Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: MacMillan Block 36, Lot 3
Title: The MacMillan House
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094862/00003
 Material Information
Title: The MacMillan House
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: MacMillan Block 36, Lot 3
Physical Description: Report
Language: English
Creator: Stewart, William A.
Publication Date: 1960
Physical Location:
Box: 7
Divider: Block 36
Folder: MacMillan B36-L3
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
224 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
MacMillan House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 224 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.891223 x -81.312681
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094862
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: B36-L3

Full Text






















The llaoeillan House


Flor'idav St. Johns County,, St. Augustin*
224 Ste George St.


(SEE AMCKED SHUTS)









The MaeMillan House--i


GENERAL STATEMENT

umber of stories

Two plus attic.

zye wall construction
Coquina masonry major first floor; wood frame second floor
and additions.


A private residence situated on its own lot, one block south
of the main commercial street of the city. The house has served as the
residence of Miss Amey MaoMillan since 1880.

Alphiteotural interest and merit
The coquina masonry of the ground floor of this house has been
dated as buing prior to 1763. Architecturally therefore the house stands
as a prime example of coquina construction of the first Spanish period

of St. Auguarine (1559-1763). 'LTie wood frame second story and attic
portions of the house, together with the fireplaces, have been dated

as o.1825 and are interesting examples of the construction of that period.
Condition of fabric
The condition of the house at present is fairly good. Recently
there has been little maintenance however and signs of deterioration are
evident.






2The MacMillan House--2


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--EXTERIOR


Overall dimensions

47'-7" x 30'-.2" horizontally. No vertical dimensions available.

Foundations

Not known. Exterior walls continue below grade.

Wall construction

Coquina masonry and wood frame.

Porohbes, stoops, bulkheads, etc.

There is a wood post and beam porch across the south end dn

both levels.

Chimneys

here is only one chimney. This is located in connection with

interior partitions, is built of coquina, and admits fireplaces into its

north and south faces on both the ground floor and second floor levels.

Openins doorways and doors; windows and shutters

The door and window openings in the coquina masonry are in-

teresting and are considered typical for the period. The openings are

forced by cutting a bevel (approximately 300) in the masonry jambs.

The window and door frames are then set into these beveled openings.

Ihe openings in the wood frame portion of the house are not

unusual in type or character.

The window and shutter arrangement for this house is unusual

and interesting, ihe shutters have adjustable louvers, arranged in

three panels. Ihe top panel is approximately seven inches wide. The




The MacMillan House--3


two remaining panels are equal in size and have the appearance of ordin-

ary two panel shutters. The windows are so designed as to conform to

the shutter arrangement, that is that the top portion of the window may
be let down to allow air to come through the top panel of the shutters.

The bottom portion of the windows is an ordinary single hung window.

The windows in this house Pre hung in two ways. On the ground

floor level the bottom portion of the windows are sash weight operated

with metal straps replacing the usual sash cord. The top portion of the

window is held in both the open and shut position by pins. The windows

on the second floor seem to be earlier than those on the ground floor,

and although the window-sahutter arrangement is the same as described

above both the upper and lower portions are pin operated. There are

only two light arrangements, 12 light and 15 light, with the majority

being 15 light windows.

Root

The roof is a single gable with the ridge running north-south.
There are no dormers. The roof covering is asbestos cement shingles.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--INTERIOR

Floor plans

The first floor plan consists of three rooms, a stair hall,

and two later additions. The additions consist of a bath-storage unit

and a tool shed. Without the additions the house may be visualized as

a rectangle with its long axis running north-south. There is a dividing

wall on this north-south axis, thus dividing the rectangle into eastern

and western portions. The eastern portion is divided into a dining








The MacMillan House--4


room on the north and a bedroom on the south, each with a fireplace.

The western portion is divided into a kitchen on the north and an

entrance-stairhall on the south. 'the tool shed addition is to the west

of the kitchen and the bath-storage addition is to the west of the en-

tranoe hall.

The second floor plan consists of four rooms and a stair hall.

Once again the plan may be visualized as a rectangle with its axis run-

ning north-south. There is a dividing partition on this axis. The

eastern portion of the rectangle is divided into a living room and bed

room, each with a fireplace. The western portion is divided into a bath

on the north, a stair iall in the center, and a bedroom on the south.

The second story balcony runs across the entire south end and is en-

tered through either of the south bedrooms,

Atatrways

lOre are two existing stairways. One stairway ocnnecta, in

a single run, the ground floor stair hall to the second floor stair hall.

The second stairway, with winders, connects the second floor stair hall

to the attic.
Flooring

The flooring is of varying widths and lengths of pine boards

throughout.

