Group Title: South Florida Field Laboratory mimeo report
Title: South Florida Field Laboratory of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, vegetable field day
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 Material Information
Title: South Florida Field Laboratory of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, vegetable field day Wednesday, May 8, 1968, Immokalee
Series Title: South Florida Field Laboratory mimeo report ; SFL68-1
Alternate Title: Vegetable field day, Wednesday, May 8, 1968, Immokalee
Physical Description: 22 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Everett, P. H. ( Paul Harrison ), 1927-
South Florida Field Laboratory
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: South Florida Field Laboratory
Place of Publication: Immokalee,Fla.
Publication Date: 1968
Copyright Date: 1968
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Field experiments -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
Statement of Responsibility: staff participating, Paul H. Everett ... et al..
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094989
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436868680

Full Text
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SOUTH FLORIDA FIELD LABORATORY

of the

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

VEGETABLE FIELD DAY

Wednesday, May 8, 1968; Immokalee SEP 30 1E3

******* ****

STAFF PARTICIPATING

Paul H. Everett, Associate Soils Chemist (So. Fla. Field Lab.)
Carlos H. Blazquez, Assistant Plant Pathologist (So. Fla. Field Lab.)
Donald S. Burgis, Assistant Horticulturist (Gulf Coast Station)
Mrs. A. J. Overman, Assistant Soils Microbiologist (Gulf Coast Station)
Warren C. Adlerz, Assistant Entomologist (Watermelon & Grape Investiga-
tions Laboratory)

*** ***+** *


D. W. Lander, Collier County Agricultural Agent, Presiding

1:00 P.M. Assembly and Registration

1:20 P.M. Reports on Research P

Dr. Everett Watermelon nutrition
Tomato variety trials

Dr. Blazquez Control of vegetable diseases

Mrs. Overman Control of nematodes

Mr. Burgis Chemical control of weeds

Dr. Adlerz Watermelon mosaic viruses

3:00 P.M. Tour of Research Plots



Soft drinks Courtesy of Kilgore Seed Company, Immokalee
Trucks Courtesy of Kaiser Agricultural Chemicals and Wilsom-Toomer
Fertilizer Company


3
6

9


165 copies


South Florida Field Laboratory Mimeo Report SFL68-1










TOUR OF RESEARCH PLOTS*

Field K


Block No.

1 Host range of target spot

3 Watermelon spray trial

4 Insecticide trial on watermelons

5 North half Pinolene 1919 on tomatoes

South half Cantaloupe variety trial

6 Tomato variety trial (vine-ripe)

7 Tomato variety trial (green-mature)

8-9 Machine harvest tomatoes

10 North half Magnesium sources for watermelons

South half Copper sources for watermelons

11-12 Rates & placements of micro-nutrients for watermelons

13-14 Rates & placements of copper for watermelons

15 Effect of lime on Fusarium wilt of watermelon

Field A

Block No.

1 Effect of Pinolene 1902 on fungicide adherence

2 Effect of Pinolene 1902 on adherence of 658

*****a*****


Page

14

14

15

15

16

16

17

18

19

19

19

20

20


Page

21

21


*Results reported in this Field Day Program are preliminary and do not
constitute an official recommendation unless so stated.







REPORTS ON RESEARCH: South Florida Field Laboratory


Watermelon Nutrition

I. Effect of Lime on Fusarium wilt of Watermelons (Spring 1967)

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of lime rates on the severity of Fusarium wilt of
watermelons.

Experimental:
Field Experiment--The plot area was located on recently cleared virgin
Immokalee fine sand having an initial pH of 4.2. Analysis of soil samples taken
before liming showed a uniformly low content of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and
potassium among the individual plots. Four lime treatments (no lime, 3,000, 6,000
and 9,000 pounds per acre) derived from a 2.5 2.5 1.0 ratio of dolomite-calcic
limestone-hydrated lime, were evaluated for their effect on the severity of
Fusarium wilt of 'Charleston Gray' watermelons. The lime was broadcast and disked
into a depth of six inches on December 29, 1966. The plots were arranged in
randomized blocks with four replications of each treatment. Each plot consisted
of double rows thirty feet long. All plots received equivalent amounts of nitrogen,
phosphorus, and potassium.

To insure the presence of the pathogen, the plots were infested on January 18, 1967
with soil known to contain the fusarium wilt fungus.

Greenhouse Experiment--This experiment was conducted to gain preliminary
information on the question of whether soil pH or calcium (Ca) level is the primary
factor in reducing the amount of watermelon wilt at higher lime rates.

Two Ca sources were chosen: (1) calcium carbonate (40% Ca) which supplies Ca and
also increases soil pH and (2) calcium sulfate (23% Ca) which supplies Ca but does
not increase soil pH. Three rates of Ca from each source and a no Ca treatment
were used, thus making a 2 x 4 factorial experiment with four replications. The
Ca rates, from each source, were: 1,200, 2,400, and 3,600 pounds per acre.

Results:
Field Experiment

Effect of lime rate on Fusarium wilt
development, soil pH and yield.


Lime Wilt Soil pH Yield

lb/A % 5/9/67 tons/A
0 93.8 4.6 0.0
3,000 47.0 5.5 5.6
6,000 38.0 6.0 8.7
9,000 14.5 6.5 13.7







Greenhouse Experiment


Effect of calcium source and rate on
Fusarium wilt development and soil pH.

