Group Title: Immokalee AREC Research Report
Title: Vegetable field day
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094211/00002
 Material Information
Title: Vegetable field day
Series Title: Immokalee AREC Research Report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Agricultural Research Center (Immokalee, Fla.)
Agricultural Research and Education Center (Immokalee, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Research Center.
Place of Publication: Immokalee Florida
Immokalee Florida
Publication Date: 1976
Copyright Date: 1973
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Varieties -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Issuing Body: Issued by the Agricultural Research Center in Imokalee, Fla., which changed its name to the Agricultural Research and Education Center.
General Note: Description based on: 1973; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1984.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094211
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 433028245
lccn - 2009229391

Full Text






Immokalee ARC Research Report SF76-2





AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Immokalee, Florida.

i of the

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
,UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


May, 1976


VEGETABLE FIELD DAY

Wednesday, May 5, 1976


D. W

1:00 p.m. -

1:20 p.m. -

1:30 p.m. -


3:00 p.m. -


*. * * * *,


Lander, Collier County Extension Director -.MODERATOR

Assembly and Registration

Welcome Dr. P. H. Everett, In-Charge, ARC-Immokalee

Reports on Current Research

Mrs. A. J. Overman Nematode research

Dr. C. H. Blazquez Epidemiology of vegetable diseases
and' influence of weather on
S vegetable diseases

Dr. D. J Schus control on vegetables

Dr. J. Aug ne Tr ties and breeding program

Dr. P-/V Everett -'v able triton and cultural practices

Tour of Ve 1~/rsearch Plots
"" ^^^


Soft drinks Courtesy of FMC Agricultural Chemical Division (Howell Heald, Mgr.)

Trucks Courtesy of Kaiser Agricultural Chemicals (Bill West, Mgr.)


i :








TOUR OF RESEARCH PLOTS*


Field "A"


Block no.

3 East

3 West


Nematicidtawinder: pepp irri at ion

Drip irrigation for pepper & tomato


2 Fertilizer rates for 'Morgan' melons

3 East Tomato variety trial (replicated)

3 West Tomato variety trial (observational)

4 & 5 -, Fusarium wilt. of watermelons

6 East N & K rates for tomatoes

6 West Micronutrients for tomatoes

7 Watermelon variety trial

8 Fert. rates & added salts for pepper

9 East 'Cytex' & 'Culbac' for tomatoes

9 Center Organic soil amendments for tomatoes

9 -West .. Micronutrients for pepper

LO & 11 Fusarium wilt of watermelons

12 Slow release fertilizers for pepper

L3 East Tomato insecticide trial

L3 Center Leafminer insecticides (tomato)

13 West Cucumber variety trial

L4 East Cucumber fungicide:

14 Center Tomato fungicide

14 West Pepper variety trial
'.' "'.


*Results reported in this Field Day Program are preliminary and
do not constitute an official recommendation unless so stated.


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27

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ne; .REPORTS 01I RESEARCH
-" .. Agricultural Research Center Inmokalee
: : ; A;. .s e a .; f : L * -

*********************


: Cu... : cumber Resistanbc to Target Spot and-Net Spot
Diseases:in tht Fall of'1973


'F. -'


C. H."BlBizquez


A random block design with three replications was used to determine the resistance
and susceptibility of eight cucumber varieties and two wild hosts (Momordica
charantia L. 'and Echynocistis 16bata [Mi~hx.] Torr. & Gray) t6 target spot (Cor
nespora cassiicola [Berk. & Curt.] Wei) and net sot (Leandria inomordica Rangel).

The varieties tested in this experiment were obtained from commercial sources, wile
the wild hosts were obtained from a nearby citrus grove'and a natural environment.


Mean % disease
.Variety or host : .Target~s ot Net .spot-


*Marketer 89.50ad 80.00a
Hybrid (Gemini x SR Table Green) 86.75a 85.50a
Ashley 85.50a 84.48a
Poinsett 61.63b 86.64a
TXP-B 76.30ab 85.50a
Victory 86.25a 87.50a
XP-1048 S 84.50a 80.10a
Burpless Hybrid 15.20c 89.50a
BalsamgApple 45.50bc 95.00a
Wild cucumber (rough) 60.25b 85.20a

1Numbers within a column fbllowed by the same letter are not
significantly different (P = 0.05) according to Duncan's
Multiple Range Test.


rj


Weather and Disease Surveillance Program

C. H. Blazquez- -

A network of weather stations first established in November, 1973, to study the
association of .weather to the developmen.,ofvegetable crop diseases .was enlarged
and improved with funds from the Center for Environmental Programs during the.fiscal
year 1974-75.

During the last months of 1974 the program- continued on the same basis as in the.
* initial stages as most of the weather instruments purchased did:not arrive at ARC-,
Immokalee until the first two months of 1975. Some of the instruments did not-
arrive until late May and June due to unavoidable delays at the factories.


--
?
o


,


I'' 'i'.':







Weekly travel was made to all;,the weather.stations to service the instruments, change
theeade ssary charts, rand repair any damages that may have occurred during the week.
A total of 71 trips was made during the fiscal year covering 9,111 miles in a station
pickup.

Weekly conferences were held with Mr. L. L. Benson, Chief Meteorologist of the
National Weather Service at Fort Myers, Fla., to discuss the operatoS of the instru-
mentps significant changes in -any of the meteorologicalf parametef~.being monitored,
and to repair any malfunctioning or damaged instrumentst.

The information collected weekly was: reduced, integrated with disease observations
on a station by station basis, and distributed to cooperators for information and
cprrooration, ,

., ..'. 2 V uA44de ;* uring last year to have a working session with Mr. D. R.'Davis and Dr,
:i .. nn (CAssociate Director and Director of the Environmental Studies: service o
.,-; Ce t N.O.A.A., Auburn, Ala., respectively) did not materialize due to a freeze
on al] travel of the E.S.S.C.: ,Ilans have now been made to travel-to Aubbtrrnand have
tb~owdk -session to: (1) plan future work, (2) establish aS1manyrdiseanfe ;bmputet
Rgrt,. s as possiblewith available data, and (3) determine what additional, if any,
S.i ''. data will be required to maximize. the- use .of.the entire program. ---

One weather. station was discontinued (Immokalee Town) durtiig the year upon the
advideiof ,Mr. L. L. Benson. The locations of the remaining weathertstations are
indicated in Table 1. ', i-'

Damage to the weather stations through vandalism has been slightas only two maximum
and two m4pium thermometers were lost. The most serious damage occurred to the
cups of a recording anemometer which were shot through ith a pellet gun.

Losses due' t weather were restricted ,ononehygrothermograph that was lost in a
flooded sheer v during the heavy rains of last summer at Royal Palm Hammock.

Lightning twice hap dAmaged the recording anemometer-wind vane and rain gauge at
ARC-Immokalee.- RepaIrg have been made and all, th'i equipment has been operating due
to the excellent support from Mr. L. L. Benson Who has twice repaired the instruments.

