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 Front Cover
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Appendix
 Back Cover














Title: Cadet handbook
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094185/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cadet handbook
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Army Reserve Officer Training Corps, University of Florida
Publisher: Army Reserve Officer Training Corps, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 2001
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Bibliographic ID: UF00094185
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Foreword
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
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    Appendix
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
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CADET HANDBOOK


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FOREWORD


Welcome to the Fightin' Gator Battalion, The University of Florida's Army
Reserve Officer Training Corps (AROTC). Army ROTC is a program through
which qualified individuals may earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant (2LT)
in the United States Army, US Army Reserve or National Guard while attending
college as a full time student. Army ROTC students earn degrees in the academic
fields of their choice and supplement their curriculum with Military Science
courses. Army ROTC enhances a student's education by providing unique
leadership and management experience as well as adventure found in few
traditional college courses. It develops physical stamina, self-discipline and poise
- all qualities that are basic to success in any career, civilian or military.

This handbook is designed to provide you with general information
concerning AROTC and for use as a reference on the specifics of the University
of Florida's Army Reserve Officer Training Corps.





(Revised 25 June 2001)


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Unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine gender is used, both men and
women are included.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


SECTION I.








SECTION II.




SECTION III.








SECTION IV.




SECTION V.











SECTION VI.








SECTION VII.

SECTION VIII.


INTRODUCTION
1. Philosophy
2. Purpose
3. History
4. AROTC and the University of Florida
5. Van Fleet Hall
6. Fightin' Gator Battalion Call Coin

ORGANIZATION
1. Faculty and Staff (Cadre)
2. Cadets
3. Special Units/Activities

PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION
1. General
2. Basic Course
3. Advanced Course
4. Commissioning
5. Military Obligation
6. Special Schools/Training

SCHOLARSHIPS
1. Scholarship Cadets
2. Application for Scholarships
3. Simultaneous Membership Program

MILITARY COURTESY
1. General
2. History of Military Salute.
3. Rendering the Hand Salute
4. Use of"SIR" and "MA' AM"
5. The Senior's Place of Honor
6. Attention
7. Courtesy to the Flag and National Anthem
8. Display of the United States Flags
9. Reporting

UNIFORMS
1. General
2. Special Unit Uniforms
3. Utility Uniform
4. Male Class A (Green) Uniform
5. Female Class A (Green) Uniform
6. Terminology/Wearing Instructions

CADET AWARDS

ADMINISTRATION


PAGE
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VIII-1









TABLE OF APPENDICES


APPENDIX A.

APPENDIX B.

APPENDIX C.

APPENDIX D.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

APPENDIX G.

APPENDIX H.

APPENDIX I.

APPENDIX J.


CADET ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

OFFICER RANK INSIGNIA

ENLISTED RANK INSIGNIA

UF PROFESSORS OF MILITARY SCIENCE (1905-current)

CHAIN OF COMMAND

GLOSSARY OF ARMY TERMS

UF CADET CORPS COMMANDERS

US ARMY BRANCHES

AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD

CADET EVALUATION SYSTEM





SECTION I


INTRODUCTION









SECTION I


INTRODUCTION

1. PHILOSOPHY

The underlying philosophy of the Army ROTC program dates back to the colonial
times when the colonial frontiersman accepted responsibility to take up arms for his own
and his neighbors' common defense. Since the emergence of our nation we have been
dedicated to the proposition that national defense is a responsibility of citizenship and
that those men and women to whom our society has offered a higher education incur the
responsibility of leadership. It is through the Army ROTC program that this philosophy is
formalized and implemented.

2. PURPOSE

AROTC is a component part of this nation's defense system. The primary mission of
AROTC is to commission the future officer leadership for the United States Army.
Every war has shown the necessity for having a large number of trained officers available
at the outbreak to train newly activated units and to bring existing units up to strength.
This is how AROTC fits into the defense picture, by providing an annual supply of
officers for the active forces and creating a pool of trained officers for the reserves.
AROTC currently provides approximately 70% of all officers on active duty, the
remainder comes from the United States Military Academy (West Point), Officer
Candidate School (OCS) or direct commissioning.