Calcium Calcium Soil
source rate Wilt pH

lb/A %
No lime 0 77.6 5.2
Calcic lime 1,200 0.0 6.1
2,400 0.0 7.0
3,600 0.0 7.1
Gypsum 1,200 87.0 4.9
2,400 79.8 4.9
3,600 73.0 4.7


Comments:
Considerable evidence was obtained from these studies which indicates that liming
soils to pH 6.5-7.0, materially reduces the severity of Fusarium wilt of watermelons.
To reach this pH, particularly on palmetto land, it would require higher lime rates
than most melon growers are now accustomed to. However, if a grower's field is
predominately palmetto land with a low soil pH, it is believed that the benefit
from the extra lime will out-weigh the cost of the additional lime.

It should be emphasized that the experiments reported here were conducted on "new
land" with a low soil pH. No conclusions can be made at this time as to the
effect of lime on controlling Fusarium wilt of watermelons grown on "old land".

II. Fertilizer Placement and Rates (Spring 1966).

Purpose: To evaluate four fertilizer placements and three fertilizer rates on the
growth and yield of watermelons.

Fertilizer placements were:

1. Banded on one side of seed row (single band)
Total fertilizer was applied in 3 equal applications, i.e. planting,
thinning, and lay-by.
2. Banded on both sides of seed row (double band)
Total fertilizer was applied in 3 equal applications, i.e. planting,
thinning, and lay-by.
3. 10" wide band 2 1/2" below seed row (broad band)
80% of total fertilizer applied at planting; remaining 20% applied as
sidedressing at lay-by.
4. Broadcast 50% of fertilizer was applied broadcast at planting and
50% broadcast at lay-by.


Fertilizer rates were:


1,000 Ibs. 6-8-8/acre
2,000 Ibs. 6-8-8/acre
4,000 Ibs. 6-8-8/acre


Each fertilizer placement was used with each rate of fertilizer.












Results:

Effect of fertilizer placement and rate on yield
(tons/acre marketable melons)

Fertilizer Fertilizer rate b/A Placement
placement 1.000 2.000 4,000 effect

Single band 18.4 22.6 27.1 22.7
Double band 21.1 25.9 23.1 23.4
Broad band 19.4 17.4 25.9 21.0
Broadcast 25.9 29.3 28.6 27.9
Rate effect 21.2 23.8 26.2


Yields were highest when the fertilizer was broadcast and lowest when the fertilizer
was placed in a 10" band directly under the seedrow (broad band). The yield from
the single and double band placements were intermediate and differed very little
from each other.

In general, the main effect of fertilizer rate was to give a linear yield increase
as the rate increased.

Comments:
Broadcast fertilization appears to be superior to band applications for watermelons,
since this experiment was conducted on new land broadcast fertilization did not
seriously increase the weed problem, but this is a factor to consider if this
placement is used on old land.

Placing fertilizer directly under the seedrow (broad band) also caused considerable
reduction in early plant growth. Although there was no visible symptoms of
"fertilizer burn" on the leaves, the root tips of these plants appeared to be
slightly damaged and fruit maturity was delayed approximately 10 days. Had not
adequate moisture been present, greater damage from the high concentration of
fertilizer salts with the broad band placement probably would have occurred. This
was found to be the case in an experiment conducted under very dry conditions in
the spring of 1967, when many of the seedlings failed to emerge and those that
did emerge had a very high mortality rate.









REPORTS ON RESEARCH: South Florida Field Laboratory


Tomato Variety Trials


I. Ground culture for mature-green harvest (Fall 1967).


The following table
this trial.


shows the varieties and breeding lines and the results of


Yield and average weight of marketable
fruit (harvested twice)

Variety Yield Av. Wt.
or line cwt/A oz.

Homestead 500 355 5.4
Tropi-red 425 5.4
Tropi-gro 396 5.7
1544-3-4-Bk CAStWd 481 4.8
1544-3-2-Bk CAStWd 465 4.8
1544-7-1-Bk CAStWd 443 5.2
1808-3-Bk CAStMWd 424 4.4
664-3-Bk CAStWd 412 4.9


Comments:
The 1544. . lines produced the best tonnage but the fruits were somewhat
smaller than Tropi-gro, Tropi-red or Homestead 500. Tropi-gro produced the
largest fruit size. Homestead 500 had considerable fruit cracking at the second
harvest, and was severely damaged by gray-leaf spot and to a greater extent by
bacterial spot than were the other entries. Graywall was not a problem during
this trial. Tropi-red and Tropi-gro are recommended for limited plantings.

II. Staked tomatoes for vine-ripe harvest (Fall 1967).

Tables 1 and 2 give the results of this trial.

Table 1. Cwt. of marketable tomatoes per acre (Fall 1967)


Variety or
breeding line
Floradel
Indian River
393-6-4-Bk CAStWd
393-6-2-Bk CAStWd
1578-5-1-Bk CAStWd
1578-4-1-Bk CAStWd
1296-2-Bk-Bk CAStWd
1296-3-1Bk CAStWd
STEP 530-Bk
1507-1-2-Bk CAStMWd


Ist-5th
162
109
109
112
60
54
146
139
84
89


Harvest
6th-lOth 11th-13th
246 115
240 114
306 101
299 103
283 107
240 127
245 108
285 122
238 142
273 119


No. 1 plus No. 2 grade fruit.