Results

Although it is premature to attempt the"finding of consistent associations between'"
weather parameters and diseases with only ;a'year and a half of collected data,
there have been some results which will be of significant importance.

One of the significant findings involved the bacterial wilt disease of tomatoes and
potatoes caused by Pseudomonas solanacearum E. F. Sm. which has occasionally caused
great concern to growers because of its rapid attack causing severe losses of plants
at varying times after planting. :At the present time there are no recommended
methods for control. During the fall season the disease severely attacked a field
in North Napleps,.ausing approximately a 60% loss of 20 acres of tomato plants in
middle Septeber, 1974. These high losses were experienced with maximum temperatures
of 90 to 92F and minimum temperatures of 680 to 70*F. As soon as the minimum
.temperatures dropped to 54 to 56F on October 4, the disease did' not continue to
spread and tomato plants again.planted in the same field grew normally' nd produced
normal yields, evel, though they Were two to three:weeks later than the Plants
initially planted. The grower did hot lose any profits frdm the above disease
occurrencee.






-5-


The above findings will be of considerable help in advising growers when their fields
may be attacked by the bacterial wilt disease.

A similar relationship was found between low minimum temperatures and a pepper and
tomato blight caused by the organism Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr., which has only
been observed during the fall seasons of the past nine years. The disease has been
first observed from the months of September through October and occasionally in
December, but generally causes severe losses to young plants during October. In a
preliminary scan of local temperatures, it has been determined that as soon as the
minimum temperatures drop below 68F, the disease ceases to attack plants and is not
observed until the following fall season. These associations are most important as
the disease can severely attack pepper and tomato plants, and the presently recom-
mended and cleared fungicides are ineffective against the disease.

At the ARC-Immokalee fields, an association between a sudden drop in monthly rainfall
and downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis [Berk. & Curt.] Rostow) was found in
records from April of 1972 (Fig. 1). Early in January of that year the disease was
observed shortly after the initial rains (0.77 inch mean monthly average) and
continued to develop during February when the mean monthly rainfall increased to
2.14 inches, however, when the rainfall dropped to 0.27 inch, downy mildew ceased
to develop and was arrested until the rainfall increased to 5.20 inches in May.

The weather and disease associations herein reported will have to be substantiated
with additional information from the coming seasons, so that at the present time,
they may only be considered as possible trends. Other results still have to be
critically gone over and compared with further data in order to indicate definite
associations.


Table 1 Geographical location in county, range, township,
section, latitude, and longitude of the Weather and
Disease Surveillance weather stations,


.Sttdain Coikty Range Township Section Latitude Longitude
ARC-Immokalee Collier 26E 46S 20 26 28' 81 27'
Corkscrew Swamp Collier 27E 47S 22 260 22' 810 36'
Immokalee #3 Collier '29E 47S 11 26 24' 81" 24'
North Naples Collier 25E 48S 26 26" 16' 810 46'
North Sunniland Collier 30E 48S 8 26 19' 810 21'
Royal Palm Hammock Collier 27E 51S 18 260 02' 81 39'
Devil's Garden Hendry 33E 47S 34 260 23' 81" 02'
Felda Hendry 28E 45S 12 26 34' 810 29'
LaBelle Hendry 26E 43S 8 260 47' 810 27'
Alva Lee 27E 43S 21 26 41' 810 37'
Fort Myers Lee 25E 45S 12 26 35' 810 53'
North Corkscrew Lee 27E 46S 25 260 27' 81 35'


*~***~ftf* ** **** *













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13


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Sil


07















Downy..mildew. occurrence in 1972


Jan. 24
I- -


Feb


Mar


May 5
I--- 4., P


Apr


May


June


July


Aug


-Q Maximum temperature

.-. Minimum temperature


Sept


Oct


Nov


Months 1972


Fig. 1. Downy mildew occurrence in relation to mean temperatures and rainfall in tri-county
area during 1972.


*


8 V


7


6


5
m


4


3


2


1


Jan


Dec
















0









-Tomato Insecticide Spray Trials

D. J. Schuster

Three insecticide spray trials have been completed on mulched, unstaked,'Walter'
tomatoes at the ARC-Immokalee. Plots:in all tests:were 15 ft. long with 10 plants
and were reply .-ated four times. Sprays were begun about 2 weeks after plant set
and continue~. uitil harvest. Each test was harvested only once.

In the fall'of 1974, all tested materials',reduced dipterous leafmines compared to
unsprayed plants although Lannate alone was not among the most effective treatments
(Table 1). Yield increases are not demonstrative of leafminer control but, rather,
of control:of pinworm and- other lepidopterous larvae. As a result, Lannate (alone
and in combination with Vydate), Bay NTN 9306 and FMC 33297 demonstrated control of
pinworm and other lepidopterous larvae'as illustrated by large increases in yield.


'Table 1. Leafmines per 10 trifoliate leaves and marketable
yield of tomato at ARC-Immokalee, Fall 1974.

Lb. Avg. Marketable
Material ai/100 gal mines yield '(bs):
Vydate 2L -- "
Lannate 1.8L 0.45 2.7a1 113.2cde
FMC 33297 0.8EC 0.10 3.6a 136.2e
Bay NTN 9306 6EC 1.00 3.2a 114.5cde
Vydate 2.OL 0.75 3.7a 52.2bc
Larnate 1.8L 0.45 14.5b 118.Ode
Check -- 50.Oc 31.Oa
Nvumbers in a column followed by different letters are
significantly different at P = 0.05 .(Duncan's Multiple,
Range Test)'.'* -


In the spring of 1975, various single or combination applications',of insecticides
were evaluated for efficacy against both leafminers and pinworms (Table 2). Phosvel
+ Thiodan and Lorsban(R) were effective against pinworms and ineffective for leaf-
miners'. Lorsban did not produce as great an increase in yield because it stunted
the early growth of tomato plants. Bay NTN 9306 alone and Phosvel or Lannate in
combination ,ith Vydate significantly reduced pinworm-damaged fruit and were also
effective for leafminer control. Other tested compounds were fairly effective
against' leafminers but did not equal the best insecticides in reducing pinworm damage
to fruit.






Table 2. Leafmines per 10 trifoliate leaves, pinworm damage and
marketable yield of tomatoes at ARC-Immokalee, Spring 1975.


