• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Hardware and software requirme...
 Procomm: an introduction
 Configuring procomm
 Using procomm
 File transfer
 Additional procomm features






Group Title: Circular
Title: Getting started with communications software
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094892/00001
 Material Information
Title: Getting started with communications software
Alternate Title: Computer series - Florida Cooperative Extension Service ; 834
Physical Description: 37 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Watson, Dennis G.
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1989
Copyright Date: 1989
 Subjects
Subject: Communications software   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "March 1989."
Statement of Responsibility: Dennis G. Watson.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094892
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26846449

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Front cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Abstract
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Hardware and software requirments
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Procomm: an introduction
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Configuring procomm
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Using procomm
        Page 21
    File transfer
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Additional procomm features
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text
101

M33
March 1989


Circular 834


Getting Started with

Communications Software


Dennis G. Watson


ctit


COMPUTER SERIES
Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida/John T. Woeste, Dean


It






















(ts


I .- '


Mention of a brand name, trade name, or trademark does not constitute
a guarantee by the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Univer-
sity of Florida of said product, nor does it imply approval to the ex-
clusion of other similar products.

ProComm is a trademark of Datastorm Technologies, Inc.

IBM is a registered trademark of the International Business Machines
Corporation.

Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products,
Inc.










Table of Contents


ABSTRACT ............................................1
INTRODUCTION ......................................2
HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS .......4
Modem 4
Communications Software 4
Communications Parameters 4
PROCOMM: ANINTRODUCTION ...................6
What is ProComm? 6
How to get ProComm 6
Installing ProComm 6
Starting ProComm 7
Exiting ProComm 9
ProComm Status Line 9
CONFIGURING PROCOMM .........................11
ProComm Help Screen 11
Dialing Directory 11
Communications Parameter Setup 14
Modem Setup 16
Terminal Setup 17
General Setup 19
Saving Changes 20
USING PROCOMM ....................................21
FILE TRANSFER .................................... 22
File Transfer Protocols 22
File Download with a Protocol 22
ASCII File Download 24
File Upload with a Protocol 26
ASCII File Upload 28
ADDITIONALPROCOMM FEATURES .................30
Automatic Redial 30
Changing ProComm's Colors 31
Keeping Track of Time 32
DOS Gateway 33
Toggle Duplex 34
Command Files 34
Sample Command Files 34
Using a Command File 36








GETTING STARTED
WITH
COMMUNICATIONS
SOFTWARE

Dennis G. Watson*


ABSTRACT
Communications software with a personal computer facilitates con-
venient access to information at remote sites. Computer equipment,
communications software and trained users are needed to take ad-
vantage of this capability. General equipment requirements and com-
munication parameters are defined. As an example of
communications software for IBM-compatible microcomputers, Pro-
Comm, is covered in detail; including installation, configuration,
usage, and additional features of the program. Through the study of
this circular, the reader is trained to use communications software, such
as ProComm, to allow their computer to communicate with remote
computers.
















*Dennis G. Watson, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering
Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville.


Getting Started with Communications Software









INTRODUCTION

Just as humans use telephones to communicate with other humans,
computers can use telephones to communicate with other computers.
Communication via telephone can be as near as the next room or as far
as halfway around the world. Telecommunications provide a quick,
spontaneous way of transferring information, faster than mailing let-
ters or diskettes. Just as the telephone provides humans with practi-
cally unlimited access to others, it also provides a computer with means
to access any number of other computers. Of course, you need to know
the phone number and just because a person or computer answers a
call does not mean that he or it will stay on the line unless he or it wants
to communicate with the caller.

Telecommunications with a personal computer is a valuable tool if you
need information from another computer for which you do not have
hands-on access. Advantages of telecommunications via computer are
that it can be done any time of day or night, it can be done rapidly and
standardization of communication codes allows incompatible com-
puters to transfer information. Home users are interested in obtaining
information and programs and enjoying forms of entertainment only
a computer can provide. Small businesses gain access to large com-
puter systems on a time-sharing basis. Large institutions with
mainframe computers are interested in computer communications be-
cause it provides users with remote access to their centralized
databases, mainframe computing and information handling centers.

Computer buffs who like the idea of conversing or communicating
with another computer or service system may do so frequently. This
type of communication results in useful information and software
moving from one part of the country to another. Public domain and
user-supported software are distributed this way. For example, com-
puter magazines who publish utility programs often have electronic
bulletin board systems so subscribers can copy the programs to their
computers.

Agribusiness managers use their computers to access agricultural
production databases, weather and marketing data, and the latest ad-
visories for their crops. The actual location of the computers which
contain this information may be in the local county extension office or
elsewhere in the state or nation.

Large institutions such as the Institute of Food and Agricultural Scien-
ces rely on telecommunications via computer to allow faculty
throughout the state to maintain contact with one another. For ex-
ample, faculty in county extension offices can contact extension
specialists and faculty in other counties via the'mail' facility of the IFAS
Computer Network.

This circular serves as an introduction to telecommunications with a
personal computer. After reading this document, you will be familiar


Getting Started with Communications Software








with the type of equipment and software required to telecommunicate
with a computer and you will be able to install, configure, and use Pro-
Comm (a popular communications program for PC-compatibles) to
enable your computer to communicate with another computer.


Getting Started with Communications Software









HARDWARE AND

SOFTWARE

REQUIREMENTS
In order to use a computer to access other computers to obtain infor-
mation and programs, you need the appropriate computer equipment
and software in your home or office. In terms of equipment, you need
a computer, a modem, and a phone line. Modems are devices which
allow electronic signals generated by a computer to be transmitted via
telephone lines. Modems are available as external or internal units. In-
ternal units are installed inside a computer, whereas external units are
connected to a computer via a serial communications port. Modems
are available for nearly all computers. One of the advantages of exter-
nal modems is that they can be used with almost any computer which
has a serial communications port. If needed, a computer dealer can as-
sist you with the selection of a modem.