3. HISTORY

The concept of military training in degree-granting institutions of higher learning has
its origin in 1819 when Captain Alden Partridge, a West Point graduate founded the
American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy (now Norwich University). Today
Captain Partridge is regarded as the "Father of AROTC".

Virginia Military Institute in 1839 and the Citadel in 1842 were the next degree-
granting institutions established under this principle of educating citizens in the principles
and fundamentals of war in conjunction with their general civilian education.

President Lincoln recognized the need for increased educational facilities including
military training. Under his leadership in 1862, Congress passed the Morrill Act, which
granted each state 30,000 acres of land for each Senator and Representative in Congress.
The land could be used to maintain colleges that would offer agricultural, mechanical and
military training. The act became known as the Land-Grant Act and thus the term land-
grant college.

The first actual provisions for the formal granting of reserve commissions came in
1908 when Congress authorized the appointment of doctors as reserve officers in the
Medical Corps. Their commissions made them liable for service at the call of the
President.









The Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (AROTC) was formally established by
the National Defense Act of 1916. Until 1916 no provision had been made for a Reserve
Corps for emergency duty. A majority of the trained personnel available after each of our
wars was soon lost in the general population following demobilization, and there was no
way to obtain help from those skilled veterans in any succeeding war unless they
specifically volunteered their services. The National Defense Act provided for an
organized Reserve Corps and AROTC as we know it today began with the passage of this
act. At the end of school year 1919-20, 135 graduates received commissions in the
Organized Reserve Corps (now the US Army Reserve). In school year 1941-42 nearly
10,000 were commissioned through AROTC and called to active duty.

Since 1916 two more acts have been passed that impact AROTC. In 1955 the
Reserve Forces Act established Reserve Commissions and obligatory service
requirements for upper level cadets. The 1964 ROTC Vitalization Act established
AROTC scholarships, created the 2-year program and increased the amount of money
that AROTC students received.

4. AROTC AND THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The background of military training at the University of Florida can be traced to two
of the colleges from which the University evolved; the East Florida Seminary which was
located at Gainesville, Florida and the Florida Agriculture College which was located at
Lake City, Florida.

In 1881, the East Florida Seminary was reorganized as a military school for its male
students. The First Commandant was Lieutenant Arthur L. Wagner, later on the staff of
General Miles, and Chief of the Bureau of Military Information with the Army in Cuba.
The military program was divided into two phases; practical instruction involving close
order drill, bayonet exercises, bar bell calisthenics (the rifle being used as a bar bell) and
signal instructions. With a few exceptions, Army and Navy Officers who were appointed
commandant of cadets came and went in succession. Many were retired and taught at the
Seminary to supplement meager pensions. Lieutenant Arthur L. Wagner, the first
commandant, taught mathematics; other military personnel taught subjects in which they
had some knowledge or training.

The military program was a fundamental part of the educational curriculum of the
Florida Agriculture College. Military drill was compulsory for all able-bodied male
students, and it was mandatory to wear a prescribed uniform. The Board of Trustees
ordered the regulations of the United States Military Academy to serve as a basis for
discipline at the College. Although the college at Lake City opened in October 1884, no
officer was assigned by the War Department until October 1889, when Second
Lieutenant Charles G. Morton, a West Point Graduate of 1883, was assigned from the
Sixth Infantry.

Attendance at drill was enforced after 1893, by making proficiency in military
science a requisite for advancement and a condition for graduation. Also a spirit of
competition was stimulated among the cadets, and prizes were offered to outstanding









students and military companies. Upon the recommendation of Lieutenant S. A. Smoke,
Cadet Commandant in 1894, the college began the practice of sending the cadets to a
one-week camp away from the campus. The site was usually somewhere on the banks of
the Suwanee River, not too far from Lake City; this summer camp rapidly became one of
the most popular features of the military program.