Wall and ceiling finish

Wall and ceiling finishes are lime plaster, papered.








The MacMillan House--5


Doorways and doors
The window-doors leading from the second floor south bedrooms

to the balcony are of particular interest, These are a combination of

single hung windows and half doors. When the lower portion of the win-

dow is closed the doors form the sill for the window unit. When the

lower portion of the window is raised and the half doors are opened, the

resultant opening may be used as a doorway. There are window length

shutters on the exterior.


The door and window trim consists of wood members combined in

a conservative but decorative design. This trim is unusual in the deep

under cuts that are used to form some of its curves,

hardware

The only hardware of interest consists of a decorative brass

door knocker, the interior door hinges, which are decorative and probably
date with the 1825 remodeling.


The lighting is not of unusual character or design. Conven-

tional outlets and switches are used.


There is no heat source other than the chimneys already


discussed.





The MaoMilian houe--6


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--SITE


Orientation (by compass reading) and general setting
The north wall of the house faces 30 west of true north. The

house sits on a lot whioh is located one block south of the main commer.
cial street of the city. The area contains several shops, a oonmaeroial
parking lot and an episcopal church and church hall. The building is

on the west side of St. George street with its east face directly on the
sidewalk line. Entrance to the house is gained by going through a gate
into an open porch on the south end of the house* From this there is an
entrance into the ground floor stair hall. Once inside the property
there is a yard which extends to the west and south of the house.

jeolosuroe (fences etc.)
A wooden fence encloses the property on the north, a wire
fence along the east, south and west
Outbuildings
None.
halks, driveways, eto.
None existing.
Landscaping, gardens, etc.
The yard shows a profusion of plantings and undergrowth in

no pattern or plan. The overall impression is one of neglect and

disorder.


prepared by: William A. Stewart, Architect
31 August 1960






















AVAILABLE ARCHITECTURAL DATA

MaoMillen House


1. HABS drawings

2. Rough tracings for above
3. HABS field notes
4. Commission photograph

5. HABS photographs


























Ortega-
The MacMillan House


Florida, St. Johns County, St. Augustine

224 St. George St.



(SEE ATTACHED SHEETS)









The MacMillan House--l


GENERAL STATEMENT

)lumber of stories

Two plus attic.

Type wall construction

Coquina masonry major first floor wood frame second floor

and additions.


A private residence situated on its own lot, one block south

of the main commercial street of the city. The house has served as the

residence of Miss Amey MacMillan since 1880.

Architectural interest and merit

The coquina masonry of the ground floor of this house has been

dated as being prior to 1763. Architecturally therefore the house stands

as a prime example of coquina construction of the first Spanish period

of St. Augustine (1559-1763). The wood frame second story and attic

portions of the house, together with the fireplaces, have been dated

as o.1825 and are interesting examples of the construction of that period.

Condition of fabric

The condition of the house at present is fairly good. Recently

there has been little maintenance however and signs of deterioration are

evident.






The MacMillan House--2


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--EXTERIOR


0yrall dimensions

47'-7" x 30t-2" horizontally. No vertical dimensions available.

Foundations

Not known. Exterior walls continue below grade.

Wall construction

Coquina masonry and wood frame.

Porches, stoops, bulkheads, etc.

There is a wood post and beam porch across the south end an

both levels.

Chimneys

There is only one chimney. This is located in connection with

interior partitions, is built of coquina, and admits fireplaces into its

north and south faces on both the ground floor and second floor levels.

Openings doorways and doors; windows and shutters

The door and window openings in the ooquina masonry are in-

teresting and are considered typical for the period. The openings are

formed by cutting a bevel (approximately 300) in the masonry jambs.

The window and door frames are then set into these beveled openings.

The openings in the wood frame portion of the house are not

unusual in type or character.

The window and shutter arrangement for this house is unusual

and interesting. The shutters have adjustable louvers, arranged in

three panels. The top panel is approximately seven inches wide. 'he




the MaoMillan House--3


two remaining panels are equal in size and have the appearance of ordin-

ary two panel shutters. The windows are so designed as to conform to

the shutter arrangement, that is that the top portion of the window may

be let down to allow air to come through the top panel of the shutters.

The bottom portion of the windows is an ordinary single hung window.

The windows in this house are hung in two ways. On the ground

floor level the bottom portion of the windows are sash weight operated

with metal straps replacing the usual sash cord. The top portion of the

window is held in both the open and shut position by pins. The windows

on the second floor seem to be earlier than those on the ground floor,

and although the window.shutter arrangement is the same as described

above both the upper and lower portions are pin operated. There are

only two light arrangements, 12 light and 15 light, with the majority

being 15 light windows.