Lb.
Material ai/100 gal
Lqnagtq + .
Vydate, 1. .. 0.45
Phosvel 45WP + "
Vydate 2L 1.00
Vydate 2L 0.75
ontor 4EC' +
,,ii.Qthene 75S 0.25
Q~thene 75S 0.50
Ba NTN 9306 6EC 1.00
Monitor 4EC 0.50
Lorsban 4EC 1.00
Phosvel 45WP + 0.75 +
Thiodan 50WP 0.50
Check --


Avg.
mines

45. 8a1

57.5ab
58.7ab

60.,0ab
60.7ab
64.5ab
72. 0b
104.5c:

115.0c
98. Oc


% pinworm
damaged fruit


.5.9a

5.0a
15.3b

6, ,16.6b
1i2.1
..3.la
3.9b
6.0a

4.4a
21.5c


Marketable
yield (lbs)


yield (lbs)


136.4cd

138.5cd
102.1b


116.3bcd
130.8bcd
117.6bcd
110.7bc
108.4bc

144.7d
73.6a


73 6


Numbers in a column followed by different letters are
different at, B-P 0.05 (Duncan's Multiple Range Test).


significantly


In the fall of 1975, all treatments reduced the numbers of southern armyworm and
granulate cutworm larvae relative, tp the check although Orthene, Lannate (alone and
in combinations), Bay NTN 9306, and FMC 33297 were superior. Vydate and FMC 33297
at 0.10 ai/100 gal reduced the number of active leafmines by the largest margin.
Yields were low because of a severe infection of late blight. Even so, all treat-
ments increased yields relative to the check with Bay NTN 9306 and FMC 33297 out-
performing the others.


Table 3. The number of southern armyworm (SAW) and granulate cutworm
(GCW) larvae per plant, active leafmines per 10 trifoliates, and
,marketable yield of tomatoes at ARC-Immokalee, Fall 1975.

Lb. No-, No. ,No. active Marketable
Material ai/100 gal SAW-. GCW mines yield (lbs)
Orthene 2.5EC 0.50 05a 0..Oa 9.5N.S. 13.Obc
Vydate +
,Lahiate 1.8L 0.45 O.0a O 0.2a 5.7 14.9abc
Bay NT- 9306 6EG' :0.75.. O.Oa. Oa 15.2 18.7bce
Bay:T 9306 6EC 1.00 1.0ab ,0.O0a 7.0 18.5bc
Dipel 2% +
Sevin 5% Dust 50# prod. 13.0cd 2.2b 7.5 4.6ab
Lannate 1.8L 0.25 l.Oab 0.5ab 9.7 13.2abc
Fundal 4EC +
Sevin 80WP .125 + 0.8 3.5ab 0.2a 14.7 14.6abc
Fundal 4EC +
Lannate 1.8L .125 ea 1.7ab 0.5ab 8.0 8.4abc
Sevin 80WP 0.80 4.Sab 0.Oa 11.2 13.6abc
Fundal 4EC 0.025 8.0bc 1.7b 11.0 12.8abc
FMC 33297 3.2EC 0.05 0.2a 0.Oa 10.0 21.3c
FMC 33297 3.2EC 0.10 O.Oa 0.2a 5.7 15.1abc
FMC 33297 25WP 0.05 l.Oab O.Oa 8.7 16.8abc
FMC 33297 25WP 0.10 O.Oa O.Oa 5.7 21.7c
Check -- 24.2d 2.5b 11.0 3.la


INumbers in a column followed


by different letters are significantly


different at P = 0.05 (Duncan's Multiple Range Test).


0


-~-----------~


-- =--


r h, ,










The Tomato Breeding Program

J. J. Augustine

The tomato breeding program is oriented to variety development for Florida and it
is based on the needs of commercial and home garden Florida growers.

The present thrust of the program is divided into three main areas:

1. Development of determinate and indeterminate fixed hand harvest types with
better size and.disease resistance than the Walter variety.

2. Development of determine and indeterminate Fl hybrids-with better size ~
S, ^n ond4isease resistance than;the Walter variety .

3. Development of types having a small vine, concentrated fruit ret, uniform
ripening, and a high yield of large, smooth, firm fruitmnecessary'for::
machine harvest.

4. Develop nt of adaptable processing types having heavy yield, firm fruits,
good color, early maturity, good machineability, and good field storage.

The specific and future emphasis will be:

1. Verticillium resistance
2. Early bli gh resistance
3. Late blight resistance
4. Bacterial leaf spot resistance
5... 4 Nematodfe resistance
6. J ;:.c--rrporatip: -
<-7. Hot-ec of large fruit types
8. Insect resistance
9. Im-oved fruit color when ripe
10. Increased size
11. Increased firmness
12. Increased yield

The objectives with the most immediate possibilities are a large fruited, high
yielding, J2, verticilli;rm resistant, Walter-type tomato variety. lnreeding lires
with these characteristics are planted in Immokalee, There are 15 breeding lines
planted in a replicated test and 16.,breading ii~es in observational test plots.







-10-


TOUR OF RESkARCH PLOTS


Field "A" '0 r.; :


BLOCK 3 (East) A. J. Overman & P. H. Everett

Nematicides under drip irrigation

Purpose: To re-evaluate effectiveness of incorporated granular nematicides under
drip irrigation in light of the fact that water movement is downward instead of
upward as in traditionally seep-irrigated fields.

Crop: Bell pepper, cv. 'Early Cal Wonder'.

Treated: Jan. 15, 1976.

Transplants set: Mar. 2, 1976.

Treatments: 4 replicates
1. Control
2. Furadan 10G 16 lb ai/A
3. MoCap 10G 20 lb ai/A
4. Nemacur 15G 20 lb ai/A

Operation: Granules were broadcast on soil surface and rotarytilled to depth of
8 inches. Beds were constructed, fertilized and 1 Viaflo drip irrigation tape
was laid in the middle of bed surface. All plots were mulched. Liquid fertilizer
is being fed into tape of alternate three beds.

Results: The test is in progress. No results are available.


*t**t**A**AA********


BLOCK 3 (West) P., H. Everett ,

Drip irrigation (ViafloTH) for mulched peppers and tomatoes '.j ,,

Purpose: To compare soluble nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) applied through the
drip irrigation system to dry N and K applied to the soil of the plant bed.






-11-


Table of treatments

Bed no. Treatment1
1 N & K through drip system
2 ..-N & K dry-in bed
3 N- &-& K-through drip system
S N & K dry in bed
:.::: ... & K through-dr ip syted- -. -
; N & K through the drip system (Beds :: .
n ;r: ..iJ 1,3 & 5) are deriied from potassium
S-- ' : nitrate-(IKN03) applied at., rate -
125 lb KNO3/A/week, which is equiva-
lent to 16 lbs N/A/week. Application
frequency is daily Mfoday through
Friday.


Dry N & K from 18-0-25 at 1,000 lbs/A was spread across the top of the finished
bed then mixed throughout the entire bed by rotatilling to a 6"-7" depth. The
beds were then re-shaped and pressed.

Planting data and drip system operation:
Jan. :15 -Bedded,, fertilized (Beds 2 & 4 only), fumigated, drip tube installed ,
.. ~::'.'and beds mulched. -.
Jan. 16 Drip system started (water only) and operated 4 hrs/day every 3 days.
Feb. 26 Pepper ('Early Cal Wonder') and tomatoes ('Walter') transplanted and
soluble N & K applied through irrigation system to Beds 1, 3 & 5,.
Feb. 26 to Apr. 20 System on for approximately 4,hrs/day, 5 days/week.- Soluble
N & K applied to Beds 1, 3 & 5 at each irrigation cycle.
Apr. 21 to date System on for approximately 6 hrs/day, 5 days/week.