In 1903, the Florida Agriculture College was redesignated as the University of the
State of Florida, and in 1905, the Florida Legislature passed the Buckman Act, which
abolished all state institutions and established the University of Florida at Gainesville. In
1904, Captain James D. Taylor, Jr. of the 18th U.S. Infantry had become Commandant of
Cadets; when the University of Florida was established at Gainesville in 1905, he became
the first Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

Military instruction at the University of Florida, in its early years, consisted of only
two semesters. Theoretical and practical instruction in the school of the soldier, and of
the company in close and extended order; company and battalion inspection; dress
parades, reviews; guard mounting and the posting of sentinels; escort of the colors were
taught during the first semester. The second semester consisted of theoretical and
practical instruction in the school of the battalion, artillery drill, and battalion ceremonies.
In 1909, under Major (later Colonel) Edgar Smith Walker, military instruction became a
two year requirement.

It was not until the passage of the National Defense Act of 3 June 1916 that an
effective Reserve Officers' Corps program was instituted at the University of Florida.
This act, amended on 4 June 1920, ordered graduates of the Advanced AROTC course to
active duty for six months with the Regular Army, at the end of which they reverted to
their Reserve Officer status.

In 1919, under the direction of Major Bloxham Ward, Infantry, an
Infantry AROTC unit was established at the University. This infantry unit
continued under the direction of Major (later General) James A. Van Fleet from
1922 to 1924. Under the supervision of Major Arthur C. Tipton, in 1928, an
Artillery unit was added. Major James A. Van Fleet returned as Professor of
Military Science and Tactics from 1930 to 1933, and was succeeded by Colonel
Gilbert M. Allen, Infantry, who served from 1934 to 1936.

Colonel William S. Browning became the first Artillery Officer to serve as Professor
of Military Science and Tactics at the University of Florida from 1937 to 1938. He was
followed by Colonel S. R. Hopkins, also Field Artillery, who was assigned from 1939 to
1943.

World War II interrupted AROTC activities at the University, but the basic course
continued to be taught during the war years. Well over 10,000 former University of
Florida students served in the Armed Forces during World War II. Of this number, 76%
were officers, 12% were noncommissioned officers, and 12% were privates and seamen.
A total of 250 individual alumni are known to have received medals ranging from the
Purple Heart to the Distinguished Service Cross. Eleven University of Florida men









received the Distinguished Service Cross, one of whom, Colonel Paul D. Tibbets, piloted
the aircraft from which the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan.

In 1946, under the supervision of Colonel E. M. Edmonson, Field
Artillery, both the Infantry and Artillery ROTC units were reactivated, and an
Air Corps unit was inaugurated. In 1948, a Transportation Corps unit was
added to the Infantry, Artillery, and Air Corps ROTC's with Colonel George S.
Price as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Subsequent to the Air
Corps becoming a separate branch of service, the Air Force ROTC at the
University of Florida became separate and independent in 1949.

In 1952, a General Military Science Army curriculum was adopted, replacing the
Infantry, Artillery, and Transportation Corps units. This GMS curriculum has been
adopted by more than half of the colleges and universities offering Senior Division
ROTC. The GMS curriculum includes subjects common to all branches of the Army, and
concentrates on developing basic military knowledge, command, and leadership qualities
necessary for all officers. Graduates of the University of Florida's AROTC unit may be
commissioned in any branch of the Army, depending on the graduate's training,
background, desires, and the needs of the service.

In 1972 the Navy ROTC program began, making the University of Florida one of the
few schools in the country to offer ROTC for all services.

During the mid-seventies all Army ROTC detachments began competing at Advanced
Camp for an award called the Warrior of the Pacific. This award is given to the #1
ROTC detachment in the country based on Advanced Camp performance. UF Army
ROTC won this award in 1978, tied for 1st with the University of South Florida in 1979
and in 1981 once again finished #1 in the Nation.