Total
523
463
515
514
450
422
499
546
465
482


482=


.v--


I89. 1g


_w





Table 2. Average weight (ounces)


Variety or Harvest Season
breeding line Ist-5th 6th-10th llth-13th Average
Floradel 7.8 7.2 5.2 6.8
Indian River 6.4 6.1 4.5 5.7
393-6-4-Bk CAStWd 8.3 8.2 6.3 7.8
393-6-2-Bk CAStWd 8.4 8.0 5.9 7.5
1578-5-1-Bk CAStWd 7.6 7.4 5.6 6.9
1578-4-1-Bk CAStWd 7.3 6.6 5.1 6.2
1296-2-Bk-Bk CAStWd 6.4 5.9 4.5 5.7
1296-3-1-Bk CAStWd 6.5 5.9 4.6 5.7
STEP 530-Bk 7.1 7.1 5.4 6.5
1507-1-2-Bk CAStMWd 7.3 6.7 5.0 6.3


1No. 1 plus No. 2 grade fruit.


Comments:
The plots were harvested 13 times beginning November
This relatively short harvest season was a result of
due to very high winds and approximately 2 inches of
The plants never fully recovered from this set-back,
period was shortened.

Yield data from this trial are summarized in Table 3.


6 and ending December 27, 1967.
damage sustained by the plants
rain occurring on December 11.
consequently the production


Breeding lines 393-6-4-Bk


CAStWd and 393-6-2-Bk CAStWd were very similar and were considered best in the
trial. The main attribute of these two lines was their ability to maintain large
fruit size relatively late in the season.

None of the entries were affected to any degree by graywall, although conditions
during the latter part of the season were apparently favorable for its development.
This was indicated by a severe outbreak of graywall in some very susceptible
breeding lines in an adjoining test.

III. Tomatoes having potential for machine harvest.

Objectives:
1. To evaluate six tomato breeding lines for horticultural characteristics
and yield.
2. To gain preliminary information for predicting harvest date for once-over
harvesting of tomato for fresh market.
3. To study the effect of plant population on tomato yields from once-over
harvest.

Experimental:
Breeding lines tested:

Breeding
line No. Breeding line designation
1 1339-D8-S3-DBk CAVStW
2 407-Dll-Sl-DBk
3 407-D3-Dl-D3k
4 407-D3-D4-DBk
5 407-D3-D2-DBk
6 407-D3-DS-DBk SpbK

All of the above lines have the jointless (J2) pedicel characteristic, which
enables the fruit to be removed from the plant without stems attached.
-7-


of marketable fruit (Fall 1967)






Harvest schedules:
1. Hand harvested 3 times--109, 119 and 133 days after seeding.
2. Once-over destructive harvest--109 days after seeding.
3. Once-over destructive harvest--119 days after seeding.
4. Once-over destructive harvest--133 days after seeding.

Number 1 above is considered to be a fairly typical harvest schedule
for mature-green fresh market tomatoes. It was used in this experiment
as a standard for comparing the yield from once-over harvest at the
other 3 harvest dates.

Plant populations:
1. 4,358 plants/acre (single row/bed)
2. 8,716 plants/acre (double row/bed)

All beds were 5' on center. For No. 1 above plants were 24" apart in a
single row. For No. 2 above the two rows/bed were 12" apart with plants
arranged in a staggered pattern.

Results (general):
Breeding lines---All lines tested are in a relatively early stage of develop-
ment, consequently a number of refinements must be incorporated through
breeding, before they will be fully acceptable. However, one or two
lines show considerable promise even at this early stage.
a. Vine habit--All lines have compact, determinate type vines. However,
under the conditions of this test the vines are somewhat larger than
would be desirable for machine harvest.
b. Fruit characteristics--Size and shape of fruit need improvement. Most
lines had many fruit with concaved blossom ends. All lines were
susceptible to graywall, particularly 1339-D8-D3 CAVStW. A major
attribute of these lines was fruit firmness and color cn ripening.
Both factors rated excellent.
c. Yield--The yield potential of fresh market tomatoes, based on the 3
harvests by hand, ranged from 14 tons to 18 tons of mature-green fruit/
acre.

Harvest dates--The main effect of harvest date on yield is shown in the
following table:

Days to Mature-green % yield of
harvest tomatoes cwt/A hand harvest

109, 119, 1331 327 100.0
1092 171 52.2
1192 227 69.4
1332 119 36.4


lHand harvested 3 times. Yield represents 100%.
20nce-over destructive harvest at 109, 119, or 133 days after
seeding.

As expected, all of the destructive once-over harvest, regardless of date, resulted
in lower yields than the 3 hand harvests. At the early (109 days) once-over
harvest there was an over abundance of immature fruit. On the other hand, the
marketable yield was reduced at the late (133 days) once-over harvest by an over
abundance of ripe fruit. Once-over harvest at 119 days resulted in a yield of
approximately 70% of the potential. If the cost of hand labor continues to rise








the 30% yield reduction, due to once-oved harvest, could be compensated for by the
lower cost of machine harvest.