Comments: Chlorine was added at each irrigation cycle from Jan. 16 to Feb. 13 to
give 1 ppm chlorine at ends of lines. Flow rate continued to increase during
this period. Chlorine addition was discontinued after Feb. 13. Flow rates
decreased gradually until Mar. 9. Since Mar. 9, flow rate has been fairly
constant but at approximately 30% above the calculated rate.







-12-


Field "M"


BLOCK 2 P. I, Evrett


Fertilizer rates- for 'Morgan' imelon grown undea pla.t& mulch

Purpose: To determine fertilizer rate for optimum production of this new honeydew
type melon recently released by the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
This melon is deec ibed in Uniferasty of Florida's Circular S-241, Ma&ch, 1976.


Plot Fertilizer
S no,treatment
1 .,- \ \. 500 bs 18-0-25/A
.,,: 2 r l,000 lbs, I,-0-25/A
3 1,500 lbs 18-0-25/A
4 2,000 lbs 5-3-8/A
5 4,000 lbs 5-8-3/A


The above fertilizers were banded onibed surface 9" to each sideof
All plots received a starter fertilizer of 500 Ibs 5-8-8/A (6.9 Ibs
spread in a 30" wide band on a false ,bedoand then bedded over.

Planting data:.
Feb. 12 -Fertilized, bedded and mulched, .
Feb. 13 Seeded. ,:
Plant spacing hills 3' apart, beds 6 -on,center (2420 plants/A).

Results: -'None go .de-. i.
..,, J .


seed row.
/100 row ft)


... ... .. ** ** ****************
,- : 1 ' '" ; .:.i : -, .- r" .Cr. s - .

S: BLOCK 31 (East)., J.- Augustine &i, H. Everett

Tomato variety trial (replicated)

Purpose: To compare advanced breeding lines having potential as commercial
varieties for fruit yield, size and quality, vine habit, and other horticultural
characteristics important to fresh market tomatoes harvested as mature-green.


18 entries 5 plots of each entry.


0







-13-


Plot Variety or Plot Variety or
no. breeding line no. breeding line
1 469 J2 10 494 J2
2 518 J2 11 515 J2
3 524 JO 12 560 JO
4 534 J2 13 591 JO
5 536-J2 14 582 JO
6 537 J2 15 835-1
7 ':, o '543 J -16 Improved Walter
8 550 J2 17 Foundation Walter
9 552 J2 18 Florida Beefsteak


Planting data:
Dec. 29, 1975 Seeded in flats.
Feb. 10, 1976 Transplanted to field.
6' between bed centers, 12"-'between plants*

Fertilizer: .
(1) 500 lbs 5-8-8/A (6.9 1bs/0O0 tow-'ft) spread in 30" wide band on false bed
and bedded over.
(2) 1,000 lbs 18-0-25/A banded on" bed Suarfce' 9" to each side of plant row.

Results: None to date.





SBLOCK 3 (West) J. J. Augustine &6 P. H. ERverett

Tomato variety trial (observational)


Purpose: To screen tomato breeding lines
for evdntu: commercial use. Also, to
f6r,'t$se In the tomato breeding program.

3I5entries- 1 plot of each.
*' 'i : '


for advancement to replicated trial and
make single plant and/or bulk selections


Plot Breeding 'Plot Breeding
no. line no. no. line no.
1 010 9 100
2 013 10 109
3 015 11 113
4 032 12 114
5 040 13 324
6 042 14 404
7 305 15 405
8 094


' : (- '" f-' '






-14-


Planting data: -.
Dec. 29, 1975 Seededin flats.
Feb. 10, !976 -iranspianted to field. -!
6' between bed centers, 12" between plants

Fertilizer:
(1) 500 Ibs 5-8-8/A (6.9 lbs/100 row ft) spread in 30" wide band on false bed
and bedded over.
(2) 1,000 Ibs 18-0-25/A banded on bed surface 9" to each side of plant row.

Results: None to date.

*********************


BLOCKS 4 & 5 P. H.Everett

Effect of certain soil treatments on the incidence
of Fusarium wilt of watermelons

Purpose: To evaluate the residual effect on the incidence of Fusarium wilt of
watermelons of several soil treatments applied in January, 1975.

Treatments tested in Spring 1975:
1. Soil pH high or low.
a. Soil pH was adjusted with either calcic lime (high pH) or sulfur (low
pH).
2. Soil fumigant with and without sodium azide.
a. Sodium azide at 30 lbs active/acre was broadcasted and incorporated
2 weeks before planting. One week prior to applying the sodium azide,
all plots were heavily inoculated with a culture of the Fusarium wilt
organism. -

1976 test: The came plots that were:used in 1975 were re-established without
: additional limaLor sulfurvwithoutf'noculation, and without applying the soil
fumigant (sodium azide). The soil pH in the limed plots on Jan. 19, 1976, was
6.8 and in thesulfur plots 5.2. One series of plots are mulched and one series
are not mulched. One series of plots have received high nitrate nitrogen,
fertilizer and one series high ammoniacal nitrogen fertilizer. Nitrogen was
applied at 180 lbs/A for all plots. Fertilizer for the unmulched plots was split
into 3 equal applications.






-15-


Table of treatments


Plot
no.
1
2

4
5
6
7
-8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


Soil
pH
-High
High
'High
High
High
High
High
High
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


Plastic-
mulch
No-
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Nes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes


Planting data:
Jan. 23 Seeded with Fla.. 75-1 watermelons an advanced breeding line from
D'r. J -M. Crall, ARC-Leesburg. This breeding line carries good
resistance to Fusarium wilt.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Hill spacing 3'.

Results: The table below shows the main effects of the various.factors on the
incidence of Fusarium wilt at two sampling dates.


Wks after Soil: H Mulch N-source Sodium azide
seeding High Low Yes No Nitrate Ammoniacal Yes No
------- - - - - --% wilt -
5 2 6 2 5 2 5 0 5
11 4 18 8 14 7 15 11 11

1Sodium azide applied in Jan., 1975, but not in 1976, therefore, little
or no benefit was expected in 1976.


iComments: 'The amount;of Fusarium wilt was less with high soil pH, plastic mulch
and high nitrate nitrogen than with low soil pH, no mulch and high ammoniacal
nitrogen.


* *~**** +****~****~** **


-


Nitrate or
ammnjiacal nitrogen
Nitrate
Azinoniacal
SAmqmoniacal
'Nitrate
Nitrate
Ammoniacal
Ammoniacal
Nitrate
Ammoniacal
-Nitrate
Nitrate
Ammoniacal
Ammoniacal
Nitrate
Nitrate
Ammoniacal


, _







-16-


BLOCK 6 (East) P. H. Everett


Nitrogen and potassium rates for tomatoes


Purpose: To determine an efficient rate of nitrogen and
harvested as mature-greens.


