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Title: Interlachen : Winter in a Summer Home
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094642/00001
 Material Information
Title: Interlachen : Winter in a Summer Home
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Winter Resort Company
Publisher: Winter Resort Company
Place of Publication: Interlachen, FL
Publication Date: 1890
Copyright Date: 1890
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094642
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Page 24
Full Text


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HOTEL INTERLACHEN, INTERT ACI-TP"N: FT.A.


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-.--I NTERLACH EN---


-~icUINTER RESORT comPANVY,

INTERLACHEN, PUTNAM COUNTY, FLA.
EIGHTEEN MILES WEST OF PALATKA, ON FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILROAD.


--- SeCURE T---

X)inter ome in a summer Jand.


WINsTER- OF 1887-8.
PRESIDENT & TREASURER, GEO. W. HASTINGS.
VICE-PRESIDENT, ID. E. V. VAN NORMAN.
SECRETARY, FRANK J. WEBB.
D IR ECTyPORS.
Gi]:,. W. HASTINGS, E. V. VAN N, IIM\N, F. J. WEBB, I.\iAll I:IE.1) STEELE, C. I-. PIERCE, JACOB SFir'.
SPRINGFIELD, OHIO.
GLOBE IT:INTINir AND PUBLISHING COMPANY.
1887.


















































LA KE CT-TIPCO.--iTnterlachen, Putriam Cotnty, Florida.










^----INTERLMTCHEN. -

In the year 1883 was incorporated in Springfield, Ohio, an enterprise, the main object of
which was to furnish economical winter homes in Florida for such as could not endure the
rigors of a changeable northern climate. The promoters of this enterprise selected as a site
for their future operations a point on the Florida Southern Railway, midway between the Gulf of
Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, in the narrowest part of the State of Florida, on high pine
lands, where the breezes of Gulf or Ocean would come laden with the odors of the pine
forests, most grateful to those afflicted with any form of pulmonary disease, asthmatic,
catarrhal or rheumatic trouble. The town site is between two beautiful lakes, and the name
is derived from its location, INTERLACHEN (between lakes.) The company proceeded to open streets through the forests,
build themselves houses, aided in erecting a modern church building, and in 1884-5 to erect a commodious hotel of fifty
rooms, overlooking in front and rear Lakes Lagonda and Chipco. The beauty of the situation and style of improvements
at once attracted the attention of travellers over the Florida Southern Railway, who stopped, purchased lots, and erected
beautiful homes.
Interlachen is a Winter Resort, somewhat after the plan of the celebrated Northern Michigan Resorts, where one may
own his own cottage, and keep house or board at the Company's Hotel at Interlachen, now in operation, or in the cheaper
hotels or boarding houses in the village. The object is a winter home, free from dissipation, where social life may be en-
joyed, in the best climate in the world, at a minimum cost; and the Company invites all who sympathize with its objects
to purchase a lot and erect a neat cottage, where they feel that they always have a retreat from the chilling winter blasts of
the North. A lot and cottage will cost not so much as a few weeks' board at a first-class hotel in any of the Florida towns ;
and while there is less style and fewer luxuries, there is more health and consequently more enjoyment, and you have the
satisfaction of having obtained the worth of your money.
To reach Interlachen, take any of the usual routes to Jacksonville, the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroad or
St. Johns River Steamers to Palatka, and from thence by the Florida Southern Railroad to Interlachen, 18 miles west.
For further information as to routes, cost of transportation, prices of lots, cost of cottages, etc., address
GEO. W. HASTINGS, President,
Interlacheni, Putnam County, Florida.



















































































































F-IRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHI.-I intrlim.lilnl


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First Congregational Chureh of Interlaehen.



l'j HE church is built in modern style, neatly carpeted throughout, and seated with seats and
backs of perforated wood, best adapted to the climate, with separate tower and bell from
the Buckeye Foundry, Cincinnati. The organization is of the Congregational order, as
best adapted to unite Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Episcopalians
o and Christians of every name, some of each being found within its fold.
F THE INTERLACH EN ACADEMY.