Roof

The roof is a single gable with the ridge running north-south.

There are no dormers. The roof covering is asbestos cement shingles.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--INTERIOR

Floor plans

The first floor plan consists of three rooms, a stair hall,

and two later additions. The additions consist of a bath-storage unit

and a tool shed. Without the additions the house may be visualized as

a rectangle with its long axis running north-south. There is a dividing

wall on this north-south axis, thus dividing the rectangle into eastern

and western portions. The eastern portion is divided into a dining








The MacMillan House--4


room on the north and a bedroom on the south, each with a fireplace.

7he western portion is divided into a kitchen on the north and an

entranoe-stairhall on the south. The tool shed addition is to the west

of the kitchen and the bath-storage addition is to the west of the en-

trance hall.

The second floor plan consists of four rooms and a stair hall.

Onoe again the plan may be visualized as a rectangle with its axis run-

ning north-south. There is a dividing partition on this axis. The

eastern portion of the rectangle is divided into a living room and bed

room, each with a fireplace. The western portion is divided into a bath

on the north, a stairhall in the center, and a bedroom on the south.

The second story balcony runs across the entire south end and is en-

tered through either of the south bedrooms.

Stairways

There are two existing stairways. One stairway connects, in

a single run, the ground floor stair hall to the second floor stair hall,

the second stairway, with winders, connects the second floor stair hall

to the attic.

Flooring

The flooring is of varying widths and lengths of pine boards

throughout.

Wall and ceiling finish

Wall and ceiling finishes are lime plaster, papered.








The MacMillan House--*


Doorways and doors

The window-doors leading from the second floor south bedrooms

to the balcony are of particular interest. These are a combination of

single hung windows and half doors. When the lower portion of the win.

dow is closed the doors form the sill for the window unit. When the

lower portion of the window is raised and the half doors are opened, the

resultant opening may be used as a doorway. There are window length

shutters on the exterior.

Trim

The door and window trim consists of wood members combined in

a conservative but decorative design. This trim is unusual in the deep

under cuts that are used to form some of its curves.

Hardware

The only hardware of interest consists of a decorative brass

door knocker, the interior door hinges, which are decorative and probably

date with the 1825 remodeling.


The lighting is not of unusual character or design. Conven-

tional outlets and switches are used.

Heating

There is no heat source other than the chimneys already


discussed.





the MaoMillan House--6


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--SITE


Orientation (by compass reading) and general setting

The north wall of the house faces 30 west of true north. The

house sits on a lot which is located one block south of the main commer.

cial street of the city. The area contains several shops, a corrmercial

parking lot and an episcopal church and church hall. 1he building is

on the west side of St. George street with its east face directly on the

sidewalk line. Entrance to the house is gained by going through a gate

into an open porch on the south end of the house. From this there is an

entrance into the ground floor stair hall. Once inside the property

there is a yard which extends to the west and south of the house.

Enclosures (fences etc.)

A wooden fence encloses the property on the north, a wire

fence along the east, south and west.

Qitbuildings

None.

Walks, driveways, etc.

None existing.

Landseapin, gardens, etc.

The yard shows a profusion of plantings and undergrowth in

no pattern or plan. The overall impression is one of neglect and

disorder.


Prepared by: William A. Stewart, Architect
31 August 1960



























The MaoMillan House


Florida, St. Johns County, St. Augustine
224 St. George St.


(SEE ATTACHED SHEETS)









The MacMillan House--1


GENERAL STATEMENT

Number of stories

Two plus attic.

T=pe wall construction

Coquina masonry major first floor; wood frame second floor

and additions.


A private residence situated on its own lot, one block south

of the main commercial street of the city. 2he house has served as the

residence of Miss Amey MacMillan since 1880,

Architectural interest and merit

The coquina masonry of the ground floor of this house has been

dated as being prior to 1763. Architecturally therefore the house stands

as a prime example of coquina construction of the first Spanish period

of St. Augustine (1559-1763). The wood frame second story and cttic

portions of the house, together with the fireplaces, have been dated

as e*1825 and are interesting examples of the construction of that period.

Condition of fabric

The condition of the house at present is fairly good. Recently

there has been little maintenance however and signs of deterioration are

evident.






1he MacMillan House--2


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--EXTERIOR


Overall dimensions

47'-7" x 30'-2" horizontally. No vertical dimensions available.

Found tions

Not known. Exterior walls continue below grade.

Wall construction

Coquina masonry and wood frame.

Porhes. stoops, bulkheads, etc.