Modem Modem
When purchasing a modem for an IBM-compatible microcomputer,
Hayes compatibility is highly desirable. Hayes Microcomputer
Products, Inc., a major manufacturer of modems for computers,
developed a set of commands which programs use to interact with a
modem. This set of commands has become a defacto industry stand-
ard and many manufacturers produce modems which use the Hayes
command set. Modems are rated in terms of the speed which they can
transfer information via phone lines measured in bits per second (bps)
and often referred to as baud rate. Currently, 2400 and 1200 bps are
the two most common data transfer rates for modems. A modem rated
at 2400 baud will also transfer data at the lower rate of 1200 baud.

Communications Software Communications Software
As is true with any use of computers, proper equipment is only part of
the solution. In order to use your computer to communicate with other
computers, you need communications software. Communications
software is available for most types of computers. One of the more
popular communications programs for PC-compatibles is ProComm.
Your computer dealer will be able to point out other communications
programs which are available for your computer.

Communications Parameters Communications
Parameters
Assuming you have the equipment and software, you are ready to
telecommunicate with your computer well, almost. First, you need
the telephone number of the computer you want to call (the computer
to be called is referred to as the remote computer) and the communica-
tions parameters of the remote computer. You're familiar with
telephone numbers but what are communications parameters? Com-


Getting Started with Communications Software








munications parameters are some 'behind the scenes' details that our
communications software needs to know about the computer it is call-
ing. These details consist of the data transfer (baud) rate of the remote
computer and how it packages each character it sends via the telephone
line. In most cases, the source which gave you the telephone number
of the remote computer will also have the communications parameters.

There are four communications parameters: 1) baud rate, 2) parity
checking protocol, 3) stop bits, and 4) data bits. As discussed earlier,
baud rate or bps is a measure of the speed at which data is transferred
via the phone line. Parity checking protocol identifies what type of
parity checking is done, if any. Parity checking alternatives are none,
even and odd, identified as N, E and O. Data bits refers to how many
bits are used to distinguish a character. (You can think of one bit as an
on or off switch.) Seven data bits provide enough combinations to
define all of the normal alphanumeric characters (letters, numbers,
punctuation characters, etc.). The graphics characters (lines, boxes,
smiley faces, etc) available in the IBM character set require eight data
bits. For most purposes seven data bits is sufficient. Stop bits refer to
the number of bits that separate each character. Typically one stop bit
is used, although two is a another alternative.

Communications parameters are generally available wherever you get
the phone number for a remote computer. What if the communications
parameters are not available? One set of communications parameters
will serve most of your needs. The parameters 1200-N-8-1 mean 1200
bps, no parity checking, 8 data bits and 1 stop bit. These parameters
are used for most microcomputers and the IFAS Computer Network.
You may have occasion to access a mainframe computer which uses
the parameters, 1200-E-7-1, indicating that even parity checking is used
with 7 data bits and 1 stop bit. Of course, if both your computer and
the remote computer have 2400 baud modems, the communications
parameters would be 2400-N-8-1 or 2400-E-7-1.

Now that the basic hardware and software requirements have been
covered, it is time to implement telecommunications with a personal
computer. The next section of this document is specific to IBM-com-
patible computers using ProComm communications software. Other
communications programs have similar features, but ProCommis used
as an example due to its popularity, widespread availability, and low
cost


Getting Started with Communications Software









PROCOMM: AN

INTRODUCTION

What is ProComm? What is ProComm?
ProComm is a telecommunications program which allows computers
to 'talk' to each other via standard telephone lines using modems.
Datastorm Technologies, Inc. is the manufacturer. ProComm requires
an IBM PC-compatible microcomputer with at least 192K of RAM (ran-
dom access memory). The latest version available at this time is ver-
sion 2.4.2. ProComm is distributed as user-support software, which
means that non-registered users are granted a limited license to use
ProComm on a trial basis. Use of ProComm, except for the trial basis
requires registration. The current registration fee for ProComm is
$25.00.

How to get ProComm How to get ProComm
ProComm is available from various sources including: other computer
users, computer users groups, electronic bulletin boards, and Data-
storm Technologies, Inc., P.O. Box 1471, Columbia, MO 65205.
Depending on the source from which you obtain ProComm, there may
be a nominal charge for distribution costs.

Installing ProComm Installing ProComm
ProComm normally comes on two 5 1/4-in. diskettes. One disk con-
tains a file named READ.ME. Read the READ.ME file, using the DOS
TYPE command or a word processor to view the file or the PRINT com-
mand to print the file on the printer. The READ.ME file explains how
to unarchive the files and lists the files that are on the diskettes. If you
are running short on disk storage space, the only file you need to start
using ProComm is the PROCOMM.EXE file, so you can copy this file
to a directory on your hard disk or to a floppy disk.

If you are installing ProComm on a hard disk, a directory organization
like the one depicted in Fig. 1 is suggested. Copy the ProComm files
into the \COMM\PROCOMM directory and the
\COMM\DOWNLOAD directory will be used to store files which you
will download (copy) from other computers. Follow the directions in
the READ.ME file to install ProComm onto your hard disk or a floppy
disk. The READ.ME file also has instructions for printing the Pro-


\ (ROOT)
L-COMM
LPDOWNLOAD
ROCOMM

Fig. 1. Suggested hard disk directory structure for installing and
using ProComm.


Getting Started with Communications Software








Comm documentation which is in the form of a disk file. You will want
to print the file for future reference. Printing will require a considerable
length of time (Note: there are approximately 110 pages with the last
page numbered 1504).

Once ProComm has been unarchived and the files are on your hard
disk or floppy disk, you are ready to set up ProComm. The only file
you need to start with ProComm is the PROCOMM.EXE file. When
ProComm runs, it creates four additional files. The four files are:
PROCOMM.PRM default parameter file
PROCOMM.XLT translate table file
PROCOMM.KEY keyboard macro file
PROCOMM.DIR telephone directory file


Starting ProComm


Starting Procomm


To start using ProComm, change to the drive and directory where the
ProComm files are stored and

enter PROCOMM

Throughout this documentation, if you are instructed to enter a com-
mand, you should type the command as presented in bold characters
and press the Enter key. ProComm will display its opening screen (Fig.
2) for a moment before displaying the registration reminder screen (Fig.
3).


Fig. 2. Initial ProComm screen which appears briefly when
ProComm is started.


