade County-grown potatoes
has been beneficial to successful potato marketing."
He is enthusiastic about continuing the program in a
nation-wide effort to increase the per capital consump-
tion of potatoes.
Mr. N. A. Falconer, President of the Dade County
Potato Growers Association, has also expressed his
confidence in this program and the assistance that the
Agricultural Extension Service has lent to this promo-
tion program. He feels that the assistance of the Agri-
cultural Extension Service in furnishing information
to the news media has increased the return on dollars
invested in the program.
Potato production in Dade County is carried out
on 6,000 to 8,000 acres of land each year. Last year
the producers realized approximately $700 an acre on
their new potato crops. Total income from new potatoes
reached $8,775,000.00. All of the potatoes produced
in Dade County during the winter months are utilized
as fresh potatoes, and 90 per cent of the crop is a red
variety, general purpose potato. The other ten per cent
is utilized by the potato chip industry at a time when
storage potatoes will not yield a satisfactory product.
Potatoes in Dade County are second in impor-
tance of the vegetable crops produced here. For the
1963-64 and 1964-65 seasons, potatoes have been one
of the few crops that showed a profit to the producer.







OPERATION

4-H







HELPING THE HANDICAPPED

Head, heart, hands, and health ............ . S
Symbols of the 4-H Club.
Dade County girls learned the true significance .
of these symbols as they worked on community service
projects to aid the handicapped senior citizen, espe-
cially those doubly handicapped by lack of finances to
provide for their needs.
At the suggestion of Betty Jo Padron, president Gordon White, Assistant State 4-H Club Agent cor
of the Dade County Girls' 4-H Council, the older 4-H ulates State Winners from Dade County -- Mrs. J
girls' midwinter crafts were planned around aids for Sutton, 4-H Alumni; Betty Jo Padron, National
these handicapped individuals. Conference; Sharon Braun, Child Development;
With the assistance of the Continuing Patient Gorman, Citizenship. Margaret Foye, not pictured
State Winner in Citizenship with Tom.
Care Division, U. S. Department of Health, Jackson
Memorial Hospital, a list of needs was determined and
specifications were worked out by the girls, the Dade
County Home Economics Extension Office, and an oc-
cupational therapist.
Then the work and the fun began. The girls made
lap boards for 48 persons confined to wheel chairs.
As a result of the girls' carpentry skill, six pa-
tients can now bathe themselves sitting safely on bath
benches in the tub or under the shower. Before they
had been dependent on bed bathers because they were
unable to get up and down in the tub or stand for a
shower.
Many patients began to strengthen weakened mus- 4-H'ers eat well to look and feel u
cles doing basket weaving using the bases provided by
the girls.
Fifty wheel chair and crutch users could forget
blisters and callouses because of hand mitts made of
leather and quality plastics with convenient closures.
Members of the Extension Homemakers' Clubs of
Dade County and individual 4-H Clubs carrying out
club projects are supporting the 4-H Council Project
and following up with other items of their own.
Dade County 4-H girls are looking forward to
visiting the recipients and getting to know more about '
how the handicapped learn to adjust and manage in 4-H Council Officers with Dorothy Minett, exc
the home. student from England.


I
ngrat-
oseph
4-H
Tom
d was


ell.


change
change















First alternates in State Awards with Mr. Gordon White
are: Gwendolyn Gibson, Public Speaking; Terri Dial,
Leadership; Gail Hamilton, Food & Nutrition; Donald
Knight, Home Grounds Beautification; and Mike Cain,
Poultry.


gMPW- Z6AFFll 7F-lmi ar.4 egmi
The proof of the pudding is in the finished product as
displayed at the Dade County Youth Fair.


1' 4-H'ers Learn by Doing.


S


4-H'ers take pride in constructing
their own fl o a t for Junior Orange
Bowl Parade.







Extension And The

Miccosukee Indians

The Dade County Extension Service was asked
to put its know-how and knowledge to work when the
Seminole Indians' newest reservation of the Miccosu-
kees opened this winter.
The Miccosukee Reservation is locatedat Forty
Mile Bend along the Tamiami Trail, west of Miami. The
Federal Government set aside the five and a half mile,
500-foot deep reservation as the home of some 180 Mic-
cosukees who eke out an existence by selling handmade
dolls and colorful clothing and by operating their camps
as tourist attraction. Economic reasons have reluc-
tantly drawn the Indians from the inner glades.
Needless to say, this low-income group of people
cannot meet the minimums of life today on such a small
piece of Everglades even by opening up their own pri-
vate living quarters for others to "gape at." This is
not their true way of life, but only a means of existence.