Table of treatments


potassium for stake tomatoes


Plot 18-0-25 18-0-25
no. Nitrogen Potassium equivalent equivalent
- - - pounds/acre - - - lbs/100 row ft
S0 0 0 0.0
2 54 75 300 4.1
3 108 150. 600 8.2
4 162 225 900 12.3
5 216 300 1200 16.4
6 270 375 1500 20.6
7 324 450 1800 24.6
8 432 600 2400 32.8
9 540 750 3000 41.2
10 648 900 3600 49.3


Fertilizer placement: 10% of the total amount of 18-0-25 for Plot Nos. 1-7 or 5%
for Plot Nos. 8-10 was broadcasted over surface of finished bed, the-remaining
90% or 95% banded on bed surface 9" to each side of plant row.. Superphosphate
at 500 lbs/A was spread in a 30" band on false, bed, then bedded over.

Planting data:
Jan. 19 Sodium azide at 36 Ibs active/acre broadcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 6 Fertilized and mulched.
Feb. 16 'Walter' variety. x 1" Speedling type) transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center..
Plant spacing in row 16".

Results: None to date.

Comments: Tomato plants in Plot No. 1 (no added fertilizer) showed no signs of
nutrient deficiency until approximately 7 weeks after transplanting. This indi-
cates a relatively high level of residual fertilizer salts (plant nutrients) from
the previous crop. : i"







-17-


BLOCK 6 (West) P. H. Everett

SMicronutrients for tomatoes

Pupoase;: To compare 3 sources of micronutrients, each at 2 rates, for their effect
on tomato yields.


-. Table of treatments

P lot Micronutrient Rate
no. source (lbs/A)2
1 FTE-503 20
2 FTE-503 40
3 TEM-300 20
4 TEM-300 40
5 Super. TEM-200 S 30
6 Super TEM-200 S 60
7 None
1FTE-503 is a trademark of Frit Industries,
Ozark, Ala.
TEM-300 (primarily oxides) and Super TEM-200 S
(primarily sulfates) are trademarks of Traylor
Chemical & Supply Co., Orlando, Fla.
2The 3 source materials were applied at rates
to give equivalent amounts of boron, copper,
iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum.


Fertilizer data:
1. Micronutrientt materials applied in 18" band on false bed, then bedded over.
2. 500 Ibs/A superphosphate in bed.
3,. -1,000 Ibs/A i18-0-25 banded on surface.

Planting data:.
Jan. 19 Sodium azide at 36 Ibs active/acre broadcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 6 Micronutrients, superphosphate and 18-0-25 applied. Bedded and mulched.
Feb. 16 'Walter' variety (1" x 1" Speedling type) transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Plant spacing in row 14".


Results: None to date.






-18-


BLOCK 7 C. H. Blazquez


Disease regq ifaaep d t Aitermelons

Purpose: To determine the resissqcA e .ewoiCultlvars to prevalent watermelon dis-
eases. .- .. : .


*P1ant.ing data:.
Field seeded
Planted on
Fertilizer


~.


Son Jan. 30, 1976.
Sten-foot ro3r', 3' between plants, 60 ft plots.
500 Ibs/A of 5-8r-8 (30% orga:ic) in a 30" band, bedded over and
1000 lbs/A 18-6" in two bands on hed.-surface 9" to each side of
.plant row. -

'""- l /- i.....


NO.


1
2
3
4
5


Results to date:


Bropedug ine cu Lt. var
. Charleston Gray
Crimson Sweet
.Florlda. Giant
ende rseetl.....a 7
Tendersweet #l.... --


No diseases have occurred to make a c'tR.on.o


': ::l.LO C r P,*: e;* *
., : . j.J .

.' 'IOCL K 8 PI 11. "E fet .tt


Fertilizer study on the yield and post-harvest quality of sweet' eppeO -r

Furrose: To evaluate ,he.effet of two fertilizer ratpa, tWr.qaio\of ni'ttate to
a-i oh~i~idi nitrogen, and four sources of added salts op: pa tt stand, yteld, and
post-harvest quality of mulched-grown bell pepper. Dr. Ralph Segall (USDA-ARS,
Orlando) is conducting the studies on post-harvest fruit decay. -


Basic fertilizer rates:
1. Low 70Q. Ib/A pi0-25-2 = 126 lbs 'N & 175. bs
43~ .I ib.,l-019-2 = 126 Ibs'" & 218 lbs
2. High' 140dI /A13-0-25-2 = 252 lbs N & 350 Ibs
2290 lbs/A 11-0-19-2 = 252 Ibs N & 435 lbs
All plots received 500 lbs/A of superphosphate.

Nitrate-N to ammoniacal-N ratios in basic fertilizers:
1. 0O% nitrate : 20% anmoniacal (18-0-25-2) .
2. 20% nitrate : 80% aimoniacal (11-0-19-2)'


K20 or-
Kj~jA nStc(l
K20/A
kC20/A


0


0


--
'~-~""~"








-19-


Sources of added salts:
1. Potassium nitrate,- KNO3
2. Calcium nitrate Ca(N03)2
3.. Potassium chloride-. KC1
4. Calcium chloride Ca(Cl)2

Each of these four salts was added (in addition to the basic fertilizer) at
1000 lbs/A. Since 3 of the salts contain nitrogen and/or potassium, the addition
of these to the basic fertilizer changes the N03:NH4 ratio as well.as the N:K
ratio. -These added salts plus the basic fertilizers were banded on the bed
surface 8" to the outside of each of the two rows of pepper No material was
placed between the rows.


Table of treatments


Basic fert.
rate (lbs/A)
700
1145
700
1145
700
1145
700


1145
700
1145
1400
2290
1400
2290
1400
2290
1400
2290
1400
2290


Basic fert.
formula
18-0-25
11-0-19
18-0-25
11-0-19
18-0-25
11-0-19
18-D-25
11-0-19
18-0-25
11-0-19
18-0-25
-11-0-19
18 0-25
11-0-19
18-0-25
11-0-19
18-0-25:
11-0-19
18-0-25
11-0-19


Salt
added
KN03
.KN03
Ca(N03)2
Ca N03) 2
KC1
KC1
Ca(C1)2
Ca(C1)2
None
None
KN03
: KN03
Ca(N03)2
Ca(N03)2
KC1
KC1
Ca(Cl)2
Ca(C1)2
None
None


Total lbs/A N03:NH4
N K20 ratio (%)


256
256
326
326'
126
126
126
S126
126
126
'382
382
452
452
252
252
252;
252
252
252


615
615:
175
175
775
775
175
175
175
175
770
770
350
350
950
950
350
350
350
350


90:10
60:40
92:8
70:30
80:20
20:80
80:20
20:80
80:.20
20:80
90:10
60:40
92:8
70:30
80:20
20:80
80:20
20:80
80:20
20:80


All plots received 100 lbs/A P205 from superphosphate.


Planting data:
Jan. 19 Sodium azide at 36 lbs active/A broadcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 27 Fertilizer applied and beds mulched.
Mar. 3 Early Cal Wonder transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Row spacing 12" apart on bed.
In-row spacing 10" between plants.