There is a wood post and beam porch across the south end en

both levels.

himneys

There is only one chimney. This is located in connection with

interior partitions, is built of coquina, and admits fireplaces into Its

north and south faces on both the ground floor and second floor levels.

Openings doorways and doors; windows and shutters

The door and window openings in the coquina masonry are in-

teresting and are considered typical for the period. The openings are

formed by cutting a bevel (approximately 30O) in the masonry jambs.

The window and door frames are then set into these beveled openings.

The openings in the wood frame portion of the house are not

unusual in type or character.

The window and shutter arrangement for this house is unusual

and interesting. The shutters have adjustable louvers, arranged in

three panels. The top panel is approximately seven inches wide. The




The MacMillan House--3


two remaining panels are equal in size and have the appearance of ordin-
ary two panel shutters. The windows are so designed as to conform to

the shutter arrangement, that is that the top portion of the window may

be let down to allow air to come through the top panel of the shutters.

The bottom portion of the windows is an ordinary single hung window.

The windows in this house are hung in two ways. On the ground

floor level the bottom portion of the windows are sash weight operated

with metal straps replacing the usual sash cord. The top portion of the

window is held in both the open and shut position by pins. The windows

on the second floor seem to be earlier than those on the ground floor,

and although the window-shutter arrangement is the same as described

above both the upper and lower portions are pin operated. There are

only two light arrangements, 12 light and 15 light, with the majority

being 15 light windows,

Roof

The roof is a single gable with the ridge running north-south.
There are no dormers. The roof covering is asbestos cement shingles.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION-INTERIOR

Floor plans

The first floor plan consists of three rooms, a stair hall,

and two later additions. The additions consist of a bath-storage unit

and a tool shed. Without the additions the house may be visualized as

a rectangle with its long axis running north-south. There is a dividing

wall on this north-south axis, thus dividing the rectangle into eastern

and western portions. The eastern portion is divided into a dining








The MaoMillan House-.4


room on the north and a bedroom on the south, each with a fireplace.

The western portion is divided into a kitchen on the north and an

entranee-stairhall on the south. The tool shed addition is to the west

of the kitchen and the bath-storage addition is to the west of the en-

trance hall.

The second floor plan consists of four rooms and a stair hall.

Once again the plan may be visualized as a rectangle with its axis run.

ning north-south. There is a dividing partition on this axis. The

eastern portion of the rectangle is divided into a living room and bed

room, each with a fireplace. The western portion is divided Into a bath

on the north, a stairhall in the center, and a bedroom on the south.

The second story balcony runs across the entire south end and is en-

tered through either of the south bedrooms.

|tairways

There are two existing stairways. One stairway conneots in

a single run, the ground floor stair hall to the second floor stair hall.

The second stairway, with winders, connects the second floor stair hall

to the attic.

Flooring

The flooring is of varying widths and lengths of pine boards

throughout.

Wall and ceiling finish

Wall and ceiling finishes are lime plaster, papered.








The MacMillan House--5


Doorways and doors

The window-doors leading from the second floor south bedrooms

to the balcony are of particular interest. These are a cor bination of

single hung windows and half doors. When the lower portion of the win-

dow is closed the doors form the sill for the window unit. When the

lower portion of the window is raised and the half doors are opened, the

resultant opening may be used as a doorway. There are window length

shutters on the exterior.

Trim

The door and window trim consists of wood members combined in

a conservative but decorative design. This trim is unusual in the deep

under cuts that are used to form some of its curves.

Hardware

The only hardware of interest consists of a decorative brass

door knocker, the interior door hinges, which are decorative and probably

date with the 1825 remodeling.


The lighting is not of unusual character or design. Conven-

tional outlets and switches are used.

Heating

There is no heat source other than the chimneys already


discussed.





2he MaoMillan House--6


DETAILED DESCRIPTION--SITE


Lrientation (by compass reading) and general setting

The north wall of the house faces 30 west of true north. The

house sits on a lot which is located one block south of the main oommer-

@ial street of the city. The area contains several shops, a commercial

parking lot and an episcopal church and church hall. The building is

on the west side of St. George street with its east face directly on 'the

sidewalk line. Entrance to the house is gained by going through a gate
into an open porch on the south end of the house. From this there is an

entrance into the ground floor stair hall. Once inside the property

there is a yard which extends to the west and south of the house.

j4olosures (fences etc.)
A wooden fence encloses the property on the north, e wire

fence along the east, south and west.

Outbuildings

None.
Walks, driveways, eto.

r!one existing.

Landscaping, gardens, etc.

The yard shows a profusion of plantings and undergrowth in

no pattern or plan. The overall impression is one of neglect and

disorder.


Prepared by: William A. Stewart, Architect
31 August 1960




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