The roll calls of the United States Army list thousands of University of Florida
graduates who have well served to defend our country. Those honored rolls also record
that many of these University of Florida alumni, in the defense of our country, gave their
lives on the battlefields of World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf War. The
following are the casualty statistics for University of Florida alumni during our last four
wars.



World War II Korean War
Killed in Action 412 Killed in Action 15
Missing in Action 159 Missing in Action 2
1LT Mark Barrett: Killed in the
line of duty on the DMZ, 1976.

Vietnam War Gulf War
Killed in Action 3 Killed in Action 0
Missing in Action 0 Missing in Action 0


T-4










5. GENERAL JAMES A. VAN FLEET HALL


All University of Florida ROTC units are housed in Van Fleet Hall which was
constructed in 1952 and named for the University's most famous former Army Professor
of Military Science, General James Alward Van Fleet.

General Van Fleet is a WW II hero and commander of the United Nations Forces
during the Korean War. From 1921-24 and 1929-33 he served as one of the University's
first ROTC commanders and guided the program in its formative years. During his years
on campus he doubled as a coach of the Gator football team; he was head coach in 1923-
1924.

As a 52-year-old Colonel in World War II, Van Fleet, who graduated from West
Point in 1915 with classmates Dwight D. Eisenhower and Omar Bradley, led the
8th Infantry Regiment ashore as the assault force on Utah Beach during the
Normandy invasion on D-Day. Within three months he was a Major General in
command of a division, and in another three months he was Corps Commander.

General Dwight Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander, has said General Van
Fleet had the "best combat record of any regimental, divisional, or Corps Commander we
produced."

After the D-Day invasion General Omar Bradley said Colonel Van Fleet's leadership
was "best described by the rate at which he was earning Distinguished Service Crosses --
about three per day."

General Van Fleet's combat awards include:

Combat Infantryman's Badge
3 Distinguished Service Crosses
4 Distinguished Service Medals
3 Silver Stars
4 Bronze Stars (Valor)
2 Air Medals
3 Purple Hearts

At the age of 96, General Van Fleet was the special guest of honor on 7 April 1987 at
the Annual UF In-Service Pass-in-Review. He said, "In my lifetime my credo has been
'The Will To Win.' I have always been surrounded by American youth. I have coached
them in football, I have trained them as soldiers, and I have led them in battle many times
in many parts of the world. I know their worth and I honor it. GOD BLESS OUR
VETERANS."









6. CALL COIN


The Fightin' Gator Battalion has adopted an old Army tradition. This tradition,
known as the Call Coin, was started by the Army during the Second World War. This is
a probable history. During the Second World War a soldier, in an Airborne or Glider
Infantry unit, would carry a silver dollar at all times. If a Paratrooper was in a bar with
other soldiers and wanted to know who else was Airborne qualified, he would slap his
coin on the table. That was the signal for all the other Airborne qualified soldiers to do
the same. Of course, non-Airborne soldiers did not know what was going on at first, but
learned quickly. They began carrying coins also. These non-qualified coin carriers
became known as "want-a-bees." They wanted to become Airborne qualified but couldn't
achieve that goal. In order to distinguish non-Airborne soldiers from Paratroopers, the
Call Coin was created. At first it was a simple coin, the same size as a silver dollar with
the unit's number and symbol engraved on it. As time passed, these coins became more
detailed. At present, you can look at a unit's Call Coin and see its history engraved on it.
Most importantly, the Call Coin allows a soldier to show that he is a member of a unit
with a proud history. It creates a feeling of team-work, prestige, honor, and high esprit-
de-corps.

As a member of the Fightin' Gator Battalion, you too can become a member of this
proud tradition demonstrating, "Leadership Excellence."


