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 Financial summary
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Title: Annual report of the director
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the director in behalf of the Executive Board
Alternate Title: Annual report of the acting director ( 1947/48 )
Physical Description: v. : ; 21-25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Association for Adult Education
American Association for Adult Education
Publisher: The Association
Place of Publication: New York
New York
Publication Date: 1935/36
Frequency: annual
regular
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1928/29-
General Note: Volume for 1947/48 has title: Annual report of the acting director.
General Note: Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility: American Association for Adult Education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094186
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 001807778
oclc - 02056152
notis - AJN1622
lccn - 34040891
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Preceded by: Annual report of the executive director

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
        Page 52b
        Page 52c
        Page 52d
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
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        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
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        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Financial summary
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Back Matter
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Back Cover
        Page 107
        Page 108
Full Text












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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR


ADULT EDUCATION












ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


in behalf of the Executive Board

for 1935-36



INCLUDING CHRONOLOGICAL OUTLINE OF

ACTIVITIES OF THE ASSOCIATION

FOR DECADE, 1926 TO 1936


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SIXTY EAST FORTY-SECOND STREET

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR ADULT EDUCATION

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

IN BEHALF OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
FOR 1935-36

IT SEEMS fitting that the report on the tenth year of activities
undertaken by the American Association for Adult Education
should be prefaced by certain observations on the Association
itself rather than by generalizations upon the movement that gives
it life. Of recent years it has been the custom in the introductions
to these reports to deal with certain of the underlying issues
deemed important to adult education in America, to attempt to
analyze these issues, and to point to a policy which might actuate
the Association (though not its component parts) in the year or
years to come. A tenth anniversary is an appropriate occasion
upon which to take stock and to determine whither such delinea-
tions of policy have led us. It also affords an admirable opportu-
nity to chart a general course for the future, although the general
rather than the specific nature of such a course should be empha-
sized. The general subject of this introduction, therefore, will be
Retrospect and Forecast-retrospect, it is to be hoped, without
regret; and forecast, it is devoutly to be trusted, not without cau-
tion and not without full power of revision.
In other years these pages have contained views on such adult
education matters as qualitative versus quantitative success, on the
use of propaganda methods, on the difficulty of combating special
pleaders, on "money changers in the temple," on the inconse-
quence of definitions and formulae, on the folly of superimposi-
tion, on the necessity of harmony as between the cultural and vo-
cational points of view, on the dangers of inflation in the adult
education idea, on progress without sensationalism, on the prin-
ciples of discriminatory thinking among both leaders and led, on
the retroactive effects of adult education ideals upon formalized
education for the young, upon professional standards and the
elimination of claptrap and charlatanism.






2 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
In the midst of the depression hysteria it is interesting to find in
the record certain frank and undisguised warnings against the
amateur economists among the educators coupled with a diagnosis
of the mental colic that seemingly possessed them. The reports
outline for the Association a position of open-mindedness on the
subject of social change but affirm the belief that a new educa-
tional order will emerge only after a considerable period of years
and then in amount commensurate only with the degree of social
change achieved. The report for 1932-33 draws attention, in a
time of dangerous reliance upon concentrated authority, to the
democratic basis and local control of American education, empha-
sizing particularly the necessity of maintaining education for
adults untrammeled and free lest extremism grow from abuse of
governmental power. One year later the report makes a plea for
liberalism, paying its respects alike to communism, fascism, and
hidebound conservatism in relation to educational matters. Those
who seek to emotionalize the content of education, the indoctri-
nators for whatever cause, are declared unworthy of the adult edu-
cation trust. The efforts of those who seek to seize control of our
curricula for children and adults, either to overthrow or to up-
hold, are decried. The report deals at length with the dangers in-
herent in the Federal Government's relief entry into the field of
adult education.
In 1934-35, the report hammers in, with some sardonic pleasure
it must be admitted, certain well-spaced nails in the coffin of the
depression-promulgated idea that "the school is and should be an
agency for social action." Complete interment of this idea has
taken place in the year that has elapsed since, and sensible edu-
cators seem now to be pretty well agreed that the task of educa-
tion stops with preparation for social action, when such prepara-
tion includes thorough understanding not of one but of many sides
of public questions. Freedom from forced belief or action seems
more firmly placed than ever as an educational tenet in the Amer-
ican democratic experiment.
These, then, are some of the questions whose consideration in
the minds of the membership of the Association, of its Council, its
Executive Board and committees, its officers and staff, have led to






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


the formulation of a policy in behalf of the organization. These
questions comprise our Retrospect. The degree of our regret-or
lack of it-can be computed only in terms of what we now judge
to be right or correct.
But it is not so much to the rightness or wrongness of these
policies that we should address our thinking at this moment if we
are to confine ourselves to the function of the Association in 1936
and in the years to come. The question to be answered is whether
there is place in the American educational scene for a body that
has operated as has our Association in the last ten years. How may
our functions for the last decade be summed up? Have we pro-
moted discriminatory thinking? Have we contributed our bit to
the developing American culture? If so, are we in a position to
continue that contribution in years to come?
It is not possible to commence such a consideration without an
initial assumption of good faith on the part of those whose duty it
has been to formulate Association policy. Let us assume, therefore,
that of honest intent to be genuinely helpful there has been no
lack. The evidence apparently exists that a conscious attempt has
been made to assign a role of constructive criticism to the Asso-
ciation. The record above referred to seems to indicate that this
role has been consistently and perhaps even effectively played
throughout ten years.
But was "constructive criticism" the functional characteristic
most needed during the ten formative years of the movement?
The Association has at least one friendly critic- and a most dis-
tinguished educator he is, as well-who feels that our effectiveness
would have been multiplied many fold if we had, as he puts it,
dared to condemn from the start much of the effort carried on
under the name of adult education. He feels that an attitude of
constructive criticism, of slow boring from within to produce
acceptable standards, has proved to be a waste of time and of
energy. His policy would have been to wipe out most of what we
had and to commence anew. Necessary purgative, destructive
criticism would have been his formula and it seems not unlikely
that old-fashioned denunciation would have been his chosen
weapon.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


At the other extreme, particularly in the early years of the
Association, were the considerable group (and they had their
representatives in the government of the organization) who be-
lieved the function of the Association to be that of a super-pub-
licity agent. They would have had us "promote" adult education,
passing our support 'round the circle of operating agencies in rota-
rian fervor, the Association itself basking in the glory of the re-
flected sunlight thus generated. Criticism would have had no place
in such a program.
An examination of the two extremes reaffirms this writer's faith
in the policy of constructive criticism. Assuredly we must work
with and from what we have, but also assuredly we should not be
content with it. The way is tedious and hard, but we shall be able
with such a policy to maintain, protect, and consolidate the ground
gained. We shall advance as an army of occupation rather than as
a raiding party, and as we go we shall have the inestimable advan-
tage of a friendly populace in little-known territory. Our lines of
communication will be strong for they will be based upon the
spread of discriminatory thinking on the part of the people to be
served. And we shall have borne in mind the fact, which can not
be too often repeated, that the adult is under no compulsion to
exhibit the slightest interest in adult education. He should no more
be frightened away from it than he should be misled by false pro-
motional promises of its efficacy as a panacea for all evils. The long
time way, the hard way, is the only safe approach to an American
culture based on understanding through education.
What remains to be done in the years to come? The answer
appears to lie in unremitting effort to progress upon the way
already blazed. Our resources, our time, our energy and what of
brains we can command all should be focused increasingly upon
our constructively critical function. New crises in adult education
constantly will arise. The next five years will see a return to eco-
nomic security and perhaps, for most of us, even relative economic
ease. With such a return to so-called "normalcy," we as a people
shall be prey again, without doubt, to the wiles and chicaneries of
the politicians and their backers from the extreme right just as
during the depression years we have been similarly annoyed by






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 5
proponents of the extreme left. Already public relations counsel,
as mouthpieces for misunderstood business, are announcing them-
selves as "specialists in symbols," their thought being that the
rightist point of view may flourish through slogans rather than
through understanding. Symbol vending passes as education
among these gentry. It is as much the business of adult education
to uncover public misapprehension spread from such sources as it
is to unmask the precisely similar frauds circulated from the com-
munistic and fascistic left. The case for discriminatory thinking is
not yet made nor ever will be fully made. It is the task of educa-
tion to further the adult public's taste for factual information and
for calm analysis of facts after they are acquired. There is still
need for the American Association for Adult Education to press
home this point of view.
It would seem that the task of the Association in carrying the
torch for adult education, so evident in the years just following the
founding, has largely been advanced to other hands. The great
formal and informal agencies dealing with human needs and rela-
tionships-the public schools, the libraries, the universities, the
museums, the churches, the associations and organizations-have
adopted adult education into their programs. No general educa-
tional consideration nowadays fails to include the adult and his
problems. The movement for adult education has reached such
size and strength that, whether we wish it to or not, it will carry
its own propaganda. It is even highly probable that those of us
trying to play the parts of constructive critics will not approve of
some of the directions in which lush growth takes place. There
will be unwisdom in some forms of adult education in the future
just as there have been mistakes in the past. Indeed errors prob-
ably will be more frequent and greater in size, for it must be real-
ized that the movement for the education of adults has assumed
enormous proportions within a small number of years. Thousands
of new leaders and teachers have come into the field without back-
ground of adult education training or experience. That some
portion of the new millions of our consumer population should be
led astray by bad leadership is inevitable.
Even though it no longer seems necessary that the Association






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


carry the torch for the general idea of adult education, it is more
important than ever that the organization should strive to protect
and maintain the ideals of adult education. The improvement of
methods and techniques, the placing of emphasis on decent and
acceptable standards, the eternal hammering away at the anvil of
qualitative performance as the only genuine test of validity, all
remain to us in our role of constructive critic. In fact our respon-
sibilities are larger in the next five years than they have been in the
last five, not only because of the greater size of the movement but
because we have now become the custodians of a body of doctrine
flowing in to us from innumerable sources developed during the
last decade. This body of sound doctrine, the results of experiment
and experience in all parts of the country, is all that exists in the
way of guidance material for the thousands of newcomers, both
lay and professional, freshly aspiring to the educational leadership
of their fellow adults.
It would seem, then, that there is much for the Association to do
in the next five years, if we are to aid in overcoming the disparity
between the powers of the leaders and the necessities of the parti-
cipants in adult education. Our clearing house for information
function, our publications activities, our study and research, our
experiment and demonstration functions, all will be strained to
the utmost if we live up to the exciting opportunities ahead.
It seems likely that the financial means for the continuance of
the Association for an additional period of five years will be pro-
vided. The Trustees of Carnegie Corporation of New York, at the
instigation of President Frederick P. Keppel, have indicated their
willingness to finance the activities of the Association for an addi-
tional term of years. It is the recommendation of the Executive
Board and of the Director that the Association accept the mandate
for continued leadership in the adult education field implied in its
willingness to receive a further support grant for the maintenance
of the organization. At the same time, the Association should be
pledged to examine its position and the general situation of adult
education in the United States four years hence, and to determine
at that time whether or not its responsibilities, either in whole or
in part, can be assumed by other organizations and institutions






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


after 1941. Within five years the present apparent lag between
leadership and needs may well have been overcome and the func-
tions of the Association, including that of serving as constructive
critic, may be found capable of transfer elsewhere. If the Associa-
tion, within a period of fifteen years, could succeed in working
itself out of its job, then its officers, board and staff might well con-
gratulate themselves and retire from the field with easy con-
sciences. The Association should welcome the time, if and when it
arrives, at which it truthfully can be said that its parts are greater
and stronger than the whole.
This Retrospect and Forecast would be incomplete and inade-
quate were it not to contain two tributes to that which has gone
before. The first is a general tribute to the many fine men and
women, most of them living but some of them, to our lasting regret,
dead, whose loyalty and services have made the American Associa-
tion for Adult Education possible. Founders many of them, mem-
bers of our Council, Executive Board and officers, all have given
generously of their time and advice. To them and to a devoted
staff at the headquarters office are extended the sincere thanks of
the Director. What of success the Association has achieved in the
last decade is attributable chiefly to them. The second tribute is
to the educational statesman who, more than any other individual,
may rightfully be designated as the founder of the adult educa-
tion movement in the United States, Frederick P. Keppel. How-
ever modestly he may disclaim the honor, however unassumingly
he may assert that adult education was "in the air," the fact still
remains that the concept of an adult education movement in Amer-
ica was his. To him all members of the Association should pay
tribute on this, our Tenth Anniversary, and to him the writer of
this report renders not only gratitude but assurances of lasting
affection.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


THE TEN YEAR RECORD

The Director of the Association has attempted to set down
elsewhere* an account of the last decade of happenings in adult
education. It is not the function of the report for 1935-36 to repeat,
extensively at least, either the general story of the last ten years or
the considerable part that the American Association for Adult
Education has played in such developments. It is, of course, inevi-
table that there should exist a striking parallelism between the
growth and changing emphases within adult education as a field
of effort, on the one hand, and the programs of the Association
and of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, on the other. Any
organization making even a half-hearted effort to study its sphere
of influence could report no less.
However, the extent and the nature of the parallelism indicated
comprise perhaps the best gauge of the effectiveness of the organi-
zation. It would be almost an unforgivable omission if this, the
tenth annual report on the Association's activities, failed to review
the decade in brief but revealing form. This is a difficult task to
accomplish in cold type, for even in the light of the well-known
American passion for statistics, figures alone are peculiarly unim-
pressive. Also, as we have learned to our cost during the depression
years, they often may lie. It would be convenient if the Associa-
tion could tell the story of its life-a life to which many hundreds
of persons throughout the land have contributed-by means, let
us say, of a single super-graph, magnificent in its proportions and
sweeping in its curves. It would be even more convenient (and
quite as misleading and unsatisfactory) if many rows of little
Austrian soldiers attractively garbed could march across these
pages depicting the superb and relentless advance of the forces of
knowledge as they cope with the black-bannered hosts of igno-
rance. It would be delightfully simple if a "flow chart" of adult
education ideas could be prepared, as irresistibly and overwhelm-
ingly convincing as the tides of the sea. However human lives,
thoughts, aspirations and ideals, which form the fabric of adult

*Cartwright, Morse A. Ten Years of Adult Education. Macmillan, 1935.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


education experimentation, reduce badly to graph portrayal or to
military analogy. And human ideas, unfortunately, ebb as well as
flow.
The pages that follow, therefore, contain merely a chronologi-
cal outline of some things attempted, some things done. Often the
end results do not appear, either because they have not yet become
apparent or because nothing measurable upon the surface seems
likely to ensue. Few such efforts should be classified as flat failures
for, as has often been said, there is much to be learned from nega-
tive or from less than positive results. Again, often the end achieved
may seem trivial in view of the hugeness of the problem addressed.
But the answer to such self-imposed criticism lies in the realization
that the conscious study of adult education methods is new. After
ten years, we still are scratching the surface. Techniques based
upon a skillful blending of art and science in the handling of adults
do not appear as well-rounded and distinguishable wholes in one
day-or ten years. We learn as we live and work and think-not
otherwise.
The following outline perforce is inadequate, sketchy and in-
conclusive but it constitutes the record of the Association. Its
compiler, recognizing better than any other its shortcomings,
nevertheless feels justified in describing it as encouraging.











CLASSIFIED CHRONOLOGICAL OUTLINE OF ACTIVITIES OF


AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR ADULT EDUCATION FOR DECADE, 1926 TO 1936

INCLUDING VENTURES CONDUCTED BY OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
UNDER THE SPONSORSHIP OF THE ASSOCIATION

ADULT EDUCATION- GENERAL


Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


March 26,
1926


FOUNDING OF THE
AMERICAN ASSO-
CIATION FOR ADULT
EDUCATION IN
CHICAGO


Advisory Com-
mittee on Adult
Education of Car-
negie Corporation
of New York
Four regional and
two national con-
ferences prelimi-
nary to organiza-
tion


Establishment of clearing house for infor-
mation on adult education
Sponsorship or conduct of studies, experi-
ments and demonstrations
Publication
Improvement in quality of educational efforts
for adults
Propagation of the idea of education for
adults
Conferences
For additional, see below


Establishment of
Association head-
quarters in New
York


May,
1926


I__ I _ _


See below




Oct. 25,
1926


Oct. 25,
1926
and
Dec. to,
1926




S Dec. 1o,
1926


May 16,
1927


ESTABLISHMENT OF
PROFESSIONAL LI-
BRARY OF ADULT
EDUCATION AT
ASSOCIATION HEAD-
QUARTERS

Determination of
Membership
Policy


Occasional brief bibli-
ographies of adult edu-
cation


Establishment of
Bulletin Service
for Association
Members


NATIONAL CONFER-
ENCE ON ADULT
EDUCATION IN
CLEVELAND (SEC-
OND ANNUAL
MEETING)


Cleveland Confer-
ence for Educa-
tional Coopera-
tion


Eight numbers of the
Journal of the Amer-
ican Association for
Adult Education, is-
sued at irregular inter-
vals over two years

Proceedings of the
Second Annual Meet-
ing of the Association,
1927; Report of the Di-
rector for 1926-27.


The compilation over ten years of the most ex-
tensive collection of books, pamphlets, and other
materials relating to adult education in existence
in the United States. Includes foreign materials.
Used by approximately two hundred persons per
month.

Policy of careful selection of members of the
Association and issuance of invitations to prop-
erly qualified groups and individuals has resulted
in a fairly stable membership group of approxi-
mately 1,200, chiefly persons professionally and
semi-professionally interested in adult education.
Figure does not include Journal subscribers.

This publication was the forerunner of the quar-
terly Journal of Adult Education.


The second annual meeting, with 1oo members in
attendance from outside Cleveland, discussed
community organization problems, adult educa-
tion in citizenship, adult education in science,
urban problems, rural problems, the psychology
of adult education, teacher training, and reading
as a factor in the process of self-education. The
report of the Director contained the first formal
announcement of policy of the Association.





Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


PSYCHOLOGICAL
STUDIES OF ADULT
EDUCATION







OMNIBUS STUDY OF
ADULT EDUCATION


Institute of Edu-
cational Research
in Teachers Col-
lege, Columbia
University




Carnegie Corpo-
ration of New
York


ESTABLISHMENT OF
JOURNAL OF ADULT
EDUCATION


THIRD ANNUAL
MEETING


Swarthmore Col-
lege and National
Community
Foundation


Study of Urban
Educational Insti-
tutions


May 18,
1927








Oct. 31,
1927


Adult Learning, by E.
L. Thorndike and oth-
ers, Macmillan, 1928.
Adult Interests, by E.
L. Thorndike and
Staff, Macmillan, 1935.



Why Stop Learning?
by Dorothy Canfield
Fisher, Harcourt, 1927.


Journal of Adult Edu-
cation, Vols. I to VIII,
February, 1929, to
April, 1936.


Proceedings of the
Third Annual Meeting
of the Association,
1928.

Urban Influences on
Higher Education in
England and the
United States, by Parke
R. Kolbe, Macmillan,
1928.


First announcement of Professor Thorndike's
important and far-reaching discoveries as to the
learning process at various age levels was made at
the Association meeting in Cleveland. No other
single project has influenced the American move-
ment as has this piece of needed psychological
research. Second only to it in importance are the
later studies of Adult Interests.

The first widely-read general study of adult edu-
cation. Materials derived from five original sur-
veys completed by Carnegie Corporation in 1925
and 1926.

The quarterly periodical of the Association; its
most important single activity. The forerunner
of the Journal, the "house organ" or bulletin type
of occasional publication, was discontinued with
the Journal's appearance.

Attended by 15o delegates from outside Swarth-
more.


Feb. 13,
1928


May 14-16,
1928


Oct. 8,
1928





CONFERENCES ON
PHILOSOPHY OF
ADULT EDUCATION


Summer Session
Courses in Adult
Education


FOURTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Teachers College,
Columbia Univer-
sity


University of
North Carolina


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Article in Journal of
Adult Education.




Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.


Headquarters


FIFTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Adult Education
Publications


SIXTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Adult Education
Council of Chi-
cago


New School for
Social Research,
New York


Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.


Numerous books, pam-
phlets, and brochures
of the Association.


Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.


Brought about a series of notable conferences on
philosophy of adult education led by L. P. Jacks,
Principal of Manchester College, Oxford, and
editor of the Hibbert Journal. Dr. Jacks pro-
foundly influenced American thinking on the
subject of adult education.

The first summer course in adult education his-
tory and techniques given in any university of
recognized standing in the United States. Sup-
port second year and thereafter by College.

Attended by 15o delegates from outside Chapel
Hill. The small group discussion type of confer-
ence.

Association occupied new and enlarged quarters
at 60 East 42nd Street, New York City.

Rural adult education, alumni education, and
radio education were themes of this meeting.
Attendance 200oo.

The revolving fund for publications established
at this time has been used continuously since.
To it is credited all income from sales of publica-
tions, advertising, royalties, etc.

About 600 delegates in attendance. Total attend-
ance of approximately i,ooo. Typical large-city
meeting-interest high.


Apr. 29,
1929



May 20-22,
1929


Feb. I,
1930


May 12-15,
1930


Sept. 22,
1930


May 18-21,
1931










Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Feb. 29,
1932




May 16-18,
1932


Sept. 26,
1932


May 22-24,
1933


Sept. 25,
1933


Survey of State
Adult Education
Facilities



SEVENTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Massachusetts
Commission on
the Enrichment of
Adult Life

Buffalo Educa-
tional Council


PUBLICATION OF
ADULT EDUCATION
HANDBOOK


EIGHTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Jones Memorial
Library, Amherst,
Massachusetts


Reports on Cur-
rent Investigations
and Experiments


Adult Education in
Massachusetts, by W.
F. Stearns, 1932.



Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.



Handbook of Adult
Education in the
United States, edited
by Dorothy Rowden.
Editions of 1934 and
1936.

Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.


Numerous articles in
Journal of Adult Edu-
cation.


The first published state survey of adult educa-
tion.




An excellent meeting of the discussion type.
About 200 registered. First general use of the
panel method-a discussion technique.

The only published guide to adult education in
America. First issue went through three editions.
The 1936 Handbook issued in connection with
the Tenth Anniversary Celebration.


The small, intimate type of annual conference-
adjudged "the best yet" by the 15o delegates in
attendance. Large attendance at public sessions
of Massachusetts residents.

A fund voted for this purpose has been used to
obtain critical evaluations of various adult edu-
cation enterprises by outside observers and
writers.





Cooperative Pub-
lications Venture


Annotated Bibli-
ography of Adult
Education


TEN YEAR REVIEW
OF ADULT EDUCA-
TION


ANTHOLOGY OF
ADULT EDUCATION

Conference on
Larger Issues in
Adult Education


NINTH ANNUAL
MEETING


Department of
Adult Education,
National Educa-
tion Association


Stanford Univer-
sity



Carnegie Corpo-
ration of New
York


Washington (D.
C.) Adult Educa-
tion Council


Annotated Bibliogra-
phy of Adult Educa-
tion, compiled by W.
M. Proctor, 1935.

Ten Years of Adult
Education, by Morse
A. Cartwright, Mac-
millan, 1935.

Deliver Us from Dog-
ma, by Alvin S. John-
son, 1934.


Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.


Under this arrangement, copies of the Journal of
Adult Education have been made available to
the individual members of the N.E.A. Depart-
ment. In the current year, the subsidy has pro-
vided also for a separate bulletin for the De-
partment.

The first published, annotated bibliography in
this field to make any pretensions toward com-
pleteness. Has proved of great value to all stu-
dents of adult education.

A review by the Director of the Association of
a decade of activity in adult education by the
Carnegie Corporation. Book has gone into two
editions.

Pronouncements, full of wisdom, from the Di-
rector of the New School for Social Research.

Policy discussion by members of Board and of-
ficers of Association pertaining both to the Asso-
ciation and to the movement. Majority view held
that long-time "reconstruction" policy should
prevail rather than the "recovery" policy urged
by minority. Decision to emphasize work with
community councils, farmers, and labor groups.

Five hundred delegates and many hundreds of
Washington residents as well participated in a
crowded program for three days.


Sept. 25,
1933


Sept. 25,
1933

Oct. 9,
1933


May 21-23,
1934









Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Enlargement of
Offices and Serv-
ices


ADULT EDUCATION
SCHOLARSHIPS


TENTH ANNUAL
MEETING





SELECTED READINGS
IN ADULT EDUCA-
TION

Service Bureau
for Teachers


National Advi-
sory Council on
Radio in Educa-
tion

Yale University


Milwaukee
County Adult
Education Coun-
cil


Journal of Adult
Education


New York Uni-
versity


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Proceedings in Journal
of Adult Education.





Adult Education in
Action, edited by Mary
L. Ely, 1936.


Mar. Ii,
i935


Joint tenancy of space at 60 East 42nd Street has
provided for enlargement of library, board room,
and stock room and mailing facilities.


Cooperation with newly formed Division of
General Studies in the Graduate School of Yale
University. Opportunity afforded for adult edu-
cation workers to study their problems with help
of a large university faculty. First year has
proved highly successful. Support accorded for
second year.

A large but interesting meeting. Attendance
about 500, with Middle West predominating.
Public sessions ran to 1,000 present. The most
successful of the middle western meetings of the
Association.

More than an anthology, or text, or volume of
selected readings. Depicts the growth of adult
education thinking in the United States.

Course outlines, lists of books, visual aids, etc., to
be distributed to teachers and leaders of adult
education by this new Bureau of the Division of
General Education.


May 20-22,
1935




Sept. 30,
1935


Mar. 2,
1936




May 18-21,
1936


TENTH ANNIVER-
SARY CELEBRATION
(ELEVENTH ANNUAL
MEETING)


New York Adult
Education Coun-
cil


Proceedings will be
separately published in
Anniversary Volume.
Accounts will also ap-
pear in the Journal of
Adult Education.


ADULT ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND EDUCATION FOR THE FOREIGN BORN


Production of
Reading Texts for
the Foreign Born



Study of Foreign
Language Organi-
zations


STUDY OF ABILITY
OF ADULT ILLITER-
ATES TO LEARN


Educational Pro-
grams in Foreign
Language Organi-
zations


Council on Adult
Education for the
Foreign Born of
New York


Foreign Language
Information
Service


South Carolina
State Department
of Education


Help Yourself Lessons,
by Winthrop D. Tal-
bot, 1926.



Unpublished MSS in
Association office.



The Opportunity
Schools of South Caro-
lina, by W. S. Gray,
Wil Lou Gray, and
J. W. Tilton, 1932.


Foreign Language
Information
Service


Wide application in teaching of mill and factory
employees, particularly in New England. Tech-
nique results-emphasis on pictorial methods.
Support to organization accorded over period
of years.

Discovered extent and quality of adult education
programs in effect within the larger and more
progressive foreign language groups in the U. S.
Support accorded over period of years.

A large-scale scientific approach to the problem
of determining educational needs of adult illiter-
ates and the barely literate. Developed materials
of instruction and psychological data of impor-
tance. Involved both Negroes and whites.

An attempt to supply educational materials to
foreign language organizations through the pow-
erful foreign language press.


The Tenth Anniversary Celebration of the
founding of the Association is to be attended by
delegates from various parts of the country,
from Canada, and from European countries. The
meeting is to be devoted to Retrospect and Fore-
cast.


May 10,
1926


May 9,
1927



Jan. 19,
1931


Dec. 17,
1935










ALUMNI EDUCATION


Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


STUDY OF EDUCA-
TIONAL PROBLEMS
OF COLLEGIATE
ALUMNI





Experiments in
Alumni Educa-
tion









Alumni Educa-
tion for Profes-
sional Groups


American Alumni
Council







Lawrence Col-
lege, Ohio State
University, Uni-
versity of Michi-
g a n, Va s s a r
College, Lafayette
College, Columbia
University Club
of New York


Stevens Institute
of Technology


Unpublished MS by
Daniel Grant of the
University of North
Carolina, 1928.
Alumni and Adult
Education, by W. B.
Shaw, 1929.

Numerous articles in
Journal of Adult Edu-
cation.









Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


May 9,
1927







Dec. 9,
0o
1929










Jan. 19,
1931


Studies resulted in widespread activities on part
of universities and colleges for their alumni, most
successful forms being the various "alumni col-
leges" and the new provisions being made for
post-collegiate professional training.



Translation into action of certain findings of the
Shaw study: yielded valuable information, both
positive and negative, as to the interests and
needs of college graduates. Developed the alum-
ni college idea, now widely adopted; built up
book service plan; explored organizational pos-
sibilities of alumni clubs; developed book lists
and other central services to alumni from uni-
versities and colleges; tried out plans for week-
end and summer institutes.

Support accorded over two years made possible
the establishment of regularly recurring summer
institutes for engineering alumni. Brought out
the desirability of the approach to alumni
through their professional interests.


--





1931


Summer School
of Engineering
Teaching


Conference on
Alumni or Post-
Collegiate Educa-
tion


A new and successful departure in engineering
teaching.


Society for the
Promotion of En-
gineering Educa-
tion

Vassar College
Alumnae Associa-
tion


College presidents, alumni secretaries, and repre-
sentatives of professional training groups con-
ferred on new developments in the alumni
education field, particularly with regard to
alumni colleges and to post-collegiate profes-
sional training.


CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION


STUDY OF PRISON
EDUCATION







Experimental
Program in Inter-
national Relations

Institute of Inter-
national Relations


National Society
of Penal Informa-
tion






Foreign Affairs
Forum of New
York

American Friends
Service Commit-
tee


The Education of
Adult Prisoners, by
A. H. MacCormick,
1931. The Prison Li-
brary Handbook,
American Library As-
sociation, 1932.

Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Article in Journal of
Adult Education.


First inclusive study of adult education in Amer-
ican prisons. This trail-blazing work has proved
to be the basis for a new movement in penology,
with country-wide ramifications.





Reached new clientele with discussion of inter-
national affairs.


Aspects of Post-Colle-
giate Education, by
Ralph A. Beals, 1935.


Jan. 14,
1935


Oct. 10,
1927


Jan. 4,
1932


1932








Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Experiments in
Prison Education


Governor's Com-
mission on Crime,
New York State


New methods worked out at Clinton and Wall-
kill prisons for the educational development of
prison inmates. Approach both cultural and vo-
cational. Experiments are profoundly affecting
prison methods elsewhere.


COMMUNITY STUDIES AND PROJECTS IN ADULT EDUCATION


Comm unity
Organization for
Adult Education


STUDY OF CLEVE-
LAND COMMUNITY
ORGANIZATION FOR
ADULT EDUCATION





COMMUNITY
STUDY OF ADULT
EDUCATION


Cleveland Con-
ference for
Educational
Cooperation and
Cleveland Educa-
tion Extension
Council

Buffalo Educa-
tional Council


Various Bulletins of
the Conference and of
the Council; also
articles in Journal of
Adult Education.



Adult Education in a
Community, by C. S.
Marsh, 1927.


Principle established of nonparticipation in local
community efforts to organize for adult educa-
tion. Policy of encouraging local initiative and
of supplying advice only after local organization
has been effected. Disclaimer on part of Asso-
ciation of propagandistic function.

First demonstration of value of a community
study, followed by city-wide program partici-
pated in by large numbers of cooperating organi-
zations. Aspects of the Cleveland plan followed
in other cities.



The first published survey of adult education in
a community. Revealed much unknown mate-
rial particularly as to extent of adult education.
Survey used as model in other cities.


1934


Oct. 25,
1926


Jan. 31,
1927 and
Feb. 14,
1927





May 9,
1927





Feb. 13,
1928



Dec. o0,
1928


Jan. 21,
1929




Dec. 9,
'1929




March 1o,
1930





Jan. 19,
1931


Co i m un i t y
Organization Ex-
perimentation


Experimental
Forum Discussion
Groups

COM IMMUNITY
STUDY IN BROOK-
LYN



DEVELOPMENT OF
STATE PROGRAM IN
ADULT EDUCATION



Study of Adult
Education Needs
and Interests in
Small Cities



Study of Adult
Education and
Recreation


Civic Federation
of Dallas, Texas



Ford Hall Forum



Brooldyn Confer-
ence on Adult
Education



California Asso-
ciation for Adult
Education



National Council
of the Young
Men's Christian
Associations



We stc h e s t e r
County (N. Y.)
Recreation Com-
mission


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.



Articles in Journal of
the Association.


The Making of Adult
Minds in a Metropoli-
tan Area, by Frank
Lorimer, Macmillan,
1931.

A State Plan for Adult
Education, by Lyman
Bryson,1934.



Article in Journal of
Adult Education.





Leisure: A Suburban
Study, by George A.
Lundberg and others,
Columbia University
Press, 1934.


Many of the techniques for the handling of
community adult education problems worked
out by this pioneering organization. Support
accorded over period of years.

The first organized discussion groups arising out
of the program of a large city forum.


Yielded valuable data on racial, industrial, and
social groups in large city. New light on adult
interests.



The first attempt to organize all the resources
of a state for adult education. Support accorded
over a period of years. The California state pro-
gram in adult education is outstanding in the
nation.

Resulted in the Meriden (Conn.) Study, a com-
munity attempt at self-survey through a repre-
sentative committee of citizens brought together
by the Y.M.C.A. First community application
of Waples' "interest finder." Results widely ap-
plied by the national Y.M.C.A.'s.

General survey of county organizations and
residents yielded certain interesting and impor-
tant adult education information, particularly as
to the arts, including music.









Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


STUDY OF ADULT
EDUCATION AS A
SMALL COMMU-
NITY PROGRAM

Community
Council for Adult
Education in New
York City


Urban University
Conduct of Adult
Education Coun-
cil


Suburban Com-
munity Experi-
ment

Experiment with
Recent High
School Graduates


The Radburn
(New Jersey) As-
sociation


New York Adult
Education Coun-
cil


Radburn, A Plan of
Living, by Robert B.
Hudson, 1934.


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education. Bul-
letins of the Council.


Cleveland Col-
lege, Western Re-
serve University


Leonia (N. J.)
Community
Council

Civic Federation
of Dallas


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


April 6,
1931


Showed values to be derived from democrati-
cally controlled, community-wide program in
adult education. Yielded new data on adult
interests.

The peculiar community problems of New York
City led the Association to participate in this
experiment over a period of three years. The
organization has received considerable outside
support and seems to be established.

Cleveland College, threatened at the time by the
depression, strengthened financially and given
responsibility for conduct of Cleveland Adult
Education Council. Results were negative from
the point of view of success of the Council, but
beneficial to Cleveland College.

Support accorded over two-year period. Results
largely riegative though Council continues under
its own financial momentum.

Support accorded over three years has resulted
in the establishment of the New Era School for
Dallas young people. Findings brought to the
attention of the National Youth Administration.


Sept. 28,
1931


May 8,
1933


Sept. 25,
1933




Oct. 31,
1933


Library, Museum,
and Community
Group Coopera-
tion


Regional Confer-
ence on Adult
Education


Conferences of
Community Or-
ganization Work-
ers and Special
Services

Study of Adult
Education in Los
Angeles metro-
politan district





COMMUNITY
COUNCIL OPERATED
FROM LIBRARY BASE


California Asso-
ciation for Adult
Education







Adult Education
Council of Den-
ver


People's Institute
of Brooklyn;
Brooklyn Mu-
seum; Brooklyn
Public Library

New England
Conference on
Adult Education


Report in preparation.
Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.







Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Article in Journal of
Adult Education.


Regional Surveys of
Adult Education, by
Jacques Ozanne, 1934.


