Title: Research projects concerned with ornamental plants
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094975/00001
 Material Information
Title: Research projects concerned with ornamental plants list compiled and data summarized, fall 1968
Physical Description: 46 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Roberts, Eliot C.
University of Florida -- Dept. of Ornamental Horticulture
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Department of Ornamental Horticulture, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1968
Copyright Date: 1968
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Ornamental -- Research -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "Conducted by Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences."
Statement of Responsibility: by Eliot C. Roberts.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094975
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 436169797

Full Text

4


RESEARCH PROJECTS CONCERNED

WITH

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS


Conducted by


Agricultural Experiment Stations
University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

















List Compiled and
Data Summarized Fall 1968

By

Eliot C. Roberts, Ph.D
Professor and Chairman
Department of Ornamental Horticulture
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


* UM BR

MA 2' .; 1970


A.S. Univ. of Flori




5 9


MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECTS OF INTEREST TO GROWERS AND USERS OF
ORNAMENTAL PLANTS AND TO THE LAWN AND GARDEN SERVICE AND
SUPPLY INDUSTRY




The Agricultural Experiment Stations of the University of

Florida are actively engaged in research on the production and

culture of ornamental plants. Specific projects are assigned

to research specialists who, in conjunction with other scientists

within the Agricultural Experiment Station, work in these areas

until information is gained which will be of value to the orn-

amentals industry. Since investigations are conducted at several

stations and laboratories within the state, it is likely that

individuals may be most familiar with the projects conducted

closest to home or at the location where a personal contact has

developed with a research specialist.

This project list and summary of results has been prepared

in an effort to emphasize the importance of ornamentals research

on a state wide basis and to recognize the research personnel

who contribute so substantially to our fund of knowledge in this

area. No attempt has been made to provide detailed progress

statements or to draw conclusions from research being conducted

at this time. As questions arise concerning results from projects

listed, additional and more specific information may.lbe obtained

From Ie "follca!J rg -pro6jec leaders: ."




1




A










LIST OF STAFF ASSIGNED MAJOR RESPONSIBILITY FOR RESEARCH ON
ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

Department of Ornamental Horticulture.- .404 Newell Hall,
University of Florida, Gainesville, _F32601


1. E. C. Roberts, Ph.D., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture
and Chairman of the Department.

2. R. D. Dickey, M. S. A., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture -
Woody Ornamentals Research.

3. G. C. Horn,.Ph.D., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture -
Turfgrass Teaching and Research.

4. J. N. Joiner, Ph.D., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture -
Floriculture Teaching and Research.

5. T. J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture -
Floriculture Teaching and Research.

6. E. W. McElwee, Ph.D., Professor of Ornamental Horticulture -
Woody Ornamentals Extension and Research.

7. S. E. McFadden Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ornamental
Horticulture Woody Ornamentals Research.

8. C. A. Conover, M. S.,Assistant Professor of Ornamental
Horticulture Floriculture Extension and Research.

9. H. G. Meyers, M. S., Assistant Professor of Ornamental
Horticulture Turfgrass Extension and Research.

10. C. E. Whitcomb, M. S., Research Associate in Ornamental
Horticulture Woody Ornamentals Teaching and Research.

11. T. E. Anderson, B. S., Instructor in Ornamental Horticulture -
Home Grounds Extension and Research.



Ridge Ornamental Horticultural Laboratory P~,.O 'eBox 790,
Apopka, F132703

1. W. E. Waters, Ph. D., Associate Ornamental Horticulturist
and Head of the Laboratory. (Formerly Gulf Coast Station)

2. R. T. Poole, Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist -
Foliage and Fern Research.

3. "Vacancy", Ph. D., Assistant Plant Pathologist Foliage
and Fern Research.












Plantation Field Laboratory 3205 S. W. 70th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, F133314

1. E. 0. Burt, Ph.D., Ornamental Horticulturist and Head
of the laboratory.

2. "Vacancy" Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist -
Turfgrass Breeding Research.

3. W. M. Morton, Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist -
Woody Ornamentals Research. (Formerly T. Cochis)

4. H. I. Borders, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist Woody Ornamentals
and Turfgrass Research.

5. T. L. Stringfellow, Ph.D., Assistant Entomologist -
Turfgrass and Woody Ornamentals Research.


Gulf Coast Station P. 0. Box 2125, Manatee Station,
Bradenton, F133505

1. J. W. Strobel, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist and
Head of the Station.

2. F. J. Marousky, Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist
(USDA) Floriculture Research.

3. "Vacancy", Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist -;
Floriculture Research.

4. "VacEacy", Ph.D., Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist -
Floriculture Breeding Research.

5. A. W. Engelhard, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist -
Floriculture Research.

6. R. 0. Magie, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist Floriculture Research.

7. E. G. Kelsheimer, Ph.D., Entomologist Floriculture Research.

8. A. J. Overman, M. S., Associate Soils Microbiologist -
Floriculture Research.

9. ;. S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Plant Physiologist Floriculture Research.


Everglades Statiu P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade, F133430


1. D. W. Beardsley, Ph.D., Animal Nutritionist and Head
of the Station.





* I


Everglades Station Continued:

2. G. H. Snyder, Ph.D., Assistant Soils Chemist Woody
Ornamentals and Turfgrass Research.

3. J. A. Winchester, Ph.D., Associate Nematologist -
Turfgrass Research.


Sub-Tropical Station 18905 S. W. 280th Street,
Homestead, F133030


1. R. A. Conover, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist and Head of
-the Station,.

2. R. B. Marlatt, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist -
Woody Ornamentals and Foliage Research..

3. R. M. Baranowski, Ph.D., Entomologist -Woody
Ornamentals Research.

4. C. W. Campbell, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist Woody
Ornamentals Research.

5. D. 0. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Entomologist Woody
Ornamentals Research..

6. T. W. Young, Ph.D., Horticulturist Floriculture Research.


Central Florida Station P. O. Box 909, Sanford, F132771


1. H. L. Rhoades, Ph.D., Associate Nematologist Foliage
Crop Research.

2. R. B. Forbes, Ph.D., Associate Soils Chemist Flori-
culture Research.

3. P. J. Westgate, Ph.D., Horticulturist Floriculture Researeh.

4. W. T. Scudder, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist
Floriculture Research.


Big Bend Horticultural Laboratory P. O. Box 539
Monticello, F132344


1. H. W. Young, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist -
Woody Ornamentals Research.

4









Department of Plant Pathology Building 833, Radio Road,
University of Florida, Gainesville, F132601


1. L. H. Purdy, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology and
Chairman of the Department.

2. T. E. Freeman, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology-
Turfgrass Research.

3. H. N. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology -
Floriculture and Woody Ornamentals Research.


Department of Entomology and Nematology 344 B McCarty,
University of Florida, Gainesville, F132601


1. W. G. Eden, Ph.D., Professor of Ehtomology and Chairman
of the Department.

2. S. H. Kerr, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology -
Turfgrass Research.

3. L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology
Floriculture and Woody Ornamentals Research.

4. V. G. Perry, Ph.D., Professor of Nematology -
Turfgrass Research.

5. G. C. Smart, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nematology -
Turfgrass and Foliage Research.


Soils Department 106 Newell Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, F132601


1. C. F. Eno, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Microbiology and
Chairman of the Department.

2. L. C. Hammond, Ph. D., Professor of Soil Physics -
Turfgrass Research.

3. W. L. Pritchett, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Chemistry -
Turfgrass Research.

4. G. M. Volk, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Chemistry -
Turfgrass Research.










Department of Agricultural Economics 162 B McCarty -
University of Florida, Gainesville, F132601


1. K. R. Tefertiller, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural
Economics and Chairman of the Department.

2. C. N. Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural
Ecomcmics Woody Ornamentals and Turfgrass Research.

3. E. W. Cake, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics -
Woody Ornamentals Extension and Research.

4. S. E. Rosenberger, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural
Ecnomaics Garden Supply Research.


Forestry Department 412 Rolfs, University of Florida,
Gainesville, F132601


1. P. W. Frazer, M. F., Associate Professor of Forestry.
Woody Ornamentals Research.










FLOWERS


EFFECTS OF NUTRITION AND POTTING MEDIA ON GROWTH AND
FLOWERING OF CERTAIN EPIPHYTIC ORCHIDS

State Project 917 T. J. Sheehan

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Preliminary in vivo experiments with orchid
root tips.

Progress A variety of orchid and tissue culture media were
tested for root elongation. Contamination by fungi, from the
vascular areas of the root sections caused complications.
Methods for control of these internal fungi are being evaluated.


THE EFFECTS OF PHOTOPERIOD AND TEMPERATURE ON THE
GROWTH AND FLOWERING OF CERTAIN FLORIST CROPS

State Project 1069 T. J. Sheehan
J. N. Joiner

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effects of storage temperature for different
periods of time and of thiourea and potassium thiocyanate on
germination of caladium tabers. Effects of photoperiod variation
on chrysanthemums as indicated by level of indole compounds
in the tissue and nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and
magnesium content of foliage.