View of Glades from Restaurant


Apron worn by waitress
(Typical design)


Interior of Restaurant


The idea of- the Miccosukee Restaurant was to
open another economic avenue for the benefit of the
Indians. In this first tribal business venture proper
training for the waitresses was needed. Four Exten-
sion home economists gave the young Indians instruc-
tions in personal grooming, cleanliness, health habits,
correct laundering, proper table setting, and the correct
procedure for serving the customers, taking orders, and
food service.


The young Indian girls learned well and have put
the things they were taught into practice. They are
quick to pass on their training to the new girls coming
to work with them.
Improvement is continually taking place. Better
grooming is quite evident. And the girls are serving
capacity crowds with ease and efficiency, and they are
growing in confidence all the time.
The Indians live in open-construction chickees,
made of cypress logs set upright and topped with palm
fronds. They live and sleep on a platform about three
feet from the ground.
There is a growing interest in building new-type
chickees, partially enclosed with modern sanitary facil-
ities and electrical equipment. Under long-term loans
this new housing is within the reach of most Indians.






Extension agents, with the help of volunteer 4-H
leaders and Extension Homemakers, taught Miccosukee
children to make and freeze cookies and to make yeast
bread. These products were all made with commodity
foods. Through careful planning, each child had a part
in mixing, measuring, baking, and, of course, eating.
Health habits and cleanliness of self and equipment
were all part of the training.
Eager learners, the children introduced their new
knowledge into everyday family living. The parents
are reached through the children.
-"-------'-------
The Miccosukees will stand on their own in time. They
are learning and receptive to new ways and ideas now.
00 00 -0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ---------'------"

BAKING YEAST BREAD
4-H Leaders Teach Miccosukee Children


Boys enjoy cutting pecan rolls


"/


Rolls, pecan rolls, and dough sticks
(almost ready for oven)


Learning to measure and mix


Letting dough rise


Principal, Mrs. Wallace, 4-H Leader and children
enjoy the finished product










































A DESIRE TO LEARN


Extension Home Economics for family members
of the migrant Agricultural worker in the South Dade
Camps began with "Vista" and an interest in learning.
Assistance for this group started with a discus-
sion and a question and answer and outlook meeting
between representatives of Vista, women of the camp
families, and Home Economics Agents.
The stage was set by Vista for the exchange of
information with the typical camp house as a meeting
place. Here their problems varied too, but basically
their expressed interest and desires involved general
areas of family living.
They were interested in sewing, using and stor-
ing food with limited facilities, spending money wisely,
housekeeping helps for close and generally inadequate
space and for those who did not work -- using the
time on hand.
The desire and need for productive activity was
most notable, so work began with two daily sessions


planned -- a daytime session for the group who did
not work and an evening session for the working group.
With eight sewing machines furnished by the
Singer Company and the Home Economics Office, the
camp house and the women, -- the first lesson was
"How to run the Sewing Machine."
Making a straight line on paper with the sewing
machine was an actual accomplishment with encourage-
ment for them. Threading the machine and sewing on
fabric strips were mastered next.
Learning to care for the sewing machine as well
as using one was the first step in helping them learn
to sew "with patterns."
Other activities in family budgeting and buying,
food preparation and storage, housekeeping and family
living will be planned in providing regular assistance
for these women.
Further involvement of family members will in-
clude training activities for the camp youngsters.






























PROTECTING OUR PERISHABLE FOODS FROM FARM TO CONSUMER



One of the marvels in our world today is the
availability of food and relatively low cost of food in
America.
We have an average abundant and year round sup-
ply of most foods typically enjoyed by U. S. consumers.
With this constant supply of food, dietary standards of
our population have risen. Many of these improvements
A 1 aare traceable to advances made during the 20th century
in transportation and refrigeration of a wide variety of
perishable foods.
The neighborhood supermarket has fresh fruit and
vegetables available each month of the year. Dade
County is fortunate in having large quantities of fresh
produce grown here and in nearby areas. However, the
local supply is only available duringthe winter season.
All of the items that enjoy strong consumer demand
am cannot be grown in this locality.
Truck transportation moves a vast majority of the
fresh fruit and vegetables from farm to retail stores.
From Florida, trucks annually haul around 129 thousand
loads of fruit and vegetables to markets in other states.
Residents of this state eat an average of about 20,000
truck loads of fresh produce each year.
-All of our fresh fruit and vegetables are perish-"
able. Many are extremely sensitive to the temperature,
moisture and handling conditions to which they are
exposed. We know that large amounts of fresh produce
spoil each year because of adverse conditions, but the
true amount is difficult to determine.