Plant population--The main effect of plant population on yield from the 6
breeding lines is shown in the following table.


Plants


Breeding line numberl


per acre 1 2 3 4 5 6 Av.

mature-green tomatoes cwt/A
4,358 182 212 227 236 248 280 231
8,716 172 166 195 186 195 232 191


lBreeding lines are listed on page

With each of the 6 breeding lines, the lower plant population produced the highest
yield. It is believed that this rather unexpected results may be explained by two
factors (1) the fertilizer level used was not sufficient for maximum production at
the high plant population and (2) spray coverage on the double rows--high plant
population-- was inadequate and yield was reduced by worm damage to the fruit.
Both of these factors could be eliminated.

Tomato Spray Trials

Tomatoes, Control of Leaf Spot Diseases in Fall 1967.
Gray leaf spot, Stemphylium solani Weber
Bacterial leaf spot, Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Doidge) Dows

A split-plot with four replications was designed in the fall of 1967 to compare
three fungicides at three rates, alone and in combination with basic copper sulfate,
for their ability to control gray leaf and bacterial leaf spots.

Spraying was begun October 3rd, and terminated November 16, 1967.

Gray leaf spot developed midway through the season, while bacterial leaf spot did
not begin until late in the season.

Spotting due to gray leaf spot was recorded on October 16, based on ratings of 0-5.
A rating of 0 representing no spotting of leaves, and a rating of 5 meaning over
40 spots per leaf. Plots were harvested on November 11 and 15, 1967.

Best gray leaf spot control was obtained with Daconil 2787 at 1 1/2 Ibs and 1/2 Ib
and Difolatan 80W at 1 1/2 Ibs per 100 gallons of water.

Highest yield was obtained with Daconil 2787 at 1 1/2 Ibs, Difolatan 80W at 1 1/2
lbs, and Daconil 2787 at 1 lb.

The addition of basic copper sulfate at 4 Ibs per 100 gallons of water to the
fungicides gave highly significant increases in yield (at the 1% level of
significance) with all the fungicides tested. It is suggested that this increase
in yield may have been due to the effect of the basic copper sulfate on the
bacterial leaf spot incidence. (Please refer to Table 1).






Tomatoes, Control of Leaf Spot Diseases in Fall 1967.
Gray leaf spot (Stemphylium solani) Weber

A randomized block experiment was designed in the spring of 1967 to compare various
rates of Dithane M-45 with five fungicides for their ability to control tomato gray
leaf spot (Stemphylium solani) Weber) of Homestead 24 tomatoes.

Fungicide spraying was begun on September 7, and terminated on November 16, 1967.
A total of 11 applications were made.

Spotting due to gray leaf spot was recorded on October 14, based on ratings of 0-5.
A rating of 0 representing no spotting of leaves, and a rating of 5 meaning over 40
spots per leaf. Plots were harvested on November 7 and 14, 1967.

Gray leaf spot developed midway through the season, so that it was possible to
properly evaluate leaf spot control.

Best control was obtained with Dithane M-45 at 1 1/2 Ibs plus Dyrene at 1 Ib,
Dithane M-45 at 2 1/2 Ibs, Dithane M-45 at 2 1/2 Ibs plus Triton oil B-1956,
Dithane M-45 at 1 1/2 lbs plus Alar 9 at 2 oz., and Polyram at 1 1/2 and 2 lbs per
100 gallons of water.

Highest yield was obtained with Polyram at 2 Ibs, Dithane M-45 at 1 1/2 Ibs, Dyrene
at 1 Ib, Polyram at 1 1/2 Ibs, and Dithane M-45 at 2 1/2 Ibs per 100 gallons of
water. (Please refer to Table 2).

Cucumber Spray Trials

Cucumbers, Control of Leaf Spot Diseases in Fall 1967.
Target spot (Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. & Curt.) Wei); Downy mildew (Pseudo-
peronospora cubensis (Berk. & Curt.) Wei); Angular leaf spot (Pseudomonas
lackrvmans (E. F. Smith & Bryan) Corener)

A split-plot with four replications was designed in the fall of 1967 to compare
three fungicides at three rates, alone and in combination with basic copper sulfate,
for their ability to control target spot, downy mildew, and angular leaf spot of
Ashley cucumbers.

Spraying was begun on October 5, and terminated on December 18, 1967. A total of
eleven sprays were made.

Disease severity was recorded on December 10, 1967. Evaluation of the disease was
made on a scale ranging 1 through 5. Ratings were made on 20 leaves per plot.

Environmental conditions were not very favorable for the development of leaf
diseases during most of the growing season. Occasionally some downy mildew and
angular leaf spots were observed in the border rows. Late in the season an inocu-
lation with target spores and foggy weather resulted in an epiphytotic outbreak of
target spot.

Best control was obtained with the 3 rates of Daconil 2787 (1/2, 1, and 1 1/2 Ibs),
as well as with Manzate D at 1.0 Ib per 100 gallons of water.

After the disease had developed, highest yields were obtained with Manzate D at 0.5
Ibs, Difolatan 80W at 1.0 Ib, and Daconil 2787 at 1.5 lbs per 100 gallons of water.
The high yield of the Manzate D at 0.5 Ibs and Difolatan 80W at 1.0 Ib per 100 gal.
of water were inconsistent with previous results, and may have been due to the late
and uneven infection of target spot. (Please refer to Table 3).
-10-













Table 1. Disease ratings of Homestead tomatoes and yields of plots sprayed with 3 different
fungicides at 3 different rates in combination with and without tribasic copper sulfate.


