Group Title: Immokalee AREC Research Report
Title: Vegetable field day
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094211/00006
 Material Information
Title: Vegetable field day
Series Title: Immokalee AREC Research Report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Agricultural Research Center (Immokalee, Fla.)
Agricultural Research and Education Center (Immokalee, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Research Center.
Place of Publication: Immokalee Florida
Immokalee Florida
Publication Date: 1984
Copyright Date: 1973
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Varieties -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Issuing Body: Issued by the Agricultural Research Center in Imokalee, Fla., which changed its name to the Agricultural Research and Education Center.
General Note: Description based on: 1973; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1984.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094211
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 433028245
lccn - 2009229391

Full Text



S FL
Immokalee ARECResearch Report IIM& 84-1 April, 1984
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH & EDUCATION CENTER
Immokalee, Florida

VEGETABLE FIELD DAY \

Wednesday, April 18, 1984 i .



Dallas Townsend, Hendry County Extension Dire tor Moderator ,'

PM I

1:00- Registration

1:15- Dr. W. E. Waters Welcome

1:20- Dr. Jim Davidson IFAS Research Overview

1:35- Reports on Current Research

Dr. J. B. Jones Bacterial Diseases of Tomato and Pepper

Dr. J. W. Scott Tomato Breeding: Varieties, Update on Fusarium
Race 3 and Bacterial Spot Resistance

Dr. D. J. Schuster Insect Control for Vegetable Crops

Dr. H. H. Bryan Fluid Drilling of Vegetable Seeds

Dr. J. P. Gilreath Weed Control in Vegetable Crops

Dr. P. H. Everett Vegetable Nutrition and Cultural Practices

3:15- Tour of Vegetable Research Plots



Soft Drinks Courtesy of Asgrow Florida Company (Huell Frier, Representative)








-2-

TOUR OF RESEARCH PLOTS*

Block no. Page

3 & 5-West Double Cropping 3
Tomatoes after tomatoes

8-West Tomato Variety Trial Staked (rep.) 5

9-11-West Tomatoes-Phosphorus and lime study 6

12-West Watermelon variety trial (rep.) 7

12-Center Watermelon variety trial (non-rep.) 8

13-West Pepper-starter fertilizer 9

13-West Pepper Variety trial (rep.) 10

13-Center Tomatoes, slow-release fertilizer 11

14-West Tomatoes-Insecticide screening 13

14-Center IFAS Pepper breeding lines 14

14-East Pepper Screening for Bacterial Spot 15
resistance

13-East Herbicides Tomato and pepper 16

12-East Cantaloupes Age of transplants 17

10-East Herbicides non-mulched watermelons 18

9 East Herbicides mulched watermelons 19

8-East Tomato variety trial non-staked (non-rep.) 21



*Results reported in this Field Day Program are preliminary and do not
constitute an official recommendation unless so stated.






-3-


DOUBLE CROPPING TOMATOES AFTER TOMATOES


Block 3 and 5 P. H. Everett


Purpose: To develop fertilizer management practices for growing a spring tomato
crop using the same mulched beds after completing a fall crop of tomatoes.
The experiment outlined below is being done with both a fluctuating water
table (Block 3) and a constant water table.

I. Fall 1983 Tomato crop (Non-staked):
The following fertilizer rates and placements were evaluated for their effect
on tomato yield and fruit size.

Fertilizer (19-0-30) rates:
1. 1000 lb/A (14 lb/100 bed feet)
2. 1500 lb/A (21 lb/100 bed feet)
3. 2000 Ib/A (28 lb/100 bed feet)

Fertilizer (19-0-30) placement:
1. Top banded banded in 1" deep grooves 9" to each side of plant row
2. Bottom banded banded on false bed 9" to each side of plant row,
then bedded over to a 4" depth

In addition to the 19-0-30 fertilizer, all plots received a uniform
application at 5-8-8-1.8 + F-503 micros at 500 lb + 15 lb/A (7 lb +0.4
lb/100 bed feet). The 5-8-8 was applied in a 30" wide band on a false
bed, then bedded over to a 4" depth.
The fall crop (cv. 'Hayslip') was transplanted on September 6, 1983 and
harvested twice (Nov. 29 and Dec. 13, 1983).
Table 1 shows the effects of fertilizer rate and placement and water
table on the marketable yields and fruit size for the 1983 fall crop.