Some 300 persons attended this, the first regional
conference on adult education. Program not dis-
similar to that of an annual meeting of the Asso-
ciation, though on a smaller scale. A most suc-
cessful gathering.


Special conference held following 1934 meeting
of the Association. Provided for visits of Asso-
ciation staff member to councils and special
publication service over period of three years.
Special studies also made.

A thorough survey of the entire district adjacent
to and including Los Angeles. Much new infor-
mation promised as to development of adult
education in community and neighborhood
units. A system of forums has grown out of this
study; the use of the radio with listening groups
has been furthered; a periodical publication is
planned, etc., etc.

The first large city council to be organized by
and conducted from a public library. A highly
interesting program is developing and the fitness
of the library for this task has been demon-
strated conclusively.

Cooperative program is under way and will be
the subject of reports later to be submitted.


Nov. 15,
1934


April 22
1935


Sept. 30,
I935







Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Experimental
Program for Tu-
berculosis Patients


Saranac Lake
Study and Craft
Guild


A community-wide program involving residents
of Saranac Lake as well as patients in the large
sanatoria there. Auspicious beginning has been
made.


DRAMA AND ADULT EDUCATION


STUDY OF THE
DRAMA AND LITTLE
THEATER MOVE-
MENT


ESTABLISHMENT OF
NATIONAL LITTLE
THEATER ORGANI-
ZATION


National Theatre
Conference


Footlights across
America, by Kenneth
Macgowan, Harcourt,
1929.


A series of books, bro-
chures, and pamphlets
on theater subjects,
published by the Na-
tional Theatre Confer-
ence.


Another initial study. Kenneth Macgowan, as a
member of the Association staff, laid the ground-
work for the national conferences which later
resulted in the organization of the little theaters
into the National Theatre Conference.

Support accorded over a period of years. Estab-
lished a national clearing house and service bu-
reau for the little theater groups. Organization
now facing the problem of self-support. Its pub-
lications widely used and conferences well
attended.


EMERGENCY EDUCATION AND COOPERATION WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT


COOPERATION IN
EMERGENCY PRO-
GRAM WITH THE
U. S. OFFICE OF
EDUCATION


Various articles in
Journal of Adult Edu-
cation.


While the Association took no responsibility for
the Emergency Program, the Director and two
special staff members constituted an advisory
committee to the U. S. Commissioner of Educa-
tion. The committee originated much of the


Oct. 29
1935


Nov. 5,
1928


Oct. 31,
1932


Sept. 25,
1933














-. Dec. it,
-" '933


List of Readable
Books for Adults


New York Public
Library


t, ,


Feb.5 -
1934


-J n. 7,
1- 935


Emergency Publi-
cations Project


STUDY OF EDUCA-
TION IN CIVILIAN
CONSERVATION
CORPS CAMPS


U. S. Office of
Education


Books of General In-
terest for Today's
Readers, compiled by
Doris Hoit, 1934. Dis-
tributed by American
Library Association.


Various publications
distributed to those
concerned with the
Government Emer-
gency Program in
Adult Education.


The School in the
Camps, by Frank E.
Hill, 1935. Articles in
the Journal of Adult
Education.


material sent to school superintendents by the
Office of Education, and in the course of two
years visited a majority of the states embarked
on the program. At no time did the committee
surrender or impair the Association's right con-
structively to criticize the venture. Grant also
made for special assistance and conferences.

The New York Public Library, the American
Library Association, the People's Institute of
Brooklyn, and the Association jointly financed
this undertaking by the New York Public Li-
brary. The list was published and given nation-
wide distribution through emergency funds pro-
vided by the General Education Board.

Support accorded by the General Education
Board over a period of two years has provided
for the issuance of many important publications
including the Hoit list (see above); Gray's Man-
ual for Teachers of Illiterates; Studebaker's The
American Way; a late bulletin on forums pre-
pared by the U. S. Office of Education, Plain
Talk, by John W. Studebaker, etc., etc.

An entertaining cross-section study of education
and guidance among the C.C.C. boys. Findings
valuable to school officials and to others dealing
with youth.









Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Conference of
School Officials
on Emergency
Programs


h 2;" Library Demon-
36..' station in Civil-
ian Conservation
Corps Camps


Teachers College,
Columbia Univer-
sity




Educational
Office, Second
Corps Area, C.C.C.


School officials of New England and of Middle
Atlantic States conferred in New York on the
continuance of adult education activity in the
schools after the cessation of the Federal Gov-
ernment's emergency program.

A plan to establish a corps area lending service
of books and other materials for C.C.C. camps.


FORUMS


CITY-WIDE FORUMS
ON CONTEMPORARY
AFFAIRS


Des Moines (Ia.)
Public School
System


The American Way,
by John W. Stude-
baker, McGraw-Hill,
1935. Articles in Jour-
nal of Adult Education
and in educational pe-
riodicals, newspapers,
etc.


The first project for the education of an entire
community, using a city school system as the
base. Experimental period of five years financed.
Attendances were large, thousands regularly
participated under the leadership of trained fo-
rum directors and speakers. This experiment has
led the way to an awakening of the school's
responsibility to the adult population. It is caus-
ing a recrudescence of the forum in America.
It has been copied widely and bids fair to con-
tinue to serve as the model for this type of
activity in the nation. Plans are now being made
for local financing.


- IDec. 17,
-'93:
-'.. .


Marc
19


A1prix I,

- -


'
"'-
"-"

'~v
""




FORUMS EXPERI-
MENTATION


Oct. I,
1934


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Conference on
Public Forums


CONFERENCE ON
FORUMS UNDER
PUBLIC AUSPICES


U. S. Office of
Education


Springfield
(Mass.) Forums
Committee, Hart-
ford (Conn.)
Public Lectures
Committee


INTERNATIONAL ADULT EDUCATION


INTERNATIONAL
HANDBOOK


World Associa-
tion for Adult
Education


International Hand-
book of Adult Educa-
tion, 1929.


These experiments constitute an approach to
contemporary questions through the back-
grounds of history. Plans devised by Hans Kohn
of Smith College. Attendance on lectures and
discussions has averaged one thousand in Spring-
field and only slightly less in Hartford. The
forums have profoundly affected library reading
and have achieved other end results of an educa-
tional nature. They have shown that the histori-
cal approach to contemporary problems will
interest Americans if the job is well done.

A day's discussion of forum difficulties, as to
organization under both public and private
auspices; the danger of over-simplification of
issues; the relationship of public schools to fo-
rums, etc.

The U. S. Commissioner of Education conferred
with members of the Board and officers of the
Association concerning the emergency forums
to be organized. The Association agreed to lend
its advice but declined to assume any responsi-
bility in connection with the project.


Jan. z2,
'935


Nov. 21,
1935


May 18,
1926










Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Oct. 8,
1928


Aug. 21-28,
1929





Sept. 22,
1930


Sept. 26,
1932


Visitation Fund
for Australia and
New Zealand

WORLD CONFER-
ENCE ON ADULT
EDUCATION




Development of
International Pub-
lications


Traveling Schol-
arships for Cana-
dians in Scandi-
navia


World Associa-
tion for Adult
Education and
University of
Cambridge

World Associa-
tion for Adult
Education


Proceedings of the
World Conference on
Adult Education, 1930.




Periodical and special
publications of the
World Association.


International Peo-
ple's College, Elsi-
nore, Denmark


Brought notable and interesting group of educa-
tors to United States from New Zealand and
Australia.

An official delegation of z and an unofficial
delegation of 70 persons from the United States
attended this first world conference at Cam-
bridge, England, August, 1929.


A new quarterly periodical was launched with a
portion of this grant, but later discontinued. The
larger portion of the sum made available still
exists and is now being used in developing a new
publications program of the World Association.

Eight Canadian students of rural life visited folk
high schools in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway,
studying under supervision of Peter Manniche.
Returned to Canada and undertook preliminary
survey of adult education there, which later
proved valuable in formation of Canadian Asso-
ciation for Adult Education. Appointments made
by American Association in cooperation with
Canadian Committee.




March 5,
1934
and
Dec. 17,
1935


ORGANIZATION OF
ADULT EDUCATION
IN CANADA


Canadian Associa-
tion for Adult
Education


Unpublished survey of
Canadian adult educa-
tion by provinces. Ar-
ticles in Journal of
Adult Education.


LIBRARIES AND ADULT EDUCATION


Development of
Rural Adult Edu-
cation in New-
foundland





Supervised Edu-
cational Service
for Seamen


Practical Studies
of Reading Inter-
ests of Library
Patrons


Newfoundland
Adult Education
Association






American Mer-
chant Marine Li-
brary Association


New York Public
Library


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.







Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.



A Readers' Advisory
Service, by Jennie M.
Flexner and Sigrid A.
Edge, 1934.


Established book-truck and extension teaching
service among agriculturalists and fishermen in
rural districts of sparsely settled country. Sup-
port accorded over period of years has resulted
in increasing financial recognition of adult edu-
cation on part of government, despite financial
straits of the country.

Results of initial experiment largely negative and
disappointing. Later experiment in supplying
services of trained librarian to men on ships when
in port successful.

The first analysis of the patrons of a Readers'
Adviser's office in an urban library. Yielded in-
formation of high value to librarians and edu-
cators.


The subsidy made by the Carnegie Corporation
has made possible numerous conferences of
Canadian educators, resulting in the formation
of a Canadian Association. Assistance from the
United States has been welcomed. The survey
is to be carefully analyzed before publication.
Support for three years to be extended to aid
the Canadian Association. Full cooperation with
American Association is assured.


Mar. io,
1930


1931




Feb. 27,
1932







Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Library Service
for Rural Minis-
ters


Vanderbilt
University


A library adult education experiment being con-
ducted by the Vanderbilt University School of
Religion. Designed for the benefit of rural min-
isters in the South entirely cut off from books or
other library service.


MUSEUMS AND ADULT EDUCATION


Research in Mu-
seum Education,
Yale University


Educational Ex-
perimentation in
a Museum

Report on British
Museums


Yale University





Buffalo Society of
Natural Sciences


Carnegie Corpo-
ration of New
York


The Behavior of the
Museum Visitor, by
E. S. Robinson, 1934.
Article in Journal of
Adult Education.


Studies by a Yale psychologist that have greatly
aided museum directors.



Aided in development of the extraordinary
teaching program of a museum known the coun-
try over for its progressive educational policies.


A Note on Adult Edu-
cation in British Mu-
seums, by Margaret R.
Scherer.


MUSIC AND ADULT EDUCATION


Study of Music in
Adult Education


Report in preparation.


This study in cross section of music activity
among adults has been delayed but should be
completed in 1936-37.


Dec. 17,
1935


1932


Oct. I,
1934


Jan. 7,
1935


_ __ _ 111




NEGRO ADULT EDUCATION


Sept. 28,
1931










1931


National Urban
League, New
York Public Li-
brary, Atlanta
Public Library


EXPERIMENTS IN
ADULT EDUCATION
FOR NEGROES









Interracial Coop-
eration in South
Africa

PREPARATION AND
PUBLICATION OF
SYLLABI FOR NE-
GROES


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education and
various periodicals,
also unpublished re-
ports on file with the
A.A.A.E.


Syllabi now in prepa-
ration.


Experiments and demonstrations extended over
period of four years. Julius Rosenwald Fund and
Carnegie Corporation jointly financed undertak-
ing. The first recognition of the educational
problems of the adult Negro. Both experiments
utilized the public library as a base. Significant
results obtained, particularly as to the degree of
interest in Negro life and history, music, art, etc.
These experiments started a Negro adult educa-
tion movement, daily growing in size and impor-
tance.


A series designed for adult use of study outlines
on Negro life and history, utilizing the experi-
ence of the Harlem and Atlanta experiments.
Alain Locke, the editor, has formed The Asso-
ciates, consisting chiefly of Negroes, to sponsor
this series.


OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION


Study of Adjust-
ment Problems of
16-18 year-old
Employed Boys


National Junior
Personnel Service


Report published in
the Journal of the As-
sociation.


Aided printing and allied trades in New York
City.


Fort Hare (South
Africa) Y.M.C.A.


Associates in Ne-
gro Folk Educa-
tion


Nov. 15,
1934


May 18,
1926








Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Oct. 25,
1926





Dec. ro,
1928


National Home
Study Council





Society for the
Promotion of En-
gineering Educa-
tion


Study of Denver
Opportunity
School


Raising of In-
structional and
Business Stand-
ards among Pri-
vate Correspond-
ence Schools

Study of Noncol-
legiate Technical
Education


CONFERENCES ON
TECHNOLOGICAL
UNEMPLOYMENT


Study of Adult
Education in In-
dustry


What Is This Oppor-
tunity School? by
F. H. Swift and J. W.
Studebaker, 1932. Arti-
cle in Journal of Adult
Education.


Numerous bulletins,
catalogs, and outlines
issued by the Council
over ten years.



A Study of Technical
Institutes, by W. E.
Wickenden and R. H.
Spahr, 1931.

Unemployment and
Adult Education,
edited by Morse A.
Cartwright, 1931.

Educational Experi-
ments in Industry, by
Nathaniel Peffer.


The gradual improvement of standards of in-
struction and of business practices brought about
by efforts of the more reputable of the private
correspondence schools.



A first study of the field between the high school
and the college. Raised new issues in technical
and engineering education.


Economists and educators brought together for
discussion of new educational needs arising out
of economic depression.


A careful analysis of the more important educa-
tional programs provided by industrial corpora-
tions. These activities were greatly curtailed
during the depression, but are again under dis-
cussion at present on an expanding scale.

Expert analysis of the oldest and best known of
the vocational opportunity schools. Report
widely distributed to school officials.


Sept. 22,
1930


April 6,
1931




Sept. 28,
1931



1931


Experiments in
Adult Education
for the Aged


RESEARCH IN AD-
JUSTMENT PROB-
LEMS OF THE UN-
EMPLOYED






Study of Techni-
cal Education in
New York Area

Conferences on
Occupational
Education


Preliminary Ad-
justment Studies
in New York

ADJUSTMENT SERV-
ICE FOR THE UN-
EMPLOYED


New York Emer-
gency Unemploy-
ment Relief Com-
mittee


Welfare Council
of NewYork City



University of
Minnesota








Chamber of Com-
merce of the State
of New York

National Voca-
tional Guidance
Association


Twelve reports of the
Adjustment Service,
1935, by Jerome H.
Bentley and staff mem-
bers of the Service.


Article in Journal of
Adult Education.



Numerous publica-
tions of the Employ-
ment Stabilization Re-
search Institute of the
University of Minne-
sota, 1931-35. Articles
in Journal of Adult
Education.

Survey published by
the Chamber of Com-
merce in 1933.


Teachers of household art and design supplied
for inmates of homes for the aged. Initial year's
subsidy permitted project to be placed largely
on a self-sustaining basis.

The important basic research underlying all the
more recent adjustment efforts for the unem-
ployed.







A careful survey of technical education based on
industrial needs in the New York metropolitan
area.

The conference which led to the establishment
of the National Occupational Conference. In-
terim support accorded to the National Voca-
tional Guidance Association.

These studies formed the basis for the project
which later became the Adjustment Service for
the unemployed of New York City.

Some 5,00oo of New York unemployed individ-
uals, largely of the "white collar" class, received
free counseling and psychological testing, aiding
in the formation of individual programs for vo-
cational, educational, and recreational activity.


Jan. 4,
1932


Feb. 29,
1932


Sept. 26,
1932








Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Studies of Occu-
pational Trends






Research in
Women's Occu-
pations

NATIONAL CLEAR-
ING HOUSE FOR OC-
CUPATIONAL INFOR-
MATION



Study of Wom-
en's Occupations


Personnel Re-
search Federation






Institute of Wom-
en's Professional
Relations

National Occupa-
tional Conference






American Wom-
an's Association


Reports were published
as result of a special
allocation for this pur-
pose from Carnegie
Corporation.

Study of Methods of
Research in Occupa-
tional Trends, by W.
V. Bingham and others.
Adjustment Service,
1933-

Publications of the In-
stitute over a period of
years.

Occupations, the Vo-
cational Guidance
Magazine. Also various
books and pamphlets,
issued by the Confer-
ence.

Report published by
the A.W.A.


The first widespread application of the Univer-
sity of Minnesota techniques. Demonstration suc-
cessful beyond all expectations. Reports will
serve as basis for adjustment efforts the country
over for years to come.

An interesting "quick study" of value in the
adjustment problem.






Needed research preliminary to the educational
and vocational guidance of women.


The Association has legal responsibility for this
effort, which operates, however, under an inde-
pendent board. The Conference has sponsored
research and studies and has attained leadership
in its field. Its program is gradually becoming
clarified.

Interesting discoveries as to adaptability of busi-
ness and professional women to new conditions
arising from the depression.


1932


Jan. 3,
'933






Feb. 27,
'933


__





PARENT EDUCATION


Clearing House
for Information in
Parent Education


Training of Lay
Leaders in Parent
Education


National Council
of Parent Educa-
tion


United Parents
Associations of
New York


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education and
parent education peri-
odicals.


Oct. 10,
1927


STUDY OF RADIO
EDUCATION


Recreation and
Adult Education


RADIO EDUCATION

Education Tunes In,
by Levering Tyson,
1930. Various publica-
tions of the National
Advisory Council on
Radio in Education.


RECREATION


National Recrea-
tion Association


The first published study on the possibilities of
the radio in education. Resulted in the establish-
ment of the National Advisory Council on Radio
in Education. Also made possible, through par-
tial support, report of the Federal Radio Educa-
tion Commission, U. S. Office of Education,
1930.


An emergency grant to the national organization
furthering recreation as a part of adult education.


The Association refused to.accept more than a
fiscal responsibility in the disbursement of funds
provided by the Ladra Spelman Rockefeller Me-
morial. The formal financial relationship was in
effect for three years. A mutually satisfactory
basis of cooperation was arranged for the ex-
change of information, etc., but the organiza-
tion's program was wholly under the control of
its own governing board.