Disease ratings


Average yield/plot


No. Material gal water + copper copper Total + copper copper Total

1. Daconil 2787 1/2 742 939 1,681 120.4 102.5 222.9 abc*
2. Daconil 2787 1 810 773 1,583 136.2 96.6 232.8 ab
3. Daconil 2787 1 1/2 691 819 1,510 153.8 127.5 281.3
4. Difolatan 80W 1/2 882 902 1,784 93.7 108.9 202.6 abcd
5. Difolatan 80W 1 838 931 1,769 96.5 104.2 200.7 abcd
6. Difolatan 80W 1 1/2 799 863 1,662 127.9 107.0 234.9 a
7. Manzate-D 1/2 1,075 1,017 2,092 86.1 69.8 155.9
8. Manzate-D 1 1,036 1,101 2,137 93.3 78.2 171.5
9. Manzate-D 1 1/2 1,009 915 1,924 99.0 68.2 167.2
10. Control 1,323 1,072 2,395 70.3 67.0 137.2


*Numbers within a given column which are followed by the same
according to Duncan's Multiple Range Test at 5% level.


letter are not significantly different


Lbs/100

















Table 2. Leaf spotting rating of Homestead tomatoes and yields of plots sprayed with 11 fungicides


lbs/100
Material gal water


Incidence of
Disease ratings
per plot


Average yield -
Harvests
First Second


Ibs per plot

Total


Dithane M-45 + Triton
Dithane M-45
Dithane M-45
Dithane M-45 + Dyrene
Dyrene
Dithane M-45 + Terramn
Dithane M-45 + Alar 9
Delan
Amobam + ZnSO4
Polyram
Control
Polyram


B-1956


ycin


1/2,4 oz
1/2
1/2
1/2, 1

1/2,280 gm
1/2, 2 oz

qt + 3/4 lb


1 1/2


31.6
35.8
40.9
42.4
38.9
31.0
24.9
29.2
24.3
47.3
16.7
29.4


34.1
31.0
33.2
40.7
28.7
33.9
19.9
29.8
26.3
37.8
19.3
38.6


65.7
66.8
74.1
83.1
67.6
64.9
44.8
59.0
50.6
85.1
36.0
68.0


abc*
abc
abc
ab
abc
abc
c
bc
c
a


abc


*Numbers within a given column which are followed by the same letter are not significantly
different according to Duncan's Multiple Range Test at 5% level.

















Table 3. Defoliation of Ashley cucumber and yields of plots sprayed with 3 different fungicides at 3
different rates in combination with and without basic copper sulfate.
Lbs/ Last harvest Lbs/
Incidence of disease Total Av. yield Plot Average yield Plot
lbs/100 Basic Copper Total Basic Copper Total Basic Copper Total
No. Materials gal water + + + -
1. Daconil 2787 0.5 42 47 89 233.4 246.2 478.8 c* 6.7 6.5 13.2
2. Daconil 2787 1.0 46 47 93 234.1 265.2 499.3 c 7.4 11.4 18.8
3. Daconil 2787 1.5 41 42 83 261.9 289.6 551.5 ab 10.4 12.0 22.5
4. Difolatan 80W 0.5 63 90 153 247.5 279.8 527.3 bc 7.7 5.2 12.9
5. Difolatan 80W 1.0 50 61 111 279.7 300.0 579.0 a 11.7 10.4 22.1
6. Difolatan 80W 1.5 70 80 150 240.0 246.9 504.1 bc 5.5 8.4 13.9
7. Manzate D 0.5 54 63 117 278.6 309.1 587.7 a 12.4 10.0 22.4
8. Manzate D 1.0 45 55 100 246.9 286.0 532.9 abc 9.3 7.3 17.0
9. Manzate D 1.5 45 47 92 274.3 260.7 535.0 abc 11.0 6.0 17.J
10. Control 115 137 252 228.0 239.8 247.8 2.7 4.4 7.5



*Numbers within a given column which are followed by the same letter are not significantly different
according to Duncan's Multiple Range Test at 5% level.






TOUR OF RESEARCH PLOTS


Field K

All blocks in this field, except blocks 10 and 15, have the following histories:

Cropping History: New land -- cleared Fall 1967.

Liming History: 4 tons/acre high calcium limestone plus 1 ton/acre dolomite
broadcasted and disked in on December 1, 1967.

Block 1. Host range of Target Spot (Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. &Curt.) Wei.).

Purpose: To determine what other crops and weeds may be alternate hosts of the
target spot fungus, a serious disease of cucumbers in this area and in
other parts of the world (Western Europe and the Balkan Countries).

Plants: Vegetables, Flowers, Weeds, Agronomic Crops.

Results: None to date.

Block 3. Watermelon Spray Trial

Purpose: To compare the efficacy of newer fungicides for the control of
watermelon foliar diseases.

Variety: Charleston Gray

Planting Data: Seeded January 23, 1968 three ten-foot beds with 3 ft. between
hills. Fertilizer -- 1,000/A of 4-8-8 30% organic 3 applications.