Table 1. Effect of fertilizer rates and placement and water table management
on tomato yield and fruit size from the Fall 1983 crop.

Yield Avg. Fruit Wt.
Treatment 1st harv 2nd Harv Total 1st Harv 2nd Harv
------25 lb bx/acre------ ---ounces/fruit---
Fert. rate (19-0-30 lb/A)
1000 1537 394 1931 6.4 4.7
1500 1602 437 2039 6.4 4.8
2000 1511 478 1989 6.3 4.6
L.S.D. 5% NS NS NS NS NS

Fert. (19-0-30) placement
Top banded 1650 503 2153 6.4 4.8
Bottom banded 1449 371 1820 6.3 4.6
L.S.D. 5% 161 126 198 NS NS

Water table
Constant 1683 406 2089 6.4 4.6
Fluctuating 1417 467 1884 6.3 4.8
L.S.D. 5% 161 NS 198 NS NS
Interactions were not statistically significant on yield or
average fruit weight.








DOUBLE CROPPING (CONTINUED)


II. Spring 1984 Tomato Crop:


Procedure
T; 1/23/84 Vines from fall crop sprayed with Paraquat and left
in place.
2. 1/26/84 Tomato seedlings (cv. 'Sunny') transplanted. These
were placed half-way between the old tomato plants.
3. 2/15/84 The 60' long plots used for the fall crop were divided
into 3 subplots. Subplots were fertilized as follows:

Subplot "N" No fertilizer (residual only)
Subplot "L" Liquid 6-0-6 at 125.1b N and 125 lb Kg2/A
or 5.5 oz of 6-0-6/plant
Subplot "D" Dry 23-0-22 at 125 lb N and 120 lb K20/A
or 1.8 oz of 23-0-22/plant

Dry 23-0-22 fertilizer was placed in 2" deep holes 9" to each side of
each plant. Liquid 6-0-6 was placed in 1" deep holes 9" to each side
of each plant.


Fertilizer


Treatments (4 replications)


Plot Fall Crop (1983) Fall Crop (1983) Spring Crop (1984)
no Rate1 Placement Rate

1 & 73 1000 Top banded None
2 & 74 1000 Top banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
3 & 75 1000 Top banded Dry 23-0-22 I 1.8 oz/plant
4 & 76 1000 Bottom banded None
5 & 77 1000 Bottom banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
6 & 78 1000 Bottom banded Dry 23-0-22 @ 1.8 oz/plant
7 & 79 1500 Top banded None
8 & 80. 1500 Top banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
9 & 81 1500 Top banded Dry 23-0-22 @ 1.8 oz/plant
10 & 82 1500 Bottom banded None
11 & 83 1500 Bottom banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
12 & 84 1500 Bottom banded Dry 23-0-22 @ 1.8 oz/plant
13 & 85 2000 Top banded None
14 & 86 2000 Top banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
15 & 87 2000 Top banded Dry 23-0-22 @ 1.8 oz/plant
16 & 88 2000 Bottom banded None
17 & 89 2000 Bottom banded Liquid 6-0-6 @ 5.5 oz/plant
18 & 90 2000 1Bottom banded Dry 23-0-22 @ 1.8 oz/plant

1Pounds of 19-0-30/acre


0


0






-5-


TOMATO VARIETY TRIAL (REPLICATED)
(STAKED CULTURE)

Block 8-West P. H. Everett, K. Armbrester, & J. W. Scott


Purpose: To compare commercial varieties and advanced breeding lines for fruit
yield, size, and quality, and for vine habit and other horticultural char-
acteristics important to fresh market tomatoes.

20 varieties and/or breeding lines 4 plots of each.