SThe promoters of this enterprise have also, with the aid of the citizens of Interlachen,
5ec i S7uG Qd erected a beautiful, and symmetrical Academy building on an avenue connecting Mariner's
a Lake with the village. The building has a frontage of 50 feet, with three apartments,
vestibule and spacious varandah, and is admirably arranged for light and ventilation, and the comfort and health of its
students." School opens in November and continues until May. Northern visitors will find here all the facilities for the
continuance of studies pursued in the Northern schools. [See last page of cover.]
The Interlachen Academy is an incorporated institution, under the laws of Florida, and it is the design of the
incorporators, at an early day, to erect dormitories for the accommodation of boarding pupils. At present, pupils from
abroad will be accommlodated in the families of the village. The course of study will be that of the Northern graded
schools. For tuition, board, etc., address
G. W. HASTINGS, President, or,
WARREN TAYLOR, Sec. and Treas.,
Interlachen, Putnam County, Florida.







































Winter Residence of J. A. Brewer, of Great Barrington, Mass., at Interlachen, Florida.


^:
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--9---


FLORIDA, "THE ITALY OF AMERICA."



.-..... .----- -- EARLY every paper one picks up has this expression, as applied to Florida. Between
', Italy and Florida, however, there can be no comparison except by contrast. Italy is
Sa region of hills and mountains, snow-capped during a large portion of the year; Florida
is nearly a plain, and in most of it snow was never seen. Italy is swept by cold moun-
tain winds in winter and by burning siroccos in summer; Florida is free from both.
.. Much of Italy is parched with drouths in summer, and irrigation is absolutely necessary
S to the growth of vegetation; Florida has abundant rains throughout the year. Italy is
a peninsula extending in the midst of the Mediterranean Sea, whose waters are no
7 JS warmer than the Atlantic Ocean in the same latitude; Florida is also a peninsula, but.
7 '- 7 surrounded on three sides by the Gulf Stream, the warmest water on the globe, and
'{. .... e being on the borders of the trade winds, receives its winds most of the time from
'- J -"7 that ocean stream, tempered to a genial equability.
Spain and the Grecian Islands compare with Italy as to climate and products; Florida stands alone and without a
parallel or place with which it can be compared. The whole earth has but one Florida, and to compare it with any other
degrades, not elevates it. California is more like Italy than.Florida, in mountains snow-capped, winds and droughts, in
dry plains and needed irrigation, in rushing torrents and naked arroyas. If her panegyrists choose, they may compare
that State to Italy, and call her "the Italy of America."
The highest praise of Florida is to call her by her beautiful and sweet Castilian name, Florida. Italy would rejoice
could she be the Florida of Europe, but she never can. No country can be like our Florida. She needs no laurels
borrowed from another's crown.






























































































































LAGrONDA LAKCE.-IInterlachern, Florida.


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-11-


UIHVY GO TO INTTERLIACGHENI1




ECAUSE Interlachen combines more desirable features as a Winter Resort for persons
-- with fixed incomes than almost any other point in the State. Social, religious and
.educational advantages are already established. Two literary clubs meet weekly for
intellectual culture and improvement. It is away from the coast, river, or low lands,
subject to malaria. It is on the highlands of the State, and midway between Gulf and
__ ,Ti- Ocean, free from gales or severe storms. It is out of the track of cyclones and tornadoes.
Si.lA'f (A.lth~~ibough the WVest Indies are the birth-place of these fearful tempests, Florida is their
dividing line, sending them east and west of her.) Interlachen is on a belt in which
S" the orange is more secure from injury by frosts than the territory 50 to 75 miles north
and south of her. Lakes Lagonda and Chipco are both in her town limits, and row
S-' boats are abundant but three to five minutes walk from her three hotels. An 80 foot
.. ..' avenue of a mile in length makes a beautiful drive to Mariner's Lake, which has a hard
road bed of three to four miles around it, and a sailing yacht and row boats on its
surface for the benefit of those who desire more sea room than is furnished by Lakes Lagonda and Chipco. A pleasant
drive of two hours brings the visitor to Cole's plantation, Lake Grandin, and a natural forest of wild oranges and mag-
nolias. A drive of two to three hours brings one into the most remarkable palmetto forest in the State, and also to the
famed Orange Springs, at one time the great resort of Floridians, (and still grandly beautiful,) Grassy Glade, Slipper Lake,
Lake Galilee, and other points, furnishing hunting and fishing resorts near at hand, while the Ocklawaha swamps, but
eight miles distant, are the home of the bear and deer.






IF YOU ARE IN FLORIDA,
0-OR ARE-

GOING TO FLORIDA,
DO NOT LEAVE THE STATE UNTIL YOU HAVE VISITED

This Beautiful City Between the Lakes.

Better See It Before You go to Other Parts of the State,
for You will find at Interlachen

MANY ATTRACTIONS
--FOR A-

WVINTER HOME!
Found nowhere else in the State.