Support accorded over period of years. Valuable
experience gleaned from efforts to solve the most
difficult problem in the work of volunteer or-
ganizations.


Nov. 3,
1930


Alar. 27,
1929


1933





RESEARCH IN ADULT EDUCATION


Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


STUDY OF NEEDED
RESEARCH IN ADULT
EDUCATION


STUDIES OF READING
HABITS OF ADULTS




STUDY OF READING
INTERESTS




Study of Durabil-
ity of Adult
Learning

Research in Prob-
lems of the Blind

INTERNATIONAL
PSYCHOLOGICAL
STUDY


Report of the Research
Committee of the As-
sociation. (In prepara-
tion.)


Cooperative ven-
ture with Amer-
ican Library As-
sociation and Uni-
versity of Chicago

University of Chi-
cago




Chinese Mass
Education Move-
ment

University of
Kansas

British Institute of
Adult Education


Reading Interests and
Habits of Adults, by
W. S. Gray and Ruth
Munroe, Macmillan,
1929.

What People Want to
Read About, by Doug-
las Waples and R. W.
Tyler, University of
Chicago Press, 1931.


The Adult Student En-
quiry, by W. E. Wil-
liams and A. E. Heath.
(In press.)


Jan. 26,
1927


The only detailed study in existence of the end-
results of adult education over any considerable
period of years. Based on large number of case
studies of adult students in England and Wales.


Gradual clarification over period of nine years
of problems most susceptible of scientific study,
all related to methods and techniques in adult
education. Research Committee has been at work
on report for four years. Its completion in 1936-
37 expected.

The basic, ground-clearing study or digest from
which most of the subsequent experimentation
and research in this field has stemmed.



The scientific basis for most of the studies since
made on reading interests.




This study has been delayed because of national
and other difficulties in China. American-trained
psychologists in charge.


Oct. 1o,
1927




Mar. 27,
1929




Apr. 2 ,
1930


Sept. 22,
1930




Jan. 19,
1931





1932


Jan. 3,
1933



S Oct. 31,
-933
'933


Nov. 15,
I934


Sept. 30,
1935


STUDY OF READING
ACHIEVEMENT AND
DIFFICULTIES OF
ADULTS OF LIMITED
EDUCATION

Preparation of
Phonograph Rec-
ords for the Blind

STUDY OF THE LEC-
TURE FIELD



STUDY OF DISCUS-
SION TECHNIQUES


ESTABLISHMENT OF
LABORATORY FOR
SIMPLIFICATION OF
READING MATERIALS


CONFERENCES ON
PRODUCTION AND
DISTRIBUTION OF
READABLE BOOKS


University of Chi-
cago





American Foun-
dation for the
Blind


What Makes a Book
Readable, by W. S.
Gray and Bernice E.
Leary, University of
Chicago Press, 1935.

Articles in Journal of
Adult Education and
various periodicals.

Unpublished MS in of-
fice of Association.
Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.

Discussion Methods
for Adult Groups, by
Thomas Fansler, 1934.


Teachers College,
Columbia Univer-
sity


Carnegie Corpo-
ration of New
York


Unpublished proceed-
ings. Articles in the
Library Journal, Jour-
nal of Adult Education,


Although verifying much that was fairly obvi-
ous, this study isolates the structural elements of
simple, understandable writing and provides a
formula for the classification of existing mate-
rials.

Resulted in the development of successful, inex-
pensive, long-playing phonograph records; used
for book reproduction for the blind.

Negative results of importance; resulted in re-
fusal to set up adult education speakers bureau.



Case materials brought together in published
form, together with analyses of the methods
used. This book has gone through three editions.

Lyman Bryson and a group of writers and stu-
dents have studied the essential qualities of sim-
ple, direct writing without vulgarization. The
laboratory is cooperating with publishers and
already has several successful publications to its
credit. This is the practical application of certain
of the findings of the Adult Reading Commit-
tee's studies and researches.

On Sept. 17 and 18, 1935, librarians, publishers,
and educators met in Princeton, where the dis-
cussion centered around distribution and manu-
facturing problems.






Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


American Library As-
sociation Bulletin, etc.


A similar conference was held in New York
Feb. 11, 1936, dealt almost wholly with the
problem of production of readable books.


RURAL ADULT EDUCATION


Experiment in
Applying Danish
Folk High School
Methods in the
United States

Folk High School
Experimentation


Studies of Rural
Adult Education


Rural Community
Experiments in
Selected Villages


Pocono People's
College




John C. Campbell
Folk School


Michigan State
College


National Commu-
nity Foundation


Reports published in
Journal of the Asso-
ciation.



Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Unpublished MSS.


Successful demonstration on instructional side,
but negative result on administrative side attrib-
utable to high cost of individual and small group
instruction.


Demonstration of success of Danish methods
when applied to homogeneous groups in south-
ern mountain districts.

Two rural counties were studied, utilizing the
county farm agent's office as a center. Result less
than positive in one county; negative in the
other. Experiments cut short by administrative
changes.

An attempt to provide educational services to
adults in rural villages in selected areas, from a
central headquarters. Traveling organizers used,
translating a summer chautauqua organization
into a winter educational institution. Results
largely negative, indicating clearly value of local
initiative.


May 18,
1926


oo


May 18,
1927


Oct. Io,
1927




Oct. 8,
1928


Experiment in
Community Or-
ganization of
Adult Education
in Rural County




RURAL EXTENSION
EXPERIMENTS IN
NOVA SCOTIA





Extension Service
to Southern
Mountain Schools


Chester County
(Pa.) Health and
Welfare Council







St. Francis Xavier
University (N.S.)







Berea College


STUDIES OF RURAL
ADULT EDUCATION


A Preliminary Inquiry
into Rural Adult Edu-
cation, by J. D. Wil-
lard, 1930. Various ar-
ticles in Journal of
Adult Education and
in rural education pe-
riodicals. Rural Adult
Education by B. Y.
Landis and J. D. Wil-
lard, Macmillan, 1933.

Social Planning in
Adult Education, by
John W. Herring,
Macmillan, 1933.





Articles in Journal of
Adult Education and
various periodicals.





Article in Journal of
Adult Education.


Provided three years' full-time and two years'
part-time services on Association staff of John D.
WVillard and Benson Y. Landis as Research Asso-
ciates in Rural Adult Education. Much of the
new liberalized programs of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture in the various states and
through the land-grant colleges is attributable to
the early work done by these members of the
staff of the Association. Rural Adult Education
is another of the important "first studies" origi-
nated by the Association.

Partial support to this experiment extended over
period of three years, when drought and depres-
sion ended activity. Valuable negative results in
indicating unwisdom of injecting highly trained
organizer from the outside into a community.
After his departure, seemingly inevitable that in-
terest should lag. Any semblance of superimpo-
sition should be avoided.

Support accorded over period of years made
possible the most far-reaching experiment in
rural adult education attempted in America. En-
tire countryside transformed, relative economic
prosperity realized, through these efforts di-
rected by Roman Catholic priests preaching a
gospel of education.

Special worker in recreation and education gave
service to various mountain schools.


1931








May 8,
1933







Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


EXPERIMENTAL
ECONOMICS INSTI-
TUTE FOR FARMERS











Rural Adult Edu-
cation Survey


New Jersey State
Agricultural Col-
lege, Rutgers Uni-
versity


Proceedings of the In-
stitute of Rural Eco-
nomics published by
Rutgers University.
Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Columbia Univer-
sity Council for
Research in the
Social Sciences


Oct. 31,
1933


SCIENCE AND ADULT EDUCATION


Issuance of Read-
ing List in Science


American Associ-
ation for the Ad-
vancement of
Science, Library
Committee


Reading lists on vari-
ous science subject-
matter classifications
published by A.A.A.S.


National distribution through American Library
Association.


Progressive-minded farmers of New Jersey have
attended these institutes for six-week periods, in
each of three years. The institutes have brought
about many discussion meetings of farmers on
current economic issues in various parts of the
state. The University conducted the enterprise
without subsidy in the third year, though the
Association is to provide funds for special activ-
ity by young farmers. The institutes have pro-
vided a pattern which has been followed, at least
in part, by other land-grant colleges and by the
U. S. Department of Agriculture.

The Association is sponsoring an inquiry by
Edmund deS. Brunner of Teachers College, in
association with Irving Lorge, into adult educa-
tion developments in villages and rural commu-
nities. This is part of a general sociological and
psychological study of rural communities, the
results to be checked with earlier surveys in
1920, 1925, and 1930.


Dec. 17,
1935


April 21,
1930





1932


Study of National
Parks


INQUIRY INTO
PLACE OF SCIENCE
IN ADULT EDUCA-
TION


National Parks
Association


Report of Committee
Number One, National
Parks Association.

Science and the Public
Mind, by Benjamin C.
Gruenberg, McGraw-
Hill, 1935. Articles in
Journal of Adult Edu-
cation by various sci-
entists.


TRAINING OF TEACHERS AND LEADERS


Teacher Training
Research Project







Traveling Teach-
er Experiment


Experiment in
Adult Class
Teaching


Joint Enterprise:
New School for
Social Research
and People's Insti-
tute of New York



National League
of Girls' Clubs


Northampton
People's Institute


Classics of the West-
ern World, American
Library Association,
1927. Experimental
Classes of the People's
Institute, by Philip N.
Youtz, 1927.

Bulletins of the League
and articles in the Jour-
nal of the Association.


Establishment of numerous demonstration cen-
ters in New York City.
Training in use of discussion techniques.






Demonstrated practicability of the traveling
teacher plan among mill girls, stenographers, etc.,
chiefly in the New England area.

Smith College students used experimentally as
teachers under faculty direction.


Study of educational use of national parks; di-
rectly affected national policy.


An attempt to discover the reason why science
offerings, as indicated by Dr. Gruenberg's find-
ings, constitute only some five per cent of the
whole of adult education offerings in the United
States. Discusses the attitude of the scientist to-
ward popular education. Conferences held by
scientists resulted in appointment of Standing
Committee on Science of the Association. This
Committee, under chairmanship of John C.
Merriam, now formulating a program.


Dec. i,
1933


May 18,
1926







Feb. 26,
1927


Apr. 2,
1928







Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Scholarships at
Teachers College


ADULT TRAINING
CENTER


Teachers College,
Columbia Univer-
sity

Teachers College,
Columbia Univer-
sity


Aided Teachers College in establishment of its
leader-training center.


Support accorded over period of two years has
enabled Teachers College to develop its Division
of Adult Education into a well-equipped and
adequately manned training center for adults.
Enrollment has shown steady increase and qual-
ity of students is improving.


UNIVERSITY EXTENSION


STUDY OF UNIVER-
SITY CORRESPOND-
ENCE INSTRUCTION


Experimental
Adult Education
in Nova Scotia

EXPERIMENTS IN
SUPERVISED CORRE-
SPONDENCE STUDY


University of Chi-
cago



Acadia University



University of Ne-
braska


University Teaching
by Mail, by W. S. Bitt-
ner and H. F. Mallory,
Macmillan, 1933.

Article in Journal of
the Association.


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education, Re-
ports of Carnegie
Foundation for the
Advancement of
Teaching, and in edu-
cational periodicals.


First comprehensive evaluation of the corre-
spondence method in teaching. Cooperative
study involving numerous university extension
divisions.

The first recognition of the adult education
problem in the Maritime Provinces of Canada; a
new conception of university extension.

Initiated supervision in correspondence study,
both in schools and for adults. The method has
since been widely adopted.


May 8,
1933


Apr. 16,
1934


Oct. 10,
1927



Dec. io,
1928


193I





Jan. 4,
1932


State of North
Carolina


Study of State
University Exten-
sion Facilities


STUDY OF UNIVER-
SITY EXTENSION
CLASS STUDENTS


Published Survey of
Higher Education in
State of North Caro-
lina.

MS in preparation.


A survey of extramural offerings of three state
institutions, together with recommendations for
improvement of the service, made by the Direc-
tor of the Association.

Study has been completed, with the cooperation
of extension divisions of a half-dozen universi-
ties. Interesting results promised as to adult stu-
dent achievement.


URBAN ORGANIZATIONS OFFERING CULTURAL PROGRAMS


Experimental
Study Groups in
Larger Cities




Development of
Educational Pro-
gram for Profes-
sional Women

Development of
Adult Education
Center in New
York City


People's Institute
of New York






American Wo-
man's Association



New School for
Social Research


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.






Article in Journal of
Adult Education.



Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Experiments conducted not only in the Great
Hall of Cooper Union, but on cooperative basis
with libraries and other organizations. The Peo-
ple's Institute has been extensively used for years
as a demonstration center for noncredit, informal
adult education.

Yielded important information on interests and
needs of professional and business women.



The Association's recommendation resulted in
Carnegie Corporation action in 1932, and subse-
quently in strengthening financially the first
large independent adult education center in New
York City. This institution should be accorded
a place at the forefront of the movement in
America.


University of
Minnesota


Feb. 28,
1932


Apr. 2,
1928






Mar. 1o,
1930





Date
Authorized


Activity


Associated
Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results


Study of Educa-
tional Needs of
Young Business
Women


Development of
Adult Program in
the Arts

Experimental Pro-
gram with Neigh-
borhood Groups


National Board of
the Young Wom-
en's Christian As-
sociations


New Students
League of Phila-
delphia

People's Institute-
United Neighbor-
hood Guild of
Brooklyn


Sept. 22,
1930


WORKERS' EDUCATION


Experiment in
Discussion of
Contemporary
Problems

Support of Work-
ers' Education



Support of Work-
ers' Education


Labor Temple
School of New
York


University of
New Zealand


Reports in Journal of
the Association.


University of
Sydney


Of very considerable value in determining pro-
gram plans within the Y.W.C.A. Also valuable
to other organizations with similar clientele. In-
volved experiment as well as study. Two-year
support accorded.


Leisure-Time Interests
and Activities of Busi-
ness Girls, by the Lab-
oratory Division, Na-
tional Board of the
YWCA, Janet Fowler
Nelson, Director.

Article in Journal of
Adult Education.


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Self-determined groups, meeting in homes, have
undertaken reading programs under direction of
visiting leader, with highly successful results.
Now developing competent leaders within
groups.


Progress in stimulating full and free discussion of
current questions by radical groups in New
York. Support accorded over period of years.


Grant used for salaries of staff tutors, for the
provision of adequate library facilities, and for
publications; all relating to Workers' Educa-
tional Association programs.
Same as above.


1932


Feb. 27,
4- 1933


Nov. i,
1926


Dec. 20,
1926



Dec. 20,
1926





Dec. 20,
1926




Dec. 20,
1926




Feb. 26,
1927








Oct. 8,
1928


Support of Work-
ers' Education




Experimental
Program for Ca-
nadian Lumber-
men and Miners


Study of Bryn
Mawr Summer
School for Wom-
en Workers in In-
dustry and Its
Students



Support of Work-
ers' Education
Support of Work-
ers' Education
Support of Work-
ers' Education
Support of Work-
ers' Education

Australian Work-
ers' Education
Publication Fund


University of
Melbourne




Frontier College
of Canada




Resident Summer
Schools forWom-
en Workers in In-
dustry






University of
Tasmania
University of
Western Australia
University of
Adelaide
University of
Queensland

Federal Workers'
Educational Asso-
ciation Council


The Highway, period-
ical publication of
Australian Workers'
Educational Associa-
tion.


The Highway, period-
ical of the Australian
Workers' Educational
Association. (See also
below.)
Articles in Journal of
Adult Education; also
The University in
Overalls, published by
the Frontier College.
Women Workers at
the Bryn Mawr Sum-
mer School, by Hilda
W. Smith; The Effect
of the Bryn Mawr
Summer School As
Measured in the Ac-
tivities of Its Students,
by Helen D. Hill.


Used in organization of tutorial classes and sum-
mer schools, in sustaining periodical of the
W.E.A., and in purchasing books for the use of
adult students in outlying districts.


Yielded important information relative to inter-
ests of workingmen under frontier conditions.




The first study of the effects of adult education
upon students made in the United States. Sup-
port accorded to organization over period of
years.






Used in strengthening program of Workers'
Educational Association.
Same as above.

Same as above.

Same as above.


This sum served as the nucleus of an endowment
fund for this publication; still regularly pub-
lished and highly valuable to the movement in
Australia.




Authorized Activity


Dec.9,
1929




Mar. Io,
1930







C. Sept. 22,
1930



1932


Oct. 31,
1933


Development of
Workers' Educa-
tion in Canada



DEVELOPMENT OF
WORKERS' EDUCA-
TION PROGRAM IN
AMERICA





Experiment in
Adult Education
and the Arts


Equipment of
Resident School
for Workers
Experimental
Education Pro-
gram


LABOR INSTITUTES


Workers' Educa-
tional Association
of Ontario



Workers Educa-
tion Bureau of
America






The Art Work-
shop of New York



Commonwealth
College of Mena,
Arkansas
Brotherhood of
Locomotive En-
ginemen and Fire-
men
Workers Educa-
tion Bureau of
America


Articles in Journal of
Adult Education




Six volumes in the
Workers Bookshelf,
published by the Mac-
millan Company. Nu-
merous articles in the
Journal of Adult Edu-
cation and in the labor
press.
Articles in Journal of
Adult Education.


Publications of the
Brotherhood.



Articles in Journal of
Adult Education, The
Federationist, and
elsewhere.


As a result of this grant and grants made in sub-
sequent years, together with the active support
of the University of Toronto, a flourishing pro-
gram of workers' education has developed in the
important Canadian Province of Ontario.
Experimental work in establishment of labor in-
stitutes in cooperation with various colleges and
universities has widened scope of workers' edu-
cation movement throughout the country. Pub-
lications extensively used as texts both among
workers and in colleges. Support of educational
work by labor unions strengthened by financial
cooperation accorded.
Successful results achieved in supplying educa-
tion for the creative use of leisure time by work-
ers employed in monotonous occupations. Sup-
port accorded for two years.
This admittedly "left wing" organization aided
in attaining self-sustaining basis.