Variety or
breeding line
Sunny
Duke
FTE 12
Hayslip
Independence(8212)
Atlantic City(58)
7067-DSBK
7025-CSBK
7060-IBK
7065-TI
7095-TSBK
7078-I1-ISBK
Shamrock #1
Shamrock #2
XPH 724
Pirate
PSR 72482
Shamrock #3
PSR 53080
GSV 82-021


Seed
source
Asgrow
Petoseed
Petoseed
GCREC-Bradenton
Abbott & Cobb
Ferry-,Mrse
GCREG-Bradenton
GCREC-Bradenton
GCRECBradenton
GCREC-Bradenton
GCRECBradenton
GCREC-Bradenton
Shamrock Seed Company
Shamrock Seed Company
Asgrow
Sluis & Groot
Petoseed
Shamrock Seed Company
Petoseed
Goldsmith Seed Company


Planting data:




Fertilizer:


December 23, 1983 seeded in trays
January 25, 1984 transplanted to field
Plants were not pruned
6' bed centers, 15" between plants (800 plants/1000 row ft)

(1) 6.9 lb 5-16-8-1.8 0.4 lb F-503 micros/100 row ft spread
in a 30" wide band on a pre-bed and bedded over to a 4"
depth.
(2) 13.8 lb 19-0-30/100 row ft banded in 1" deep grooves 9"
to each side of plant row.


Culture: Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre


Plot
no
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20


-- --










PHOSPHORUS AND LIME STUDY
(Tomatoes)

Blocks 9, 10, & 11 West P. H. Everett and R.D. Rhue

Purpose: To study the effects of phosphorus and lime rates on tomato production
and to obtain correlation data for the IFAS soil and tissue testing program.
This test will be conducted for a minimum of 4 years in order to study the
residual effect of phosphorus and lime. This (1984) is the 3rd year of this
study.

Phosphorus rates (applied Jan. 1982)
1. No phosphorus
2. 250 lb P20O/acre
3. 500 lb P205/acre
4. 750 lb P205/acre

In 1983 the original plots were split, with one-half of each plot
receiving 40 lbs P205/A and one-half receiving no P205. In 1984, the
1983 plots were split, with one-half of each plot receiving 40 Ibs
P205/A and the other half receiving no P205. With this procedure
there are some plots that have received no P205 and some that have
received as high as 830 Ibs P205/A since 1982.

Lime (dolomite) rates (applied Nov. 1982)
1. No lime
2. 1 ton dolomite/acre
3. 2 tons dolomite/acre
No lime applied since 1982.

Fertilizer:
Nitrogen (215 Ib N/A) and potassium (340 Ib K20/A) applied
Jan. 20, 1982.

Planting data:
Transplanted variety 'Sunny' Feb. 1, 1984
18" in-row spacing
6' between bed centers

Culture:
Plestic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre











WATERMELON VARIETY TRIAL (REPLICATED)

Block 12 West P. H. Everett and J. M. Crall


Purpose: To compare IFAS breeding lines (Dr. J. M. Crall, ARC-Leesburg) and
commercial varieties for melon yield, size and quality.

10 varieties and/or breeding lines 4 plots of each.

Nine entries are large melon types and 1 entry is small melon type.


Plot Variety or Elon Seed
no breeding line type source

1 Jubilee Jubilee Asgrow
2 Charleston Gray Charleston Gray Asgrow
3 Crimson Sweet Crimson Sweet Asgrow
4 F82NC Small ARC-Leesburg
5 F82CE Round Strip ARC-Leesburg
6 F83NE Charleston Gray ARC-Leesburg
7 F82NW Jubilee ARC-Leesburg
8 F83CE Charleston Gray ARC-Leesburg
9 S82NW Jubilee ARC-Leesburg
10 S81NW Jubilee ARC-Leesburg


Planting data:




Culture:


Fertilizer:


January 23, 1984 field seeded
Bed spacing 6' center
In-row spacing 3'
Thinned to 1 plant/hill

Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre

(1) 6.9 lb 5-16-8-1.8 0.4 lb F-503 micros/100 row ft.
spread in a 30" wide band on a pre-bed and bedded
over to a 4" depth.
(2) 13.8 lb 19-0-30/100 ft banded in 1" deep grooves
9" to each side of plant row.