Progress All tubers germinated rapidly except those stored
at 500F. which were delayed because of apical bud injury -
Tubers receiving this treatment, however, had more shoots per
pet than other treatments, but leaves were abnormally green and
small. Potassium thiocyanate was harmful in most instances,
causing a delay in germination and a reduction in number of
shoots per pot. Thiourea caused more shoots per pot at 500F
than other treatments. Data on the flowering mechanism of
chrysanthemums is being proo~ssed.







CHEMICAL WEED CONTROL IN COMMERCIAL CUT FLOW'S


State Project 1092 W. E. Waters
D. S. Burgis

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Weed control in Easter lilies and control of
Nutsedge Cyperus rotundus 1.

Progress Scales and small bulbs were treated preemergence
and lay-by with amiben amide, bensulide, dichlobenil, EPTC,
Trifluralin and prometryne at varying rates. Slight phytotox-
icity was noted only with the dichlobenil treatment. Good to
excellent weed control was obtained with all treatments except
amiben amide which only gave fair control. Two field experiments
conducted on Broward fine sand to determine the soil persistence
and effectiveness of 4 herbicides in controlling purple nutsedge
resulted in excellent control with dichlobenil. When 20 pounds
active ingredient per acre of dichlobenil was incorporated in
the soil sufficient quantities persisted after 24 months to be
highly toxic to beans, and tomato transplants and moderately
toxic to coan,gladiolus. corms and squash.


MACRO-ELEMENT NUTRITION OF CERTAIN FLORICULTURAL CROPS

State Project 1107 J. N. Joiner
T. J. Sheehan

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Translocation of phosphorus in gladiolus corms
as determined by movement of radioactive phosphours. Effect of
nitrogen and potassium and fumigation on bulb size and flower-
ing of Narcissus tazetta 'Paperwhite'. Effects of media and
fertilizer levels on pot-grown chrysanthemums 'Yellow Delaware'
and 'Oregon'.

Progress P32 applied to potting soil was absorbed and
translocated with equal ease and rapidity to all parts of
the gladiolus plants and increased in all tissue for about 16
weeks after potting then decreased. Bulb weight did not vary for
narcissus under the treatments described. Bulbs will be forced
to obtain flowering data. 'Oregon' chrysanthemums produced more
and larger flowers in 2/3 bark 1/3 perlite, but flowers
developed faster in peat-sand. 'Delaware' produced more
flowers which matured faster in 2/3 bork 1/3 perlite. Medium
levels of fertilizer were better than low and as good as high
levels.











FACTORS AFFECTING THE KEEPING QUALITY OF CUT FLOWERS


State Project 1181 W. E. Waters
S. S. Woltz

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Study of keeping quality of chrysanthemums,
gladiolus and roses. Effects of well water on keeping quality
of cut-flowers.

Progress With chrysanthemums light and cooling prolonged
storage life and maintained chlorophyll, sugars and photo-
synthetic capacity of leaves at higher nitrogen levels.
Increasing rates or duration of nitrogen application improved
keeping quality of leaves in light but not in dark. Prolonged
nitrogen fertilization depressed keeping quality of flowers
stored in dark but improved it for those in light. With
gladiolus flower keeping quality and bulb yield were not affected
greatly by treatments. With roses nitrogen and potassium
levels failed to exert any major effect on keeping quality.
A study of well water salinity and soluble fluoride on keeping
quality of chrysanthemum, gladiolus and rose flowers indicated
that total water salinity was the primary factor in reducing
keeping quality of chrysanthemums; however, soluble fluoride
was the primary factor in reducing keeping quality of gladiolus
and roses.

MORPHOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF GROWTH
REGULATORS ON FLOWERING PLANTS

Hatch Project 1189 J. N. Joiner
T. J. Sheehan

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effects of heavy aromatic naptha (HAN) on dis-
budding and growth of chrysanthemum varieties Fred Shoesmith,
Mrs. Ray and Indionapolis #1. Effects of long day treatments
and chemical sprays on flowering and growth of Gardenia
jasminoides 'Veitchii'. Effects of IAA and kinetin on rooting
of stem cuttings of two clonal selections of Feijoa sellowiana.
Effects of 9-and 10-carbon methyl esters of nonanoate and a
moisture of 6- and 10- carbon solutions on terminal bud abortion
of azaleas in pots and in the field and on potted chrysanthemums.









Project 1189 Continued:


Progress Only Fred Shoesmith variety of chrysanthemum was
affected by treatment. The highest level of HAN applied on
the 14th short day gave the best disbudding results. Long
day intervals had no effect but cycocel sprays doubled the
number of gardenia flowers compared with the check and 239
treatments. With Feijoa sellcwiana gas chromatography failed to
reveal endogenous indole compounds in any tissue, but did reveal
one unknown compound which was present in much greater quantity
in difficult to root cuttings than in the others. Kinetin
and IAA promoted rooting only on cuttings from the relatively
easy-to-root cloce. Data on the effect of methyl esters of
nonbnoate on chrysanthemums is being proedsed; ~ ;. .


CHRYSANTHEMUM SPACING

Non Projected J. N. Joiner
T. J. Sheehan
C. A. Conover

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effects of different planting patterns on field
chrysanthemum production.

Progress Number of bunches per bed, weight per bunch,
number of stems per bunch and percent recoverable stems were
affected by number of cuttings used and planting patterns.


NEMATODES THEIR EFFECTS AND CONTROL
ON VEGETABLE AND ORNAMENTAL CROPS

State Project 992 A. J. Overman

Entomology

Concerning Nematode control in container grown roses on
Rosa fortuniana rootstock. Effect of gladiolus flower and
corm production on rootknot nematode infested soil.

Progress Rose flower production indicated that rates of
Zinopho.s greater than 4 pounds per acre active and Temik
greater than 0.6 pounds were phytotoxic. Sarolex increased
flower production as application rates increased from 8 to
32 gallons per acre. Gladiolus flower and corm production
were not improved by post-plant applications of Sarolex, Zinophos,
Nemagon, Dasanit, parathion, phorate and Temik at the rates tested.










METHODS OF APPLYING SYSTEMATIC
INSECTICIDES TO PLANTS

State Project 1095 R. M. Beranowski

Entomology

Concerning Determination of.residues of UC 21149 in chrysan-
themum tissue resulting from single and double applications
of two formulations at various rates.

Progress Samples that were taken at regular intervals after
application were held frozenn until shipped to the Crobaugh
laboratories for analysis. Data is being processed.


IDENTIFICATION, PATHOGENICITY AND CONTROL OF STYLET
BEARING NEMATODES ASSOCIATED WITH CHRYSANTHEMUM
PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA

State Project 1149 R. M. Baranowski
A. J. Overman

Entomology

Concerning -' Effect of the miticide ambush on nematode popu-
lations associated with.c rysanthemums.

Progress Total nematode populations were very low during
the test season. Plant growth was very poor and uneven growth
within plots precluded the taking of yield data.


BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT AND OTHER PESTS OF
CUT FLOWERS

State Project 1269 E. G. Kelsheimer

Entomology

Concerning Control of two spotted spider mite Tetranychus
spp. on roses, chrysanthemums and carnations and looper
complex on chrysanthemum.

Progress Marocide was effective at the rates used for control
of two-spotted spider mite on chrysanthemums, roses and car-
nations. Thuracide is an effective control for the looper
complex on chrysanthemum but should be applied in the late
afternoon for best results. Established infestations of loqper
require the addition of a phosphatic for at least the first
application or until brought under control and then weekly
sprayings of the bacterial pathogen should suffice.









BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECTS AND
RELATED PESTS ON ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

State Project 1353 E. G. Kelsheimer

Entomology

Concerning Infestation of oleander scale Phenacapsis cockerelli
cooley det. Dekle on Bird of Paradise Strelitizia reginae.

Progress Monsanto 47114 and Ambush applied at 3 times the
normal dosage look like promising controls for the scale.


IMPROVEMENT OF GLADIOLUS CORMS
WITITPHOSPHATIC ''IECTICIDES2

Non Projected R. 0. Magie

Entomology

Concerning Use of phosphatic insecticides in gladiolus
production.

Progress Parathion 10% granules scattered over corms in
open furrow increased number and weight of flowers and corms
by 50 to 60%. Corms from the insecticide treated plots were
bright and clean compared to the dark scabby corms from
control plots. The latter were heavily infested with mites.
Fusarium disease as well as insects and mites were controlled
by the phosphatic insecticides,


GLADIOLUS COrM CLEARING AS A MEANS OF
LOCATING HIDDEN NEMATODE INFESTATIONS

Non projected R. C. Nims

Entomology

Concerning Development of a relatively simple way of locating
tissue infested with nematodes orsither pathogens.