This year the Dade County Agricultural Agent's
Office was asked to schedule and conduct a series of
produce handling schools for truck drivers. The request
indicated that quality, maintenance, care and handling
were the major concerns.
Dr. Stanley E. Rosenberger, Marketing Specialist
of the Agricultural Extension Service at the University
of Florida, was called in to help plan and organize
these truckers' produce schools. Nolan L. Durre, Asso-
ciate County Agent; Seymour Goldweber, Associate
County Agent; and Richard M. Hunt, Assistant Market-
ing Agent of the Dade County Agricultural Department,
all took turns with Rosenberger in conducting training
sessions for truck drivers. Emphasis was placed on
ways to properly care for each of the different kinds of
products to be assured of delivering a premium quality
product to the market.



















Dr. Stanley E. Rosenberger, Marketing Specialist, Uni-
versity of Florida, conducting first truck drivers' school.


Truck driver demonstrates to class proper stacking
methods to insure good ventilation while in transit.


Nolan Durre, Associate County Agent, points to a good
refrigeration unit for hauling perishable produce.


Bruno Stein, Educational Director for Alteman Trans-
port Lines, in whose classrooms the Truck Drivers'
Schools were held.















PLASTIC MULCH ALLOWS


MULTIPLE CROPPING FROM


ONE FERTILIZER APPLICATION


FIi~
b~iN


Figure 1. Mr. Robin Bryant made a dream come true by
building one piece of equipment to lay plastic and plant
seed. This was a giant step in the direction of suc-
cess.


S:v2 rL


Figure 2. In the field the one machine could lay plastic
mulch, burn a hole in the plastic for the seed, plant
seed and spray the hole with a herbicide. This reduced
the cost of production by reducing labor requirements.


U


The use of plastic mulch to cut the cost of tomato
production has opened the way for a highly successful
multiple cropping system in Dade County.
Plastic mulch was first used on a large scale in
Dade County tomato production in the 1964-65 season
by a leading farmer, Mr. Robin Bryant. Mr. Bryant had
wanted to employ several advantages of plastic mulch
in an attempt to reduce the costs of tomato production.
Plastic mulch prevents the fertilizer from leach-
ing during rainfall. It conserves moisture by reducing
evaporation. It reduces the amount of soil splashed on
the plants by rains and irrigation water, resulting in
cleaner fruit and less fruit diseases. These advantages
were sorely needed by the tomato industry because


profits have been changed to losses in recent years
due to bad weather and competition from other areas
where production costs are much lower than in Dade
County.
Personnel in the Dade County Agricultural Agents
Office helped guide Mr. Bryant in his fertilizer program.
When plastic mulch is used, all fertilizer necessary to
raise the crop must be added prior to applying the
mulch. Soil testing prior to planting showed the kind of
fertilizer needed. Soil tests throughout the growing
season indicated that all the fertilizer was not being
removed, even though much rain had fallen and some
areas had been under water.
The latest information and recommendations on













































AIIi



Figure 3. The success of growing a good plant from
seedlings was due to comparatively weed-free environ-
ment as well as a constant supply of moisture and fer-
tilizer nutrients.


tomato spraying for disease and insect control were
available to Mr. Bryant from the County Agent's Office.
The success of the 500-acre production, demon-
strated by favorable yields of marketable tomatoes, was
enough to show Mr. Bryant that plastic mulch was a
valuable new cultural practice for tomato production.
But the happy story does not end here because
further soil testing by the County Agent's Office per-
sonnel showed that fertilizer still remained under the
plastic after fruit production had declined. In order to
utilize the remaining fertilizer, cucumbers were planted
and a good yield was realized. No additional fertilizer
was needed to produce this crop.
Still this is not the end of the story because fur-


Figure 4. After the tomato plants had stopped produc-
ing, cucumber plants were grown without further addi-
tion of plastic or fertilizer. This greatly increases the
chances of financial success.