-8-


WATERMELON VARIETY TRIAL (OBSERVATIONAL)


Block 8 West P. H. Everett


10 Varieties 1 plot of each


Plot Seed
no Variety source
1 XPH 962 Asgrow
2 Mirage Asgrow
3 Charleston Gray Asgrow
4 Jubilee WR Asgrow
5 Crimson Sweet Asgrow
6 Sunshade Asgrow
7 XPH 5024 Asgrow
8 XPH 957 Asgrow
9 Prince Charles Petoseed
10 XPH 5082 Asgrow


Planting data:



Culture:


Fertilizer:


January 23, 1984 field seeded
Bed spacing 6' on center
In-row spacing 3'
Thinned to 1 plant/hill

Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation Vorlex @ 12 gal/treated acre

(1) 6.9 lb 5-16-8-1.8 0.4 lb F-503 micros/100 row ft.
spread in a 30" wide band on a pre-bed and bedded
over to a 4" depth.
(2) 13.8 lb 19-0-30/100 ft banded in 1" deep grooves
9" to each side of plant row.


0






-9-


PEPPER STARTER FERTILIZER


Block 13-West Field B P. H. Everett

Purpose: To determine the effect on early plant growth, fruit yield and size
of dry starter fertilizer rates in combination with starter fertilizer
solutions.

12 fertilizer treatments 4 plots of each.


Plot Dry Starter No. application Starter Solutionz
no Fertilizer1 Starter Solution2 Applied @

1 None 0 ----------
2 None 1 Planting
3 None 2 Planting + 1 wk
4 None 3 Planting + 1 wk + 2 wk
5 500 lb 5-16-8/A 0 ----------
6 500 Ib 5-16-8/A 1 Planting
7 500 Ib 5-16-8/A 2 Planting + 1 wk
8 500 lb 5-16-8/A 3 Planting + 1 wk + 2 wk
9 1000 lb 5-16-8/A 0 ----------
10 1000 lb 5-16-8/A 1 Planting
11 1000 Ib 5-16-8/A 2 Planting + 1 wk
12 1000 lb 5-16-8/A 3 Planting + 1 wk + 2 wk
IDry starter fertilizer spread in 30" wide band on pre-bed and bedded over to
a 4" depth.
2Starter solution 5 lbs 20-20-20/100 gal. @ 3 ounces of solution/plant/
application.

Planting data: February 3, 1984 transplanted (cv 'Early Calwonder')
Bed spacing 6' on center
In-row spacing 8"
2 plant rows/bed (12" between plant rows)

Fertilizer: In addition to the starter fertilizer shown in the above table, all
plots received 1000 Ibs 19-0-30/A (13.8 lb/100 row ft). This was
banded on each shoulder of the bed, 9" from each plant row.


Culture: Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre







-10-


PEPPER VARIETY TRIAL (REPLICATED)


Block 13-West P. H. Everett

Purpose: To compare released and non-released commercial varieties for fruit
yield, size, shape, and other horticultural characteristics.

15 varieties 4 plots each


List of Entries


Variety
Early Calwonder
Gator Belle
Skipper
Shamrock
Nelody
XPH 5017
Liberty Belle
Bell Captain
Valley Giant
Jupiter
NVH 3052
Bell Tower
P1000

Greene Belle


Seed source
Asgrow Seed Company
Petoseed
Asgrow Seed Company
Asgrow Seed Company
Asgrow Seed Company
Asgrow Seed Company
Abbott & Cobb
Petoseed
Abbott & Cobb
Northrup King
Northrup King
Sluis & Groot
Sluis & Groot

Abbott & Cobb


0


Planting data: December 22, 1983 All varieties seeded in Speedling trays.
February 8, 1984 Seedlings transplanted in field
Bed 6' on center, 2 rows/bed with 12" between rows and 8"
between plants down row.

Fertilizer: (1) 500 lb 5-16-8/A (6.9 lb/100 row ft) spread in 30" wide band
on pre-bed and bedded over to 4" depth
(2) 1,000 Ib 19-0-30/A (13.8 lb/100 row ft) banded on each
shoulder of bed 9" from plant row


Culture: Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre


Plot no
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15


I I






-11-


SLOW RELEASE NITROGEN AND POTASSIUM FOR TOMATOES

Block 13 Field B P. H. Everett

Purpose: To compare fertilizer containing slow release N and K20 with fert-
ilizer made from conventional N and K 0 sources for their effect on
tomato production. Two placements of each fertilizer mix will be
evaluated.