Progress Starch digestion with acid, followed by dehydration
and clearing of the corms proved to work best. Fixing and
hardenihgof the tissues in a 10% formaldehyde solution for
at least several months was necessary for good results.
After infiltration with xylene the tissues were transparent and
the internal anatomy of the corms was viewable. Necrotic and
distorted tissue was easily located and removed, and it was
ready to be inbedded in paraffin for future microtome section-
ing and subsequent microscopic examination.









CONTROL OF GLADIOLUS CORM DISEASES


State Project 502 R. 0. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Chemical therapy of latent Fusarium infection
of gladiolus corms.

Progress Duter, Thiabendazole, iodine plus DMSO, Phaltan,
and Sp 345 were found promising as pre-plant corm treatments.
With relatively healthy stock of large friendship corms a
15-minute pre-plant soak in parathion 8E increased early and
total flower production and a similar soak in Phaltan increased
both flower and corm production. Thiabendazole improved
flower quality and produced heavier corms than Dowicide B
and Bay 33172. Furrow and dip treatments were compared.


CONTROL OF CURVUIARIA AND BOTRYTIS
DISEASES OF GLADIOLUS

State Project 506 R. 0. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Control of Botrytis cinerea using gladiolus as a
host.

Progress The opening florets of cut spikes of Spic and
Span variety developed much less B. cinerea infection when
dipped or sprayed with Tutane solution 18 hours after inoc-
ulation with Tutane, Captan, Daconil 2787, Etsparen, or
Thiabendazole. Termil dust (Daconil 2787) was as effective as
Captan, Botran and Daconil 2787 sprays in controlling petal
infection of flowers.


GLADIOLUS BREEDING

State Project 737 R. O. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Development of new gladiolus varieties.

Progress Two selections, a pink and a lavender are being
propagated for possible release and four other selections are
being critically evaluated. The:.following refinements and
resistances were found in 14 breeding stocks: strong,straight
stems; vigorous roots; well-attached, flat florets; and
resistances to Carvularia, Fusarium and Botrytis diseases.








PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS OF THE NUTRITIONAL AND CULTURAL
CHARACTERISTICS OF ASCHOCHYTA CHRYSANTHEMI, THE CAUSE OF
ASCHOCHYTA BLIGHT OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS

Non Projected A. W. Engelhard

Plant Pathology

Concerning Aschochyta chrysanthemi fungus disease on
commercially grown chrysanthemums.

Progress A chrysanthemi isolates collected in Florida
have produced very few pycnidia in vitro. Mycelial growth was
much more rapid on PDA than on MA. At 280 but not at 200 or
24C mycelial growth was greatly reduced in "intermittent"
light as compared to in the dark. Infection of foliage and
flowers of chrysanthemum occurred when inoculated with
suspensions containing thick-walled mycelium. Freezing the
suspensions did not destroy the infective nature of the
mycelium. The thick-wall mycelium appeared to resist desi-
ccati6n in the laboratory.


EVALUATION OF FUNGICIDES (WITH AND WITHOUT META SYSTOX -R)
:FOKRHYTOTOXITY ON.OPE1- CHRYSANTHEMUM FLOWERS

Non Projected A. W. Engelhard

Plant Pathology

Concerning Effect of fungicides on phytotoxicity in Chrysanthemum
morifolium 'White Iceberg' and 'Indianapolis Yellow'.

Progress After the third spray definite petal injury occurred
with Botran. When fungicides were mixed with Meta-Systox R the
results were the same except that the amount of plant response
from Botran was increased and definite injury occurred with
Tutane after third and fourth sprays on White Iceberg but not
Indianapolis Yellow. Meta-Systox R sprayed alone injured both
varieties beginning with the third spray. It was not readily
apparent whether incipient flower injury occurred more readily
on older rather than younger blooms or whether it occurred as
the result of the accumulation of toxicant with successive
sprays.








TWO SPOTTED MITE POPULATIONS ON CHRYSANTHEMUMS SPRAYED WITH
TWENTY FUNGICIDE TREATMENTS

Non Projected A. W. Engelhard

Plant Pathology

Concerning Effect of fungicide treatments on two spotted
mite Tetranychus telarius populations on chrysanthemums.

Progress On 'White Iceberg' chrysanthemums Orthocide
treatments gave the lowest mite populations and Manzate the
highest.


AGE OF CHRYSANTHEMUM FLOWERS IN RELATION TO BOTRYTIS DISEASE
SUSCEPTIBILITY

Non projected R. 0. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Susceptibility of. chrysanthemum to botrytis
disease.

Progress The ray flowers of Indianapolis white were most
susceptible to Botrytis cinerea infection when the young
buds unfolded and then became progressively less susceptible as
the flowers matured. The flowers appeared to increase in
susceptibility as they senesced.


PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE CAUSES OF SOME FLOWER
AND FOLIAGE DISEASES OF ASTER, CARNATIONS AND CHRYSANTHEMUMS

Non Projected .A. W. Engelhard

Plant Pathology

Concerning Downy mildew Basidiophora entospora on king
asters Callistephus chinensis.

Progress B entospora was extremely pathogenic on leaves and
stems, but did not infect flowers of king asters. White
Iceberg foliage was not susceptible to B entospora, necrosis
or decay has been observed on the foliage and on the flowers
of asters, chrysanthemums and carnations. The diseased
condition has been observed in the field, on flowers in transit
and on potted chrysanthemum plants. One isolate tentatively
identified as Alternaria spp. (1665) decayed asters, carnations
and chrysanthemum flowers, while another Alternaria spp. (1652 A)
decayed asters and chrysanthemum flowers. Botran, Daconil
2787, Dyrene, Dithane M-22 Special, Dithane M-45, Dithane 2-
78, Fermate, Manzate and Orthocide provided good control of
the disease caused by the 1652 A isolate.
15








CURING OF GLADIOLUS CORMS IN RELATION TO FLOWER PRODUCTION
AND FUSARIUM DISEASE CONTROL

Non projected R. 0. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Comparison of five curing methods on gladiolus
corms.

Progress Curing methods had little or no effect on flower
and corm production of all varieties. Morsodren treated
corms produced plants with inferior numbers of flowers and
corms.


PHYTOPHTHORA CROWN ROT OF PETUNIA IN FLORIDA

Non Projected H. N. Miller

Plant Pathology

Concerning Crown rot and blight of petunia caused by the fungus
Phytophthora parasitica.

Progress All parts of stems and leaves may be infected.
Roots are not generally infected. Symptoms include blackened,
watersoaked areas of stems and lateral branches and blighting
of leaves and growing tips. Stems at the ground line may
become straw colored and somewhat shredded. Plants wilt and
die. Investigations on control of this disease by sanitation,
sterilization of soil, pots and flats and by the use of
fungicidal soil mixes and soil drenches are under way.


LILY BULB TREATMENTS TO CONTROL COLLETOTRICHUM BLACK SCALE
DISEASE

Non Projected R. 0. Magie

Plant Pathology

Concerning Control of block scale and Rhizoctonia dis-
coloration of lily bulbs.

Progress The best yields of marketable wi-te bulbs were
produced with Daconil 2787.









YELLOW STRAPLEAF OF CHRYSANTHEMUM MORIFOLIUM RAM


State Project 997 S. S. Woltz

Plant Physiology

Concerning the yellow strapleaf (YSL) syndrome of
chrysanthemum morifloium RAM. Iceberg.

Progress Treatment of Iceberg plants with 1-amino, 2-
nitrocyclopentane, 1-carboxylic acid (ANCPA), the toxin
synthesized by Aspergillus wentii wehm. produced the YSL
syndrome. Foliar sprays as well as root applications of the
chemical produced the same results. L.leucine added to the
treatments reduced the symptoms. This indicates that the
toxin is acting as an antimetabolite of leucine, although
this is not necessarily the sale mechanism of toxicity.
Zinnia is severely affected by ANCPA treatment. The most
common response is a failure to develop chlorophyll (yellow-
ing) in rapidly expanding leaves. The time required for visible
response to occur ranged from 1 to 6 days. Transient yellowing
disappeared in 5 to 7 days whereas the severe expression
lasted 14 to 21 days. Deformations that occurred, such as
narrowing of leaves and hyponasty were longer lasting or
permanent.


EFFECT OF FLUORIDES ON CERTAIN HIGHER PLANTS

State Project 1148 S. S. Woltz

Plant Physiology

Concerning methods for comparing the metabolic response of
leaf disks from several plant species to floating in dilute
HF solutions containing various sugars and inorganic constituents.

Progress Measurements were made of growth in terms of increased
area of disks as well as increases in fresh weight. Photo-
synthesis, respiration, and change in chlorophyll content in
response to fluorides were measured. Disks from bean leaves
were much less sensitive to HF ret-ardation of photosynthesis
than gladiolus leaf disks. The inclusion of 0.1 N glucose in
the flotation solution increased the sensitivity of photosyn-
thesis to fluoride inhibition.