Getting Started with Communications Software












PROdRnn
Version 2 ,4.
10 1995, 1986 Datastor Technolouleas Inc. (Fornrly PIL Softuare Systes)
This is a user supported product. It Is gut public domains and it is
not free soflare. You are granted a limited license to use this project
on a trial basis. If you uish to wtluue using the produce after the
trial period you ust register by sendgl: (a) $25 for registration only
ino dislh) (b) $35 for registration plus the latest version on dsk, or
(c) S5 for registrattitl disk and printed bound enmal to the address
belou. nissourl residents please add 4.3W sales tax.
ProuCm support MuS: (3tA 449-94t 24 hours per dago 7 days per ueek.
lhami you for your support?
.. Datustorn Technologles Inc. PO lao 1471 Colnblai 11 65215 =s

Fig. 3. ProComm screen reminding user about registration
requirements.

If you have a registered copy of ProComm, you can ignore the registra-
tion reminder screen. If not, if you decide to use ProComm after a trial
period, you should register your copy. After you have used ProComm
several times, this screen will no longer appear. ProComm will con-
tinue after you press the spacebar.

press Spacebar

ProComm is now in the terminal mode and the screen is blank except
for a status line at the bottom (Fig. 4).


Fig. 4. Main ProComm screen, in terminal mode, ready for user
commands.


Getting Started with Communications Software









Exiting ProComm Exiting ProComm


Before using ProComm any further, make sure you know how to exit
ProComm. ProComm is exited by pressing two keys (Alt and X) simul-
taneously and responding yes (Y) to a question confirming the exit
from ProComm to DOS. To exit ProComm locate the keys marked Alt
and X on your keyboard. To press both keys simultaneously, hold
down on the Alt key while you press the X key.

Press Alt and X

ProComm responds by displaying a window (Fig. 5), in which it asks
if you want to exit to DOS. To respond yes, you need to enter Y. Y is
entered by pressing the Y key and then the Enter key.

Enter Y

ProComm exits, the screen dears and a DOS prompt is displayed.


Fig. 5. ProComm window asking user to confirm decision to exit to
DOS.


ProComm Status Line


ProComm Status Line


If you exited ProComm, restart it now by following the directions in
the Starting ProComm section. Your display should look like Fig. 4.
Examine the status line. Each of the eight boxes relays information on
the current status of ProComm as described below:
ALT-F10 HELP This box indicates that help information is avail-
able by pressing the two keys Alt and F10 at the same time. This
function will be used later. If you are using a command file to run
ProComm, the command file's name will appear in the first box.
ANSI-BBS This box indicates which terminal emulation mode is
currently being used. Terminal emulation is required for informa-
tion from another type of computer to be interpreted and dis-


Getting Started with Communications Software


Exiting ProComm


Exiting ProComm









played appropriately by ProComm. This setting can be easily
changed.
HDX This is the box which relays the current duplex setting. Op-
tions are HDX which means half duplex and FDX which means
full duplex. This setting is adjustable at any time.
300 N81 This indicates the current communications parameters
with 300 being the baud rate, N being no parity check, 8 being 8
data bits and 1 being 1 stop bit.
LOG CLOSED This status box indicates whether the feature has
been activated which allows logging' incoming information, from
another computer, directly to disk. Closed indicates that the log
is inactive.
PRT OFF This box indicates the status of the ProComm option
which sends incoming information directly to the printer (PRT).
CR The first CR box indicates whether ProComm is adding a line
feed to each incoming carriage return. If so the status box would
contain CR-LF
CR The second CR box indicates whether ProComm is adding a
line feed to outgoing carriage returns. If so the status box would
contain CR-LF.


Getting Started with Communications Software









CONFIGURING

PROCOMM


ProComm Help Screen


ProComm Help Screen


Now that you have examined the status line,

press Alt and F10

at the same time to display the help screen (Fig. 6). (To press two keys
such as Alt and F10 at the same time, press and hold the Alt key, press
the F10 key and release both keys.) The help screen is divided into three
sections: major functions, utility functions and file functions. Study the
help screen to see what functions are available in ProComm. The Pro-
Comm documentation describes each of the functions. Only the func-
tions required to start using ProComm are described in this document.


Fig. 6. ProComm help screen, listing the major, utility, and file
functions.

In order to return to the terminal mode screen (Fig. 4), you can press
the Esc'escape' key. In most cases, pressing the Esc key will cause Pro-
Comm to return to the previous menu from the current menu.


Dialing Directory Dialing Directory

The first major function is dialing directory. It allows you to give Pro-
Comm the telephone number and communications parameters of the
computer you wish to call. To display the dialing directory,

press Alt and D


Getting Started with Communications Software










at the same time. The dialing directory screen lists the phone numbers
which are stored in ProComm (Fig. 7). If you have a customized copy
of ProComm, you may see other entries than the one in Fig. 7. If you
have a copy as distributed by Datastorm Technologies, Inc., you will
only have their entry in the directory.


1- Datstoru Twkchuoileis

2-................... a.*
6 4........... I4..4;xx1x11
6- 4...........
7- 4004.6.0 ....... 6.021.1t
,84,I.,4~.*hll iihlt1tt*tt


1314 449-9461
S IrS *44~4
* am .1.-.*4.
...4 4.......

t too 444-6444
t .p .144,4441


24's-l-U-
LaB-U-U-l
u28n~-flU


1299-u-e-i
IZSH41-9-


R BOOMse. It NOMI t-1l In Mn In # 41
P LD VAAM 0 DU.eD BNWU F Film
fgUpolhf lage L.rint Intries V'4 9ul"
N. To lPon. nd. ILttM roe BBC Eit


NodsstaI W', ATI
Dial W-.Maiffi: t


LD CodW ke'lua
OM Pout M1IMI M__


.a am .

Fig. 7. ProComm dialing directory screen, listing the current
entries and options.


This screen is used to enter the telephone number of the computer sys-
tem you wish to call. Since you probably have no need to call Datas-
torm, you can revise entry number 1 to replace it with the phone
number of the computer you want to call.

Press R

to revise a dialing directory entry. A window opens on the screen (Fig.
8) asking for the entry number to revise or'+''-','@' or '#'.


Fig. 8. Window requesting entry in dialing directory to revise.