Slow Release N Sources:
Two coated urea materials, each containing 41% N, obtained from
Estech General Chemical Corporation.
1. Coated Urea #150 80% N release in 150 days at 70*F.
2. Coated Urea #270 80% N release in 270 days at 70*F.

Slow Release K20 Sources:
A fused potassium-silicate containing 20% K20 obtained from
Estech General Chemical Corporation.

Table 1 describes the fertilizer treatments.

Planting data: February 8, 1984 transplanted (cv 'Sunny')
Bed spacing 6' on center
In-row spacing 18"

Culture: Plastic mulch with seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre









SLOU RELEASE NITROGEN AND POTASSIUM FOR TOMATOES
(continued)

Table 1. Description of fertilizer treatments


Plot Fertilizer Fertilizer Lbs/Acre
no materials placement N P20q KpO


(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)


(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)


(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)


Coated Urea #150
5-16-8-1.8
Slow-Release K20
19-0-30
TOTAL

Coated Urea #150
5-16-8-1.8
Slow-Release K20
19-0-30
TOTAL

Coated Urea #270
5-16-8-1.8
Slow-Release K20
19-0-30
TOTAL

Coated Urea #270
5-16-1.8
Slow-Release K20
19-0-30
TOTAL


(a) 5-16-1.8
(b) 19-0-30
TOTAL


(a) 5-16-8-1.8
(b) 19-0-30
TOTAL


30" band
30" band
30" band
2 bands


30" band
30" band
30" band
2 bands


30" band
30" band
30" band
2 bands


30" band
30" band
30" band
2 bands


false bed
false bed
false bed
surface


surface
false bed
surface
surface


false bed
false bed
false bed
surface


surface
false bed
surface
surface


30" band on false bed
30" band on surface



30" band on false bed
2 bands on surface


108 0 0
25 80 40
0 0 185
115 0 182
248 80 407

108 0 0
25 80 40
0 0 185
115 0 182
248 80 407

108 0 0
25 80 40
0 0 185
115 0 182
248 80 407

108 0 0
25 80 40
0 0 185
115 0 182
248 80 407

25 80 40
223 0 351
248 80 391


25 80 40
223 0 351
248 80 391


45% of the total N and
K20 in this fertilizer
program are derived from
slow release sources


45% of the total N and
K20 in this fertilizer
program are derived from
slow release sources


45% of the total N and
K20 in this fertilizer
program are derived from
slow release sources


45% of the total N and
K20 in this fertilizer
program are derived from
slow release sources


98% of the total N and
100% of the total K20 in
this fertilizer program are
derived from soluble sources.

98% of the total N and
100% of the total K20 in
this fertilizer program are


0







-13-


INSECT CONTROL ON TOMATOES

Block 14-West D. J. Schuster


Purpose: To evaluate new insecticides or combinations of insecticides on
tomatoes for control of insects, primarily leafminers.

Crop: Tomato cv. 'Sunny' grown unstaked.

Statistical Design: Randomized complete block with 4 replications

Transplants set: February 16, 1984


Weekly, beginning 3 weeks after transplanting (March 8)


Table of Treatments


Plot no.


Treatment


lb.a.i./100 gal


Check (water)
CGA 72662
CGA 72662 + Dipel
CGA 72662 + Dipel
11K 936
mI 936 + Ambush
Nemacur
Nemacur
Evisect
Evisect
vbnitor
Dipel 2x
XE 938
XE 938
Ambush


Operation:


0.125
0.125 + 0.5
0.063 + 0.25
0.005
0.005 + 0.05
2.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
1.0
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.1


There will be at least one preharvest evaluation of insect damage.
Leafminer control will be evaluated by determining the numbers of
large leafminers since some of the insecticides do not kill larvae
until they reach the third instar. Yields of damaged and undamaged
fruit will be determined. Fungicides are applied weekly.


Treatments:






-14-


PEPPER BREEDING LINE TRIAL

Block 14 Field B R. Subramanya & P. H. Everett

Purpose: To evaluate 5 pepper breeding lines from the IFAS pepper breeding
program.