IMPROVEMENT OF PEST CONTROL AND NUTRITIONAL PRACTICES FOR
CALADIUM TUBER PRODUCTION


State Project 1089 R. B. Forbes
P. J. Westgate
H. L. Rhoades
W. T. Scudder

Soils

Concerning Nutritional studies, Nematode control and weed
control important in Caladium tuber-production.

Progress Yields of Caladium in a nitrogen, phosphoras, potassium,
magnesium experiment were not affected by treatment. Best
tuber yields were obtained with ON, 100 pounds P205, and 200
pounds K20 per acre plus minor elements. CopperfSve a threefold
increase in tuber yields over the. check. There were no
significant yield differences in the test involving controlled
release nitrogen and pttastium materials. Immersing root-knot
nematode infested Candidum and Crimson Wave tubers in Zinophos
and Dasanit reduced root galling in the subsequent crop and
significantly increased the yield of tubers. DNBP, paraquat,
linuron, atrazine, ametryne and prometryne and mixtures of these
with oils and surfactants produced good weed control without
lasting injury when applied post emergence to weeds at the
time of caladium emergence.








FOLIAGE PLANTS


A PHYSIOLOGICAL DISORDER OF FOLIAGE PLANTS

Non Projected R. D. Dickey

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effect of high soluble salts as a cause of physio-
logical disorders in Philodendron oxycardium (cordatum) and
Scindapsus aureus (pothos).

Progress A chlorosis of the leaves in which white stripes
alternated with green stripes and a reduced leaf size with
roughened and distorted surface have been observed on cordatum
and pothos plants. Peat on which plants were- grown
contained 5,880,11,620 and 21,000 ppm soluble salts. These
symptoms were correlated with the high soluble salt contents
noted.


EVALUATION OF SUB-TROPICAL ORNAMENTAL PLANTS FOR SOUTH FLORIDA

Non.Projected T. Cochis

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of nearly 300 species in the Newbill
Research Botanical collection.

Progress A check list of plants in the collection has been
compiled. Growth habit, cold and heat resistance, flowering,
propagation and other data are being collected on these plants.
New plants are being added from private and commercial sources
and from the USDA Plant Introduction Stations.

NEMATODES-THEIR EFFECTS AND CONTROLS ON VEGETABLE AND
ORNAMENTAL CROPS

State Project 992 H. L. Rhoades

Entomology

Concerning- Infestation of leatherleaf fern Polystichum
adiantiforme with the lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans.

Progress Nematocides that reduced nematode populations and
significantly increased yield of leaf were a mixture of
Zinophos and Thimet, Temik, and NIA 10242.












NATURE,.:CAUSE AND CONTROL OF DISEASES OF TROPICAL FOLIAGE
PLANTS


State Project 1021 R. B. Marlatt
P. G. Orth
R. W. Harkness

Plant Pathology

Concerning Diseases of Diffenbachia, Rubber Plant and
Philodendron.

Progress A rot of stem cuttings of diffenbachia was studied
by evaluating growth response to potting media, planting
depths, positions of the cuttings and sizes and locations on
the stems. D. amoena grew faster than the others, and along
with D. picta 'Rudolph Rhuers' was less susceptible to rotting.
Sphagnum moss was the best medium. Younger nodes grew faster
than basal nodes. Planting single node cuttings with the stem
axis parallel to the "soil" surface was advantageous to growth.
Cuttings formed a definite protective periderm layer beneath the
cut surfaces when stored at high relative humidities. D.
picta 'Memoria-corsii' showed more periderm formation than
the others. D. exotica was especially susceptible to rotting.
The source and manner of leaf infestation of Ficus decora
by a foliar nematode is being studied. Neither the cause nor
control of another serious leaf-spot has been found. Insufficient
and excessive amounts of major and minor nutrients are being
investigated. Effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium
on bacterial streak of P. oxycardium along with studies of
infection are under way.









TURFGRASS


EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF TURFGRASSES FOR FLORIDA I

State Project 652 G. C. Horn
E. O. Burt

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of Bahiagrasses, Bermudagrasses,
Centipedegrasses and St. Augustinegrasses.

Progress Argentine rates the best of the Bahiagrasses tested.
An'additional 20 strains of law growing bahiagrasses have been
added to the experiment. FB-137 bermudagrass is outstanding
and tifdwarf looks good. Taxonomic studies on Centipede
flowers indicate that color of stigmas and anthers offer a
possible means for identification of different strains. Of
the St. Augustine grasses FA-220 is outstanding. Several
thousand St. Augustine seeds have been collected and these
will be planted.


EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF TURFGRASSES FOR FLORIDA II

State Project 652 E. 0. Burt
G. C. Horn

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of Bahiagrasses, Bermudagrasses and
St. Augustinegrasses.

Progress Wilmington bahiagrass was superior in most character-
istics but is difficult to establish. Argentine bahiagrass
was superior in all characteristics. FB-137 bermudagrass
was superior to any of the others tested for lawn, fairway and
tee use. Tifdwarf. was superior for use on golf greens. Based
upon desirable characteristics of color, appearance, low-
growing tendencies, absence of seedheads and pest resistance
the best experimental strains of St. Augustine were: FA-220,
FA-40, FA-16, FA-65 and FA-23 (ranked in descending order
of quality ratings.)









FERTILIZATION OF TURFGRASSES


State Project 1178 G. C. Horn
W. L. Pritchett
E. O. Burt
G. M. Volk

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Fertilization of Argentine bahiagrass, Zoysia and
Tifgreen bermudagrass with emphasis on Nitrogen and Potassium.

Progress Argentine bahiagrass winter killer where treated with
16 pounds of Nitrogen per 1000 square feet per year. Some
winter kill was noted at the 8 pound Nitrogen rate. On Zoysia
the high rate of Nitrogen (16 pounds per 1000 square feet) had
less dollarspot fungus than the 8,4 and 0 pound rates. High
levels of Potassium retarded dollarspot fungus but not as much
as Nitrogen. On Tifgreen bermudagrass under putting green
conditions 6 pounds of Ureaform per 1000 square feet applied
bi-monthly and 2 pounds of Milorganite applied monthly gave?
beat:results. Ammonium sulfate at the rate of 2 pounds per
1000 square feet applied bi-weekly was best of the soluble
sources. The superiority of K2SO4 was not evident when sulfur
was added to the other soluble sources. KC1 looks good when
additional sulfur is added in the form of ammonium sulfate.


CONTROL OF WEEDS IN WARM-SEASON TURFGRASSES WITH HERBICIDES I

State Project 1282 E. 0. Burt
G. C. Horn
J. R. Orsenigo

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Preemergence control of Annual weeds and Poa
annual control in Bermudagrass greens.

Progress The following herbicides gave good control of annual
weeds without injury to bahiagrass, bermudagrass, centipede-
grass, St. Augustinegrass or Zoysiagrass: 0-6989, C-6313,
Tenoran, Patoran, Planavin and Sindone. The following her-
bicides gh6 good control of Poa annual without injury to
Tifgreen, Tifdwarf and Everglades- 1 bermudagrass: Azak,
Betasan or Presan, benefin (Balan) and Trifluralin (Treflan).
The most effective controlwvas obtained when the application was
made a gew days prior to germination.










CONTROL OF WEEDS IN WARM SEASON TURFGRASSES WITH HERBICIDES II

State Project 1282 E. 0. Burt
G. C. Horn
J. R. Orsenigo

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effects of various herbicides with and without
oil treatment and nematicide (Bayer 25141) on Tifdwarf.
putting green turf to determine tolerance of grass to treat-
ment.

Progress Most toxic treatments included simazine, atrazine,
prometryne, silvex, high rates of 2.4-D amine or butyric.
One-forth pound ai/A Banvel D, 4 pounds ai/A Tok and 8 pounds
ai/A of sindone or sindone B? were considered the limit for
safe applications of these materials. Other treatments were
found non toxic at the rates used.


EVALUATION OF NINE STRAINS AND THREE PLANTING RATES OF
RYEGRASS AS OVERSEEDING GRASSES ON TIFDWARF BERMUDAGRASS

Non Projected G. C. Horn

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of nine strains of ryegrasses for
turf quality on winter putting greens.

Progress Three selections (Flhybrids) from Northrup King and
Company (N-106, NK-100, NS-33) were superior to all others
tested. Seed size was variable NK-100 had 653 seeds per
gram and N3-37 had 185 seeds per gram. Fifty pounds of seed
per 1000 square feet was the best rate of seeding.


COMPARISON OF SEVERAL STRAINS OF BLUE, BENT, FESCUE, RYE AND
TIMOTHY FOR OVEPSEEDING TIFDWARF BERMUDAGRASS GREENS

Non Projected G. C. Horn

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of 17 strains of true bluegrass, 3 strains
of Timothy, 6 strains of bentgrass, 10 strains of fescue and 2
strains of ryegrass, f'or overseeding tifdwarf bermudagrass greens.