Getting Started with Communications Software


DIALI NG DIRECTORY









The latter four characters are used to represent long distance access
codes which ProComm can be instructed to use. Entry number 1 is the
one you want to revise, so

enter 1

The window changes (Fig. 9) with the upper line containing the infor-
mation for entry 1 as currently contained in the dialing directory. Ad-
jacent to the prompt 'Name:' you will see a blinking cursor. This is
where you type in the name of the computer you want to call.


DIALIHt G I 1 8 i C10AI

1- at r Idi m logies 1 314 ii iij i MI--. -In-111 -l --

Datastmr Tlchnologlis 1 314 449-81 24849-8-1 N


3.- .................... ..... ,,,. 12es- 1
=) ie Rlse l S lMual BDIallg tiry to Dial
P LD Code 3olWtea Etr F Fin
F Upgli Page L Print hatrlae t4 scroll
HWeA Top Pag End DotM ag cS.wlt
rodm BDal O n AImT U11 Codnds rtet
Dial ud .Saffilx I Coa TorSt Attles COH2
1AU1O DBIALE
Fig. 9. Dialing directory window requesting the new name for the
entry being revised.

For example, use the following information:
Name: Make Believe Computer
Phone number: (555) 555-1234
Baud rate: 1200
Data bits: 8
Stop bits: 1
(If you have information about a computer you want to call, replace
the example information with your own.)

Enter Make Believe Computer

to place the name of the computer in the dialing directory. ProComm
replaces Datastorm Technologies with Make Believe Computer and
prompts for the phone number.

The phone number of Make Believe Computer is (555) 555-1234. Pro-
Comm will not accept the parenthesis so use a space just like the
original entry. Since this is a long distance number, you'll want to put
a 1 in front. If you are using a phone system which requires that you
enter a number such as 8 instead of 1, replace 1 with an 8. If your phone
system requires an access code before dialing, use the plus sign '+' in-
stead of 1 to represent the long distance access code. The long distance


Getting Started with Communications Software








code must be described to ProComm separately by revising entry + (see
page 503 in the ProComm documentation for a complete description
of the procedure and use of long distance codes).

Enter 1 555 555-1234

Upon your pressing enter, ProComm updates the phone number and
requests the baud rate. Instead of entering the baud rate, you select one
of the preset rates. ProComm displays 2400. Make Believe Computer
uses 1200 baud, so

press Spacebar

until 1200 appears and

press Enter

For each of the next items which are parity, data bits, stop bits, and echo
on;

press Enter

to accept the preset values. If a different value was needed, you would
press the Spacebar until the one needed appeared and then press Enter.
(The options on communications parameters were discussed pre-
viously in the Communications Parameters section.) In response to
'Command File:'

press Enter

since you do not have a command file for Make Believe Computer
(command files are discussed on pages 701-725 of the ProComm
documentation).

To save the new entry to disk

press Y

You will now see the dialing directory redisplayed with the new entry.
The phone number entry is now complete. If you wish to enter addi-
tional phone numbers, you may do so now, following the same steps
to revise a different entry number. To exit the dialing directory,

press Esc

and the dialing directory will disappear.

Communication Parameter Setup Communication Parameter Setup


The next task is to set up ProComm with the appropriate default com-
munications parameters.


Getting Started with Communications Software








Press Alt and F10


at the same time to bring up the help screen again. The default com-
munications parameters are set by the 'Line Settings' functions which
is the fourth item under Major Functions.

Press Alt and P

at the same time to bring up the line settings menu (Fig. 10).


Fig. 10. ProComm line settings menu.


This window is used to set the default communications parameters.
(The default communications parameters set at this point are overrid-
den by parameters set in the dialing directory.) In most cases, you will
use the parameters N,8,1. If you have a 2400 baud modem,

enter 9

or if you have a 1200 baud modem

enter 8


Afterenteringthe number,you will see the 'CURRENTSETTINGS' line
at the top of the window change. The next step is to tell ProComm
which communications (COM) or serial port is being used for the
modem. If you do not know, ask the person who installed your modem
which COM port the modem uses. In most cases, it is COM1. If your
modem is connected to COM1,

enter 20

to tell ProComm to use COM1 or if your modem is connected to COM2,

enter 21


Getting Started with Communications Software









to tell ProComm to use COM2. Since you have changed the com-
munications parameters,

enter 24

to save them to disk. A flashing message will appear momentarily
saying "Saving changes to disk" and the 'Line Settings' window will
disappear.


Next other setup information needs to be set up in ProComm. Do you
remember how to display the help screen? If you forgot, look at the
box on the far left of the status line.

Press Alt and F10

at the same time to bring up the help screen. Under'utility functions',
the second option is "Setup Screen...... Alt-S".

Press Alt and S

at the same time to display the setup menu (Fig. 11). Option 1, modem
setup, needs to be completed at this time.


Fig. 11. ProComm main setup menu.

Modem Setup Modem Setup

Enter 1

to display the modem setup menu (Fig. 12). The default values for
modem setup are usually acceptable unless you have a pulse dialing
phone.


Getting Started with Communications Software











1) Hodem hilt string .... ATBB S7?'B S 55 U1 Xl SB91
2) Dialing command .... ATDT
3) iBaling cna suffix tf
4) Connect string ..... CWOIECT
5) No Connect string I RBUS
6) ND Comnnct string 2 U.. 01C
7) ND Cnnect string 3 ,, NO (fRIM B
8) HI Connect string 4
9) Hangup string .....,,, --*++-AIIBI
18) Redal tliemut dala 38
11) iedial pause delay .#. 2


Fig. 12. ProComm modem setup menu.


If you have a pulse dial phone, the dialing command (#2) and the redial
pause delay (#11) need to be changed. If you have a pulse dial phone

enter 2

and at the 'MODEM DIALING COMMAND =' prompt,

enter ATDP

This informs ProComm that the phone is pulse dial. Since a pulse dial
phone often takes longer to disconnect, the redial pause delay (#11)
needs to be longer.

Enter 11

and at the 'REDIAL PAUSE DELAY =' prompt,

enter 5

These are the only changes to be made to the modem setup so

press Esc

to return to the setup menu.


Terminal Setup Terminal Set-up

Items in the terminal setup may need to be changed.