Results: Preliminary results from plant counts indicate better stands with lower
fertilizer rates and a high nitrate to ammoniacal nitrogen ratio.


~*** ~** ** * *** ****


Plot
no.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9.
10
11
12;
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20


I


.


.








BAOCK 9 (East) P. H. Everett

CytexTM and CulbacTM for tomatoes


.1
I ---.


Purpose: To evaluate the
effect on.tomato fruit
*' ".I ;? ; t.. .. .


effect of two organically d ~e ed materials for their
size and yield.


Table of treatments


Plot .E ow applied, and o '
no. Material1 dosage rate
1 'Cytex' (1) Transplant water 1/2 gal 'Cte /A
(2) At full bloom foliar spray 1/2 gal 'Cytex'/A
S 'Cytex' At full ~:lboMifolali pray 1/2 gal 'Cytex'/A
.. '."Cy ..Transplant. water- i/2 gal 'Cytex'/A
( r-'-L., 'Cuibac' Three fdlIar sprays .,
:, (l):.10 'daysafter ,tr~qsplanting 4 oz 'Culbac'/A
.I: (2) At first bloom 6 oz 'Gulbac'/A: .
':, (3) Atf'ull blooa--. 6 oz 'Culbac'/A
5 'Culbjac' .I (1) Tradfsplant water 1:1000 dilution
.,; (2) Plus-3'61oliar sprays as in Treat ent #4
"'1 6 'Cul4ac' Three foliar sprays; :
S. (1) id-'days after transplanting 94 oz 'Culbac'/A
(2) At first bloom? 5 oz 'CulbacI/A
; ; (3) full bloom-- 5 oz 'Culbac'/A
'7 N N o treatment

.'Cytex' (At ant & Pacifif Research,,- n, -N. Palm_Beach, Fla.) is a
-cytokinin,. 9rmo Lconcentfate and 'qulbac (TransAgra Corp., Memphis,
':Tenn.) is, aLact6bacills(-'didophilu eiaentation ptdduct. Both
"materials are sad to profbte certain yp- s of plant esponses.,
C


Planting:data: :
Jan. 19 Sodum azide at 36 lbs active/A d ,~adcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 10 500 ibs/A superphosphate applied ;:bedded and fertilized with 1,000 lb1/A
18-6-25.
Feb. 23 'Walter'variety (1" x 1" Speedling type) transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center. f
Plant spacing 18" in-row. .'


Results to date: On Mar. 29, just before the
& 6, the number of fruit set 'er: plant was

Treatment :


or plot no.
1
21


3
4'

6
7


full bloom spray on Plot Nos. 1,2,4,5,
determined.

.Av, o. .ff uit'
set
1.07
6 '' .


* . .,0


1.07
1 .97

.67


1Tr. No. 2 was not applied until after
this count was made, therefore, it
would be equivalent to the untreated
check (Tr. 7).


I1 1


rI:.1


i
r
.. ~


--


II




-21-


BLOCK 9 (Center) P. H. Everett

Organic soil amendment for plastic mulched tomatoes

Purpose: To compare the effect of two rates and two placements of an organic soil
amendment (a by-product of the sugarcane industry) on tomato fruit size and yield.

I'tes of organic amendment (OA):
1. 2 T/A
2. 4 T/A

Placements of or-anic amendment (OA):
1. 30" banlv on false bed and covered to 3" depth
2. 30" ban( oa surface of finished bed


Table of treatments

Plot no. Treatment
1 2 T/A OA + 150 lbs/A 18-0-25 starter both on false bed
2 2 T/A OA + 150-lbs/A 18-0-25 starter both on bed surface
3 4 T/A OA + 150 lbs/A 18-0-25 starter both on false bed
4 4 T/A OA + 150 Ibs/A 18-0-25 starter:both on bed surface
5 4 T/A OA on false bed (no 18-0-25)
6 No OA + 150 lbs/A 18-0-25 starter on bed surface


All plots (except No, 5) were fertilized with 1,000 lbs/A 18-0-25 banded on
surface of finished bed 9" to each side of plant row. All plots received 500
lbs/A superphosphate in 30" band on false bed, .then covered to 3" depth.

Planting data:
Jan. 19 Sodium azide at 36 lbs active/A broadcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 11 Treatments applied and mulched.
Feb.. 16 'Walter' tomatoes transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Plant spacing 24" in-row.

Results: None to date.


*********************





-22-


BLOCK 9 (West) P. H. Everett

Micronutrients for pepper

Purpose: To compare 3 sources of micronutrients, each at 2 rates, for their effect
on pepper yields.


Table of treatments

Plot Micronutrient Rate
no. source (Ibs/A)2
1 FTE-503 20
2 FTE-503 40
3 TEM-300 20
4 TEM-300 40
5 Super TEM-200 S 30
6 Super TEM-200 S 60
7 None
1FTE-503 is a trademark of Frit Industries,
Ozark, Ala.
TEM-300 (primarily oxides) and Super
TEM-200 S (primarily sulfates) are
trademarks of Traylor Chemical & Supply
Co., Orlando, Fla.
2The 3 source materials were applied at
rates to give equivalent amounts of boron,
copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and
molybdenum.


Fertilizer data:
1. Micronutrient materials applied in 18" band on false bed, then bedded over.
2. 500 lbs/A superphosphate in bed.
3. 1,000 Ibs/A 18-0-25 banded on surface.

Planting data:
Jan. 19 Sodium azide at 36 lbs active/A broadcasted and incorporated.
Feb. 11 Micronutrients, superphosphate and 18-0-25 applied. Bedded and mulched.
Feb. 26 'Early Cal Wonder' pepper transplanted to field.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Rows 12" apart on bed.
In-row spacing 10".


Results: None to date.





-23-


BLOCKS 10 & 11 P. H. Everett

Effect of certain soil treatments on the incidence
of Fusarium wilt of watermelons

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of several soil treatments on the incidence of
Fusarium wilt of watermelons. This is essentially a duplication of the experiment
in Blocks 4 & 5, except treatments were applied this season rather than in the
1975 season.

Treatments tested:
1. S6il pH high or low.
a. Adjusted with either calcic lime (high pH) or sulfur (low pH).
2. Soil fumigant with or without sodium azide.
a. Sodium azide at 36 lbs active/acre was broadcasted and incorporated 2
weeks before planting.
b. One week prior to applying sodium azide, all plots were heavily
inoculated with a culture of Fusarium wilt organism.
3. Plastic mulch with or without.
4. NitrLte nitrogen vs ammoniacal nitrogen.
/ a. One series of plots received 80% nitrate and 20% ammoniacal, and one
/series received 20% nitrate and 80% ammoniacal.