Progress Arista bluegrass Poa pratensis was the best blue-
grass, followed by Canadian bluegrass (N4-154); Prato, Park, Poa
trivialis and Windsor. Other bluegrasses rated much lower.
Timothy was undesirable. Penncross bent was best followed by
Astoria, Colonial, Seaside, Holfier, Highland.. Chewings fescue
was best followed by Iceohew, Pennrlawn and Creeping Red. Others
were much poorer.









BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT AND RELATED
PESTS OF TURFGRASSES I

State Project 678 S. H. Kerr

Entomology

Concerning Lawn chinch bug control and earwigs as pests
around residences.

Progress At the rates used mocap and NIA 10242 appeared
promising; SD 9098 was highly promising. Labidura riparia
and Euborella annulipes are the common earwigs found around
residences. Life history and seasonal distribution studies
are being made.


BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT AND RELATED
PESTS OF TURFGRASSES II

State Project 678 T. L. Stringfellow

Entomology

Concerning Control of lawn chinch bugs in St. Augustine grass.

Progress Akton, Monsanto's CP 47114 and Dyfonate gave most
control at the rates used on turf which yielded evidence of
resistance to diazinon and other phosphatic.insecticides. A
small plot screening method for rapid preliminary evaluation
of insecticides and a technlqu.e for resistance trials has
been developed.


PATHOGENICITY AND HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIPS OF NEMATODES ON
TURF IN FLORIDA

Hatch Project 1098 G. C. Smart, Jr.
V. G. Perry

Entomology

Concerning Phytotoxicity of Niagara 10242, comparison of
candidate nematicides, and identification of nematodes.

Progress Niagara 10242 at the rate used was severely phytotoxic
to Everglades bermudagrass and mildly phytotoxic to Bayshore
bermudagrass and breeding line F B 165. Akton plus Nemagon
provided the same degree of control as nemagon alone.' Ring
and sting nematodes were controlled with Dasanit and Nemagon
at the rates used. Sarolex controlled sting nematodes but not
ring nematodes. Dasanit and mocap provided best control.of the
lesion nematode at the rate used. Turfgrass (bermudagrass)
injury from Hypsoperine graminis was less than that caused by
Bblonclaimus longicaudatus. Two new nematicides (TH 285 N DuNema
and TH 336N) show considerable promise. Nematode identifications
were made on 1970 samples. 24











FACTORS INFLUENCING SURVIVAL AND PATHOQENIGCLT OF PLANT
PARASITIC NEMATODES

Hatch Project 1294 V. G. Perry
G. C. Smart

Entomology

Concerning Pathogenicity tests of the pseudo root-knot
nematode Hypsoperine graminis.

Progress Small galls were produced, root systems were reduced,
growth was stunted, foliage was chlorotic and plants were
subject to wilt as a result of the parasitism on St. Augustine
grass and Tifgreen bermudagrass. The nematode completed its
life cycle in 32 to 35 days at 280o and females produced from
181 to 1000 eggs each. Infection is by the second larval
stage, which enters hosts near root tips, becomes sedentary in
undifferentiated tissues and undergoes three molts to become
adult in about three weeks. Giant cells are produced by the
hosts with an increase in other cells to produce the small root
galls.


NEMATODE PATHOGENICITY AND CONTROL ON TURFGRASS


Non Projected J. A. Winchester

Entomology

Concerning Screening of nematicides on several turfgrass.
varieties.

Progress On Ormond bermudagrass, Th 285-N, Sarole,, Mocap
and DAC 1263 produced significantly more vigorous green turf
than untreated grass. On everglades #1 bermudagrass., Mocap
and Nia 10242 were more effective than Sarolex and Th 285-N.












DISEASES OF TURFGRASSES


State Project 802 T. E. Freeman

Plant Pathology

Concerning Effect of light on sporulation of Helminthosporium
stenospilum. Effect of nitrogen fertilization of turfgrasses
Fungicide evaluation Studies. Resistance of bahiagrasses to
dollar spot.

Progress Exposure to 200 foot-candles of white light for 1 minute
was sufficient to initiate spare production by Helminthosporium
stenospilum. Srporulation increased with each additional light
exposure up to and including 15 minutes. Beyond this time no
significant increase was noted. Increasing the rate of
ammonium nitrate supplied to ryegrass seedlings resulted in a
progressive decrease in the severity of cottony blight caused
by Pythium aphanidermatum." This decrease in disease damage
was evident by the smaller size of the affected area and the
severity of foliar blighting. For control of Heminthosp.rium
spp. on bermudagrass Fore and Daconil 2787 were superior to
others tested. Addition of a soluble source of nitrogen
(ammonium nitrate) to the spray mixture reduced the effectiveness
of thiram for the control of gray leaf spot of St. Augustine-
grass caused by piricularia grisea. Argentine bahiagrass is more
resistant to the dollar spot organism (Sclerotinia homoeocarpa)
than either Pensacola or Paraguayan.


BIOCHEMICAL FACTORS AFFECTING PHYTOPATHOGENESIS

State Project 1008 T. E. Freeman
H. H. Luke

Plant Pathology

Concerning Factors affecting the infection of St. Augustine-
grass by Piricularia grisea.

Progress The amide Glutamine was found to enhance the germ-
ination of P. grisea spores over a wide range of concentration.
In addition, this compound caused a slight increase in in-
fection when applied to the leaves at the time of inoculation
with P. grisea. The upper and lower surfaces of the leaf react
differently to inoculation with P grisea. The lower surface
was highly resistant, exhibiting only on occasional lesion, while
the upper surface was severely affected. This difference was
unexpected and is unexplained.









ENDOPARASITIC FUNGI OF CYST AND STING NEMATODES


Hatch Project 1225 H. N. Miller
V. G. Perry

Plant Pathology
Entomology

Concerning Examination -of cyst.and sting nematodes for the
presence of parasitic fungi.

Progress A species of fungus Phizoctonia has been observed
parasitizing the cysts and eggs of the nematode Heter&de!a
leuceilyma The fungus is readily isolated and cultured.
Several parasitism studies have been made in the greenhouse by
growing St. Augustinegrass in sterilized soil and inoculating
with the fungus and nematode separately, alternately and
concurrently. Results have not been conclusive.


ALGAE CONTROL IN TURFGRASS

Non Projected T. E. Freeman

Plant Pathology

Concerning Effects of available fungicides on control of algae.

Progress- Fore and Memmi provided excellent algae control at
the rates and frequencies of application used.


DISEASES OF TURFGRASSES IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Non Projected H. I. Borders

Plant Pathology

Concerning Brown patch disease of bahiagrass Paspalum notatum
and Helminthosperi um infection on Tifgreen bermudagrass.

Progress Brown patch was controlled with a maneb-zinc formulation
(FORE). Equally good control was obtained by the use of Krcmad
(a cadmium-chromium-thiram mixture). Excellent control of
Helminthosporrinm was obtained from Daconil 2787.








MOISTURE RETENTION, MOVEMENT, MEASUREMENT AND AVAILABILITY
TO PLANTS IN FLORIDA SOILS

State Project 957 E. H. Stewart
W. H. Speir
E. O. Burt

Soils

Concerning Studies on the subirrigation of sod with porous
tile.

Progress A wide range in flow rates of porous tile indicate
need for improvement. Tile clog by bacterial growth and
inorganic deposition and these factors reduce the flow rate.
Chemical treatment of the water with hydroxyacetic'.acid and
with sodium hypochlorite successfully restored and maintained
an adequate flow rate. Moisture is used by the sod out to
approximately 1 foot to each side of the tile. A thin con-
centrated network of roots enveloped.each porous tile, and a
thin matted layer of roots developed on top of the polyethylene
plastic sheeting that was placed under the tile as one method
of installation.


FERTILIZATION OF TURFGRASSES I

State Project 1178 G. M. Volk

Soils

Concerning Movement of nutrients and pH changes in putting
green soils.

Progress Calcium nitrate, ammonium nitrate and ANL resulted
in about the same penetration of nitrate nitrogen in the
soil. There was no corsistent differential effect from
several years use of these materials on the residual levels
of Calcium, Magnesium, Potassiom or on soil pH at various
depths. Gaseous loss of NH3 from solution urea or pelleted
area would be negligible if followed by greens irrigation.
Soil pH determinations of Lakeland and Leon fine sands were
markedly affected by presence of soluble fertilizer constituents.










FERTILIZATION OF TURFGRASSES II


ttate Project 1178


E. O. Burt
G. C. Horn
W. L. Pritchett
G. M. Volk


Soils

Concerning Bermudagrass response to magnesium ammonium
phosphateand to copper.

Progress Residual response for avperiod of 48 months was
noted on Tifway bermudagrass fertilized with a single application
of magnesium ammonium phosphate. Tifgreen bermudagrass
grown on a Pompano fine sandy soil gave a highly significant
response from applications of copper the second and third
year after treatment.


EVALUATION OF CONSUMPTIVE WATER USE, SOIL-WATER STORAGE AND
THE INTERRELATION OF THESE COMPONENTS OF THE WATER BUDGET FOR
SMALL AGRICULTURAL WATERSHEDS IN PENINSULAR FLORIDA


Non Projected


W. H. Speir
E. H. Stewart
E. 0. Burt


Soils


Concerning An analysis of the water budget components from
the Taylor Creek water shed.