Attempt to educate through a union periodical
on contemporary questions. Results undeter-
mined.


These grants enabled the Workers Education
Bureau to spread its program throughout the
country. Labor institutes held in the Far West as
well as in the Middle West and East, all with the
cooperation of universities and colleges of
standing.


Organization


Published Results


Other Apparent Results






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


THE CURRENT YEAR
The portion of the report that follows deals briefly with devel-
opments of the Association program during the current academic
year, 1935-36. The period has been one of considerable activity
upon the part of the staff. The publications load has been far
heavier than is normal, and the number of personal calls and corres-
pondence requests for advice and information greater than at any
other time in the history of the Association. The service function
of the organization has been at a high peak, attributable of course
to the rapidly growing interest in adult education in all parts of
the country. The exactions of the office have been so heavy that
it has been possible to spend relatively little time in the field, a
condition that should be remedied in the year to come. While it is
true that in one form or another the stories of most of the import-
ant adult education enterprises the country over come into Asso-
ciation headquarters, still a New York office is remote from the
firing line. The only safe way of dealing with adult education
problems is on the basis of experience derived at first hand. Effort
will be made to have four of the five executive members of the
staff each spend a reasonable portion of his time away from New
York on Association business during the year to come.

FORUMS EXPERIMENTATION
The year 1935-36 has seen the appointment of a special com-
mittee of the Executive Board on Forums Experimentation. The
national publicity attending the Des Moines experiment and the
active efforts of the United States Commissioner of Education,
John AW. Studebaker, to spread the forum discussion idea through-
out the states have brought about a necessity for evaluation of this
medium and for clear-cut enunciation of its assets and of its short-
comings. The special committee is making some progress toward
this end, though it is yet too early to generalize in print. The Ex-
ecutive Board itself has held two formal conferences on the subject
during the year. In addition, members of the special committee and
of the Board have visited each of the three experiments sponsored
by the Association, in Des Moines, in Springfield, Massachusetts,






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


and in Hartford, Connecticut. Numerous conferences with those
responsible for the conduct of these experiments supplemented by
a heavy correspondence are gradually building up a body of ex-
perience on forums that ought to be of considerable value eventu-
ally.
Reports indicate that the Des Moines attendance has struck a
level that probably represents normal for this type of activity in
that city. The attendance is uneven, and it is probable that many
of those attending central forums would be better served at the
neighborhood gatherings. The attendance at the central forums
has increased, while that at the neighborhood forums has decreased.
The experiment is suffering from the lack of forum leaders who are
resident throughout the year, far too much reliance having been
placed of late upon those engaged for short periods of six weeks or
less. Experience seems to show that at least one of the leaders
should be a permanent or semi-permanent member of the staff and
that he should bear an academic (rather than an administrative)
relation of leadership to the whole enterprise. Plans are under way
in Des Moines for the formation of a committee of sponsors for
the forums made up of local citizens, a group that should have
been in existence from the start in the opinion of several kindly
critics of the venture. A scheme for financing the forums after the
termination of the subsidy has been devised and is receiving en-
couraging support in Des Moines. The liaison between the forums
and library still seems tenuous and on the whole unsatisfactory,
though it is only fair to say that if it had not been for stringent
scarcity of funds for book purchases, the degree of cooperation
would have been much greater.
The experience of the Hartford Public Lectures Committee
with the series started this year has repeated that of the Springfield
Public Forums committee last year. Attendances of one thousand
and more have not been uncommon, and the validity of Professor
Hans Kohn's historical method of approach to contemporary
problems seems to have been thoroughly established. The Hart-
ford committee, operating from the Horace Bushnell Memorial,
has been most interested to gauge the results of the first year's ex-
perience and, despite a flood disaster, is confidently making plans







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


for a second year. Springfield also experienced a flood which
caused a postponement of a portion of the 1935-36 series, but the
Springfield Committee is making plans for the third year of their
forum program, and a financial campaign in behalf of the forums
is now being carried on. It is hoped that this campaign will bring
in a sum sufficient, in combination with a diminished grant from
the Carnegie Corporation, to carry the series in 1937. The library
cooperation in Springfield continues to be an outstanding feature
of the experiment. Newspaper support of the Springfield series
has been extraordinary, such complete accounts of the lectures
and discussions being published that no small educational result has
been achieved by this means alone.
It seems wise to complete a period of years with each of these
experiments and then to determine the extent to which local funds
may be expected to finance the undertakings indefinitely. The
amounts involved are not large and are quite within the powers
of the two communities. The subsidies made by the Carnegie
Corporation this year have been $3,000 in each city.
The Association has been consulted by Commissioner Stude-
baker with reference to the recently initiated emergency forums
program, financed by a special grant from relief funds. The diffi-
culties in the way of such a program are great, because of both its
relief and its temporary nature. The Board of the Association,
while declining to take a responsibility in the selection of leaders
proffered by Commissioner Studebaker, still has agreed to advise
with him, both individually and collectively. A memorandum of
safeguards advisable for the government to follow in setting sail
on the uncharted seas of subsidized discussion of contemporary
problems was drawn up by the Forums Experimentation Commit-
tee and presented to Mr. Studebaker at a conference of the Board
held in New York at the inception of the program.

FEDERAL EMERGENCY PROGRAM
In the last three years considerable space in the annual reports
has been devoted to analyses of the Federal Emergency Relief pro-
grams in adult education. Association criticism of these programs
has been frank and perhaps has served to emphasize the difficulties







50 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
and shortcomings rather than to bring out the undeniable excel-
lencies of the programs in some localities. There seems to be no
reason to recant and it is still the opinion of qualified observers that
on the whole the Federal Emergency program is low in quality
though high in quantity. It will always be so in a program con-
ducted chiefly in order to make jobs for people needful of relief.
However, despite forbidding handicaps, success or a modicum of
success has been achieved in enough cases so that thoughtful school
officials are now giving thought and attention to the problem of
retaining within the school system the effects of the impetus given
to the movement by the relief effort. An appetite for adult educa-
tion-a national appetite, in fact-has been enhanced by the emer-
gency offerings. With the approaching withdrawal of Federal
relief support, the school systems are bestirring themselves to
capitalize the good will toward education that has been engen-
dered among adults by the Federal program. Some superintend-
ents are already diverting competent staff members to this new
field for the public school, and it seems likely that demands soon
will be made upon the teacher training institutions for individuals
qualified to deal with adult problems-demands that, by the way,
the teacher training institutions, except in a few notable instances,
will be quite unable to fill. The Association has aided Teachers
College, Columbia University, in financing a conference on the
emergency program held in the late spring.
The Association has continued to cooperate with the U. S.
Office of Education with respect to the emergency program.
Funds carried over from 1934-35 have been made available and
augmented by a special grant of $i,ooo made by the Carnegie
Corporation, on recommendation of the Association, during the
current year. In addition, the General Education Board has re-
peated its grant of $7,500 made in the previous year for the publi-
cation of materials useful in connection with the emergency pro-
gram. This fund has been used in the distribution of The American
TVay by John W. Studebaker (McGraw Hill, 1935), of a pam-
phlet on forums prepared in the Office of Education, and of Plain
Talk, a booklet written by Mr. Studebaker and published by the
National Home Library Foundation in 1936.







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


The Association has brought back to life its Advisory Commit-
tee on the Emergency Program, disbanded at the close of the
previous year, in order to be of service if and when requested by
the Office of Education.

C.C.C. CAMPS STUDY
It is possible to report a most generous reception accorded to
Frank E. Hill's study of the Civilian Conservation Corps camps
educational program, The School in the Camps, published and
distributed in an edition of i6,000 copies by the Association in the
late spring of 1935. This report did much to clarify the thinking
of schoolmen with reference to the camps, and its effect upon the
corps of educational directors in the camps has been salutary.

LIBRARIES
During the last four or five years the interest of librarians in
adult education has more or less become focused upon the devel-
opment of readers' advisory services within the various public
libraries. The extension of the educational idea to other depart-
ments of the library has suffered by reason of this channeling, and
the significance of the movement for the reference, book-buying,
cataloguing, and circulation departments has failed to be fully
recognized. The concern of librarians with adult education has
steadily increased, but both in the library world generally and
within the professional organization, the American Library Asso-
ciation, recognition of the educational nature of the problem has
decreased.
It was with more than usual interest, therefore, that members of
the staff and Board greeted the announcement that the Board on
the Library and Adult Education of the A. L. A. were planning a
special conference on adult education and libraries to be held at
Princeton March io and i I, 1936. It was the privilege of the Direc-
tor and of Lyman Bryson to attend as representatives of the Amer-
ican Association. The discussions were illuminating, particularly
with regard to the development of the adult education idea in the
smaller libraries. Plans were made for a considerable increase in
emphasis, at library conferences, state, regional, and local, upon







52 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
adult education as a central responsibility of the library. Arrange-
ments were also made looking toward the increase of adult educa-
tion activity within the staff of the A. L. A., and cooperative
measures as between the two organizations chiefly concerned
were discussed to good effect. Considerable time was devoted to a
consideration of the leadership responsibilities of the librarian
within his community so far as adult education activity is con-
cerned. It was the consensus of opinion of those present that
library initiative in such matters as the assembling of community
councils of adult education, etc., was desirable.
It is to be hoped that a recrudescence of interest in adult educa-
tion may take place in the year to come. It would seem unfortunate
if the librarians, who occupied positions at the forefront of the
adult education movement at the time of its inception, should give
way to agencies perhaps less qualified to deal with the educational
problems of adults than are the libraries, which for more than fifty
years have been directly concerned with informal adult education
of a highly important type.
Through action taken by the Carnegie Corporation, upon the
recommendation of its library advisers, the Association has
assumed responsibility for a library demonstration in Civilian Con-
servation Corps camps located in the Second Corps Area which
has its headquarters in New York City. The sum of $5,00ooo thus
made available will be used to engage the services of a corps area
librarian who will attempt, on an experimental basis, to provide
improved library service for educational directors and enrollees
in the camps located in this district. The demonstration is just
being started and is projected for the year to come.

READING SIMPLIFICATION
The special committee of the Association on the production of
simple reading materials announced in last year's report has con-
tinued its activities on a somewhat enhanced scale during the year
that is just closing. Charles A. Beard has continued as chairman
of this committee but the main load of its work has been carried
by Lyman Bryson of Teachers College, Columbia University. A
grant of $6,250 made by the Carnegie Corporation upon recom-





























JAMES E. RUSSELL NEWVTON D. BAKER
1926-1930 1930-1931


FELIX AI. WVARBURG
1931-1932


EDWVARD L. THORNDIKE
1934-1935


DOROTHY CANFIELD FISHER
1932-1934


CHARLES A. BEARD
1935-1936


PRESIDENTS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION


FOR ADULT EDUCATION


























































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o*"
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LPFP'


REPRESENTATIVE PUBLICATION ,


AAMERICAN ASSOCIATION



































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0xn'i CA,:
X5"U O WA


ISSUED OR SPONSORED BY THE


FOR ADULT EDUCATION
















































HEADQUARTERS LIBRARY ON ADULT EDUCATION

AND RADIO EDUCATION






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


mendation of the Association has made possible the establishment
at Teachers College of a "readability laboratory" wherein mem-
bers of the faculty, graduate students, and relief workers have
cooperated in experiments looking toward the simplification and
classification of reading materials. Very considerable progress has
been made in isolating the factors which determine readability in
books. It has been possible through special contractual arrange-
ments made by the laboratory to apply these principles to a few
books and pamphlets which have subsequently appeared in print.
On September 17 and 18, 1935, a conference arranged by the
Carnegie Corporation was held in Princeton under the supervision
of Frederic G. Melcher of The Publishers' Weekly and Charles E.
Rush, Associate Librarian of Yale University and a member of the
American Association's Board. This conference was attended by
publishers, librarians, and a few individuals representing adult
education. Chief consideration was given to problems of distri-
bution of books to new audiences, recognition being given to the
fact that a new group of potential book buyers had appeared as a
result of the widespread adult education movement. Relatively
little attention was given to the production of readable books, con-
sideration of this problem being left for a later conference.
On February i 1936, the American Association assembled a
conference consisting chiefly of publishers but attended also by
librarians and adult educators. At this time Professor Bryson laid
before the publishers the progress made in the delineation of the
readability problem in his laboratory and made an offer to them of
cooperation in the handling of manuscripts on a contractual basis.
The response to this offer has been slow, but the results have been
highly encouraging in the few cases where manuscripts have actu-
ally been subjected to the laboratory procedures.
It is quite clear that the Association will wish to go forward
with the work of its readability committee in the year to come.
Whether or not it should continue to maintain a laboratory at
Teachers College is a question that at this time of writing has not
been decided, but it is clear that a portion of Professor Bryson's
time will be available for the studies which the committee desires
to see carried out. The Association is also debating the propriety






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


of cooperating with one large publishing house which has indi-
cated its willingness to enter the field of simplified and readable
books on rather a large scale. If this cooperative arrangement is
worked out, it will probably result in the discontinuance of the
laboratory as such at Teachers College. There seems to be reason
to expect greater returns on the experimental side through con-
centrated cooperation with one publisher than can be achieved
through diffuse and haphazard cooperation with many.

THE JOURNAL
It seems safe to say that the Journal of Adult Education reflects
in its contents the concerns and interests of its readers more clearly
and completely than the average semi-professional or general
magazine does. This is not due to any unusual sensitivity on the
part of the editors of the Journal nor to unusual letter-writing
activity on the part of its readers. Rather, the explanation lies in
the simple fact that very frequently the contents of the Journal
are made up almost entirely of contributions from its regular
readers. From the very first, the work of editing the Journal has
consisted largely of choosing articles from among its readers' vol-
untary and self-inspired accounts of their activities, experiences,
and reflections rather than of trying by various means to learn
what their interests are and then procure articles dealing with
those interests. It follows logically that an analysis of the contents
of the Journal yields a fairly accurate chart of trends in adult
education thought and practice.
The four issues of the Journal since the last annual report (num-
bers 3 and 4 of volume VII and i and 2 of volume VIII) have
contained a total of fifty-four articles, exclusive of those in the
National Education Association Bulletin and of all departmental-
ized material. Of these fifty-four articles, fourteen may be roughly
classified as theoretical, twenty-eight as descriptive, and six as
being on the borderline between theory and practice. Three
articles have dealt with the question of indoctrination, the con-
troversial issue still in the forefront of academic debate; and three
have been concerned with the evaluation of work done-a check-
up of accomplishment.
It is scarcely necessary to point out the significance of these






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


figures. In the early volumes of the Journal, at least eighty per
cent of the articles discussed the need for adult education or
attempted to define its aims or delimit its boundaries. Today
articles describing what is actually being done outnumber two to
one those that theorize about what can or should be done. Adult
educators need, of course, to go much further than they have in
their efforts to determine, so far as they can, the worth and effec-
tiveness of what they have accomplished or what is now being
carried on. The appearance of a few articles of a critical nature in
recent volumes of the Journal is an encouraging sign that the need
for evaluation has been recognized and that steps in that direction
are already being taken.
Frequent requests for permission to reprint Journal material
continue to be received. Two new educational periodicals that
have made their appearance in the last year-The Education
Digest, published monthly in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Educa-
tional Abstracts, a bi-monthly review with publication offices in
Albany, New York-are, with our permission, regularly digesting
or abstracting articles from the Journal. It is naturally gratifying
to know that, through the medium of the Journal, adult education
is thus extending its circle of influence.
The temporary arrangement by which the Bulletin of the De-
partment of Adult Education of the National Education Associa-
tion was for two years published as a section of the Journal ter-
minated in October, 1935. According to present plans, the Bulletin
is again to be issued as a separate publication. The Carnegie Cor-
poration, on recommendation of the Association, has supplied
$,ooo0, of which $400 is to be devoted by the Department to the
new bulletin and $600 to subscriptions to the Journal to be distri-
buted to members of the Department. The bonds of interest and
sympathy between the N.E.A. Department and the Association
that have resulted from working together during the two years
of joint publication still hold firm and will, it is hoped, continue to
add strength to the work of both organizations.
The Journal has as usual received its main support from a grant
made for the purpose of its publication by the Carnegie Corpora-
tion. In addition, a small residue of a special fund of $2,550, pro-
vided by the Corporation in October, 1933, has enabled the editors






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


to pay for occasional articles written to their order and requiring
considerable research.

ADULT EDUCATION IN ACTION
What has been said of the contents of the Journal of Adult
Education in regard to their being indicative of trends in adult
education theory and practice applies with equal if not greater
force to the collection of Journal articles which the Association
has just published in a volume entitled Adult Education in Action,
under the editorship of Mary L. Ely. This collection, which covers
the entire period of the publication of the Journal, consists of
some one hundred and sixty Journal articles, each of which has
been abridged without altering its original form and style. The
resulting digests, together with a few historical facts supplied in
editorial notes, have been woven into a unified whole. The book
is more than an anthology or collection of selected readings. It is,
in fact, as its title states, a record of adult education in action.
Furthermore it is an authoritative record, being made up of
original documents written by the men and women who have
been responsible for the initiation and development of adult edu-
cation in this country.
Useful as such a record unquestionably will be, the book will
probably perform its greatest service to the cause of adult educa-
tion for another reason. To the discerning it will tell an inspiring
story of a battle for human betterment, a battle waged against the
heavy odds of man's own ignorance, incompetence, and intermit-
tent discouragement, but carried on, nevertheless, with tremen-
dous courage and with the sustaining faith that, as Alvin Johnson
says in the closing words of the book, "results better than we can
specify are written in the skies." It is this story more than anything
else that justifies the efforts of the men and women who are work-
ing in the cause of adult education and that should encourage them
to go forward.