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Inquiries answered by

T$JB INTERIAGCHENE LTlITER RESORT CO.,
INTERLACHEN, FLORIDA.
cetrofsca adltraylfe oslon;godcuchadsholpkilrFs
Maxium dvatage atminmumcost Doyoulikethestye fr -awiner ome
Inquiries answered by 1



L INTERLACHEN, FLORIDA.













































Interlaohein Winter Res~denoe of Geo. W. Hastings, of Springfield, Ohio.











Y Winter Colon-r.


H-OUM H ANII S of people whose health requires a residence in the South during the
winter months, find their purse incapable of standing the pressure of four-dollars-a-day
S f hotels, and attendant expenses.
To all such, who would like to join in the formation of a winter colony, the town
of Interlachen, on an elevated plateau, 10 feet above tide water, between two beauti-
ful lakes, presents superior inducements. The location is naturally beautiful, and it
is proposed to embellish it by planting the avenues connecting the lakes (Lagonda and
Chipco) with palmettoes, nagnolias, and other tropical trees; also the borders of the
Sik' lakes. The water is clear, deep, with sandy bottom and shores, and affords facilities
in h for fishing, boating and sailing. Interlachen has no surroundings which are likely
to induce malaria, and those who have lived in the vicinity have never been subject
to it. The country around, especially to the west, affords fine views, abounding
in high hills, from which lakes of all sizes are visible; the roads, for a pine region, are good.
The Florida Southern Road passes directly through the place, (four trains a day), the Company furnishing season or
commutation tickets at low rates. It is only 18 miles from Palatka, one of the largest and most thriving towns of Florida.
The land is well adapted to orange culture, and can be had at a mile to three miles for $50 to $15 per acre. Lots in town,
according to size, up to half an acre, $40 to $Ioo. The best of hunting, quail, ducks, geese, deer, bear, can be had in
the vicinity, or by riding a few miles. The easy aci e.,ibility of Interlachen from the north or from the St. John's River
by rail, is one of the many advantages.







--16-

Interlachen can meet the needs of all classes of visitors-the ones with plethoric purse, who desire, and will have,
and are willing to pay for, the luxuries and comforts obtainable, and those who are satisfied with less style, if the bed and
board are good, and for those seeking neither luxuries, enjoyment or recreation as an end, but whose slender purse, and
frail constitutions, compel them to seek a mild climate at as small cost as is consistent with health and comfort, and finally
find employment wholly, or in part, to pay expenses of those who are able and willing to work, who have not the means
to cover even the lowest cost of board. To those who desire to make here a permanent home, aid will be furnished
towards purchasing a lot and lumber to erect a cottage at a low rate of interest. So we invite all, who seek in Florida,
either a winter or a permanent residence, to see Interlachen before purchasing elsewhere.
Extensive building is going on at all seasons of the year. Carpenters, bricklayers, plasterers, shoemakers, laundrymen,
and other artisans can find partial employment, while those of sufficient means to erect larger or smaller houses, can gain
a livelihood, or a partial one, by renting or keeping boarders. But the place is especially desirable for parties who have
small fixed incomes. They can. spend their winters in Interlachen at much less cost than in their Northern homes, and in
the midst of good society.
The sales of lots only to those who will improve them has resulted in the rapid settlement of the place by a good
class of people. The third hotel is now completed and ready for guests, and ample accommodations in hotel and boarding
houses will be found for all who will come.






-17-


ChlImATOLOGY OF FLORIDA.

Extracts from a Letter of Dr. Lente, a Celebrated Physician of Florida.

T your your request I give you my ideas on the climate of Florida, especially this portion
Sof it, and also my opinion of the safety of a residence here during the entire
year, with a consideration of the means of avoiding, as far as possible, diseases inci-
dent to a semi-tropical climate. With regard to the winter climate and its effect on
various diseases, I can speak understandingly, having treated hundreds of cases sent
S i ~ me by physicians all over the country, and having conversed with a great many highly
intelligent people, who have traveled the world over in search of health, and whose
/ verdict is more apt to be unbiased than my own, or that of any one whose interest
lies in one country or in. any one locality. Almost without exception, I think I may
safely say without any exception, this verdict has been that the winter climate of
S / Florida is far superior to that of any of the usual resorts of Europe or Africa.
S It is difficult to convey a definite idea of the beauty of the climate jand of its fit-
/ -- ness for the treatment of certain diseases. The erudite and accomplished editor of
Copeland's Medical Dictionary truly says: "The climate of Florida is wholly
peculiar." One must remain here at least through one winter to appreciate it. It
. i- is quite different from that of any other Southern State, and one may see a reason
for this if he will examine its topography. Jutting out, a it does, from the main body of the country, in a comparatively
narrow strip, not over a hundred miles across the peninsula there is no portion that is not more or less influenced by the
breezes from the Gulf or the Ocean, presenting many features of an insular climate. This may explain why, when a
temperature of 850 or 90' is almost intolerable, at certain seasons of the year, in other States, it is quite comfortable here.