Progress A comparison of the interaction of runoff, evapotrans-
piration and ground water levels was made. A linear relation-
ship was found between plant density or percent sod cover and
annual evapotranspiration of Tifway bermudagrass grown on an
Arzel fine sand with a 36 inch water table.









WOODY ORNAMENTALS


VARIETY TESTS OF MINOR FRUITS AND ORNAMENTALS

State Project 187 C. W. Campbell

Ornamental horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of minor fruits and ornamentals

Progress During a relatively warm winter most of the
temperate fruit trees had no bloom and greatly delayed
foliation. Even peaches with very low chilling requirement
were late in blooming and maturing fruit.


FACTORS AFFECTING THE GROWTH AND QUALITY OF WOODY ORNAMENTAL
PLANTS

Hatch Project 896 R. D. Dickey

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effect of slow release vs. rapidly available
nitrogen and potassium sources on growth and quality of
Pittosporum tobira. The response surface resulting from tests
involving 5 levels each of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium
was investigated for growth and visual grade of Ilex opaca
'East Palatka'.

Progress Pittosporum plants receiving urea-formaldehyde
one-half at start of experiment and one-half July 1, were
as large and of higher quality than plants given urea-
formaldehyde all at start of experiment. Split applications
of urea-formaldehyde were as good as NH4NO3 applied either
monthly or bimonthly. Plants given encapsulated ammonium
sulfate all at the experiment's initiation or in split
applications were inferior in size and quality to plants
receiving either urea-formaldehyde or NHiNO3. Potassium
frit applied all at the start of the experiment or one-
half at start and one-half July 1 was as good as KiCl
applied either monthly or 1".imonthly. Ilex plants had maxi-
mum Nitrogen response at 1029 ppa and produced best quality at
1140 ppa. Amounts above 83 ppa Potassium and 13 ppa
Phosphoras did not. improve growth or quality.








DEVELOPMENT OF NEW PLANTS FOR ORNAMENTAL USES


Hatch Project 897 S. E. McFadden
T. J. Sheehan
G. C. Horn

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of Amaryllis, Euanmus, Ligustrum,
Pittosporium, Hibiscus Paspalums and Stenotaphrum secundatum.

Progress Two hundred Amaryllis seedlings were selected for
further study. Radiation induced alterations in leaf color
patterns were obtained from variegated cultivars of Euonymus,
Ligustrum and Pittosporium. Cuttings from altered shoots were
rooted to supply material for further sutdies of irradiation
effects on shoot apices. Inbreeding within 6 hybrid lines
of perennial hibiscus was begun to obtain cultivars that
can be propagated by seed as well as iregetatively. Self-
polinated seed were obtained as a first step in producing
homogeneous lines from previously selected hybrid seedlings.
Twenty dwarf type MBspalums were added to the Bahiagrass
experiment. Many seedlings of Stenotaphrum secundatum were
grown off.

EFFECT OF CONTAINER SIZE TIME IN CONTAINER, AND TRANSPLANTING
METHOD ON GROWTH OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

State Project 987 R. D. Dickey

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effect of container size, time in containers, and
transplanting methods on growth in containers and afterward
in the field of Ligustrum Japonicum, pddocarpus macrophylla
maki and 'Formosa' Azalea.

Progress No effect of these factors could be determined
visually on roots of. plants dug from the field.

LIVEOAK CONTAINER CULTURE

Non projected: J. N. Joiner
G. Meskimen

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effect of media combinations and fertilizer levels
on growth of live oak in containers.

Progress- Media and fertilizer levels affect rate and type
of growth made by the oak trees. As much as 4 feet of growth
in 11 months has been obtained.









TESTING OF MONROVIA CULTIVARS


Non Projected S. E. McFadden

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of L20 ornamental cultivars.

Progress Thirty-seven cultivars were found to be best suited
for cultivation at the Gainesville location. Full sunlight
and no winter protection were provided. Choices were based
on complete survival of plants in a field nursery for 2
years or longer without showing severe injury from seasonal
temperature extremes. Included were 3 evergreen tree conifers;
2 deciduous tree conifers 3 shrub conifers 5 tree dicots;
24 shrub dicots.

REFINEMENT IN PLANT GRAFTING TECHNIUES

Non Projected S. E. McFadden

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Improvements in joining scionstock to rootstock
in grafting.

Progress Comparison of two new methods with conventional
cleft and splice joining methods have been made. Improvement
is also desired in rooting rose cultivar cutting grafts with
Rosa fortuniana rootstock. Evidence was obtained that the tape
used in wrapping the graft wound influences root initiation
at the base of the rootstock cutting. Tests have begun to
determine other translocated treatment effects on rooting and
on rate of graft union.

CONTAINER STUDIES WITH ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

Non Projected T. Cochis

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Effects of nine different types of containers on
growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Carissa grandiflora, Podocarpus
macrophylla and Persea americana.

Progress No difference was found in plant growth when all
plastic containers were compared with all metal containers
and with clay pots. No appreciable difference in plant
growth within the group of plastic pots was noted, while there
was some variation in plant growth within the group of metal
containers.










ORNAMENTAL MULCH STUDIES


Non Projected T. Cochis

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Use of raw sugarcane bagasse as a mulch around
Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Acalypha wilkesiana, Podocarpus
macrophylla, and Murraea exotica.

Progress The bagasse mulch gave excellent control of weeds
when a 2 inch layer was applied. The mulch reduced water loss
by evaporation from Arzell fine sand.

HERBICIDE STUDIES WITH CONTAINER GROWN ORNAMENTALS

Non Projected T. Cochis

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Control of weeds with herbicides in containers of
Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.

Progress Thirteen different granular formulations of
herbicides were used in a vermiculite mulch on top of the
soil. All materials gave some degree of weed control.
Difficulty in even distribution of the granular materials
was encountered. Unless this is remedied, liquid formulations
may have to be used in containers.

SOIL MIXES FOR CONTAINER GROWING OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

Non Projected T. Cochic

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Mixtures of bagasse, pinebark,-sewage sludge,
peatmoss, muck soil, calcired clay, perlite, vermiculite and
sand were used in containers for growth of Hibiscus rosa-
sinensis, Carissa grandiflora and Podocarpus macrophylla.

Progress Data from this test is being processed.










ROSE MULCHES


Non Projected W. E. Waters

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluation of seven surface mulches applied
around 2 year old 'Red American Beauty' roses grafted on
Rosa fortuniana.

Progress Maximum flower yield was obtained frcm plants
mulched with fiberglass. All mulches gave good weed control
for the first four months. After 16 months excellent weed
control was obtained only with fiberglass.

ORNAMENTAL EVALUATION

Non Projected H. W. Young

Ornamental Horticulture

Concerning Evaluations of ornamentals.

Progress The camellia planting seedlings and plant introductions
were enlarged. A severe drought has damaged or killed many
specimens. A rose variety planting has been enlarged. Cold
hardiness and tolerance to high summer temperatures are being
evaluated on selected shrubs and trees.

EVALUATION OF FUMIGANTS AND INSECTICIDAL DIPS FOR CONTROL OF
INSECTS.

State Project 1315 L. C. Kuitert

Entomology

Concerning Use of various.dips for control of scale.

Progress Thirteen varieties of camellias were submerged in
a bidrin solution. The Tomorrow and Prof. Sargent varieties
were injured. Cheerful and Mrs. Charles Cobb varieties were
injured to a lesser extent. Appreciable scale reduction was
noted after 33 days. A Bayer 25141 dip caused some leaf
drop on Alba Plena and Rainy,Sun varieties. Excellent control
of tea scale was obtained. A 0i-Syston dip for 10 minutes
was compared with onm for 20 minutes. Considerable leaf
injury developed on the varieties receiving the 20 minute
exposure. Scale control was excellent. Less than 10% kill
of oleander scale was obtained by submerging magnolias in
Bayer 25141. No phytotoxicity wasobserved. No phytotoxicity
occurred from dipping Maidenhbit-fern in Zinophos at the
concentrations used.













BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECTS AND RELATED PESTS ON ORNAMENTAL
PLANTS I

State Project 1353 L. C. Kuitert

Entomology

Concerning Control of aglaonema scale Temnaspidiotus excisus
green; two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae koch; tea
scales Fiorinia theae green; soft brown scale Coccus hesperidum
Linn. and white flies, aphids thrips lace bugs, and a longhorn
beetle Psyrassa pertenue coy.