COIN FRONTT COIN BACI


I-6





SECTION II


^^kr-ma


ORGANIZATION









SECTION II


ORGANIZATION

1. FACULTY AND STAFF (CADRE)

The instructors in the Army ROTC department are all active duty military. The
department head has the title of Professor of Military Science (PMS). The PMS is the
senior representative of the Department of the Army here at the university. Other officers
assigned here as instructors are titled Assistant Professor of Military Science (APMS).
They serve primarily as teachers and are available to counsel students with any type of
problem. Senior Non-commissioned Officers (NCO's) who are assigned here are called
Military Instructors. These NCO's are involved in the teaching of military skills.
Additional administrative and supply personnel are assigned to the detachment.
Collectively the active military on campus is referred to as the cadre.

2. CADETS

All students taking Army ROTC are grouped into Military Science (MS) levels based
on their academic alignment and military training experience.
MS I Normally an Academic Freshman
MS II Normally an Academic Sophomore
MS III Normally an Academic Junior / First year Graduate Student
MS IV Normally an Academic Senior / Second year Graduate Student

Each student is classified as a cadet and collectively referred to as the Fightin' Gator
Battalion.

The Fightin' Gator Battalion is organized and staffed basically the same as an active
duty Army unit. The type of organization varies with the existing size of the Fightin'
Gator Battalion. In the 1950's the Bn consisted of almost 1000 cadets and was organized
as a Regiment. Then in the 1960's, it was reorganized as a Brigade. Today, the unit is
organized as a Battalion. (See organizational chart Appendix A). Below is a discussion
of the command and staff positions that are filled by cadets.

a. Battalion Level:

(1) Battalion Commander: The Battalion Commander is the senior Cadet Officer
for all Battalion activities. The Battalion Commander has the responsibility to effectively
employ all battalion resources to ensure the accomplishment of Battalion objectives. The
Battalion Commander receives orders from and reports to the PMS. The formulation of
new policies and programs, or changes to existing policies and programs must have prior
approval from the PMS or his authorized representatives. The Battalion Commander
ensures the accomplishment of Battalion missions by delegating and supervising
activities of the Cadet Company Commanders and the Cadet Staff officers.

(2) Battalion Executive Officer: The Battalion Executive Officer is the ranking staff
officer and is directly responsible to the Battalion Commander for coordination and









supervision of staff activities. The Battalion Executive Officer:


Supervises staff activities as necessary.
Coordinates staff work efforts.
Assigns those staff duties which are not specifically identified in this document.
Provides the Commander with information pertaining to staff activities.
Ensures timely command staff coordination on all cadet activities which in any way
influence or involve the University of Florida cadet operations or activities.
Assumes the duties of the Battalion Command when the Commander is not present.
Supervises and coordinates detailed administrative and logistical staff planning for
FTX's.
Assists the Battalion Commander with other activities as required.

(3) Battalion Adjutant (S-1): The Battalion Adjutant is the primary staff officer
responsible for all matters pertaining to personnel and administration. The Battalion
Adjutant is under the Cadre Director of Support for guidance and is responsible for the
following:

Provides the Commander with information and recommendations pertaining to personnel
and administrative matters.
Maintains accurate and current battalion administrative records.
Periodically publishes an information bulletin of cadet activities.
Organizes and coordinate the use of the cadet battalion bulletin board.
Organizes, monitors and controls a sponsor program for newly assigned cadets.
Acts as the staff coordinator for cadet awards.
Coordinates Hometown News Release Program.
Administers and coordinates any other battalion administrative program as required by
the Battalion higher chain of command.
Maintains an accurate, current roster of all cadets participating in Leadership laboratory
and Physical Training.
Maintains accurate cadet attendance records for Leadership Labs and PT and reports
cadet attendance to the appropriate instructor.
Reports cadet attendance to the appropriate instructor for lab and PT.
Arranges for the presentation of battalion incentive awards for units and individuals.
Makes general information announcements to the cadet corps.
Maintains accurate cadet attendance records at FTX's
Establishes first-aid station and controls medical personnel.
Arranges for the presentation of FTX incentive awards for units and individuals.
Maintains an Administrative Battalion Headquarters on FTX's.
Establishes a duty roster for required non-training FTX details, i.e. KP, guard, CQ.