Treatments
No. Material
1. Daconil 2787
2. Daconil 2787
3. Daconil 2787
4. Difolatan 80 W
5. Difolatan 80 W
6. Difolatan 4 Flo
7. Manzate D
8. Manzate D
9. Manzate D
10. Du Pont 1991 +
Surfactant F
11. Polyram
12. Daconil 2787 +
Basic Copper
13. Difolatan 80 W +
Basic Copper
14. Difolatan 4 Flo +
Basic Copper
15. Control


Rate/100
gallons


1 lb
2 Ibs
3 Ibs
1 lb
1 1/2 lbs
2 1/2 pts
1 lb
2 Ibs
3 lbs
8 oz
4 oz
2 Ibs
2 Ibs
4 Ibs
1 1/2 Ibs
4 Ibs
2 1/2 pts
4 Ibs


Results to date: Not enough disease has occurred to


date to make a comparison.


-14-








Block 4. Insecticide trial on watermelons (cooperative with Dr. Adlerz, Leesburg
Station).


Planting data:


Seeded January 23, 1968. Charleston Gray Variety.
spacing. 24' single row plots. 3 replications.


3' x 10' hill


Treatment ounces Application
No. Insecticide actual/A interval
1. Azodrin 3 4.0 Weekly spray
2. Azodrin 3 8.0 Weekly spray
3. Cygon 2. 4.0 Weekly spray
4. Temik 10G 4.0 Preplant
5. Temik 10G 8.0 Preplant
6. Temik 10G 16.0 Preplant
7. TH 427 I 5G 8.0 Preplant
8. TH 427 I 5G 24.0 Preplant
9. Temik 10G 32.0 Sidedressed 2/28/68
10. Untreated
11. Untreated
12. Untreated


Treatments 4 thru 8 were
the seeds.
The first application of


applied 2" to the side and slightly below

Treatments 1, 2 & 3 was made of 2/20/68.


Block 5, N1/2. Pinolene 1919 on Tomatoes

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of Pinolene 1919 at various concentrations and
application intervals on the growth, flowering and yield.


Field seeded January 17, 1968.
Tropi-Gro Variety
10' Single row plots, 5' between
4 replications


Treatment
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.


Pinolone 1919
concentration1
Check (none)
0.5%
1.0%
2.0%
3.0%
5.0%
Check (none)
0.5%
1.0%
2.0%
3.0%
5.0%7


beds, 2' between plants


,pplUation
intervals
7 days
7 days
7 days
7 days
7 days
7 days
14 days
14 days
14 days
14 days
14 days
14 days


I applied at a rate of 100 gal/acre


-15-


Planting data:


*


5.0%











Comments:


Pinolene is the Miller Chemical & Fertilizer Corporation's trade name
for turpene polymers intended for agricultural use. When sprayed on
the leaves of a plant it forms a clear film which reduces water loss
by transpiration which in turn may reduce transplanting shock,
physiological wilt and winter injury to certain plants, particularly
evergreens. It also has potential as a pesticide residue control agent
to extend the effective life of certain pesticides.


Results to date: Definite phytotoxicity to leaves of tomato plants has been
observed at the 5.0% concentration at both the 7 & 14 day application
intervals. Effect of this leaf damage on yields remains to be seen.
Volume applied as well as concentration may be involved, because in an
earlier non-replicated test when 250 gals/acre was applied, damage was
more severe even at 2.0% concentration.

BLOCK 5. S 1/2. Southern Cantaloupe Variety Trial

Planting data: Seeded March 6, 1968
2' x 5' hill spacing; 1 plant/hill


1,000
1,000
1,000


lb. 4-8-8/A at planting
lb. 4-8-8/A April 8
lb. 4-8-8/A April 17 (lay-by)


Variety
or line
VBL-67-1
VBL-67-7
L-39-1
Hales Best
AC-64-1
AC-67-59
AC-67-47
AC-63-11
VBL-68-80
VBL-67-2
AC-66-21
AHD-63-2


Breeder or
Seed Source
C. F. Andrus

R. T. Brown
Asgrow Seed Co.
J. D. Norton
If
it
"i
C. F. Andrus

J. D. Norton
if


Location
VBL, Charleston, S. C.
(I II II
S. La. Sta., Port Sulphur, La.
Atlanta, Ga.
Auburn Univ.

It to

VBL, Charleston, S. C.
it 1i 11
Auburn Univ.
of 11


BLOCK 6. Tomato variety trial (staked) for vine-ripe harvest.

Planting data: Transplanted to field February 5, 1968
5' between rows; 16" between plants
Pruned to a "fork"
1,000 Ib 4-8-8/A at planting
1,000 Ib 4-8-8/A February 22
400 Ib 4-8-8/A before staking (March 11)
Sidedressed weekly (beginning April 10) with 100 Ib 13-0-44/A


Plot
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.