-18-

The climate is not, strictly speaking, an equal one. But the variations are within such limits of temperature as not
to be prejudicial to health. On the contrary, I have always considered this peculiarity of Florida climate an advantage
over the more equable ones of Nassau and the West Indies. I found myself, after enjoying the never-varying sameness
of the West India temperature, enervated at the end of the winter. Even the consumptive and the sufferer from kidney
disease need a change-something to dispel the languor of monotonous warmth, however pleasant that may seem. These
variations of temperature make it necessary for the tourist or invalid to come here, especially if he proposes to spend the
winter and spring, with both thick and medium clothing-none that is very thin. That temperature which at the North
would require thin clothing would necessitate medium here for comfort or safety. Two thickn-c,ses, at least, both of
underclothing and outer wraps, are needed.
As regards rainy and cloudy weather, Florida stands pre-eminent. Three-fourth, of all the rainfall of the year, which
is not excessive, occurs in summer, leaving a very small amount to be divided among the other seasons ; consequently, it
is difficult to raise vegetables here on a large scale safely without means of irrigation, usually by wind-mills. From
twenty-five years' observation, says Dr. Baldwin, there has been an average of 235 clear days for the whole year. Of the
remaining 130 days, a large number were clear a good portion of the day. During the past winter we have not had half a
dozen rainy days, and almost uninterrupted sunshine. Forry, a most reliable authority, gives the annual number of fair
days as 309 for a series of years, and on the Northern Lakes 117. On the coast of Florida the number is 250.
The dew, as in all climates where the rainfall is slight, is sometimes quite heavy; but it does not usually commence
until late at night, and does not inconvenience those who are indoors, while it refreshes vegetation, and prevents destruc-
tion by drouth. Fogs are not commonly seen except during the warm weather or the early winter, and they are not then
frequent, at least in this locality. They occur oftener and last longer as you near the mouth of the river.
The question of ott/a.,i- has been considered a somewhat important one to persons coming here from the North, and
has been a favorite weapon of those who aim to injure the interest of this State. I say has been, because, within the last
ten or twelve years, malaria has so generally invaded the whole North, that persons coming from most portions of it in
winter can not fail to better themselves; as it is well known that however malarious the South may be in the summer, the
poison ceases, in a great degree, to exist in healthy localities, in winter; whereas, in the North it often prevails irr-winter







-19-


,almost as badly as in the summer. Northern visitors have an idea that, as spring approaches, say from the middle of
March until May, the temperature rises to such an extent as to become exceedingly uncomfortable. This is an entire
mistake. April is the pleasantest month of the year, and the most important one for invalids. There are warm periods
of from five to ten days all through the winter and spring, when the thermometer shows almost a summer heat at noon.
I have seen this in December, and it may occur in any month. But they are succeeded by a period of a few days of quite
cold weather, when fires are necessary morning and evening, and perhaps throughout the day. These brace up and give
energy to the system, and are generally grateful even to the feeblest invalid. It is always warm and pleasant in the sun,
ho\we\er, on such days.
The following information was taken from a table showing the population and mortality for each county in Florida,
published by the Bureau of Immigration :
Total deaths in i,ooo of all ages ...- ..-- ..... -....--- ...- ..- ..... 9
Total deaths from Consumption in I,ooo of all ages -....--......... .6
Total deaths from other Pulmonary Diseases in 1,000o -..---......-... 5
It must be borne in mind that a large portion of the deaths from consumption are cases of invalids from other States
and countries, many of whom come here in dying and hopeless condition.
The thermometer does not rise as high here in summer as in New York or Canada, and the sea breezes, which in-
fluence every part of the State-as has been previously stated-and the frequent showers, render the atmosphere more
agreeable at all times than one would suppose; far more so than the adjacent Southern States. The evenings and
mornings are pleasant. The difficulty is more in the long continuance of the hot weather--from May to October. In
summer it might be advisable, especially in case of a sickly season, to go into the interior a short distance among the
pine hills, where there is little or no fever. There is just such a spot as is needed an hour's ride west of Palatka, on
the Florida Southern Railway-Interlachen. It lies between two pretty little lakes, clear, deep, with sandy shores and
bottom, the land around sloping back gradually in the form of an amphitheater. They abound, as do all the lakes in the
State, in black bass. They furnish good drinking water also. This is destined to become, within a couple of years, a
wvell-populated place. Numhrer- of Northern men have purchased lots, and have built or contracted for good residences