(4) Battalion S-2: The Battalion S-2 is the primary staff officer responsible for all
matters pertaining to publicity and public relations and is responsible to the Recruiting
Operations Officer for guidance and direction. The S-2 position is normally only filled
during the fall semester. The Battalion S-2:


11-2









Provides the commander with information and recommendations relative to
publicity and public relations.
Ensures that cadet activities receive appropriate media coverage.
Supervises and controls the cadet photography section.
Maintains publicity files and records.
Establishes public relations policies and procedures (SOP).
Submits quarterly articles to 1ROTC Region "Cadet" newspaper.
Prepares news releases, photographs or articles on all cadet activities for external
media sources.
Ensures comprehensive internal news coverage for all Leadership Laboratories,
Field Training Exercises, Special Unit Activities, Tri-Service Activities,
and other cadet activities warranting news coverage.
Provides a briefing for dignitaries visiting cadet training.
Ensures timely announcements of pending cadet activities to the news media.
Maintains annual detachment scrapbook/history.
Coordinates with the University Yearbook Staff for input of annual ROTC
material into the school's yearbook.

(5) Battalion S-3: The Battalion S-3 is the primary staff officer responsible for all
matters pertaining to cadet operations and training activities. The Battalion S-3 is under
the Cadre Director of Training for guidance and is responsible for the following:

Establishes training objectives for each MS year group as required by the PMS,
Director of Training or Cadet Battalion Commander.
Develops a Leadership Lab, Physical Training, and FTX Training program and
schedule to accomplish training objectives.
Plans and schedules training activities for Leadership Labs and FTX's.
Ensures training quality control and compliance with training objectives.
Develops cadet and unit training incentive awards criteria with the S-1.
Maintains cadet training publication library.
Establishes tactical or training operations center on all Field Training Exercises.
Ensures that cadet instructors prepare and rehearse lesson plans that are
stimulating, challenging, and hands-on in nature.

(6) Battalion S-4: The Battalion S-4 is the primary staff officer responsible for all
matters pertaining to cadet supply and logistics activities and is provided guidance by the
Cadre Director of Support. The Battalion S-4:

Provides the commander with information and recommendations pertaining to
supply matters.
Maintains accurate cadet supply and equipment records.
Follows and refines the Battalion SOP for the control and accountability of
supplies and equipment.
Maintains accountability, control and security of cadet supplies and equipment.
Requisitions and procures supplies and equipment as required by cadet instructors
and Company chains of command.
Provides for issue of supplies and equipment for all cadet activities.










(7) Battalion S-5: The Battalion S-5 is a member of the cadet
Battalion staff who works closely with the Cadre Recruiting
Operations Officer to accomplish recruiting objectives. The Battalion S-5:

Serves as primary cadet recruiting coordinator.
Provides input to the Battalion Marketing Action Plan (MAP).
Makes recommendations to the Recruiting Operations Officer on upcoming
campus events and recruiting activities.
Forms the communications link between the Recruiting Operations Officer and
the cadet Battalion for recruiting activities.
Supervises cadet-recruiting activities.
Tracks cadet recruiting activity success.