Table of treatments

Plot Soil Sodium Plastic Nitrate or
no. pH azide mulch ammoniacal nitrogen
1 J1High Yes No Nitrate
2 ;High Yes No Ammoniacal
3 High Yes Yes Ammoniacal
4 High Yes Yes Nitrate
5 High No No Nitrate
6 High No No Ammoniacal
7 High No Yes Ammoniacal
8 High No Yes Nitrate
9 Low Yes No Ammoniacal
10 Low Yes No Nitrate
11 Low Yes Yes Nitrate
12 Low Yes Yes Ammoniacal
13 Low No No Ammoniacal
14 Low No No Nitrate
15 Low No Yes Nitrate
16 Low No Yes Ammoniacal
1Two weeks before planting high soil pH was 6.9 and low
soil pH was 5.6.


Fertilizer data:
1. 80% nitrate : 20% ammoniacal from 18-0-25-2 applied at rate equivalent to
180 lbs N 250 lbs K20/A.
2. 20% nitrate : 83% ammoniacal from 11-0-19-2 applied at rate equivalent to
180 lbs N 311 Ibs K20/A.
3. Fertilizer for unmulched plots was split into 3 equal applications.





-24-


Treatment and planting data:
Dec. 18, 1975 Sulfur at 1/2 T/A or lime at 1 1/2 T/A broadcasted and incorporated
Jan. 28, 1976 Fusarium wilt inoculum applied.
Feb. 4 Sodium azide applied.
Feb. 19 Bedded, fertilized and mulched.
Feb. 20 Seeded with 'Charleston Gray' variety watermelons.
Bed spacing 6' on center.
Hill spacing 3'.

results: Treatment effects have been determined on (a) seedling emergence, (b)
percent wilt, (c) seedling vigor, and (d) plant stand. Some of the results are
given in the following table.


Main effects

Seedling1 Wilt '%)2 Plant Seedling vigor4
Treatments emergence (%) 3/23 3/30 stand3 (%) (grams/seedling)
High soil pH 72 14 19 87 4.67
Low soil pH 79 26 37 73 3.20

Sodium azide 76 15 23 84 4.07
No sodium azide 75 25 33 76 3.79

Mulch 80 19 27 83 4.62
No mulch 70 21 28 77 3.25

High nitrate 76 16 24 86 4.23
High ammoniacal 74 23 31 74 3.64


1Counts 17 days
2Counts on 3/23
2 plants/hill.
3Counts made on
4Determined 3/8
include roots.


after seeding.
and 3/30 were 7

3/30.
when hills were


and 14 days, respectively, after thinning to


thinned to 2 plants. Seedling weights do not





-25-


BLOCK 12 P. H. Everett

Fast and slow release nitrogen sources for plastic mulched pepper


Purpose: To compare 2 placements and 3 rates of 3 nitrogen sources on plant stand,
growth and yield of sweet pepper.

Nitrogen sources from:
1. Sulfur coated urea (SCU) (37.1% N) slow release N.
2. OsmocoteTM (14-14-14) (ammonium nitrate + ammoniated phosphate) slow
release N.
3. 18-0-25 (potassium nitrate + ammonium nitrate) fast release.

Nitrogen rates:
1. 89 1bs/A (low rate).
2. 178 Ibs/A (medium rate).
3. 356 lbs/A (high rate).

Superphosphate and/or potassium sulfate was used to adjust the P and K levels to
give equal amounts within each of the 3 nitrogen rates. When superphosphate was
used to adjust P level, it was spread in 24" band on false bed, then bedded over.
/'
Placements:
1. All nitrogen and potassium mixed into plant bed spread across the entire
w-idth of finished bed then mixed by rotatilling to depth of 6". Beds were
then re-shaped and pressed.
2. All nitrogen and potassium on surface of finished bed 10% of the total
fertilizer for the various rates was spread in 24" band on bed surface; the
remaining 90% was placed in 2 narrow bands on each bed shoulder 8" from plant
row.


Table of treatments


N-source
material
SCU--
SCU
SCU
SCU
SCU
SCU
OsmocoteTM
OsmocoteTM
OsmocoteTM
OsmocoteM
OsmocoteTM
OsmocoteTM
18-O0-25
18-0-25
18-0-25
18-0-25
18-0-25
18-0-25
No added fi


N-rate
(lbs/A)
89
89
178
178
356
356
89
89
178
178
.356
356
89
89
178
178
356
356
fertilizer


Nitrogen & potassium
placement1
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S


mixed throughout bed with rotatiller (see Placement No. 1).
surface of finished bed (see Placement No. 2).


Plot
no.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
IM=
S =





-26-


Planting data:
Feb. 19 E. rtij. izqT eatments applied, bedded and mulched.
Mar. 2 'Early CalToiJner* pepper trdwi ig noted to field -
: B".'tBed;:.siacing-6. ., pnngTern
Row spacing 12". \
In-row spacing 10". ,

Results: Plants showing fertilizer salt damage were counted: 9. 13 and..21 day,, after
trahsplattinagK. a d,,pants were replaced with" iew transplants after each count.


Main effect of treatments on fertilizer -alt damaged plantsl


Days after transplanting
Treatments 9 13 21 Total
- % plants damaged - ,-


12
19


26

13
18
25

'24


4 -4
4 4
7 6


5
4
5

5 '
4
count.


OsmocoteTh
48l, Cr-0-25


Low rate
Med. rate
.;,High ;at |E

Fert. mixed
S,.Fertt. surface


1;Dam agdagd plants were replaced after each
: 7 I, . , . . .


20
27
"39

S23
25
36

38
24


*; '


An insight into the over-all contribution of soluble salts from the nitrogen
source material, as indicated by salt damaged transplants, can be gained from
the interaction effect between.:rate andr placement of each source material.


' ; :i. .Salt Oamage4,


transplants (%)


N-source i Rates1
material Placement Low Medium High
OsnmooteT Mixed in bed 22j 21. 21
Bed surface 15, 16 22

SCU + K2S04 Mixed in bed 28 28 54
Bed surface .14 17 21

18-0-25 Mixed in bed 27 43 77
Bed surface 30 33 26
1Low rate equivalent td (1) 636. bs Osmocote/A, or (2) 240
Ibs SCU + 248 Ibs KSO04/A, or (3) 495 Ibs 18-0-25/A.
ieditu rate equivalent to (1) 1272 lbs Osmocote/A, or (2)
:80 i1bs SCU + 496 lbs K2SO4/A, r6r (3) 990 lbs 18-0-25/A.
High rate equivalent to (1) 2544 lbs Osmocote/A, or (2)
960 lbs SCU + 992 lbs K2S04/A, or (3) 1980 lbs 18-0-25/A.


* *** ~** *~***~* ** ***


ra.


K!''j*.


:i


"!





-27-


BLOCK 13 (East) D. J. Schuster & P. H. Everett

W Insecticide spray trial on tomatoes

Purpose: Evaluate new and registered materials in controlling tomato insect pests.

Treatments: 10 including a check.

Replicates: 4, randomized complete block.

Plots: Raised mulch, standard fertilizer and cultural practices (15 ft. plots with
5 ft. aisles).

Variety: 'Walter', unstaked.

No. plants/plot: 10.