Progress Plants and-tip cuttings of Aglaonema commutatum
Schott were treated with dimethoate, diazinon, meta systox-R,
bidrin and thiocron for control of scale. All treatments
were effective. Morestan, chloropropylate, pentac and Meta
Systox-R gave excellent control of two 'potted spider mite
on roses. A combination of ethion plus oil emulsion was the
most effective control for tea scales on camellias. Dimethoate
was very effective on immature tea scales, white flies, aphids
and thrips on a variety of ornamental plants and on lacebugs
infesting sycamore. A cane borer pupa in rose cane was
identified as a longhorn beetle. This insect has caused
considerable damage in some areas. Soft brown scale in
orchids was controlled with Dimethoate and Meta Systox-R.
These materials also controlled the two-spotted spider mites.

BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECTS AND RELATED PESTS ON ORNAMENTAL
PLANTS II

State Project 1353 T. L. Stringfellvr

Entomology

Concerning Control of scale Hemiberlesia cyanophylli sign.
on variegated lillyturf Liriope muscari variegata. Control
of the weevil Piazorhinus tuberculatus Blatch on Sea-grape
Coccolobis uvifera and dove plum C. diversifolia. Control of
insects on royal palm Roystonea regia and cabbage palm
Sabal palmetto.

Progress Dimethoate, General Chemical's 6506, Niagara's
10242 and Monsanto's CP47114 were somewhat effective in
controlling scale on lillyturf. DDT and Azinophosmethyl were
effective in protecting new foliage of sea-grape and dove plum
from damage by weevils. Bidrin injectors for control of palm
insects have been successfully used without injury to royal and
cabbage palms. Control of aphids, scale insects, the royal
palm bug and certain disease vectors are being evaluated by this
method.








BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECTS AND RELATED PESTS ON ORNAMENTAL
PLANTS III

State Project 1353 D. O. Wolfenbarger

Entomology

Concerning a weevil Copturus floridanus on Mahogany trees
and mite control on roses.

Progress A weevil produced rough, scarred areas with a brown
gummy exudate gave mahogany trees a very unsightly appearance.
All forms of sulfur, the selenium preparations and the newer
materials for mite control on roses have lost their effectiveness.
Galecron (CIBA 8514) 50 EC Morestan 25w and GC 6506 25w gave
most effective control at the rates used.

CHRISTMAS TREE PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA

State Project 1006 P. W. Frazer

Forestry

encerning Pruning of sand pine trees and evaluation of
loblolly pine and pond pine for Christmas tree use.

Progress Pruning of the sand pine had no effect on tree quality.
Loblolly pine and pand pine failed to grow to Christmas tree size.

ERADICATION AND PREVENTION OF NEMATODES THAT ATTACK WOODY AND
FOLIAGE ORNAMENTAL PLANTS IN FLORIDA

State Project 1177 H. N. Miller
V. G. Perry

Plant Pathology
Entomology

Concerning Methods of application, rates, formulations, and
new materials for control of nematodes.

Progress Thoroughly saturating the soil of container grown
plants by drenching with Zinophos and Mocap was as effective
in eradicating or controlling nematodes as the bare-root dip
or pot dip method of application. Nematicides which were
somewhat phytotoxic caused more damage to sensitive plants
when drenched than when used as bare-root dips. Zinophos and
Mocap were not phytotoxic at the rate used. Granular formulations
of nematicides are less effective than-'liquid or emulsible
formulations. Granular formulation of 8 nematicides failed to
eliminate root-knot nematodes from heavily infected gardenia
plants in containers. Placement of granules in the soil
appears to be critical for maximum effectiveness. Of the newer
nematicide chemicals tested, olin, 0M53799; Thompson Hayward,
TH 336N; and Chemagro Bay 68138 were the most promising.











DISEASES AM) CULTURAL PROBLEMS OF MINOR SUBTROPICAL VEGETABLES,
FRUITS AND ORNAMENTALS I

State Project 1336 H. I. Borders
.T. Cochis

Plant Pathology

Concerning Infection of Norfolk Island Pines Araucaria spp.
by a fungus, Cryptospora longispora which causes a twig blight.
Crown-gall caused by Xanthomonas trumefaciens on crotons
Codiaeum variegatum. Nutrition of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.

Progress Fair control of infection on Norfolk Island Pine
was achieved by pruning infected twigs and spraying with tribasic
copper sulfate alternated with maneb and by removing the plants
from the heavy forcing environment and thus allowing them to
grow at a move normal rate. Heavy forcing also has an effect
on container grown Schefflera actinophylla. Water-soaked lesions
with brown corky-colored centers develop. No primary pathogen has
been found. Mercuric chloride sterilization of clippers stopped
a crown-gall outbreak on crotons. Use of phytcmycin plus
dimethylsulfoxide painted on the galls arrested gall growth
and no secondary galls developed. A physiological disorder
"Black Splash" of hibiscus, evidenced by black necrotic lesions
on the stems and petioles of the plants is being studied with
plants grown on varying nutrient solutions.

DISEASES AND CULTURAL PROBLEMS OF MINOR SUBTROPICAL VEGETABLES
FRUITS AND ORNAMENTALS II

State Project 1336 R. B. Marlatt
C. W. Campbell
R. A. Conover

Plant Pathology

Concerning Diagnosis of tropical fruits and ornamentals.

Progress Thirty finespecimens of diseased fruits and 122
ornamentals were studied.










DISEASES OF ROSES


Non Projected H. N. Miller

Plant Pathology

Concerning A serious disease of rose cane pieces in propagation
frames. Powdery mildew control on roses. Black spot control
on roses.

Progress In propagation frames stems become blackened and water
soaked, leaves wilt and the canes die before rooting. White
mycelium is noted on the blackened stems, numerous bright
orange perithecia can be observed. A species of Cylindrocladium
has been isolated and pathogenicity proved. Infection has been
obtained by mixing macerated cultures of the fungus with soil
before sticking the cuttings or by drenching the soil with a
spore suspension. Coating the freshly cut ends of the cuttings
with captain before sticking in the propagation bench was
effective in preventing infection. Pipron and experimental
fungicides Ortho 199 and Geigy 16306 gave excellent control of
powdery mildew and were generally as effective as actidione PM.
Daconil dust is as effective as most standard fungicides used
as sprays for Black Spot control. Dupont 1991 (liquid)
compared favorably with standard recommended fungicides.

ROSE NUTRITION ON LIGHT SANDY SOILS ON THE LOWER EAST COAST OF
FLORIDA

State Project 1232 T. W. Young
N. C. Hayslip
G. H. Snyder

Soils

Concerning Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilization
of Happiness and Christian Dior roses on Rosa Fortuniana
stock grown on Immokalee fine sand.

Progress First year data indicated the total number of blossoms
increased with increasing nitrogen to a maximum of 1560 pounds
per acre for Happiness and 1600 pounds for Christian Dior.
Effect of phosphorus was insignificant. Maximum yields were
obtained with about 1500 pounds of K20 per acre. Maximum
stem lengths were obtained with 1500 and 1560 pounds per acre
of N and K20 respectively. Christian Dior produced significantly
more blossoms than Happiness but Happiness had longer stem. No important
difference was noted between mulched and unmulched plants.










OTHER RESEARCH PROJECTS OF INTEREST TO
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS


Although some research projects may not be directly

concerned with ornamental plants, they provide basic information

on plant growth which may have application to ornamentals.

Other projects may be directed towards providing useful infor-

mation on modifying the soil and atmospheric environments to

provide improved pest control or. they may be related to general

aspects of Agricultural Economics or Agricultural Sciences

important in every day business operations. The following

projects are listed as improtant in this context.


Agricultural Engineering

DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT FOR THE APPLICATION OF SOIL FUMIGANTS
TO THE MINERAL AND'ORGANIC SOILS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

State Project 1020 H. L. Rhoades

Concerning Application of granular nematacides with an in-
the-row applicator just prior to planting of crops.


IRRIGATION EFFICIENCY

State Project 1269 J. M. Myers
R. E. Choate
C. D. Baird

Concerning Effects of evaporation under varying conditions
on irrigation efficiency.











AGRONOMY

INTERRELATION OF ENVIRONMENT TO THE PHYSIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY
OF PLANTS. II ORGANIC ACID METABOLISM OF PLANTS IN RELATION
TO MINOR ELEMENT NUTRITION


Hatch Project 766


Concerning Interactions of calcium, potassiam
on organic acid content of plants.


V. N. Schroder

and nitrogen


CHEMICAL CONTROL OF DITCHBANK WEEDS IN PEAT AND SANDY SOIL
AREAS OF SOUTH FLORIDA


State Project 1029


J. R. Orsenigo
L. W. Weldon


Concerning Control of ditchbank weeds by use of certain
herbicides.

EVALUATION OF HERBICIDES FOR CONTROL OF
AQUATIC WEEDS

State Project 1124 R. D. Blackburn
L. W. Weldon

Concerning Testing of 107 new herbicides on aquatic weeds.

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE,
FORAGE AND OTHER USES I


State Project 1167


G. B.
E. S.
G. M.
S. C.


Killinger
Horner
Prine
Schank


Concerning Digitaria introductions, Arachis accessions.