Plot Breedin Line
no No

1 8309-1
2 8309-3
3 8309-61
4 8309-67
5 8309-90

13 plots of each number

Planting data: February 27, 1984 transplanted to field
Bed spacing 6' on center
In-row spacing 8"
2 rows/bed, 12" between rows

Fertilizer: (1) 6.9 Ib 5-16-8-1.8/100 row feet spread in a 30" band on a
pre-bed and bedded over to a 4" depth.
(2) 13.8 Ib 19-0-30/100 row feet banded on each shoulder of
bed, 9" from plant row.

Culture: Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre








-15-


EVALUATION OF PEPPER CULTIVARS FOR
SUSCEPTIBILITY TO BACTERIAL LEAF SPOT

Block 14-East J. B. Jones and P. H. Everett


Purpose: To determine the susceptibility of
highly tolerant breeding lines for
leaf spot.


pepper cultivars and several
susceptibility to bacterial


Cultivars:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.


Liberty Bell
Cadice
pierced
Skipper
Call Bell #19
5-1-1-LF
Crispy
Four Corners
Espadon
Better Bell
Lady Bell
Gator Belle
25. ProBell


Gedeon
Clovis
Mission Bell
Belle Tower
Greene Bell
Annabelle
Belle Star
10R
Early Calwonder
Bell Boy
NVH 3050
44-1-3


Operation:


Plants were set March 2, 1984. Plants were spaced 8" apart in
double rows. Plants were sprayed routinely for fungal and insect
control. The plants will be spray inoculated with Xanthomonas
campestris pv. vesicatoria. Several routine evaluations for
disease severity will be made over the course of the growing
season.


Summary: No data has been obtained as of yet.






-16-


WEED CONTROL IN TOMATO AND PEPPER ROW I~DDLES I

Block 13-East J. P. Gilreath, P. H. Everett & J. W. Prevatt

Purpose: A number of herbicides are currently labelled for use in tomato and
pepper row middles. Sencor + Paraquat, Amiben and Devrinol are commonly
used materials; although, Amiben has been used much less than the other two
treatments, which are considered to be the grower standards. Some growers
apply Devrinol as a preemergence surface applied material, while others
feel that it must be lightly incorporated, primarily to protect it from
being broken down by sunlight. Dual has shown some potential for use in
tomatoes in preliminary tests. In addition Dual provides some control of
yellow nutsedge and poor control of purple nutsedge. Goal has been researched
for use in tomato middles for several seasons now.at the Bradenton GCREC and
on the farm of D.C. McClure. This compound is of particular interest
because it offers some control of nightshade which is becoming a particularly
important weed pest in south Florida. Therefore, this experiment is being
conducted to compare these herbicide treatments for injury to tomato and
pepper and for weed control in row middles. The plots are to be maintained
free of weeds at a commercially acceptable level by additional applications
of herbicides as needed. This information will ultimately be used to
make cost/benefit analyses of the resulting weed control programs.
Experimental Design: Randomized complete block with half of each plot planted
to tomato and the other half planted to pepper.
Number of Replications: 4
Plot Size: 7 Feet X 25.5 Feet with the middles on either side of the bed
being treated.
Number of Plants Per Plot: 10 tomato and 12 pepper
Cultivars: 'Sunny' tomato and 'Early Calwonder' pepper

List of Treatments

Herbicide Rate Method of
treatment (lb.a.i./A)* application

1. Sencor 1.0 pretransplant
+ Paraquat 0.5 postemergence
directed spray
2. Amiben 3.0 pretransplant
3. Devrinol 2.0 pretransplant
4. Devrinol 2.0 pretransplant
incorporated
5. Goal 1.0 pretransplant
6. Dual 1.25 pretransplant

pounds of active ingredient per acre

Applied 0.5 Ib.a.i./A Paraquat + X-77 to all plots to kill emerged grasses
(2 leaf stage) prior to application of treatments.
DATE OF INITIAL APPLICATION OF PRETRANSPLANT AND PRETRANSPLANT INCORPORATED
HERBICIDES: January 26, 1984.
Date Transplanted: January 30, 1984







-17-


CANTALOUPES

Block 13-East Field B P. H. Everett


Purpose: To evaluate the effect on production of field
transplants when planted in field on the same date.


seeded vs different age


5 treatments (seeded + 4 ages of transplants) 4 plots of each


Plot
no Age of transplants

1 0 weeks (Field Seeded)
2 7 weeks
3 6 weeks
4 5 weeks
5 4 weeks


Planting data:





Transplants:


February 2, 1984 planted in field
Bed spacing 6' on center
In-row spacing 2'
1 plant/hill
Variety 'Magnum 45'

Grown in styrofoam trays with 1'" x 1-"cavities.