MECHANICAL AIDS TO LEARNING
It would seem that on the whole those responsible for adult
education enterprises had been slow to grasp the full significance






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


of recent developments in the field of mechanical aids to learning.
That adult education should concern itself increasingly with such
devices as the radio, the motion picture film, and the gramophone
seems inevitable, yet to date adult education generally the country
over has not reached out on any wide scale to make experimental
use of these media. Can it be that the conservatism that is our heri-
tage from the more formalized branches of education has set up a
mental bloc against progressive enterprise in this direction? This
reporter prefers to believe that the retardation of experimentation
is attributable to hard times. Depleted budgets leave little room for
the expensive exploration of new and untried media. It is to be
hoped, and even expected, that with some measure of returning
financial flexibility and the coincident reductions in cost of the
devices due to mechanical invention and commercial exploitation,
adult education will try out thoroughly the effectiveness of eye
and ear aids with adult audiences and groups.
By far the most progress in this country has been made with the
radio as a tool for adult education. That this is in large measure
directly traceable to the experimental activities of the National
Advisory Council on Radio in Education, brought into existence
by our Association, there seems no doubt. And yet the officers and
board of the radio education organization would be the first to
admit that the surface of the possibilities in this field barely has
been scratched.
The year has seen an interesting series of committee delibera-
tions and conferences conducted by the Council looking to the
formulation of a new organizational policy for the future. It seems
likely that the former emphases upon public policy in its relation-
ship to radio education and upon the direct conduct or sponsorship
of programs would give way deliberately to a program of experi-
mentation through the cooperative establishment of radio educa-
tion workshops, through development of committee studies and
researches of a constructively critical nature, and through imple-
menting the headquarters office so as to carry on more effectively
the clearing house for information function of the Council. Sus-
tained activities on the part of one or more field workers would do
much to further such a program and to improve air performance






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


not only among the community groups but among the universities
and colleges.
Preliminary studies of the motion picture film as an educational
aid have been carried on during the year by the American Council
on Education. These studies seem to indicate the need for the
formation of an American Film Institute designed to further
motion picture instruction both for children and for adults, but
so far no definite move toward organization has taken place. It is to
be hoped that if and when such an Institute is formed, due care will
be taken to limit the scope of its proposed activities so as to avoid
entanglement with the film industry, on the one hand, or undue
interference with independent educational experimentation, on
the other.
The gramophone as an aid to the learning process seems largely
to have been neglected in America, except for the special studies
undertaken by the American Foundation for the Blind in the
development of long-playing records. It may be found desirable
to undertake an inquiry into the educational possibilities of this
medium, and our Association might well consider the sponsorship
of such an inquiry. The British Institute of Adult Education has
had a gramophone study under way for some months. The issu-
ance of the British report will be awaited with interest on this side
of the Atlantic and may well contain valuable hints as to the pro-
cedure to be followed in initiating an American study.
It seems clear that the present intimate relationship between the
staffs and boards of the Association and the Radio Education
Council should continue. In addition to our parental responsibility
there is every indication of a drawing together of interests because
of the Council's probable future emphasis upon educational ex-
perimentation. The Association should likewise hold itself in readi-
ness to cooperate closely with any reputable educational film
group that may be formed. Indeed it is not too much to hope that
in the more remote future it may be found possible to coordinate
the activities of the several more important groups dealing with
all the mechanical aids to learning, at least in so far as these activi-
ties are concerned with the adult public. It is even probable that
our Association itself would prove useful in this regard.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


SCIENCE
The distribution of Science and the Public Mind, written by
Benjamin C. Gruenberg, formerly of the Association staff, and
published by the McGraw-Hill Company, has resulted in an in-
creased consideration of the problems of science and adult educa-
tion on the part of a good many scientific organizations. The Asso-
ciation has maintained throughout the year its Committee on
Science and Adult Education of which John C. Merriam, Presi-
dent of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, is Chairman. The
committee's progress has been slow, and as yet it has not been
possible to select a secretary for the committee and to commence
the work of direct cooperation with the various scientific organi-
zations. Certain factual studies have been completed for the com-
mittee by Marguerite E. Schwarzman, and it is expected that a
progress report will soon be forthcoming which will indicate a
program of future activities for the Association in this field.
The Association has found it possible to further the studies of
Dr. Gruenberg along certain of the lines indicated in his survey of
the field. Consequently Dr. Gruenberg is engaged at the present
time as Associate in Science of the Association upon a study, first,
of the extent to which present teachers in science are aware of the
needs of the adult lay public as distinguished from the needs of
high school or college students; second, of the places where
science teachers are being effectively trained to consider the atti-
tudes of value to adults living in an age of science; and third, of
whether or not a wider diffusion of scientific information and out-
look is socially advantageous.
MUSIC
In the report for the last year, announcement was made of the
commencement of a study of the place of music in adult education,
to be carried on by Eric Clarke, appointed to the staff as field
representative for this purpose. Because of circumstances over
which the Association had no control, not only has this study been
delayed but, in order to meet other opportunities open to him,
Mr. Clarke has found it necessary to sever his connection with the
Association and with the study. While ordinarily the cessation of






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


a study which had only been commenced would be a matter of
serious import, good fortune has attended the efforts of the Asso-
ciation to replace Mr. Clarke. The services of Willem van de Wall
have been secured, and he will carry the study forward during the
coming year. On recommendation of the Association, the Car-
negie Corporation (which met Mr. Clarke's salary out of its own
special study funds) has appropriated $6,000, chargeable to the
adult education experimental fund for 1935-36, for the continu-
ance of the study. Dr. van de Wall will make his headquarters with
the Russell Sage Foundation, members of this organization having
graciously consented not only to house him but to aid and advise
him in the prosecution of his study. His plan of attack upon the
problem will be similar to that contemplated by Mr. Clarke,
namely, an attempt to evaluate music activities for adults in cross
section in typical communities of the United States ranging from
the rural on the one hand to the metropolitan on the other. It is
expected that Dr. van de Wall's report will be ready for publica-
tion in the early spring of 1937.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION
The Association has been able to continue financial assistance,
on a somewhat diminished basis, to two experiments in community
organization reported last year, the California Association for
Adult Education and the Denver Adult Education Council. The
Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation allocated $5,000 to the
Association as a contribution of approximately half of the budget
required for carrying forward the Denver project, leaving the
balance to be realized from local sources. The Denver Adult Edu-
cation Council has made progress slowly, but constructively and
well. Particularly of interest is a demonstration of popular adult
education on a neighborhood basis as worked out cooperatively
by the Council and the Denver Public Library, a unique feature
of the Denver program which offers possibilities for adaptation in
other communities.
A grant of $7,500 to the California Association for Adult Edu-
cation in 1934-35 was used for a series of projects initiated for the
most part after the report for last year was written. The principal






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


activity was a survey, conducted cooperatively by the California
Association and numerous other agencies in Los Angeles and en-
virons, of radio, the arts, international relations, foreign popula-
tions, the public schools, and emergency education programs. The
various parts of the survey, completed but not yet published,
already have led to a noticeable quickening of interest in many
forms of activity throughout the Los Angeles metropolitan area.
At the same time, the California Association planned and con-
ducted two ingenious radio programs which proved very popular,
a bureau for assisting schools and clubs with the planning and
staffing of a dozen local forums, and several "community self
study" groups both in Los Angeles and in neighboring towns.
These groups are especially interesting as a demonstration of the
possibility of bringing together disparate elements for the serious
consideration of problems involving not only adult education but
also broader aspects of community planning.
In the fall of 1935, Lucy Wilcox Adams, Executive Director of
the California Association, presented a series of proposals for
extending the scope of the experiment, including continuation of
a variety of activities which arose quite naturally from the survey
of the previous year, continuation and enlargement of the "com-
munity self study" groups, further series of radio programs, circu-
lation of exhibits, development of the forum bureau, establishment
of a limited number of experimental centers for creative partici-
pation in the arts and for cooperative research in local problems,
setting up institutes for the training of leaders in rural districts,
and publication of a bulletin for the dissemination of news about
worth-while local programs of all types. On the strength of these
representations, the Executive Committee recommended and the
Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation granted the sum of $5,ooo,
or one third of the total proposed budget. The resignation of Mrs.
Adams shortly after the grant was made retarded the California
Association's program, but progress is reported under the direc-
tion of various persons who already had been actively associated
with the management of the various projects.
The first New England Conference on Adult Education was
held December 9-I 1, 1935, when several hundred representatives






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


from all parts of New England assembled in Boston at the call of
the Adult Education Council of Greater Boston. The program
was built on the following themes: Adult Education, an Ally of
Democracy; The Front Page of New England Adult Education
Activity (showing some of the new developments of outstanding
activities in the promotion of leisure-time programs in New
England); Do Hobbies Tend to Break Down Art Standards?;
Education for Better Family Life; The Techniques and Problems
of Adult Education; The Place of the Church in Adult Education;
Freedom of Speech in Adult Education. The Carnegie Corpora-
tion allocated $i,ooo to the Association as a contribution toward
the expense of the Conference.
Continuation of the exploratory field service reported last year
has been made possible by a grant of $4,500oo made to the Associa-
tion by the Carnegie Corporation. A preliminary report prepared
by Ralph A. Beals, Assistant to the Director of the Association,
was discussed by community delegates to the Tenth Annual
Meeting of the Association in May 1935, and has since been made
available to interested inquirers from various parts of the country.
Mr. Beals has devoted a part of his time during the year to further
conferences, correspondence, and field trips relating to the general
subject of community organization.

SARANAC LAKE STUDY AND CRAFT GUILD
As a result of a grant of $3,000 received from the Carnegie
Corporation the Association has been able to participate in a
unique experiment in community organization in adult education
with wide implications for educational therapy, conducted under
the auspices of the Saranac Lake Study and Craft Guild. The
Guild was formed late in 1935 by officials of sanitoria for the
tuberculous, doctors in private practice, trustees of the public
library, the school authorities, and officials of the village of
Saranac, all of whom realized the values which a community pro-
gram of adult education might have in the physical rehabilitation
of some two thousand patients in the village. Educational and
recreational facilities based on a careful study of the interests and
abilities of both confined and ambulant patients have been worked
out in some detail. In so far as practicable, the various programs






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


are carried out by convalescents with such assistance as can be
secured from outside agencies. The preliminary work of organi-
zation was ably directed by William F. Stearns, Director of the
Prospect Union Educational Exchange.

WORKERS' EDUCATION
The establishment of a research and study division within the
Workers Education Bureau of America has been a development of
the year just closed. Under the leadership of Mollie Ray Carroll,
experimentation and special studies have been commenced in the
Michigan and Illinois areas and, it is to be expected, these activities
will be extended to other areas as funds and time permit. The
Bureau has continued its widespread and important program of
labor institutes, bringing into conference university and college
faculty members and labor leaders within selected regions for
discussions of problems of high importance to labor. Relations
between the Bureau and the Association have continued to be close
and mutually advantageous. Spencer Miller, Jr., Director of the
Bureau, has been an active and interested member of the Executive
Board of the Association, and has served the Association gener-
ously both within the United States and in Europe in connection
with its international relations. The Association viewed with ap-
probation the action of the Carnegie Corporation in making a
grant of $11,250 toward the support of the activities of the
Workers Education Bureau during the current year, submitting
a unanimously favorable recommendation to the Corporation on
this subject.

PARENT EDUCATION
It is a pleasure to report continued cordial relations with many
organizations actively concerned with education for family life
and parenthood, most especially with the National Congress of
Parents and Teachers and the National Council on Parent Educa-
tion. Both organizations have responded promptly and helpfully
whenever called upon. An effort has been made by the Associa-
tion to respond in like manner. Assisted by members of the staff,
the Director prepared and delivered a broadcast on adult education
in a series sponsored by the National Congress of Parents and






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Teachers, and the Association has been represented at several con-
ferences called by the National Council on Parent Education.
Largely as a result of continued emphasis by national leaders,
parent educators are coming more and more to think of themselves
as inseparably identified with general adult education. This
strengthening of common ties gives promise of advantage to both
fields.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE GROUPS
Nearly all the 14,ooo,ooo foreign-born residents of the United
States are adults, most of them came to this country with little or
no formal schooling, and many of them are excluded from our
established educational agencies by the barrier of language. A pro-
posal for an experiment in mass education through the foreign
language press was submitted to the Executive Committee in
January by the Foreign Language Information Service and for-
warded to the Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation with a recom-
mendation for favorable action. A grant of $5,000 was later made
for this purpose by the Corporation.
The proposal calls for the preparation of two series of articles,
translation into nineteen languages, and publication in a number of
foreign language papers which reach approximately nine-tenths
of the foreign language population in the United States. The
articles will be run as special features under a uniform heading,
with questions and discussion invited from readers. The first series,
"Shall I Become a Citizen?" addressed to five million aliens ad-
mitted for permanent residence, will include twenty articles on
such topics as citizenship and jobs, citizenship and deportation,
etc. A second series on "You and Your Children" is designed to
help immigrant parents to understand the point of view, customs,
and standards of American young people and the American insti-
tutions in which their own children are growing up.

RURAL ADULT EDUCATION
In December, 1935, the Executive Committee recommended to
the Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation that $7,500 of the adult
education experimental fund be utilized in making a grant of






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


$19,970 to the Council for Research in the Social Sciences at
Columbia University for a study of the human aspects of the
current rural situation to be conducted under the direction of
Edmund deS. Brunner. The study will be based on a quick re-
survey of 140 agricultural villages scattered in 28 states, previously
examined under Dr. Brunner's direction in 1920-2 1924-25, and
1930. Since 1930 there has been a tremendous shift in population
in the United States and it seems probable that the social situation
in rural America has changed in specific and quite significant ways.
Dr. Brunner proposes to study such topics as population changes
both in the villages and in the surrounding trade areas, decentral-
ization of industry, trade, government, unemployment, religious
and social organizations, schools, youth, and adult education. The
section on adult education will seek to answer such questions as:
what has happened to the interest in adult education clearly
detectable in embryonic form in 1930; what has been the effect of
the emergency education program; has there been any change in
the attitude of agencies-public schools, churches, the extension
service; have any other agencies, such as libraries, entered the
rural adult education field; if so, what have been their programs
and achievement.
The Institute of Rural Economics at Rutgers University, sup-
ported in part by grants received by the Association from the
Carnegie Corporation as reported in each of the last two years,
has concluded its third and most successful season, without finan-
cial assistance from the outside. Those responsible for the direction
of the experiment feel that progress has been made in discovering
ways and means of stimulating free discussion of controversial
issues among the rural leaders of the state. The program has not
been offered as yet to young adults who have passed the age of the
traditional youth groups but are not yet ready to accept affiliation
with the organizational interests of their parents. Particular atten-
tion is now being given to this aspect of the problem under the
leadership of the Chairman of the Association, Dean-Emeritus
James E. Russell. The Executive Committee has recommended
that the Corporation appropriate $,000o to the Association for
use when a plan of procedure has been worked out.







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


POST-COLLEGIATE EDUCATION
The substantial investment of funds in experimental develop-
ment of projects specifically for college graduates and in two pub-
lished surveys of these and related enterprises continues to bear
fruit in a slowly increasing consciousness of the importance of
this field of endeavor. Alumni colleges, week ends, institutes,
seminars, forums, and the like, continue to increase in number,
patronage, and prestige. The earlier and more numerous reading
projects, however, appear to have fallen off in number as well as
in popular appeal.
In recent years it has been suggested on several occasions that
the Association should endeavor to do in some professional field
what it had attempted to do in encouraging college graduates to
continue their interest in non-professional studies. A non-technical
sketch of post-collegiate education in engineering and medicine
was included in the second of the two surveys mentioned above.
Beyond this the Executive Committee has been unwilling to go on
its own initiative.
An appropriate opportunity for a limited experiment serving
members of a single profession and for re-directing attention to
the educational values of consecutive reading and study was found
this year, and the Executive Committee of the Association recom-
mended that the Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation appropri-
ate $6,ooo to Vanderbilt University for use of the School of
Religion in establishing an extension library service. The Corpora-
tion Trustees approved the recommendation as a charge against
library funds ($4,000) and adult education funds ($2,000). Al-
though the project has not yet been worked out in detail, it is
expected that the educational facilities afforded by the library will
be made use of by many ministers in the South, particularly in
rural areas, where library service is meager or non-existent.

NEGRO ADULT EDUCATION
The experiments in Negro adult education established and
carried on over a period of years through financial support of the
Carnegie Corporation and the Rosenwald Fund, accorded on
recommendation of the Association, have gone forward despite






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


the cessation of the foundation subsidies. The New York Public
Library especially is to be congratulated on its successful attempt
to absorb these important educational activities at a time when
budgetary provisions had been cut to the bone. In Atlanta, the
irreparable loss suffered through the death of John Hope, Presi-
dent of Atlanta University, undoubtedly constitutes a check to
adult education activity for Negroes in that region, but there is
still a definite possibility that the cooperative arrangement planned
between Atlanta University and the Negro branch of the Atlanta
Public Library may go forward.
The usual delays have been encountered by the Associates in
Negro Folk Education in the preparation and publication of their
syllabi for adult use. The editor of the series, Alain Locke of
Howard University, reports however that a majority of the nine
syllabi are now in manuscript form, with the others to be com-
pleted within the next few months. It seems likely that the fall of
1936 will see the issuance of these new and interesting guides to
the study of Negro life and history. Advance interest in the series
indicates that the demand for the syllabi will be high, and accord-
ingly a wide distribution is planned.

NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL CONFERENCE
The work of the National Occupational Conference has gone
forward according to schedules worked out by the retiring direc-
tor, Franklin J. Keller, who on February i, 1936, returned to his
duties as Principal of the East Side Continuation High School in
New York City. The Conference has been fortunate in securing
the services of Edwin A. Lee, Professor of Vocational Education
on leave of absence from the University of California and for-
merly Superintendent of Schools of San Francisco. Dr. Lee will
assume the directorship of the Conference as of July I, 1936.
Extension of his leave of absence has been granted by the Univer-
sity of California for a period of two years. While awaiting Dr.
Lee's assumption of authority the Executive Committee of the
Conference has spent considerable time in attempting to work out
a tentative program for the future, relating to the diffusion of
information concerning occupational guidance at all levels, and







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


has also, through its Technical and other committees, made plans
for the securing of occupational information and the encourage-
ment of studies of individual aptitudes.

PRISON EDUCATION
A significant venture in the adult education of prisoners has
been under way during the last two years as a result of grants
totaling $25,ooo made directly by the Carnegie Corporation on
recommendation of the Association, to the New York Commis-
sion for the Study of the Educational Problems of Penal Institu-
tions for Youth for establishment of experimental programs in
Clinton and Wallkill prisons. At both institutions the educational
activity has included specially organized programs for guards and
other prison personnel; rearrangement of the work day to pro-
vide educational activity; collection of significant data about the
inmates; introduction of socio-economic as well as vocational in-
struction; improvement of the library; and preparation of devices
effective in propagandizing for education. At Wallkill, several
series of interesting work sheets also have been prepared, and
several loose-leaf volumes of curricular materials in the socio-
economic field at Teachers College, Columbia University. An
impressive proportion of the prisoners in each institution has
responded eagerly to the various educational offerings. The em-
phasis upon educational programs in these two prisons has caused
a re-awakening of interest in education in other state correctional
institutions. Provision for educational development is being made
in the state budget now under consideration in the Legislature.

TRAINING FOR LEADERSHIP
The paramount importance of intelligent, open-minded, and
well-informed leadership in adult education has been dwelt upon
repeatedly in these reports. The problem has become acute during
the last three years as a consequence of the relatively large number
of leadership programs which have grown up under various
auspices. A tentative move was made early in the year to discover
whether agencies offering or professing to offer training for pro-
spective leaders in adult education would welcome an effort on the






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


part of the Association to study and report factually on develop-
ments in this direction with a view to eventual conference and
possibly to the cooperative planning of basic training programs.
Since several important institutions seemed unwilling to partici-
pate for one reason or another, the plan has been abandoned for
the present.
The Association has nonetheless continued to express its inter-
est in the problem of training for leadership in quite definite ways.
On recommendation of the Executive Committee of the Associa-
tion, the Carnegie Corporation appropriated the sum of $7,500 as
a third and final grant in partial support of the comprehensive
experiment in leadership training at Teachers College, Columbia
University, comprising special courses, seminars, research, and
supervised field work.
A different approach has been developed by the Division of
General Graduate Studies organized by Yale University in the
spring of 1935 in the belief that facilities for advanced university
work would be useful to many persons who are not preparing for
research careers but who are, nevertheless, engaged in, or planning
to engage in, occupations of a distinctly intellectual character.
The Division offers no special courses, but draws upon existing
resources of the University to adjust each student's work to his
own special needs. Of the present students in the Division of Gen-
eral Graduate Studies, some are devoting all of their time to formal
seminar courses, some are devoting most of their time to a special
project, while others have divided their time fairly equally be-
tween course work and individual study. On the recommendation
of the Association, the Carnegie Corporation appropriated $4,000
which has been used to establish grants-in-aid to students already
engaged in, or planning to engage in, some form of adult education.
The Executive Committee has gone on record as wishing to
cooperate with the Division of General Education, New York
University, in establishing a service and research bureau in 1936-
37. Such a bureau, it is felt, will have a definite contribution to
make in the field of training for effective leadership.







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


ADMINISTRATION

The following members of the Council have served as officers and
members of the Executive Board for the year 1935-36:

President
Charles A. Beard

Vice-Presidents
Remsen D. Bird Alain Locke
Harvey N. Davis William A. Neilson
Matthew S. Dudgeon John W. Studebaker
George F. Zook

Chairman: James E. Russell
Vice-Chairman: Everett D. Martin
Secretary: Jennie M. Flexner
Treasurer: Harold Stonier
Director: Morse A. Cartwright


EXECUTIVE
Lucy W. Adams***
Arthur E. Bestor*
Lyman Bryson*
Harry W. Chase*
Frank M. Debatin***
Grace E. Frysinger**
Franklin F. Hopper***
Carl F. Huth**
Henry W. Kent*
*Term expires September 30, 1936
**Term expires September 30, 1937
***Term expires September 30, 1938
tDeceased


BOARD
Austin H. MacCormick**
Frank L. McVey**
Everett D. Martin*
Spencer Miller, Jr.***
Harry A. Overstreet*"
Robert I. Rees***
Charles E. Rush***
Elmer Scott*
Robert E. Simont







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


The committees appointed by the Chairman for the year 1935-
36 are as follows:
Executive Committee
Arthur E. Bestor, Lyman Bryson, Morse A. Cartwright,
Harry W. Chase, Everett D. Martin (Vice-Chairman),
Robert I. Rees, Charles E. Rush, James E. Russell (Chairman)

AAAE Tenth Anniversary Jubilee
Jerome H. Bentley, Arthur E. Bestor (Chairman),
Edmund deS. Brunner, Ned H. Dearborn, Spencer Miller, Jr.

Research
Lyman Bryson (Chairman), Thomas Fansler, Ralph A. Beals

Negro Education
Jennie M. Flexner, Franklin F. Hopper (Chairman), Everett D. Martin

Adult Reading (Joint Committee with the A.L.A.)
Lyman Bryson, E. L. Thorndike








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


The following members of the Association have served as mem-
bers of the Council during this year:

TERMS EXPIRE 1936


Jerome H. Bentley
Arthur E. Bestor
Edmund deS. Brunner
Harry W. Chase
L. L. Dickerson
Jennie M. Flexner
Grace E. Frysinger
Charles R. Green


Lucy W. Adams
L. R. Alderman
Seymour Barnard
G. F. Beck
W. W. Bishop
Lyman Bryson
L. D. Coffman
Ned H. Dearborn
M. S. Dudgeon
E. C. Elliott
Dorothy Canfield Fisher
Sidonie M. Gruenberg


Edgar W. Knight
Read Lewis
Frank L. McVey
C. S. Marsh
Charles W. Mason
James A. Moyer
William A. Neilson
Paul M. Pearson


TERMS EXPIRE 1937

Franklin F. Hopper
William J. Hutchins
Carl F. Huth
Edith J. R. Isaacs
E. C. Jenkins
F. E. Johnson
George Johnson
F. P. Keppel
Benson Y. Landis
W. M. Lewis
E. C. Lindeman
Austin H. MacCormick


Leon J. Richardson
Edward S. Robinson
James E. Russell
Florence H. Snow
Harold Stonier
Douglas Waples
Caroline A. Whipple
Philip N. Youtz


Everett D. Martin
John C. Merriam
Robert I. Rees
Charles E. Rush
Robert E. Simont
Hilda W. Smith
Edward L. Thorndike
Levering Tyson
Felix M. Varburg
Frederic A. Whiting
George B. Zehmer


TERMS EXPIRE 1938


Beulah Amidon
Newton D. Baker
Remsen D. Bird
W. S. Bittner
Scott Buchanan
Marguerite H. Burnett
Kenyon L. Butterfieldt
Olive D. Campbell
S. P. Capen
Mollie Ray Carroll
Harvey N. Davis
Frank M. Debatin
John Dewey
Helen H. Dingman
C. R. Dooley
tDeceased


Linda A. Eastman
A. Caswell Ellis
John Erskine
Milton J. Ferguson
Wil Lou Gray
R. M. Grumman
John Hopet
Walter A. Jessup
Henry W. Kent
Robert S. Lynd
Carl H. Milam
Spencer Miller, Jr.
Fred A. Moore
Elizabeth C. Morriss


Thomas H. Nelson
Marion Neprud
David K. Niles
Harry A. Overstreet
James Harvey Robinsont
Carl B. Roden
Elmer Scott
Chester D. Snell
Herbert L. Spencer
William F. Stearns
John W. Studebaker
Rhoda M. White
Louis R. Wilson
Henry M. Wriston






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


It is with regret that the Director announces the impending re-
tirement of James E. Russell as Chairman of the Association effec-
tive at the close of the current year. Dean Russell has held positions
of leadership within the Association since its founding. His wis-
dom and far-sightedness have saved the Association and its Direc-
tor many a false step. He has brought to the Association from his
store of experience accumulated during a lifetime of educational
endeavor not only new ideas but penetrating analyses of older
ideas. His presence at meetings of the Board will be sorely missed,
but there is comfort in his promise.of counsel and advice from time
to time and in his assurance of an abiding interest in the welfare of
the Association.
The following persons have retired from the staff of the Asso-
ciation upon the completion of special assignments: Gustav F.
Beck, Field Representative for Canadian Relations; Eric T. Clarke,
Field Representative to study music in community life; and Frank
E. Hill, Field Representative to study the educational program of
the Civilian Conservation Corps. Benjamin C. Gruenberg has been
reappointed Associate in Science to make further studies of the
place of science in adult education.
The Association lost four valued members through death during
the last year: Kenyon L. Butterfield, John Hope, James Harvey
Robinson, and Robert E. Simon. All four had served as members
of the Council. Dr. Butterfield was both a member of the Execu-
tive Board and a founder of the Association. Dr. Hope served also
as a Vice-President. Mr. Simon was serving his second term as an
active member of the Executive Board at the time of his death.
Dr. Butterfield, Dr. Robinson, and Mr. Simon were all members
of the original group of sponsors for the Association.
At the opening of the year 1935-36, the Carnegie Corporation
of New York tentatively set aside $ioo,ooo as an Experimental
Fund for Adult Education. This sum was supplemented by $4,500
remaining unexpended in the experimental fund for 1934-35, mak-
ing a total of $104,5oo available for experimental projects and
studies in 1935-36. Additional appropriations from general and
library funds to the extent of $15,250 were made by the Carnegie
Corporation to supplement grants from the experimental fund.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


PUBLICATIONS
It is gratifying to report an increase in the demand for publica-
tions during the past twelve months. Requests for free publica-
tions and orders have come from every state in the Union, from
practically all European countries, and from China, Japan, South
Africa, Australia, Persia, and Turkey.
An outstanding new publication of the Association is Adult
Education in Action, edited by Mary L. Ely. The book is dis-
cussed in detail elsewhere in this report. Adult Education in
Action, issued in May 1936, already has been adopted as a textbook
by a number of colleges and universities offering courses in adult
education.
The second edition of the Handbook of Adult Education was
issued early in May 1936. Three printings of the first edition of
the book have been sold since its publication in the spring of 1934.
The book has become a standard reference work in public and
university libraries, and it is being used increasingly for supple-
mentary reading in courses in adult education. The 1936 edition
of the book includes a long and comprehensive article on the
development of the Federal emergency program. In addition,
there are thirty-five articles on other phases of adult education
written by experts and over i,ooo brief notes of the activities of
local and national agencies engaged in adult education. Several
hundred programs not listed in the 1934 edition are included.
The year saw the completion of the reports on the activities of
the Adjustment Service. Seven reports were published covering
the following subjects: development of informational resources of
the service, medical and psychiatric services, relationships with
other community agencies, general appraisals of the service, a
study of io,ooo clients, a study of o00 clients, and clients' opinions
of the service. These reports are being used by vocational coun-
selors and as source material in connection with the many courses
in vocational guidance now being given in colleges and universities.
PUBLICATION FUNDS
The revolving publications fund continued to be augmented
during the year through sales of publications, amounting to







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


$685.35, and through income from royalties totaling $642.96. The
balance of $5,717.52 reported as of March 3 1935 has increased
to $6,014.96 as of March 31, 1936. Expenditures during the year
have included the printing of extra editions of Discussion Methods
for Adult Groups, Regional Surveys of Adult Education, and the
1934 Handbook of Adult Education in the United States; and
preliminary expenses in connection with preparation of Adult
Education in Action, and the 1936 Handbook of Adult Education
in the United States. The cost of manufacture of the last two
books will be met out of this fund, reimbursement to be made from
sales.
In June 1935 the General Education Board authorized an emer-
gency grant to the Association of $7,500 for the continuation dur-
ing 1935-36 of the preparation and dissemination of printed infor-
mation on the organization of programs of adult education in co-
operation with the United States Office of Education. Through
the use of this fund, the Association published and distributed
widely an edition of 16,ooo copies of The School in the Camps,
by Frank Ernest Hill. The Association also purchased o0,000
copies of Plain Talk, by John WV. Studebaker, for distribution
through the United States Office of Education; and 1,250 copies
of Education for Democracy-Public Affairs Forums, by John W.
Studebaker and C. S. Williams.
During the twelve months since the publication of the last
annual report, the Association has been able to distribute publica-
tions as follows:
To Members.-Journal of Adult Education, Volume VII, Num-
bers 3 and 4, Volume VIII, Number i and 2; The School in the
Camps, by Frank Ernest Hill; Plain Talk, by John W. Studebaker;
and Education for Democracy, by John W. Studebaker and C. S.
Williams.
To Council and Organization Members.-In addition to the
above: Science and the Public Mind, by Benjamin C. Gruenberg;
and the Annual Report of the Director for 1934-35, American
Association for Adult Education.
To Officers and Executive Board.-In addition to the above:
Viewpoints on Economic and Social Issues and Their Relation to






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Rural Life, Institute of Rural Economics, Rutgers University;
Development of Informational Resources in the Adjustment Ser-
vice, by L. S. Hawkins; Medical and Psychiatric Services in the
Adjustment Service, by Charles O. Fiertz; Community Agency
Relationships of the Adjustment Service, by L. S. Hawkins,
Gwendolen Schneidler, and H. A. White; General Appraisals of
the Adjustment Service, by J. A. and Florence Lee Fitch, C. S.
Coler, and D. G. Paterson; Ten Thousand Clients of the Adjust-
ment Service, by G. L. Bergen; A Study of One Hundred Clients
of the Adjustment Service, by Emma Seipp; Clients' Opinions of
the Adjustment Service, by L. S. Hawkins; and Adult Education
in Action, edited by Mary L. Ely.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
It is with much gratification and pleasure that report is made of
the successful establishment of the Canadian Association for Adult
Education in the year just drawing to a close. An examination of
the chronological record of the American Association will show a
recurring concern during the last seven years for the efforts of our
national neighbors to the north to bring together the private and
public agencies dealing with the educational offerings to adults
within the Dominion. It has been the privilege of the American
Association to be of some slight service in the solution of the
Canadian organization problem, both through the occasional
presence in Canada of certain of its staff members and through its
financial recommendatory privilege to the Carnegie Corporation
of New York. The history of the formation of the Canadian group
to some extent has paralleled our own. National conferences and
regional discussions have preceded the final effort, until it is now
fair to state that the new Canadian Association represents most if
not all the important movements for the education of adults in
existence within the nation. Members of the American Association
look forward to close cooperation and interchange of ideas with
the membership of the Canadian group. Especially does it seem
likely that Canada, through experiment, demonstration, and study,
will be able to shed light upon many of the peculiarly difficult
problems attendant upon the education of adults in rural areas-






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


problems which are shared by Canada and the United States. At a
conference to be held in June, 1936, the Executive Committee of
the Canadian Association will select a Director, locate and organ-
ize its headquarters, and prepare for activity to commence with
the opening of the academic year in the fall. A national conference
will be held in December, 1936.
Informal conferences held during the summer of 1935 in Lon-
don by Spencer Miller, Jr., and the Director, representing the
American Association, and officers and council members of the
World Association for Adult Education, have resulted in a deci-
sion to recommence operations in the publications program of the
World Association, under the grant for the purpose made avail-
able in 1930 by the Carnegie Corporation upon recommendation
of the Association. A new publications committee of the world
body has been formed under the chairmanship of W. E. Williams,
Secretary of the British Institute of Adult Education, who will
serve as editor. The American Association has released funds suf-
ficient to carry the program for a trial period of six months and
has promised to give consideration at the conclusion of that period
to the extension of the period to one year, decision to be based
upon the success attained in the initial period.
The affairs of the World Association have been "in commis-
sion" for the last two years, but a meeting of the Council of the
organization is scheduled for mid-August, 1936, when it is to be
presumed decisions will be reached as to the future government
and policies of the international body.

THE ANNUAL MEETING
The Tenth Annual Meeting of the Association was held in
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 20-22, 1935, with approximately 450
persons registered, and more than i,000 in attendance at the public
sessions. The program provided for six general sessions, two of
which were held in the evening and were attended by the inter-
ested public. There were also two symposiums which were held
concurrently, fourteen sectional discussions, and two business
meetings, the last being open only to members of the Association.
The Public Schools as Adult Centers, Adult Education under







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Public Auspices, Adult Interests, Readable Books, and the Use of
the Radio and Motion Pictures (with demonstrations) were the
subjects of the addresses and discussions at the general sessions.
The enthusiasm of the midwestern hosts was encouraging and
enlivening to the speakers and the members of the headquarters
staff, and the result was an unusually stimulating meeting marked
by a ferment of ideas and personalities and by a sense of the grow-
ing scope and power of adult education.