Enter 2

to display the terminal setup menu (Fig. 13). This screen lists the
default parameters for configuring how information appears on your


Getting Started with Communications Software


I


I











13 terminal enulation ... A
2) Duplex t ...I, ...,.or


1 mUnmaL sEp -
MSt-uS 18) Break eagth (us) .... 35m
I 11) Enqulrg (CTM -B) ..... 01T


3) FIW control ...., O.. E no
4) CM translatim tin) ,, CH
5) CH trinlatior tout) CB
6) B translation .a... DEST
73 S ke defnitaton .... IS
B3 Line urap ...,,, .... OFF
9) Scroll ..,..>,***** 01


OPTlO -N-


Fig. 13. ProComm terminal setup screen.


monitor and the action of keys on the keyboard. Terminal emulation
option is the first consideration. ANSI-BBS is suitable in many cases,
however if you need to access the IFAS Computer Network system, ter-
minal emulation needs to be set to VT-100, since that is the standard of
the Computer Network. To change the setting,

enter 1

and a prompt line appears at the bottom.

Press Spacebar

until the terminal emulation mode you need appears, then

press Enter

If you selected VT-100, you will also note that item #6, "BS translation
....... DEST' changes to "NON-DEST'.

In most cases, the duplex option needs to be set to FULL duplex.

enter 2

and

press Spacebar


so FULL appears and

press Enter

If you will be accessing a computer system such as the IFAS Computer
Network, then you will want to change item 7, "BS key definition" from


Getting Started with Communications Software


ISO hEit








'BS' to 'DEL'. This makes the Backspace key act the same as the Del key.
The Computer Network does not recognize the normal action of the
Backspace key, so setting it to act as the Del key is important for con-
venient use.

Enter 7

and

press Spacebar


until DEL appears and

press Enter

This completes the terminal setup needed for common uses of Pro-
Comm.

Press Esc


to return to the setup menu.


General Setup


General Setup


General setup items need to be completed to efficiently use ProComm.

Enter 4

to examine the 'GENERAL SETUP' screen (Fig. 14). The first two items,
editor name and default d/l (download) path are the ones you may
want to change. ProComm allows you to call up an editor from within
ProComm by pressing the Alt and A keys at the same time. Item #1
gives ProComm the name of the editor to use. When you enter the
name of the editor, be sure to include the drive and complete path or


Fig. 14. ProComm general setup screen.


Getting Started with Communications Software









ProComm will not find it unless the editor is in the same directory as
ProComm. For example if the editor you will use is WordPerfect and
the WordPerfect files are stored on the C: drive in the \wp\wordp
directory then

enter 1

to change the editor name and

enter C:\WP\WORDP\WP

Now when you press the Alt and A keys simultaneously from the main
screen or help screen, WordPerfect will start and when you exit Word-
Perfect, you will be back in ProComm. (Remember to use the Word-
Perfect Ctrl-F5 command to load and save files as DOS text files in order
to transfer them via computer as ASCII files.)

The default d/l path is useful to store any files downloaded from
another computer in the directory indicated by this option. For ex-
ample, if you installed the ProComm files into the
\COMM\PROCOMM directory and made a second directory called
\COMM\DOWNLOAD as suggested in the prior Installing ProComm
section, you want to change item 2 to C\COMM\DOWNLOAD\.

Enter 2

and

enter C:\COMM\DOWNLOAD\


The general setup is complete so

press Esc


Saving Changes


From the setup menu

enter S

to record your changes so ProComm will remember them. ProComm
will briefly display the message, "PARM FILES UPDATED". Now

press Esc

to exit the setup menu. This completes the setup of ProComm, now
you should be ready to use ProComm.


Getting Started with Communications Software


Saving Changes










USING PROCOMM


At this point, you should have ProComm installed and set up for use.
(The following instructions assume you have a Hayes compatible
modem connected to a phone line.) ProComm should be in the ter-
minal mode (Fig. 4). You may need to follow the steps in the Starting
ProComm section to start ProComm. In order for ProComm to call the
remote computer, you need to tell it which entry in its dialing directory
to use.

Press Alt and D

at the same time to bring up the dialing directory (Fig. 7). Each entry
in the dialing directory has a corresponding number listed on the left
side. At the prompt, enter the number of the entry you want to call.
For example, if entry number 1 is the one you want to call,

enter 1

The dialing directory window will disappear and a line will be dis-
played at the top of your screen indicating that ProComm is dialing the
number. If your modem's speaker is turned on, you will be able to hear
the phone ring. If the phone rings, but is not answered within a cer-
tain amount of time, ProComm will end the call and display a "NO
CARRIER" message.

If the remote computer answers the call, you will hear a high pitched
whine and ProComm will display a "CONNECT' message. After the
connect message is displayed,

press Enter

once every second until the remote computer responds with its greet-
ing or log on message. By pressing enter, you are sending a response
to the other computer to verify the baud rates between the computers
are the same. Once the computer you have called responds with its log
on message, you will need to enter the information it requests or your
call may be terminated by the remote computer. If the remote com-
puter hangs up, ProComm will display a "NO CARRIER" message.
The source from which you received the phone number and com-
munications parameters of the remote computer should be able to
answer any questions you have about using the computer.

When you finish a session with a remote computer, use the remote
computer's command to terminate the call. After a pause, ProComm
will display the "NO CARRIER" message. The ProComm command
described in the Exiting ProComm section should be used to exit Pro-
Comm and return to DOS.


Getting Started With Communications Software









FILE TRANSFER

One of the advantages of telecommunicating with a remote computer
is being able to transfer information from one computer to another.
One method of transferring information is through a 'mail' feature.
You should be able to obtain information about the mail facility from
the personnel who support the remote computer system. Another
method of transferring information is through the transfer of complete
files. The files may contain programs, images or text. ProComm has
file uploading and downloading features. File uploading is used to
transfer a file from your computer to the remote computer. Download-
ing is used to transfer a file from the remote computer to your com-
puter.

File Transfer Protocols File Transfer Protocols

File transfer protocols are used to transfer files. Xmodem is probably
the most popular protocol for microcomputer to microcomputer trans-
fers. Kermit is a protocol which is typically available on all mini or
mainframe computers. For instance, county extension faculty who ac-
cess the IFAS Computer Network need to use the kermit protocol to
transfer files. For the xmodem and kermit protocols, you must prepare
the remote computer to upload or download a file before instructing
ProComm to upload or download a file.