I


their testing showed that fertilizer remained under the
plastic. This makes it possible for a third or more
crops to be grown from the one initial cost of plastic
and fertilizer materials.

This form of crop diversification could change
the overall outlook for Dade County's tomato produc-
tion. This multiple cropping system given more chances
for a successful crop even though one of the crops may
be partially damaged or completely killed by diseases,
insects or adverse weather conditions.

The Dade County Extension Service always strives
to lead in furnishing new information from the Agricul-
tural Experiment Stations and in showing new ways for
growers to increase their chances for success.







AGRICULTURAL AND HOME ECONOMICS EMPHASIS

DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


EXTENSION TEACHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES
BY COUNTY AGENT'S STAFF AND
HOME ECONOMICS AGENT'S STAFF


Total Days Worked ............................................

Days Devoted to:
Adult Work ........................................................
Youth Work ........ ..............................
In-Service Training (Staff) ............................

Days Devoted to Helping People Make Decisions

Agricultural Production, Management,
and Natural Resource Development
Farm Business, Organization Development
and Management ............ .....................
Prevention and Control of Plant and Animal
Diseases, Insects, Weeds, and Other
Pests ....................................................
Soil and Water Management, Conservation,
Natural Disasters and Civil Defense ........
Management of Crops, Livestock, Poultry,
Equipment and other capital items ............
Agricultural and Horticultural Problems of
home owners and part-time farmers ............
Other activities concerning production,
management and resource development ....
Total days

Marketing and Utilization of Farm
Products
Marketing principles and methods .................
Grading, packing, storing and quality
maintenance of agricultural products ........
Development and improvement of marketing
organizations, firms and facilities ............
Consumer information on agricultural
commodities .....................................................
Other activities concerning marketing and
utilization .................................... ...........
Total days

Home Economics
Foods and nutrition ....................................
Clothing and textiles ............. ......................
Housing, household equipment and
furnishings ...................................................
Human relations and child development ........
Home management and home industry ...........
Health, safety and civil defense ....................


3201


2458
597
156


294


217

255

269

184

91
1310




86

124

132

43

44
429


196
223

142
134
141
121


Other family living and home economics
subjects ..................................................
Total days

Resource Development and Public
Affairs
Organizing and working with resource
development organizations, agencies
and other groups ... ........................
Work with State, county and local
government groups on resource
development and public affairs ...............
Planning and preparation of resource
development and public affairs material
and supervising and administering public
affairs programs ..... .....
Total days


251
1208






88


65



101
254


Studies of Problems and Opportunities .......... 733
Field Trials, Tests and Demonstrations ........ 1082
Consultations Providing Information to
Individuals and Families ............................ 51,668
Consultations Providing Information to
Organizations and Agencies ..................... 21,203
News Articles ............................. ................. 977
Radio Programs ......................---..-.................. 2009
Television Programs .............-......-................... 256
Publications Distributed ............................... 512,479
Direct Mail Distributed -..........................-..... 130,418
Meetings for Planning and Developing
the Extension Programs .............................. 3692
Training Meetings for Leaders ........................ 273
Leaders Trained .........................--..........-- ..- 2555
Other meetings at which County Extension
Staff Presented Information ........................ 19,714

Youth Development Work
4-H Club Members .................-- ..-.....-........ ..... 1333
Other Youth Involved in Direct Extension
Training Programs ...................................... 5250
4-H Club Project Work:
Individuals with agricultural projects ...... 284
Individuals with Other 4-H Projects ........ 1333
Youth Reached Through Special
Teen-Age Nutrition Programs ................ 12,049
Adult Leaders Working With Youth
Programs ............................................ 370
