OTHER ACTIVITIES
On recommendation of the Executive Committee of the Asso-
ciation, the Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation made grants for
experiments more fully reported in recent years as follows: $ i,ooo
to the Civic Federation of Dallas as a third and final grant in sup-
port of the New Era School for recent high school graduates;
$2,750 (with $2,750 additional from library funds) for an experi-
ment with self-constituted groups conducted by the People's
Institute-United Neighborhood Guild of Brooklyn in cooperation
with the Brooklyn Public Library and the Brooklyn Museums;
and $2,000 as an emergency grant to the National Theatre Confer-
ence to perpetuate a skeleton form of organization until responsi-
bilities to be assumed by the Federal Theatre Project are more
sharply defined. Report also should be made of the generous action
of the Carnegie Corporation in granting the Association $8,500
from general funds for use in meeting extraordinary expenditures
incident upon the Tenth Anniversary Celebration.
Once again it is possible to report only that progress has been
made toward preparation of a report by the Committee on Studies
and Research and toward preparation of a report on the ability
and achievement of students in divisions of university extension.
Publication in each instance is hoped for in the ensuing year.

CONCLUSION
The readers of this report will be able to judge for themselves
the extent to which the activities of the year just closed synchro-
nize with, and accord with the reasonable expectations of, the
program developed during the last ten years. As members of the







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 79
Association we should not delude ourselves into the belief that we
have accomplished much. Let us rather feel that, though perhaps
we have made some slight progress in our studies of the meaning
of adult education, there still remains a vast amount to be done.
To the task of further exploration, then, wholeheartedly and
unanimously should we dedicate the Association in the years to
come.
Respectfully submitted,
Morse A. Cartwright
New York City
April 29, 1936







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

FINANCIAL SUMMARY


I. Statement of Financial Condition,
September 30,1935; Statement Show-
ing Changes in Funds for the Fiscal
Year Ended September 30, 1935;
Statement of Income and Expenses
for the Fiscal Year Ended September
30, 1935; Summary of Total Income
and Total Expenses for the Fiscal
Year Ended September 30, 1935; and
Appropriations Received for Ac-
count of Other Organizations for
the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
1935.
(As audited by Frederick Fischer, Jr.,
Member, American Institute of Ac-
countants and American Society of
Certified Public Accountants.)


II. Statement of Financial Condition,
March 31, 1936; Statement Showing
Changes in Funds for the Six Months
Ended March 31, 1936; Statement of
Income and Expenses for the Six
Months Ended March 31, 1936; Sum-
mary of Total Income and Total Ex-
penses for the Six Months Ended
March 31, 1936; and Appropriations
Received for Account of Other Or-
ganizations for the Six Months
Ended March 31, 1936.


I
Mr. Morse A. Cartwright, Director
American Association for Adult Education
60 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y.


Dear Sir:
Pursuant to engagement, I have audited the books and accounts of
the AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR ADULT EDUCATION for the fiscal year
ended September 30, 1935, and present herewith the following four
Exhibits and one Schedule:
EXHIBIT "A": Statement of Financial Condition, September 30, 1935.
EXHIBIT "A": Schedule "I"-Statement Showing Changes in Funds for the
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1935.
EXHIBIT "B": Statement of Income and Expense for the Fiscal Year Ended
September 30, 1935.
EXHIBIT "C": Summary of Total Income and Total Expenses for the Fiscal
Year Ended September 30, 1935.
EXHIBIT "D": Appropriations Received for Account of Other Organizations
for the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1935.

Very truly yours,
Frederick Fischer, Jr.,
Certified Public Accountant
October 21, 1935
New York, N. Y.








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


EXHIBIT A
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION, SEPTEMBER 30, 1935


Assets
Cash
Capital Account
Managing Account


$10o,498.60
6,464.95


Total Assets .


Liabilities
Prepaid membership dues . . . . .
Prepaid subscriptions to Journal of Adult Education
Balance payable on appropriations received for ac-
count of other organizations, per Exhibit "D"

Total Liabilities . . . . .

Net Asset Value......


917.01
314.30


1,250.00

S . 2,481.31

. . $105,482.24


The net asset value comprises the following funds:
Maintenance Fund, per Schedule "I" . . . . .
Publication Funds, per Schedule "I" .........
Special Project, Study and Conference Funds, per Schedule "I" .


Total Funds


EXHIBIT A-SCHEDULE I

STATEMENT SHOWING CHANGES IN FUNDS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1935


Maintenance Fund
Balance, September 30, 1934
Add:
Transferred from Special Project, Study and Con-
ference Funds:
Alumni Education Study . . .
Lecture Field Study . . . .
Negro Adult Education Experiments .

Balance September 30, 1934, of Administrative Re-
serve-transferred . . . .

Excess of income over expenses September 30, 1935,
per Exhibit "C" . ... . .

Balance, Maintenance Fund, September yo, 1935,
per Exhibit "A" . . .


$107,963.55


$ 11,099.09
20,252.11
74,131.04

$105,482.24


$ 4,352-78


22.73
303.73
332.89


659.35


5,000.00


1,086.96


. $11,099.09








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Publication Funds
Cooperative Publications Program with National
Education Association and Other Organizations
Excess of income over expenses, September 30,
1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . .

Balance September 30, 1935

Handbook of Adult Education-1936
Excess of income over expenses, September 30,
1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . . .

Balance September 30, 1935

International Review of Adult Education
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . .
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935


Journal of Adult Education
Balance September 30, 1934
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, per Ex-
hibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . .

Publications Fund for Federal Adult Education
Program
Balance September 30, 1934 . .
Add-Excess of income over expenses September
30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . .


Balance September 30, 1935

Research Report
Balance September 30, 1934
No changes . . . .

Balance September 30, 1935

Revolving Fund for Publications
Balance September 30, 1934
Add-Excess of income over expenses,
30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . .


September


333-33


114.93


218.40


2,282.43

1,715.95

S . 3,998.38


1,045.28


1,045.28


4,987.67

366.48


Balance September 30, 1935


400.00


400.00


2,890.04


2,890.04


6,942.40

1,041.70


5,900.70


5,354.I5







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Simplification of Materials Project
Excess of income over expenses, September 30,
1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .. .445.16

Balance September 30, 1935 . . . . . 445.16

Total Publication Funds September 3o, 1935,
per Exhibit "A" . . . . . $20,25z2.

Special Project, Study and Conference Funds
Adjustment Service
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . 10,337.25
Add-Refunds applicable to prior period . 1,898.84

$12,236.09
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . 9,450.05

Balance September 30, 1935 . . . . . 2,786.04

Adult Reading Study-Conferences and Experiments
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . 831.26
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . 203.42

Balance September 30, 1935 . . . . . 627.84

Alumni Education Study
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . 1,981.96
Deduct-Excess of expenses over in-
come, September 30, 1935, per Exhibit
"C" . . $1,959.23
Transferred to Maintenance Fund 22.73
1,981.96
Balance September 30, 1935 ......

Advisory Service Federal Adult Education Program
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . 667.62
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . 420.95

Balance September 30, 1935 . . . . . 246.67

Canadian Adult Education Organization
Balance September 30, 1934 . . . 8,305.05
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . 4,757.38


Balance September 30, 1935


3,547.67








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Community Organization Service
Balance September 30, 1934
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . . .
Cooperation, Federal Office of Education
Excess of income over expenses, September 30,
1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . . .
International Psychological Study of Adult Educa-
tion
Balance September 30, 1934 .
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . . .
Lecture Field Study
Balance September 30, 1934
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income,
September 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . $Ioo.o5
Transferred to Maintenance Fund .303.73

Balance September 30, 1935


National Occupational Conference
Balance September 30, 1934
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . . . .
Negro Adult Education Experiments
Balance September 30, 1934
Add-Excess of income over expenses, September
30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . .


Deduct-Transferred to Maintenance Fund

Balance September 30, 1935


90.11


1,414.97


621.43


621.43


569.38


569.38




403.78



403.78


51,166.69

1,769.43


49,397.26


309.25

2,461.14


2,770.39
332.89


2,437-50


Reports on Investigations and Experiments
Balance September 30, 1934 . 1,284.04

Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, Septem-
ber 30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . . . 364.30

Balance September 30, 1935 . . .


919.74








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Science Study
Balance September 30, 1934 . .
Add-Excess of income over expenses, September
30, 1935, per Exhibit "C" . .

Balance September 30, 1935 . .
Study of Community Music
Excess of income over expenses, September 30,
1935, per Exhibit "C" . . .

Balance September 30, 1935


Total Special Project, Study and Conference Funds,
September 30, 935, per Exhibit "A" . .



EXHIBIT B
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1935


Income
Maintenance Fund
Appropriations received from Carnegie
Corporation . .
Membership dues
Individual . . .
Organizational . . .


Journal of Adult Education
Subscriptions and sales of single
Advertising sales . .


copies 1,093.64
105.00


Publication Funds
Cooperative Publications Program with National
Education Association and Other Organizations
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Handbook of Adult Education-1936
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Journal of Adult Education
Appropriation from Carnegie Corpo-
ration . . 15,000.00
Allocation from Department of Adult
Education of the National Education
Association . . ,2oo.oo

Publications Fund for Federal Adult Education
Program
Appropriation from General Education Board


1,076.40

8,6 1.26


9,687.66


2,444.26


2,444.26


$74,131.04


$35,000.00


$2,514-55
1,034.93


3,549-48



1,198.64


$ 39,748.12


1,000.00

4,000.00






16,200.00


3,750.00








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Revolving Fund for Publications
Sales of 1934 Handbook of Adult
Education . . . . 1068.66
Sales of miscellaneous publications 1,109.20
Royalties on publications . . 1,084.3

Simplification of Materials Project
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation

Special Project, Study and Conference Funds
Adjustment Service
Sales of publications . . .
Community Organization Service
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Conference on Civic Forums
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Cooperation, Federal Office of Education
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
National Occupational Conference
Appropriation from Carnegie Corpo-
ration . 69,950.00
Subscriptions and sales of reprints .. 6,422.51


Negro Adult Education Experiments
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Science Study
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Study of Civilian Conservation Corps Camps
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation
Study of Community Music
Appropriation from Carnegie Corporation


114,809.84


Total Income


Expenses
Maintenance Fund
Annuity payments .
Accountants' fees .
Incidentals . .
Insurance .
Office library . . .
Office furniture and equipment
Office supplies, stationery and mimeo-
graphing . .
Postage and general shipping charges.
Printing, publications, publicity
Rent .
Repairs and maintenance .
Salaries . . .


1,342.40
150.00
607.71
35.98
141.78
1,346.92

804.94
569.31
1,368.22
3,450.08
144.50
26,192.83


3,262.17

1,000.00


29,212.17


337.33

4,000.00

500.00

3,000.00




76,372.51

12,000.00

10,000.00

2,000.00


6,6oo.oo


. $183,770.13









ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Telephone and telegraph .
Travel . .


Publication Funds


Cooperative Publications Program
with National Education Associa-
tion and Other Organizations
Handbook of Adult Education-1936
International Review of Adult Edu-
cation . .
Journal of Adult Education
Publications Fund for Federal Adult
Education Program . . .
Revolving Fund for Publications .
Simplification of Materials Project


822.23
1,684.26


38,661.16


6oo.oo
1,109.96

I,041.70
16,314.93


2,034.05
2,895.69
554.84


24,551.17


Special Project, Study and Conference Funds


Adjustment Service . .
Adult Reading Study- Conferences
and Experiments . .
Alumni Education Study .
Advisory Service, Federal Adult Edu-
cation Program . .
Canadian Adult Education Organiza-
tion . .
Conference on Civic Forums
Community Organization Service.
Cooperation, Federal Office of Edu-
cation . .
International Psychological Study of
Adult Education . .
Lecture Field Study . . .
National Occupational Conference
Negro Adult Education Experiments
Reports on Investigations and Experi-
ments . .
Science Study . .
Study of Civilian Conservation Corps
Camps . .
Study of Community Music .


Total Expenses .


Excess of Income over Expenses


120,356.05

. 183,568.38

. 201.75


9,787.38

203.42
1,959.23

420.95

4,757.38
500.00
4,090.11

2,378.57

569.38
1oo.05
78,141.94
9,538.86

364.30
1,388.74


2,000.00
4,155.74







00 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

EXHIBIT C
SUMMARY OF TOTAL INCOME AND TOTAL EXPENSES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1935

Maintenance Fund


Income
Expenses


S$ 39,748.12
38,661.16


Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A,"
Schedule "I". . . . . .

Publication Funds
Cooperative Publications Program with National
Education Association and Other Organizations
Income . . ,000.00
Expenses . . . 600.00

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Handbook of Adult Education-1936
Income . . . .... 4,000.00
Expenses . . . . ,109.96

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .

International Review of Adult Education
Incom e . . . . .. .......
Expenses . . . 1,041.70

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .


Journal of Adult Education
Income . .
Expenses .


16,20o.00
16,314.93


Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .

Publications Fund for Federal Adult Education Program


Income .
Expenses


3,750.00
2,034.05


Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .


Revolving Fund for Publications
Income . . .
Expenses . .


3,262.17
2,895.69


Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .


$ 1,086.96


400.00


2,890.04


1,041.70*


114.93*


1,7'1595


366.48








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


Simplification of Materials Project
Income . . . . 1,000.00
Expenses . . . 554-84

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Special Project, Study and Conference Funds
Adjustment Service


Excess of income over expenses
Community Organization Service


Income . . . 4,000.00
Expenses . ........... 4,090.11

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Cooperation, Federal Office of Education
Income . . . 3,000.00
Expenses . . . 2,378.57

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .


445.16






9,450.05*





203.42*





1,959.23*





420.95*





4,757.38*


90.11*


621.43


Income . . 337-33
Expenses . . .9,787.38

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Adult Reading Study-Conferences and Experiments
Income . . .. .....
Expenses . . . 203.42

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Alumni Education Study
Income. . . ... ......
Expenses . . . 1,95923

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Advisory Service, Federal Adult Education Program
Income . . . . . ......
Expenses . . . 420.95

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"
Canadian Adult Education Organization
Income . . . . ....
Expenses . . . . 4,757.38

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "1"
Conference on Civic Forums
Income. ........ .. . . 500.00
Expenses . . . 500.00







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


International Psychological Study of Adult Education
Incom e . . . ......
Expenses. . . ..... 569.38
Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Lecture Field Study
Incom e . . . ......
Expenses . . . .100.05
Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" .


National Occupational Conference
Income . .
Expenses . .


76,372.51
78,141.94


Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Negro Adult Education Experiments
Income. ............ 12,000.00
Expenses . . 9,538.86

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Reports on Investigations and Experiments
Incom e . . . . .......
Expenses . . . 364.30

Excess of expenses over income, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Science Study
Income.. . . 1o,ooo.oo
Expenses . . . 1,388.74

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I"

Study of Civilian Conservation Corps Camps


Income .
Expenses


2,000.00
2,000.00


Excess of income over expenses


Study of Community Music
Income . . . 6,600.00
Expenses . . 4,155-74

Excess of income over expenses, per Exhibit "A," Schedule "I" 2,444.26

Total Excess of Income over Expenses . . . $ 201.75


* The excess of expenses over income in these funds is offset by unexpended prior
period balances of the respective funds.


569.38*




100.05*


1,769.43*





2,461.14





364.30*





8,6 1.26







ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


EXHIBIT D

APPROPRIATIONS RECEIVED FOR ACCOUNT OF OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1935

Balance September 30, 1934, Payable to:


Peoples Institute, United Neighborhood Guild


Receipts
Appropriations received from Carnegie Corporation,
for account of:
California Association for Adult Education . .$ 7,500.00
Civic Federation of Dallas . . . 2,000.00
Adult Education Council of Denver . . 5,000.00
Des Moines Adult Education Program . 30,000.00
Institute of Rural Economics, Rutgers University 5,000.00
Leonia Community Council . . . 4,000.00
National Theatre Conference . . . 5,000.00
New York Adult Education Council . . 3,000.00
Springfield, Massachusetts, Civic Forums . 4,500.00
Teachers College, Columbia University . 15,000.00

Total Receipts . . .


Disbursements


$ 2,625.00


81,000.00

83,625.00


Payments to:
California Association for Adult Education.
Civic Federation of Dallas . . . .
Adult Education Council of Denver . .
Des Moines Adult Education Program .
Institute of Rural Economics, Rutgers University
Leonia Community Council . . .
National Theatre Conference . . .
New York Adult Education Council . .
Peoples Institute, United Neighborhood Guild .
Springfield, Massachusetts, Civic Forums
Teachers College, Columbia University .


7,500.00
2,000.00
3,750.00
30,000.00
5,000.00
4,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
2,625.00
4,500.00
15,000.00


Total Disbursements .

Balance September 30, 1935, Payable to:
Adult Education Council of Denver.


82,375.00


$ 1,250.00








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


II

EXHIBIT A
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION, MARCH 31, 1936


Assets
Cash
Capital Account
Managing Account


Total Assets


S$111,522.85
41,615.21

. . $153,138.06


Liabilities
Prepaid membership dues . . . . .
Prepaid subscriptions to Journal of Adult Education.
Balance payable on appropriations received for ac-
count of other organizations, per Exhibit "D" .

Total Liabilities . . . .

Net Asset Value......


214.90
167.86


10,750.00

. . 1,132.76

....$142,005.30


The net asset value comprises the following funds:
Maintenance Fund, per Schedule "I" . . . . .$ 11,173.48
Publication Funds, per Schedule "I" ........ 27,089.69
Special Project, Study and Conference Funds, per Schedule "I" 103,742.13


Total Funds.


.$142,005.30


EXHIBIT A-SCHEDULE I
STATEMENT SHOWING CHANGES IN FUNDS
FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED AIARCH 31, 1936

Maintenance Fund


Balance, September 30, 1935
Add-Excess of income over expenses, March 31,
- r T L


$ 11,099.09


1930, per tLxn t . . 74.39

Balance, Maintenance Fund, March 31, 1936, per Exhibit "A"


Publication Funds
Adjustment Service
Balance, September 30, 1935 . . 2,786.04
Deduct-Excess of expenses over income, March
3 1936, per Exhibit "C" . . . 1,612.24

Balance, March 31, 1936 . . . . .


$ II,173.48


1,173.80




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