At other times, you may be in the process of receiving a mail message
and you would like to download the mail message to a file; or you may
be composing a mail message and you would like to upload the con-
tents of a text file into the mail message. The ASCII file transfer is used
for these purposes, since an ASCII file transfer is not a special protocol,
it does not require that the remote computer be prepared for the trans-
fer.

File Download with a Protocol File Download with a Protocol

There are two main steps to downloading a file from a remote com-
puter. First, instruct the remote computer to transfer a file to your com-
puter. Often the remote system will respond by telling you to prepare
to receive the file. Second, inform ProComm to receive the file. In this
process, it is imperative that both computers be set up to use the same
file transfer protocol. In order to implement the following download
procedure, you must start ProComm, call a remote computer and in-
struct the remote computer to download a file to your computer.

Press PgDn

PgDn is the key used to display the download window (Fig. 15). From
the menu of file transfer protocols, select the one which the remote com-
puter is using to send the file to your computer. For example, if you


Getting Started With Communications Software












-- mUm --
1) XHOBI
2) permit
3) Telink
4) n1I0I?
M) VIHODEI
6) YtODM Batch
7) ASCII
B) COMPUJSEMIE
9) IsmOD
SC Cancel
PrnotcoI




ALT-Fle HGE I UT-e I r I V eX I I B l U1 ass.t I Cr I CR
Fig. 15. ProComm download protocol selection window.

are connected to another microcomputer, you may be using xmodem,
so

press 1

to select the xmodem protocol. If you are downloading a file from a
minicomputer such as the IFAS Computer Network, you may use the
kermit protocol, so

press 2

to select the kermit protocol.

If you selected the xmodem protocol, ProComm will display a second
window (Fig. 16) asking you to enter the name of the file to be
downloaded.


Fig. 16. File name input window for modem protocol.


Getting Started With Communications Software









You can use the same name as the file was called on the remote com-
puter as long as it is an acceptable DOS file name. For example, if the
file you are downloading is named PROGRAM.COM, you could

enter PROGRAM.COM

and ProComm will begin the download process by displaying the
download status window (Fig. 17) and would store the file under the
name of PROGRAM.COM on your computer.


,res s eC to abor
Fig. 17 Download status window.

If you are using the kermit protocol, you will not be asked to enter the
file name, since with the kermit protocol, your computer gets the file
name from the remote computer. ProComm will inform you when the
file transfer is complete. ProComm stores the downloaded file in the
directory specified in the 'General Setup' section. If you followed the
example, the file would be in the C:\COMM\DOWNLOAD directory.


ASCII File Download


ASCII File Download


ASCII file downloads can be started at any time unless a ProComm
command file is active. An ASCII file download will copy any infor-
mation displayed on the screen to a file. An ASCII file download begins
when you

press PgDn

The download window appears (Fig. 15) and you

press 7

to select an ASCII download. ProComm responds with a window re-
questing the name of the file in which to save the download (Fig. 18).


Getting Started With Communications Software


oPIOMCB; Ma
rFIL aMI: INOGWs C
Fuz sin;
FILBSI 3;
tLOCX CMSX:
v sccs efn:s
TRIM TSFMD:
1PaCKS THUSFERRED:
lUCXS .IM FILE:
lEROR COUIIT
LSnT flESSft.=OIM















ASCII DOMLOAD
numsIII:


al.-nB HEP I UT-i I Fm I Z I UB I LO CISS I NFT OFF I C 1 C
Fig. 18. File name input window for ASCII download.

You can enter any valid DOS file name, for example,

enter DOWNLOAD.ASC

The window will disappear and the status line at the bottom of the ter-
minal mode screen will be changed (Fig. 19).


Fig. 19. ProComm status line during ASCII download.

When you are ready to end the ASCII download,

press Esc

You can view the downloaded file with the DOS TYPE command or a
word processor or print the file using the DOS PRINT command. Pro-
Comm stores the downloaded file in the directory specified in the
General Setup section. If you followed the example, the file would be
in the C:\COMM\DOWNLOAD directory.



Getting Started With Communications Software








File Upoa wit a rtcl ieUlodwtaPooo


Uploading a file is very similar to the file downloading procedure.
Again, there are two main steps. First, instruct the remote computer to
receive a file from your computer. Often the remote system will
respond by telling you to send the file. Second, instruct ProComm to
send the file. In this process, it is imperative that both computers be
set up to use the same file transfer protocol. In order to implement the
following upload procedure, you must start ProComm, call a remote
computer and instruct the remote computer to receive a file from your
computer.

Press PgUp

PgUp is the key used to display the upload window (Fig. 20). From the
menu of file transfer protocols, select the one which the remote com-
puter is using to receive the file from your computer.


Fig. 20 ProComm upload protocol selection window.


For example, if you are connected to another microcomputer, you may
be using xmodem, so

press 1

to select the xmodem protocol. If you are uploading a file to a mini-
computer such as the IFAS Computer Network, you may use the ker-
mit protocol, so


press 2


to select the kermit protocol.


Getting Started With Communications Software


File Upload with a Protocol


File Upload with a Protocol








If you selected the xmodem protocol, ProComm will display a second
window (Fig. 21) asking you to enter the name of the file to be
uploaded.


SPlease eater f IIlenam:


ALT-rM ELt I Ur-iae I FDx I ZM -U I LG CLSAs | PUT o I CH | CH
Fig. 21. ProComm window requesting name of file to upload using
xmodem protocol.

For example, if the file you want to upload is PROCOMM.EXE and it
is located in the current directory, you would

enter PROCOMM.EXE

and ProComm will begin the upload process by displaying the upload
status window (Fig. 22). If the file to be uploaded is in a different drive
or directory, preface the file name with the drive and path information.


Fig. 22. ProComm upload status window.


Getting Started With Communications Software








If you are using the kermit protocol, you will be asked to enter a file
specification instead of a file name. Since kermit will let you transfer
multiple files, you could use '*' or'?' wildcards in the file specification.
ProComm will inform you when the file transfer is complete.