I [


I-










Replicated Trial

Plot Variety or
No. Br. line
1. Floradel
2. Indian River
3. 393-6-4-1-BK CAStMWd
4. 393-9-D2-BK CAVStMWd
5. 393-9-D1-BK CAVStMWd
6. 310-1-D2-DBK-D1-BK CAVStMWd
7. 316-1-2-5-D1-BK CAVStMWd
8. 216-17 -BK-D5-D3 -Dl-03 -DBK-DBK CAVStMW

Observational Trial (So. end of Block 6)

Plot Breeding
No. line
101 393-1-R1-BK CAStMWd
102 380-4-BK-1-Dl CAVStMWd
103 393-9-D1-D1 CAVStMWd
104 393-7-D1-D3 CAVStMWd
DOl1 1544-7-1-1-BK CAStMWd
D012 2098-BG3 (elongated fruit)
S= indeterminate vine type
I = determinate vine type
D = determinate vine type

BLOCK 7. Tomato variety trial for mature-green harvest

Planting data: Transplanted to field February 2, 1968
6' between beds; 2' between plants
Fertilizer 1,000 Ib 4-8-8/A on February 2, 22 & March 20;
200 Ib 13-0-44 on April 12.

Replicated Trial


Plot Variety or
No. Br. line
1. Homestead S & M 500
2. Tropi-Gro
3. Tropi-Red
4. STEP 535-2-1 CAStMWd
5. 1544-3-4-BK CAStMWd
6. 1544-3-4-BK-BK CAStMWd
7. 664-3-1-BK CAVStMWd
8. 1150-4-2-3-FP4-FPBK CAStW
9. 2005-D4-BGBK CAVStW J2
10. 407-D3-D2-D2 CAVStW J2


-17-







Observational Trial (So. end of Block 7)


Plot
No.
D01.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


BLOCKS 8 & 9. Tomatoes


for Machine Harvest


Purpose: To evaluate 6 breeding lines at 4 harvest schedules and 2 plant
populations for their potential as machine harvest varieties.
This experiment is similar to the one conducted in the Fall of 1967.


Planting data:


Field seeded January 12, 1986
Beds on 5' centers
Block 8 single row/bed equivalent to 4,358 plots/A
Block 9 double row/bed equivalent to 8,716 plots/A


Breed lines indicated by No. 1 through 6
Harvest schedule indicated by a, b, c or
Plant population indicated by A, B, C or


line


Breeding
line
505-D7-BGABK
407-Dll-S1-D10-BGBK
407-D11-S1-D4-BGBK
407-D3-D4-DBK-SpBK
407-D4-S1-DBK
1346-D10-S3-D10-BGABK


Description
3 harvests by hand
once-over harvest at 1st
once-over harvest at 2nd
once-over harvest at 3rd


Plant
Population
8,716
4.358


harvest of "a"
harvest of "a"
harvest of "a"


Indicated by
A & B
C&D


Example of Field Plot numbering system:
Ala means 8,716 plants/A breeding line no. 1 to be
harvested 3 times by hand.


-18-


Breeding line
407-D3-D1-BG1
1339-D3-D1-D1-BG3
407-D3-D5-D2-2
407-D3-D5-D2-1
1339-D3-S1-D1-BG2
407-D3-Dl-D1-1
912-3-1 -CAVStMWd
1346-D10-53-D1-S2
1346-D10-S3-D1-EG2
407-D3-D2-D5-D2-BK


Harvest
Schedule
a
b
c
d






BLOCK 10, N 1/2. Magnesium (Mg) sources for watermelons


Purpose: To evaluate several sources of magnesium for t'.hir ability to supply
Mg to watermelons as measured by plant up-take of Mg and by yield.

Cropping history: New land.

Liming history: 4 tons high calcium lime/A Dec. 1, 1968

Planting data: Seeded Jan. 15, 1968 Charleston Gray variety, 3' x 10' hill
spacing, single row plots, 4 replications, N-P-X constant for all plots.


Plot Magnesium MgO
No. source lb/A
1 Pro/mesium (30 mesh) 60
2 Pro/mesium (66 mesh) 60
3 Pro/mesium 60
4 Magnesium sulfate 60
5 K Mag 60
6 Check None


BLOCK 10, S 1/2. Copper (Cu) sources for watermelons

Purpose: To evaluate 3 sources of Cu for their ability to supply Cu to the
plant as measured by plant up-take of Cu and by yield.

Cropping history: New land.

Liming history: 4 T/A high calcium lime + 1 T/A dolomite Dec. 1, 1968

Planting data: Seeded Jan. 15, 1968 Charleston Gray variety, 3' x 10' hill
spacing, single row plots, 4 replications, N-P-K constant for all plots.

Plot Copper source Cu source Metalic Cu
No. lb/A lb/A
1 Copper sulfate (25% Cu) 16.0 4
2 Copper oxide (50% Cu) 8.0 4
3 Copper oxide (75% Cu) 5.3 4

BLOCKS 11 & 12. Experiment on rates and placement of micro-nutrients.

Purpose: To compare 4 rates and 2 placements of micro-nutrients for their
effect on watermelon yield. This is to investigate the possibility of
phosphorus reducing the availability of certain micro-nutrients when the
micro-nutrients are mixed in the fertilizer and applied in bands.

Planting data: Seeded Jan. 30, 1968 Charleston Gray variety, 3 row plots,
3' x 10' hill spacing, 4 replications, micro-nutrient source is Frit-503,
N-P-K constant for all plots.