Culture: Plastic mulch with seep irrigation
Soil Fumigation VorlexR @ 12 gal/treated acre.


Fertilizer:


(1) 500 Ibs 5-16-8-1.8 + 15 lb F-503/A or 6.9 lb 5-16-8-1.8 +
0.2 lb F-503/100 linear bed feet. This fertilizer spread
in 30" wide band on a pre-bed and bedded over to a 4" depth.
(2) 1000 Ibs 19-0-30/A or 13.8 Ibs 19-0-30/100 linear bed feet.
This fertilizer banded in 1" deep grooves 9" to each side
of plant row.






-18-


EVALUATION OF TWO WEED CONTROL PROGRAMS IN
NON-MULCHED TRANSPLANTED WATERMELON

Block 10-East J. P. Gilreath, P. H. Everett & J. W. Prevatt

Purpose: Watermelons are currently produced under two production systems in
Florida: mulched and nonmulched culture. Because of the limited number
of herbicides previously available for use in watermelon, their erractic
performance and several other factors, many growers have begun producing
melons with plastic mulch culture. Three herbicides currently recommended
for use in nonmulched watermelon production are Devrinol, Sonalan and a
combination of Prefar + Alanap. Sonalan has performed poorly in previous
research in south Florida (Gilreath and Everett) because it requires
overhead irrigation (which is-not available) or rainfall (which occurs
sporadically in the spring) within 7 days after application. Thus only
2 preemergence herbicide treatments are of .practical value to the south
Florida watermelon producer and these offer slightly different spectrums
of weed control. In the past one of the biggest problems with producing
melons on pasture land has been the tremendous grass weed problems which
have developed. Fusilade is a postemergence grass herbicide which has
shown much potential for controlling emerged grasses in watermelon. In
addition-to weed control problems, growers are occasionally victims of a
freeze which requires them to start over. In this event many growers use
transplants of watermelon seedlings so they can still make the season in
time to produce a crop. In other cases, growers may lose the stand due to
herbicide drift problems or other means of herbicide injury. This experiment
is the result of the latter.
In our original experiment watermelons were planted January 10 and grew
well initially. Preemergence applications were made January 12. Devrinol
provided much better grass control than did Prefar + Alanap; however,
Fusilade was still needed to control escaped grass weeds. Fusilade was
applied February 3 and provided excellent control of established goose
grass and crabgrass. There was a high population of nightshade in the field.
Neither herbicide treatment did an acceptable job of controlling nightshade,
but a combination of Prefar + Alanap gave better control than did Devrinol.
In order to eliminate the nightshade Roundup was applied with a wiper appli-
cator on February 24. Although Roundup was applied so as to not contact the
watermelon plants, severe Roundup injury occurred and the field had to be
reset with transplants.
This experiment is being conducted to evaluate two herbicide programs for
weed control in transplanted watermelon.

Experimental Design: Randomized complete block

Number of Replications: 4

Plot Size: 2 rows (6 feet row width) X 30 feet with 10 feet alleys

Number of Plants Per Plot and Spacing: 20 plants spaced 3 feet apart in the
row


Cultivar: Charleston Gray (Asgrow)







-19-


EVALUATION OF TWO WEED CONTROL PROGRAMS IN
NON-MULCHED TRANSPLANTED WATERMELON
(continued)


LIST OF TREATMENTS


Rate Method of
Treatment (lb.a.i./A)* application

1. Prefar + Alanap 5.0 + 3.0 preemergence
Fusilade 0.25 postemergence
2. Devrinol 2.0 preemergence
Fusilade 0.25 postemergence

* pounds of active ingredient per acre

Date Transplanted: March 5, 1984

Date of Herbicide Applications: Preemergence llarch 9, 1984

Prior to transplanting, the beds were barred off to a 1 foot wide bed,
the old plants were removed, any existing weeds were hoed off the bed top,
additional fertilizer was applied to the bed edge and disc hillers used to .
reform a 30 inch wide bed. The same herbicide treatments were applied
preemergence to the weeds and postemergence over the top of the watermelon
plants. Prefar + Alanap was also applied preemergence to the weeds, but the
transplants were shielded from the spray by covering them with paper cups.