ASCII File Upload


ASCII File Upload


ASCII file uploads can be started at any time unless a ProComm com-
mand file is active. An ASCII file upload will transmit text from the
designated file to the remote computer and display it on the screen, as
if you had typed it. An ASCII file upload begins when you

press PgUp

The upload window appears (Fig. 20) and you

press 7

to select an ASCII upload. ProComm responds with a window request-
ing the name of the file to upload (Fig. 23).


Fig. 23. ProComm window requesting name of ASCII file to upload.

You can enter any valid DOS file name, for example, if you had a file
named UPLOAD.ASC in the current directory, you could

enter UPLOAD.ASC


Getting Started With Communications Software








The window will disappear and the status line at the bottom of the ter-
minal mode screen will be changed (Fig. 24). ProComm will inform
you when the file upload is complete or you can press Esc to terminate
the file upload.
















LIUE: I a SCII FILE inBAD MPS E 01 ABO
Fig. 24. ProComm status line during ASCII file upload.


Getting Started With Communications Software









ADDITIONAL

PROCOMM FEATURES


Automatic Redial

Occasionally, you may want to call a computer which is hard to reach,
due to busy phone lines. ProComm has a feature, called automatic
redial, which will continuously redial a number until a connection is
made or until you end the redial command. The redial feature is in-
itiated by pressing the Alt and R keys at the same time. You need to
know the entry number, in the dialing directory, of the remote
computer's phone number.

Press Alt and R

at the same time to initiate the automatic redial feature. A window will
be displayed requesting the number to dial (Fig. 25).


It~intbws) to dial'
I 03N or Prevuians-A bas


scs o 11t i -ss I aI 2aam t 1A u CBsIse.l m3 orT iCI 101
Fig. 25. ProComm window requesting dialing directory entry
number for automatic redial.

If the computer you want to dial is the first entry in the dialing direc-
tory,

Enter 1

The automatic redial status window will be displayed (Fig. 26). Pro-
Comm will continue dialing the number until a connection is made or
until you press the Esc key to abort the redial.


Getting Started With Communications Software


Automatic Redial










OK



DIALING: Hake Belieue Cwmpter
PASS mUBE: 1
ELPSED TINE THIS TRY; 1
TIME AT START OF DIAL: 82:22:39l
TIME AT STARB OF THIS CALL: 02;22.48
DELAY TIME: 3
PMSE T1iE: 2
LIiED COIDII FILE:
LAST CALL RESULT:
SPACE: Recycle BEL Renoue front list EIDt Change delay tine
Press ESC to Abort



EDIALING... I UT-e10 I FDX I ZiB M1 I LOG CLOSU .I PIT OFF I C I CR
Fig. 26. ProComm redial status window.

Changing ProComm's Colors Changing ProComm's Colors

ProComm allows a user to set the screen colors. As ProComm is dis-
tributed, it should display equally well on monochrome or color
screens. However, you may wish to change the colors ProComm uses
for some of its windows. The key combination of Alt and Z brings up
the color selection window. If you wish to reset colors or examine this
option,

press Alt and Z

at the same time. The color selection window (Fig. 27) contains instruc-
tions for resetting the colors.


Fig. 27. ProComm color selection window.


Getting Started With Communications Software









To exit the color selection window,


press Esc

and another window will appear (Fig. 28), asking if you want to save
the color changes to disk.


couHI SELECTION
Fig. 28. ProComm window requesting whether user wants to save
color changes.

If you have made changes which you wish to be used the next time you
start ProComm,

press Y

to save the changes or

press N


to not save the changes.


Keeping Track of Time


Keeping Track of Time


You may use a remote computer which limits the amount of time you
can be logged on. ProComm has a feature which allows you to check
how long you have been using the remote computer. It is called the
elapsed time feature. By pressing the Alt and T keys at the same time,
a window will appear (Fig. 29) which displays the elapsed time for the
call in hours, minutes and seconds.

Press Alt and T

to display the elapsed time window and

press Esc


Getting Started With Communications Software


-u-i 0al SelectionI
iaH.-f u. --".iu~lrr --- --~---~~~~'~~---~- |
HEI.P "M'u ..Mol
SVJIA LItM COLORM
I EILLS
SV SatIcolorchavns to dJskT RAP-



(Press SC to exit)















8Z/16T 122:18:53FH
ELAPSED TIIE THIS CALL l:88:44







ALT-FI HELP I UT-18B I FDX | 24I88 81 I LOG CUDSD I PI T OFF I CR I C1
Fig. 29. ProComm window displaying time elapsed for a call.

to remove the window.

DOS Gateway Dos Gateway

There will probably be times while you are using ProComm and con-
nected to a remote computer that you will want to go to a DOS tem-
porarily such as to copy or rename a file, without exiting ProComm.
ProComm provides a DOS gateway feature which allows you to go to
DOS temporarily without disconnecting from the remote computer.
To execute the DOS gateway command,

press Alt and F4

at the same time. ProComm will respond by starting DOS (Fig. 30).


Fig. 30. Screen display after executing the DOS Gateway function
of ProComm.


Getting Started With Communications Software









You can now execute any DOS commands or run programs. When you
are ready to go back into ProComm,

enter EXIT

at the DOS prompt and you will return to ProComm at the point from
which you left it.


Toggle Duplex


Toggle Duplex

If you are using ProComm and you get two letters for each one you
enter, you need to toggle the duplex. To toggle the duplex,

press Alt and E

at the same time. You will see a change in the status line at the bottom
of the screen. This is a temporary change which stays in effect until
ProComm is exited. If you need to toggle the duplex each time you call
a remote computer, change the default duplex as described in the Ter-
minal Setup section and save the changes as described in the Saving
Changes section.


Command Files Command Files

The ProComm feature of using command files is very important.
Through the use of command files, the commands which you repeat
each time you call and log on to a remote computer can be automated
for you. First, you must create a command file using a word processor
or text editor. After the command file is created you can instruct Pro-
Comm to use it. (The ProComm documentation provides a detailed
discussion of command files on pages 701 to 725.)

Sample Command Files Sample Command Files

Figure 31 is an example of a command file which can be used by IFAS
faculty to call the IFAS Computer Network and log on. In the com-
mand file, any text following a semicolon in a line is a comment and
ProComm ignores it. Three lines in the command file need to be
changed. The first change is to the second line of the command, which
instructs ProComm to use entry # 1 in the dialing directory. If you are
using a different entry number, you will need to change the number.
The second change is on the eighth line (TRANSMIT "UserName!")
needs to be edited to replace 'UserName' with your IFAS Computer
Network user name. The exclamation mark (!) must remain since it
represents the Enter key. The third change is on the tenth line (TRANS-
MIT "MyPassword!"), where the text 'MyPassword' must be changed
to the password for your user name on the IFAS Computer Network.