Plot No. Treatment
1 Check (No Frit-503)
2 30 lb. Frit-503/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
3 45 lb. Frit-503/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
4 60 lb. Frit-503/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
5 Check (no Frit-503)
6 30 lb. Frit-503 preplant-broadcast & incorporated
7 45 lb. Frit-503 preplant-broadcast & incorporated
8 60 lb. Frit-503 preplant-broadcast & incorporated
-19-










BLOCKS 13 & 14. Experiment on rates and placements of Copper (Cu).


Purpose: Same as Blocks 11 & 12


Planting data:


Seeded January 18, 1968 Charleston Gray Variety
3 row plots, 3' x 10' hill spacing, 4 replications
Copper source is copper sulfate
N-P-K constant for all plots


Plot No. Treatment
1. Check (No Cu)
2. 2 Ib Cu/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
3. 4 lb Cu/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
4. 8 lb Cu/A mixed with fertilizer & banded
5. Check (No Cu)
6. 2 Ib Cu/A preplant-broadcast & incorporated
7. 4 Ib Cu/A preplant-broadcast & incorporated
8. 8 lb Cu/A preplant-broadcast & incorporated


BLOCK 15. Effect of lime on Fusarium wilt of watermelons

Purpose: To determine the effect of 4 liming materials each applied at 4 rates
for the control of Fusarium wilt of watermelons.

Cropping history: New land (pH 4.7)

Lime history: No lime until treatments were applied on January 5, 1968.


Planting data:


All plots infested with Fusarium wilt fungus on January 26.
Seeded January 29 Charleston Gray Variety
3' x 7' hill spacing, single row plots, 4 replications
Fertilizer: 3 applications of 1,000 lb 4-8-8/A


Material
No. Material
1. Calcic limestone (raises pH & supplies calcium)
2. Dolomite limestone (raises pH & supplies magnesium
& calcium)
3. 1/2 Calcic + 1/2 dolomitic limestone
4. Gypsum (supplies calcium, does not raise pH)


Rate
No.


Rate
tons/A


P, 0
b 2
c 4
d 6


Example
la is
Ib is
etc.


of plot numbering system:
a check plot (no lime)
calcic limestone at 2 tons/A


-20-









Results as of April 12, 1968
Effect of lime source and rate on per cent Fusarium wilt of Charleston Gray
watermelons (April 12, 1968).


Lime rate tons/A Source
Source 0 2 4 6 mean
Calcic lime 47.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.8
Dolomite 45.0 6.2 3.1 3.1 14.4
Calcic + Dol. 41.0 12.5 10.3 2.5 16.6
Gypsum 24.4 14.0 29.2 36.8 26.1
Rate mean 39.4 8.2 10.6 10.6


Lime rate Significant 1% level
Lime source Significant 5% level
Rate x source Significant 5% level

Field A

BLOCK 1. Effect of Pinolene 1902 on the adherence of fungicides to Homestead tomato
leaves.

Purpose: To compare the amount of fungicide residues at 7 and 14 day spray intervals
and determine disease control.

Cropping history: Fall and Spring 1966 native cover, Spring 1967 tomatoes, Fall
1967 tomatoes.

Planting data: Transplanted to plots March 8, 6 five foot rows, 5' plots; 2' between
plants, Fertilizer: 1,000 Ibs/A 4-8-8 30% organic applied 3 times to date

Treatments:


Trt.
no. Materials
1 Daconil 2787
2 Daconil 2787
3 Dyrene
4 Difolatan 80W
5 Polyram
6 Difolatan 4 Flo
7 Manzate D
8 Dithane M-45
9 Control (Pinolene 1902)
(No fungicide)
10 Control (No Pinolene 1902


Lbs per
100 gals
1/2
1 1/2
1
1 1/2
1 1/2
2 1/2 pts
1 1/2
1 1/2


& no fungicide)


Days of intervals
7 (-) 15 (+)
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+


Results to date: Not enough disease has
to date.


appeared on leaves to suggest any effects


BLOCK 2. Effect of Pinolene 1902 on the adherence of Miller 658 to Homestead
tomato leaves.

Purpose: To compare the amount of Miller 658 residues at 2 different rates (2 and
4 Ibs per 100 gallons of water) sprayed at 3 intervals (5, 10, and 15 days)
with 3 rates of Pinolene 1902.


-21-


& no funp-icide)





I I nm |f--i


--









Cropping history:


Planting data:


Fall and Spring 1966 native cover
Spring 1967 Tomatoes
Fall 1967 Tomatoes

Transplanted to plots March 8
6 five foot rows
5' plots; 2' between plants
Fertilizer 1,000 Ibs/A of 4-8-8
times to date.


(30% organic) applied 3


Treatments:


Treatments Rate/100 Days of Lbs of Miller 658
No. Materials Gallons Intervals 2 (-) 4 (+)
1. Pinolene 1902 1.5 5 +
2. Pinolene 1902 1.5 10 +
3. Pinolene 1902 1.5 15 +
4. Pinolene 1902 0.5 5 +
5. Pinolene 1902 0.5 10 +
6. Pinolene 1902 0.5 15 +
7. Pinolene 1902 None 5 +
8. Pinolene 1902 None 10 +
9. Pinolene 1902 None 15 +
10. Control No Pinolene No Miller 658


Results to date: No toxic effect of the high
observed to date.


rate of Pinolene 1902 has been


-22-




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