-20-

WEED CONTROL IN PLASTIC iMLCHED WATERMELONS

Block 9-East J. P. Gilreath, P. H. Everett & J. W. Prevatt

Purpose: Watermelons are currently produced under two production systems in
Florida: mulched and nonmulched culture. In mulched culture Paraquat is
frequently used to control weeds in the middles. Once vine growth enters
the middles, Paraquat can no longer be applied and serious weed problems
can develop. Devrinol has recently been labelled for both preemergence
and postemergence (to the crop) over the top applications in watermelon.
One of the big problems with production of watermelon on bahfia sod land
is grass weeds. Fusilade has shown excellent potential for control of
grass weeds in watermelon. Whether weeds compete with the crop or not
is uncertain, since the fertilizer is in the mulched plant bed. This
research is being conducted to determine (1) if weeds in the middles of
mulched melons compete with the crop and reduce yields or if weed control
is necessary only to reduce alternate hosts for other pests and to keep
the harvesting crew happy and (2) if a grower could use Paraquat to remove
the early flush of weeds, then apply Devrinol to the clean middles once
the vines enter the middles and control subsequent grass weeds with post-
emergence applications of Fusilade.

Experimental Design: Randomized complete block

Number of Replications: 4

Plot Size: 2 rows (6 feet wide) X 30 feet with 10 feet alleys

Number of Plants Per Plot and Spacing: 20 plants spaced 3 feet apart in row

Cultivar: Charleston Gray (Asgrow)

LIST OF TREATMENTS

Rate Method of
Treatment (1b.a.i./A)* application
1. Weedy check --- -
2. Paraquat + X-77 0.5 postemergence
+ directed spray as needed
Devrinol 2.0 postemergence
+ (post to crop, pre
to weeds)
Fusilade 0.25 postemergence
* pounds of active ingredient per acre

Date Field Seeded: January 10, 1984

Dates of Herbicide Applications: February 24, 1984 (Paraquat)
Iarch 9, 1984 (Devrinol)

Preliminary Results: Numbers of weeds in the row middles were high compared
to numbers in the herbicide treated field; however, weed growth was minimal
due to the lack of fertilizer.







-21-


TOMATO VARIETY TRIAL (NON-REPLICATED)

(NON-STAKED GROUND CULTURE)

Block 8-East P. H. Everett & J. W. Scott


To screen tomato breeding lines for advancement to replicated
and for eventual commercial use; also, to make single plant
bulk seed selections for use in the IFAS tomato breeding program.


35 IFAS breeding lines and 6 commercial breeding lines or commercial varieties -
1 plot of each entry


Planting data:



Fertilizer:






Culture:


Plot no. Entry

1-30 GCREG-Bradenton breeding lines
31-35 TREC -Homestead breeding lines
36 Vegas
37 Shamrock #4
38 Shamrock #5
39 Shamrock #6
40 Shamrock #7
41 Winners Circle

December 29, 1983 Seeded in Speedling trays
February 2, 1984 Transplanted to field
6' bed centers, 18" between plants (667 plants/1000 bed ft)

(1) 500 lb 5-16-8-1.8 Ig/A (6.9 lb/100 row ft) +
30 Ib F-503 micros/A (0.4 lb/100 row ft) spread
in a 30" wide band on pre-bed and bedded over to
4" depth.
(2) 1,000 lb 19-0-30/A (13.8 lb/100 row ft) banded in
1" deep grooves 9" to each side of plant row.

Plastic mulch and seep irrigation
Soil fumigation VorlexR 0 12 gal/treated acre


Purpose:
trials
and/or

























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