3~1f


DADE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

Personnel Chart


JOHN D. CAMPBELL
Department Chairman and
County Agricultural Agent



Miami Offices
2690 N. W. 7th Avenue


MRS. HELEN B. MacTAVISH
Department Vice-chairman and
Home Economics Agent



Homestead Offices


County Agent's Office

RoY J. CHAMPAGNE
Asst. County Agri. Agent

Louis J. DAIGLE
Asst. County Agri. Agent

RALPH E. HUFFAKER
Asst. County Agri. Agent

MARSHALL E. SMITH
Technical Illustrator

MISS MARGARET HUTTON
Secretary

MRS. DOROTHY LAPORTE
Clerk-Steno I

MRS. ELIZABETH A. HATHAWAY
Clerk-Steno I


Home Economics Office

MRS. JUSTINE L. BIZETTE
Asst. Home Eco. Agent

MRS. ELIZABETH D. CLARK
Asst. Home Eco. Agent

MRS. RUTH H. REECE
Asst. Home Eco. Agent

MISS VICTORIA M. SIMPSON
Asst. Home Eco. Agent

MRS. DOROTHY MARTIN
Clerk -Steno II

MRS. TERRY R. MALMSTEN
Clerk-Steno I

MRS. MARGARET DARDEN
Clerk-Typist I


County Agent's Office

NOLAN L. DURRE
Asso. County Agri. Agent

SEYMOUR GOLDWEBER
Asso. County Agri. Agent

JOSEPH D. DALTON
Asst. Count Agri. Agent

RICHARD M. HUNT
Asst. County Mkt. Agent





Home Economics Office

MISS PATRICIA HELMS
Asst. Home Eco. Agent


1102 North Krome Avenue

CHARLES WELSH
Laboratory Technician

MRS. LENA COWART
Clerk-Steno II

MISS LINDA HERBENICK
Clerk-Steno I








1116 North Krome Avenue

MIss MARY JANE LOVING
Clerk-Steno I


I


C







AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

(Cooperative Work in Agriculture and Home Economics)


HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS


Develops and provides
agricultural information
of interest to the gener-
al public, homeowners,
businessmen and tour-
ists. Disseminates pub-
lic affairs information
that is closely related
to agriculture in coop-
eration with county,
state and federal gov-
ernments.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCA.
TION AND ADVISORY
SERVICES


Provides a planned pro-
gram of agricultural
education and advisory
services to the people
including activities in
all phases of prodic-
tion, processing and
marketing of agricultur-
al products.


MS YOUTH PROGRAMS -
GIRLS





Provides training to
youth in agriculture,
home economics and re-
lated areas. Mental,
physical, social and
spiritual growth is em-
phasized. Coordinates
4-H Club projects and
activities. Gives career
guidance and other as-
sistance to youth inter-
ested in agricultural
and home economics
subjects. Character de-
velopment and good cit-
izenship are long range
goals of the youth pro-
gram.


HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION


Extension Home Eco-
nomics develops and
provides a planned pro-
gram to help people in
all areas of family liv-
ing Consumer Educa-
tion, Home Management,
Family Economics, Fam-
ily Life Education,
Health and Safety Edu-
cation, Foods and Nu-
trition, Clothing and
Textiles and related
areas. Assists with
problems related to sub-
tropical living. Provides
opportunities for per-
sonal growth and devel-
opment of leaders.


HOME, COMMUNITY AND
PUBLIC AFFAIRS


Serves as a resource for
Home Economics infor-
mation. Cooperates with
related community agen-
cies for improvement of
health, safety and rec-
reation. Keeps home-
makers informed on mat-
ters of local interest,
government and public
affairs pertaining to
families, and encour-
ages the exercise of
citizenship responsibil-
ities.


OFFICE OF THE COUNTY AGENT


Formulates and interprets policies and proce-
dures and has administrative responsibility for
planning, developing and carrying out a coordi-
nated Agricultural Extension Service program in
cooperation with the University of Florida and
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Technically super-
vises the agricultural program.


AGRICULTURAL OFFICE


Provides information and educational services to
all areas of agricultural and horticultural inter-
ests--production, processing, marketing, supply
and service. Services extend to commercial pro-
ducers, agri-business firms, homeowners and
governmental agencies. Provides youth training
and guidance in agriculture. Initiates surveys
and studies and prepares reports to encourage
development of agricultural resources.


EXTENSION HOME ECONOMICS OFFICE


The County Extension Home Economics Agent
assists with development of the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service program and technically super-
vises the Extension Home Economics program
for youth and adults. The office provides advi-
sory and educational information in all phases of
home economics related to family living, through
interpretation and application of this information.


I









ORGANIZATIONAL CHART



State of Florida


U. S. Government


1


Metropolitan Dade County
Board of County Comm.



County Manager


University of Florida
(Land-Grant University)


Federal Extension
Service


Institute of Food and
S Agricultural Sciences
(Provost for Agriculture)


College of Agriculture
University of Florida


Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations
University of Florida


Dade County Agricultural
Department


Florida Agricultural
Extension Service
University of Florida


U. S. Department
of Agriculture


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F school of Forestry
University of Florida]


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