Spacing: 18" centers.

Planting date: 8-week old plants set Feb. 20, 1976.

Application: Weekly, beginning Mar. 10, 1976.

Results to date: Sampled Mar. 24 and Apr. 7, 1976.


Plot Lbs ai Tomato pinworms Active leafminers
no. Material per 100 gals per 10 trifoliates per 10 trifoliates
1 Check -- 0.5 120.7
2 Azodrin 5E 1.00 0.6 29.6
3 Plictran 50WP 0.50 0.1 75.0
4 Lannate 1.8L 0.45 0.0 94.7
5 PP557 2EC 0.20 0.0 10.7
6 PP383 2EC 0.05 0.1 13.4
7 UC51762 50WP 0.50 0.0 57.5
8 Bay NTN 9306 6EC 1.00 0.0 9.9
9 FMC33297 3.2EC 0.10 0.0 12.0
10 FMC33297 3.2EC 0.05 0.0 25.2


*********************


BLOCK 13 (Center) D. J. Schuster & P. H. Everett

Insecticide spray trial on tomatoes

Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of insecticides against the vegetable leafminer.
Evaluate effect of leafminers on tomato yield.

Treatments: 5 including a check.

Replicates: 4, randomized complete block.





-28-


Plots: Raised mulch, standard fertilizer and cultural practices (15 ft. plots with
5 ft. aisles)

YVaretv: 'Walter', unstaked.

i.. '.pl.ts/plot: 10

SpLing: 18" centers.

.Plnting date: 8-we.k old plants set Feb. 20, 1976.

r ii WePlekley, beginning grMar. 10, '1976.

i.tenance spray for tomato pinworm: Weekly applications of Fundal 4EC (.25 lb
a"ilO0 gal) and Dipel WP (0.50 lb product/100 gal).

3e u3rs ;o 'cate: Sampled Mar. 24 and Apr. 7, 1976.


Plot Lbs ai Leafmines/10 trifoliates
no. Material per 100 gals & Total Active
1 Check -- 242.7 60.7
Diazinon 4EC 5 174.2 41.1
Cygon 2.67EC 0.5 119.5 17.6
4 Azodrin 5EC 1.0'0C 127.6 25.5
5 Monitor 4EC 0.5 101.1 10.0

. ... ... . ... .. . . . ..... ....** **** .
". -: " : .'



BLOCK 13 (West) C. H. Blazquez

Disease resistance to target spot

?' *.:t-: To determine the degree of resistance to target spot (Corynespora
ciasshi.cola [Berk. & Curt.] Wei) of Florida cucumber breeding lines.

Pi nting data: -
":ield seeded on Mar. 10, 1976.
Planted on 45 ft plots with no. alleys, 12" between plants.
Fertilizer 500 lbs/A of 5-8-8 (30% organic) in a 30" band, bedded over and
1000 Ibs/A 18-0-25 in two bands on bed surface 9" to each side of
plant row.


^Tx. no. Breeding in/clult ivar
1 Fla. Breeding line CR-6M
2 Fla. Breedirg finn CR-8M '
3 Fla. -ceedir.- line C3-7M ;
4 Fla. Breeding line CR-9M
5 Poinsett (Ssnford)


Results to date: No disease has occurred to nake a comparison.


4 !ia. 3r.~.odm2 .Z~AC ~





-29-


BLOCK 14 (East) C. H. Blazquez


Comparison of downy mildew control by soil incorporation
and foliar application with similar fungicides

Purpose: To determine the best method of application(ground incorporation or foliar
application) of two promising fungicides for the control of downy mildew
(PseIdoperonospora cubensis [Berk. & Curt.] Rostow) of cucumbers.

Planting data:
Field seeded on Mar. 10, 1976.
Planted on 10 ft plots with 3 ft alleys, 12" between plants.
Fertilizer 500 lbs/A of 5-8-8 (30% organic) in a 30" band, bedded over and
1000 Ibs/A 18-0-25 in two bands on bed surface 9" to each side of
plant row.

Fungicide treatments:
1. Soil incorporated fungicides were weighed, mixed with 1 Ib of 40 mesh sand
as diluent, and broadcast over a false bed of the treatment area before
pressing each treated bed.
2. Foliar applications were made on a weekly basis after emergence of the first
true leaves.


Tr. Method of Rate/A in lbs
no. application Material formulated
1 Soil incorporated CGA 29212 1/4
2 Soil incorporated CGA 29212 1/2
3 Soil incorporated CGA 38140 1/4
4 Soil incorporated CGA 38140 1/2
5 Untreated check
6 Foliar application CGA 29212 1/4
7 Foliar application CGA 29212 1/2
8 Foliar application CGA 38140 1/4
9 Foliar application CGA 38140 1/2
10 Unsprayed check


Results to date:
widespread by
was made.


Downy mildew was first observed on Mar. 24, 1976, and became
Apr. 8 so that by Apr. 16 the first evaluation of the treatments









o -30-


BLOCK 14 (Center) C. H. Blazquez


S Improvement of fungicide efficacy by the addition of stickers

Purpose:" To 4etprmine the improvement of gray leaf spot (Stemphylium solani Weber)
control on tomatoes with Bravo 6F by the addition of two Premier Co. stickers.


Planting data:
Transplanted
Planted 9Dp,5
-ertiJ4^1 -


Results to date:


to plots Mar. 10, 1976.
six-foot rows, 10 ft plots with 2' between plants.
500 Ibs/A of 5-8-8 (30% organic) in a 30" band, bedded over and
1000 lbs/A 18-0-25 in two bands on bed surface 9" to each side of
plant row.


Tr. Rate/100
no. Material gals water
1 PC AG 1 + Bravo 6F 1 oz + 2 qt
2 PC AG 1 + Bravo 6F 2 oz + 2 qt
3 PC AG 2 + Bravo 6F 1 oz + 2 qt
4 PC AG 2 + Bravo 6F 2 oz + 2 qt
5 Bravo 6F alone 2 qt


No disease has occurred to make a comparison.


BLOCK 14 (West) C. H. Blazquez

Disease resistance of peppers tpqprevalent fungus and virus diseases

Purpose: To screen the most promising Florida pepper breeding lines and cultivars
for resistance to prevalent fungus and virus diseases.

Planting data:
Transplanted to plots Mar. 10, 1976.
Planted on 5 six-ft rows, 10 ft plots with 5 ft alleys with 10" between plants
on double rows.
Fertilizer 500 Ibs/A of 5-8-8 (30% organic) in a 30" band, bedded over and
1000 lbs/A 18-0-25 in two bands 18" apart on top of the bed.


Tr. no. Breeding line/cultivar
1 Resistant Florida Giant (Cook No. P-3)
2 Yolo Wonder (Cook No. P-10)
3 Fla. Breeding line No. 18
4 Fla. Breeding line No. 19
5 Early Cal Wonder (Cook No. P-25)
6 Fla. Breeding line No. 29


Results to date: No diseases have occurred to make a comparison.


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