S-20--

for the winter. The best of hunting can be had in the vicinity, and the lakes afford facilities for sailing, boating and
fishing. The roads are common country roads, but mostly hard and tolerably smooth, and rides around the country in
various directions among the beautiful lakes of all sizes, afford a sufficient variety for the whole season;
SI would like to call the attention qf such physicians as may chance to read it, to the very great advantage of this
climate. I can speak advisedly of this locality at all events, in the treatment of the various forms of Bright's disease of
the kidneys. I have been surprised and delighted at the rapid improvement, even in cases which seemed to promise very
little when they came here. Even in the last stages, cases have temporarily improved, but of course finally succumbed.
They must, however, be under the care and observation of a proper physician. Both diet and drugs, and advice with
regard to their habits and mode of life ami'l surroundings so different from those at home, are necessary. They must
also be where they can obtain proper food, especially milk, which can not be had in all localities. This is not the proper
place for the detail of cases.
Palatka, Fla. FREDERICK D. LENTE.







HOTEL INTeRLATCHeN,


Interlachen, Florida,
Eighteen Miles West of Palatka, on
Florida Southern R. R.


INTE R A C HEN
WINTER RESORT CO.,
P ROP I J ET 11 i .,


CAPACITY FOR ONE HUNDRED GUESTS.

New lHotel! New Furniture! Good Fare! CleanI eds! Filtered R.aiin
Water Lake Views from all Parts of the Hotel, and G -otdl Botatiig,
Sailing and Fishing within five mniniiiteu walk of Hotel. Hotel Inter-
lachen is a Winter Hotel, easy of recesss and !bl thirty-six Ihours from
Cincinnati or New York.




/


Jacksonville, Tampa j Key-West Railway.
BROAD GAUGE TRUNK LINE-

From JACLGSOIVIllE TO TAMPA
--T--VIA.
Palatka, Deland, Sanford, Orlando and Bartow,
And only Line Between Jacksonville aid ST. AUGUSTINE and to the INDIAN
RIVER. Direct connections made with Florida Southern Railway
at Palatka to and from
IE I N T R L T C I- N ,N
GAINESVILLE, OCALA and LEESBURG. Solid Trains Run Through from
Jacksonville to Tampa, via SANFORD and the South Florida Railroad,
Carrying CUBAN FAST MAIL and Pullman Buffet Sleeping
Cars, connecting at Tampa with Steamers for Key-
West and Havana, three times a week.
Absolutely the Shortest and Quickest Line to all points in South Florida.
All trains arrive and depart from Savannah, Florida and Western Railway station in
Jacksonville, making direct connection from the North and South.
ALL TRANSFERS ARE THUS AVOIDED.
0. VV. BENTLEY, N. R. NIORAN, L. C. DENYING,
GENERAL MAN.\ E. GEN'L SUPERINTENDENT. GEN', TICKET AGENT







Florida Southern Railway
OR7:NqE BeLT ROvTe.
THE ONLY THROUGH, ALL RAIL LINE TO

Tampa, Lakeland and all points on Florida Southern Ry.
GAINESVILLE, OCALA, LEESBURG, PALATKA, TAVARES and EUSTIS,
Landing on LAKES HARRIS and GRIFFIN, ALTOONA, SUMMIT,
RAVENSWOOD and ASTOR, TAMPA and PUNTA GORDA.
MAKING DAILY CONNECTIONS WITH STEAMERS ON
St. Johns River and J. T. & K. W. Railway.
At Palatka, for Jacksonville; at Punta Gorda, with steamships for Key West
and Havana; at Astor, with night steamers up and down St. Johns River; at
Silver Springs, with steamers for Ocklawaha River; at Palatka, with Atlantic
Coast Line for New York.
SHERMAN CONANT, S. C. BOYLESTON,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. & Ticket Agt.
































































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