Getting Started With Communications Software











A ProComm command file must be saved as an ASCII or DOS text file
with a '.CMD' extension. For example the command file listed in Fig.
31, could be saved as VAX.CMD.


TART: ; Okay let's start
IAL "1" the IFAS Network is entry 1 in
my PROCOMM dialing directory
RANSMIT "!" send a carriage return, the I
RANSMIT "!" represents a carriage return
PAUSE "l" ; pause 1 second for VAX to respond
AITFOR "Username:" wait for user name prompt
RANSMIT "UserName" ; type my user name
AITFOR "Password:" ; wait for password prompt
RANSMIT "MyPassword!" ; type my password

Fig. 31 Sample command file to access IFAS Computer Network.


More advanced command files, such as those in Fig. 32 can be used for
to automate log on procedures further. The command file listing in Fig.
32 is used to access the IFAS Computer Network, to look for a new mail
message, and to act accordingly. If a mail message is waiting, this com-
mand file automatically goes into mail and reads the first message. If
there is no new mail, the command file will ask if you want to log off
and, then it will either log off or end the command file.


START:
)IAL "1"
TRANSMIT "!"
TRANSMIT "!"
?AUSE "1"
iAITFOR "Username:"
TRANSMIT "UserName!"
4AITFOR "Password:"
rRANSMIT "MyPassword!"
4AITFOR "new Mail message" 30
IF WAITFOR
WAITFOR "$"
TRANSMIT "MAIL!"
WAITFOR "MAIL"
MESSAGE "!"
MESSAGE "You have mail.!"
ALARM 1
TRANSMIT READD"
ELSE
MESSAGE "!"
MESSAGE "No mail this time.l"
MESSAGE "Shall I log off for
ALARM 1
GET S2 1
SWITCH S2
CASE "Y"
TRANSMIT "!"
TRANSMIT "LOG!"
ENDCASE
CASE "y"
TRANSMIT "!"
TRANSMIT LOGIC "
ENDCASE
DEFAULT
TRANSMIT "!"
ENDCASE
ENDSWITCH


Okay let's start
the IFAS Network is entry #1 in my
PROCOMM dialing directory
send a carriage return, the
represents a carriage return
pause 1 second for VAX to respond
wait for user name prompt
type my user name
wait for password prompt to appear
type my passwordIT "I
wait 30 seconds for new Mail message
Do I have any mail
there is mail, wait for the $ prompt
type mail
wait for mail prompt


sound the alarm to alert me
Stype read
no mail today

you (Y/N) ? "
; sound the alarm to wake me up
;get my Y or N response
; if my response is Y
; log off the Network
; if my response if y
; log off the Network

; Ok then give me a prompt


Fig. 32. Advanced ProComm command file to access IFAS
Computer Network


Other command files can be used to access electronic bulletin boards.
The command file listed in Fig. 33 can be used to access the bulletin
board of a popular magazine dedicated to personal computers.


Getting Started With Communications Software










START:
1IAL "5"
TRANSMIT "I"
AUSE "1"
TRANSMIT "!"
AUSE "1"
AITFOR "name:"
RANSMIT "your name!"
AITFOR "City:"
RANSMIT "your city!"
AITFOR "State:"
TRANSMIT "FloridaI"
AITFOR "Name:"
CRANSMIT "your company name!"
AITFOR "Title:"
RANSMIT "your title!"
AITFOR "Phone:"
RANSMIT "your phone number!"
AITFOR "Y ?"
RANSMIT "y!" ; Yes, I can display graphics

Fig. 33. Sample ProComm command file to access an electronic
bulletin board.

Using a Command File Using a Command File


There are two ways to instruct ProComm to use a command file, as
described above. The first way is to include a parameter on the DOS
command line when you start ProComm. In the Starting ProComm
section, the command for starting ProComm was listed as:

enter PROCOMM

To start ProComm with the VAX.CMD command file, use the follow-
ing command instead:

enter PROCOMM IfVAXCMD

The '/f' tells ProComm to immediately begin by executing the com-
mands in the command file which follows the'/f which is VAXCMD
in this case. ProComm automatically used the automatic redial feature
when dialing a number from a command file.

ProComm also provides a way to start a command file after ProComm
is already running. The two keys Alt and F5 when pressed simul-
taneously bring up the command file choice window.

Press Alt and F5

simultaneously to display the command file selection window (Fig. 34).
The files in the current directory with a .CMD extension will be listed
in the right hand window. Use the up and down arrow keys to high-
light the command file of your choice and press Enter to execute the
command file. If the command file is not in the current directory, enter
the name of the file, including drive and path. As you type the file
name, it will appear in the window at the far left and when you press
Enter, ProComm will execute the commands in the file.


Getting Started With Communications Software













I Co nd tIle: 1


Commid FIles
aI1ISRgJ.ouK
FIE.OID
KP-IUII.O3
.BS CD
SOI:CLOID


AL.T-Fr HEuL I uT-l I I 24O8 10 IC CLOSED MF OFF I CR I C
Fig. 34. ProComm command file selection window showing
sample command files distributed with ProComm.

A command file can be interrupted at any time by pressing the Esc key.
When a command file is active, the window at the far left of the status
line will contain the name of the command file.

ProComm contains several additional functions which have not been
described herein. By invoking the help screen, you can review the list
of features and try them. Additional reference material on ProComm
can be found in the ProComm user's manual.


Getting Started With Communications Software















































































COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, John T.
Woeste, director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further the purpose of the May
8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals
and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, handicap or national origin. Single copies of extension publications (excluding
4-H and youth publications) are available free to Florida residents from county extension offices. Informaton on buk rams or copies or out-
of-state purchasers is available from C.M. Hinton, Publications Distribution Center, FAS Building 664, University of Florida, Gainesvile,
Florida 32611. Before publicizing this publication, editors should contact this address to determine availability. Printed 10/91.




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