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE SPECIES FOR PASTURE, FORAGE
AND OTHER USES II


State Project 1167


J. E. McCaleb
E. M. Hodges


Concerning Evaluation of 9 selections of African grass in-
troductions, 20 clones of Pensacola bahiagrass, Rhodesgrass.










EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE
RANGE AND FORAGE USE AND WHEN APPLICABLE FOR OTHER USES III

State Project 1167 P. H. Everett
J. E. McCaleb

Concerning Response of 10 grasses to fertilizer treatments.

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE
FORAGE AND OTHER USES IV

State Project 1167 A. E. Kretschmer,Jr.

Concerning Winter annual and summer growing legumes and
grass varieties.

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE,
FORAGE AND OTHER USES V

State Project 1167 R. J. Allen, Jr.
T. W. Casselman

Concerning Development of a small plot harvester.

FORAGE GPASS IMPROVEMENT BY INTERSPECIFIC HYBRIDIZATION WITHIN
THE GENUS DIGITARIA

Hatch Project 1227 S. C. Schank

Concerning 418 progeny of interspecific crosses between
various digitaria.

INDUCED MUTATIONS AT SPECIFIC LOCI IN HIGHER PLANTS

Hatch Project 1237 A. T. Wallace

Concerning 215 mutants produced by ionizing radiations and
chemicals.

A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE GROWTH
OF HIGHER PLANTS

State Project 1302 S. H. West

Concerning Correlation of growth with nucleic acid metabolism.

FIELD APPI,TCATIONS OF AQUATIC HERBICIDPFS, ~BTOTOGTCAL AND
ECrOT.OITOAT, STUDIES

Non Projected R. D. Blackburn
L. W. Weldon

Concerning-water quality and control of aquatic weeds with
herbicides.










BOTANY


BIOSYNTHESIS OF CARBOHYDRATES IN PLANTS

Hatch Project 953 T. E. Humphreys
L. A. Garrard

Concerning a study of sugar methabolism.

METABOLISM OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN BY PLANTS

Hatch Project 1042 G. J. Fritz

Concerning The study of oxygen fixation by higher plants.

A FLORA OF FLORIDA

Hatch Project 1118 D. B. Ward

Concerning Nomenclature and distribution of the vascular
flora in Florida.

BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF HIGH
TEMPERATURE ON PLANTS

Hatch Project 1191 D. S. Anthony

Concerning A study of protein turnover in plants as "
affected by high temperatures.


ENTOMOLOGY

BIOLOGY OF IPS BARK BEETLES ATTACKING SLASH AND LONGLEAF PINE

Hatch Project 1108 R. C. Wilkinson

Concerning Induced attacks by adult Ips calligraphus (Germ.)

COMPATIBILITY OF INSECTICIDES, FUNGICIDES AND FOLIAR FERTILIZERS
IN SPRAY MIXTURES

State Project 1169 N. C. Schennk
W. C. Adlerz

Concerning A study of means of increasing experimental
efficiency indetermining compatibility of pesticide mixtures.










FORESTRY

FERTILIZING SOILS FOR SOUTHERN PINES

State Project 988 R. E. Goddard
C. M. Kaufman

Concerning Genetic capacity to respond to added nutrients.

CORRELATION OF SOIL SURVEY INFORMATION WITH TREE GROWTH IN FLORIDA

State Project 1130 C. M. Kaufman

Concerning- Relation between laboratory analyses of selected
soil profile samples and quality of slash and longleaf pine.

BREEDING SUPERIOR STRAINS OF SOUTHERN PINES

State Project 1175 R. E. Goddard
R. K. Strickland

Concerning 25 tests of progenies of selected slash pines.

ROOT GROWTH OF SLASH PINE

State Project 1176 C. M. Kaufman

Concerning Growth of the primary horizontal roots and of
height and dbh, of selected lines of planted slash pine under
irrigation, fertilization and cultivation treatments.

STOCK-SCION RELATIONSHIPS IN SOUTHERN PINE

McIntire-Stennis Project 1293 W. H. Smith

Concerning Grafting of 4 different sources of slash and loblolly
pine under varying treatment.

FUSIFORM RUST RESISTANCE IN SLASH PINE

McIntire Stennis Project 1320 R. E. Goddard

Concerning Selection of Fusiform rust resistant seedlings of
slash pine.

BIOSYNTHESIS OF CELTTLOSE IN TREES

Non Projected R. G. Stanley

Concerning A cell-free particulate fraction prepared from
pine cambium cytoplasm which synthesized a cellulose-like
material invitro.










FRUIT. CROPS

PRECONDITIONING PLANTS IN RELATION TO COLD TOLERANCE

Hatch Project 838 .:i C. H. Hendershott
J. F. Gerber
J. W. Sites

Concerning -Treatment of plants to improve cold hardiness.

A STUDY OF POSSIBLE METHODS OF FROST PREVENTION UNDER FLORIDA
CONDITIONS

State Project 868 J. F. Gerber
A. H. Krezdorn

Concerning Field trials with heaters of varying types.


PLANT PATHOLOGY '

INDUCED TOLERANCE AND RELATED PROCESSES THROUGH WHICH CROP PLANTS
RETARD DEVELOPMENT OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Hatch Project 978 D. A. Roberts

Concerning The entrance and infection;, of undamaged cells by
2 plant viruses.


SOILS

CLASSIFICATION AND MAPPING OF-.ELORIDA SOILS

State Project 389 F. B. Smith
R. G. Leighty
R. E. Caldwell
V. W. Carlisle
T. C. Mathews
L. G. Thompson, Jr.

Concerning Soil classification and mapping.

THE ROLE OF THE MAJOR BASES IN FLORIDA SOILS

Hatch Project 598 N. Gammon, Jr.

Concerning Increasing soil pH and a corresponding reduction
in the avallabhlity of sonl Mn.










SOIL FERTILITY STUDIES ON AGRICULTURALLY IMPORTANT SOILS OF
WESTERN FLORIDA

State Project 903 W. K. Robertson

Concerning Lime, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium require-
ments of plants.

EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM ON THE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOIL
EXCHANGE COMPLEX

Hatch Project 939 T. L. Yuan
J. G. A. Fiskell

Concerning The relative importance of Fe and Al in phosphorus
retention in soils.

MOISTURE RETENTION, MOVEMENT, MEASUREMENT AND AVAILABILITY TO
PLANTS IN FLORIDA SOILS

State Project 957 L. C. Hammond

Concerning Use of asphalt moisture barriers to control soil
water.

FERTILIZING SOILS FOR SOUTHERN PINE

State Project 988 W. L. Pritchett

Concerning Lack of response of slash pine to nitrogen and
potassium fertilizers.

METHODS OF DETERMINING EXTRACTABLE NUTRIENTS IN SOIL

State Project 1071 H. L. Breland
W. L. Pritchett
F. B. Smith

Concerning Use of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer for
Ag', Al, Ba, Ca, Cl, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Si, Se and Zn
for tests of soils.

CORRELATION OF SOIL SURVEY INFORMATION WITH TREE GROWTH IN FLORIDA

State Project 1130 W. L. Pritchett

Concerning Analysis of soil profile samples from 1305
forest sites.

BIOASSAY OF INSECTICIDE TREATED SOILS

State Project 1144 R. C. Bullock

Concerning Residual toxicity of granular insecticides.

45


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S.. *


MOVEMENT OF FERTILIZER ELEMENTS IN FIATWOOD SOILS

State Project 1150 C. L. Dantzman
J. E. McCaleb
E. M. Hodges

Concerning Plant nutrient content of soil solution samples
taken 6 inches to 20 inches below the soil surface.

LIME BORON INTERFERENCE IN LEON FINE SAND

State Project 1215 .. H. W. Winsor

Concerning Use of B and a complete micronutrient frit
(Cu,Fe,Mn,Mo and Zn) where soils may have been overlimed.

WATER TABLE CONTROL ,N ORGANIC SOIL

State Project 1248 T. W. Casselman
E. H. Stewart

Concerning Measurement of water table under irrigation and
drainage practices.

INFLUENCE OF MINERALOGY OF SOUTHERN SOILS ON CERTAIN CHEMICAL
AND PHYSICAL REACTIONS

State Project 1285 J. G. A. Fiskell

Concerning Effects of soil characteristics on chemical and
physical reactions that effect plant growth.

EVALUATING CHEMICALS FOR THE CONTROL OF SOIL BOBVE FUNGI

State Project 1299 R. D. Berger

Concerning Incorporation of several fungicides in soil
prior to planting.

INTERACTION OF PESTICIDES WITH SOIL ORGANISMS

State Project 1317 D. F. Rothwell
C. F. Eno

Concerning Use of pesticides and their persistence in the soil.

EFFECTS OF GARBAGE COMPOST ON SOIL AND CROP PRODUCTION

State Project 1347 C. C. Hortenstine
D. F. Rothwell

Concerning Use of garbage compost containing 1.2% N, 0.26%
P, 1.3% Ca, 250 ppm Zn 130 ppm Mn, 25 ppm B and 125 ppm Ct.

46




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