Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 13, Lot 7 Ortega
Title: [Letter to Robert H. Steinbach]
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094788/00020
 Material Information
Title: Letter to Robert H. Steinbach
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 13, Lot 7 Ortega
Physical Description: Correspondence
Language: English
Creator: Manucy, Albert
Publication Date: 1968
Copyright Date: Public Domain
Physical Location:
Box: 6
Divider: Block 13 Lots 5-7
Folder: Ortega B13-L7
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
70 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Ortega House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 70 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.895485 x -81.313128
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094788
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: B13-L7

Full Text




UNITED STATES
i DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
SOUTHEAST REGION, P. O. BOX 10008
FEDERAL BUILDING, RICHMOND, VA. 23240
IN REPLY REFER TO:
February 9, 1968



Mr. Robert H. Steinbach
Construction Superintendent and
Archeologist
St. Augustine Historical Restoration and
Preservation Commission
Box 1987
St. Augustine, Florida 32084
7/
Dear Bob:

In reply to your February 7 letter about the 13-foot-high house, I
can't offer you a dogmatic solution. Perhaps you have^pretty fair
evidence of the kind of 11-story structure we usually associate
with a post-1763 date. It is also possible that the upper floor
had windows only in the gables. Today's insistence on many openings,
mainly for light and cheer, is not based on Spanish tradition.

Had this house been in a Spanish town, most likely it would have
been oriented with the short wall on the street, and the gable roof
would have been a shed roof. Several type houses of this general
character are illustrated in my paper on folk architecture in Spain,
and no. 9 shows a typical street facade treatment with a small window
ventilating the upper room. This is a row house, with no fenestra-
tion on the side walls. The patio wall at the second floor level,
as I remember, had only a door and small window. This house was in
a village near C6rdoba. The zone is temperate, say about like
central Georgia.

But the Ortega house differs so much from this one that there is really
no parallel. The 11-inch walls suggest gables to me rather than a hip
roof, and if you have gables, you can ventilate. Dormers, if not
documented, can be omitted. Other possibilities might be small win-
dows below the roof plate (somewhat as in the no. 9 mentioned above),
small shed-roofed dormers above the plate, crickets, etc. In con-
sidering the need for upper room ventilation, remember that the old
time shingle roofs were full of crevices and cooled off rapidly as
soon as the sun left. (This is saying again that when in doubt, omit
a debatable opening.)













Recently I had to decline an invitation to participate in the pres-
tigious Architecture and the Arts Seminar at Houston Baptist College
and suggested your name as one who could do Spanish architecture
in Florida. I hope you will.

Sincerely,




Albert Manucy
Historian




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