(8) Battalion Sergeant Major: The Battalion Sergeant Major is a LDP evaluated
position filled on a rotating basis by MS III cadets. The Battalion Sergeant Major is
responsible for all Battalion functions and assists the Battalion Commander in the
administration processes of the Battalion.


b. Company Level:

(1) Company Commander: Supervises, organizes and controls the activities of the
cadets assigned to the company. Plans and coordinates all training for the company and
is responsible for the welfare and morale of all assigned cadets.
(2) Platoon Leader: Supervises, organizes, coordinates, and controls the activities
of the cadets assigned to the platoon. Responsible for the welfare, training and morale of
all assigned cadets.
(3) Platoon Sergeant: Assists the Platoon Leader in the performance of platoon
functions. Assumes the Platoon Leader's responsibilities and duties in his/her absence.
(4) Squad Leader: Responsible for coordination and organization of all squad level
activities and accountability of all members of their assigned squad at all ROTC events.
(5) Fire Team Leader: Responsible for activities of assigned team members.

3. SPECIAL UNITS/ACTIVITIES:

a. Gator Guard: The Guard was organized in 1953 and is the oldest established
special unit within the detachment. It is patterned after the Army's Old Guard, which
represents the Army in Official State Ceremonies.
The mission of the Gator Guard is two-fold. From a military standpoint, its mission
is to build better leaders and, therefore, better officers. The Guard accomplishes this by
exposing the cadet to situations not afforded to the regular AROTC cadet, in which
he/she has a chance to exercise initiative, imagination and leadership. In addition, the
Guard stresses discipline, military precision and bearing, and responsibility. By
developing and emphasizing these traits, the Gator Guard accomplishes its first objective.
The second part of the Guard's mission is that, as a student of the University of Florida,
each Guardsman represents the University in all his official duties, such as parades,
competitions, or an honor guard at social functions. Membership in the Guard is open to









all interested students.
Activities of the guard cover a broad spectrum. The Guard is a fraternal type
organization with a wide range of social activities, i.e. parties, intramural sports
participation, etc. The Guard also provides physical fitness and military skills training.
The Gator Guard is a service organization in that it performs color guard duties for the
ROTC department and for other activities both inside and outside the university. The
Guard's black powder cannon is fired at school events as requested. Primarily, however,
the Guard is a precision drill team that performs and competes utilizing close order and
exhibition type drill. The Gator Guard's trophies bear witness to their abilities in
competition.
The Guard marches in various parades to represent both AROTC and the University
of Florida. Two of its annual parades are the University of Florida Homecoming Parade
in Gainesville, and the Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans, LA

b. Gator Raiders: The Gator Raiders were formed in the early 1960s to provide
cadets with the opportunities for increased tactical and special operations type training.
The mission of the Raiders is to develop military skills, leadership, and
professionalism through a demanding and progressive training program.
Membership is open to all students but status as an active member is awarded only to
those who successfully complete one semester of Raider training. Raider training is
patterned after Army Ranger training and is divided into four phases. Each phase lasts
one semester and places emphasis on technical and tactical subjects. Successful
completion of all phases is followed by placement in leadership and training positions.
The Raider Company conducts training that enables cadets to become proficient in
Infantry tactics. Its goals consist of instilling confidence and strong leadership qualities
in each cadet and preparing cadets for the tactical portion of Advanced Camp. The
Raider Company accomplishes its goals by conducting tactical training, rappelling, and
MOUT training (Military Operations in Urban Terrain). Raiders will be tested on their
tactical proficiency and leadership ability on a FTX (Field Training Exercise) each
semester. Each Raider is expected to display enthusiasm during training and set the
example for other cadets in the Fightin' Gator Battalion to follow.

c. Ranger Challenge Team: The University of Florida Ranger Challenge Team was
activated in August 1986. Team members are highly motivated volunteers who are
interested in developing proficiency in basic infantry skills and testing that proficiency in
competition at Brigade and Region levels.
The mission of the Ranger Challenge Team is to promote the Ranger spirit, develop
physical endurance, increase proficiency for military skills and represents the university
in competitive events.
Membership is open to any student enrolled in Army ROTC. Teams are selected by
internal competition.
Major activities include orienteering, patrolling, and general military skills training.









d. Scabbard and Blade: Scabbard and Blade is a National Honorary Society that
was founded in 1904-05 by 5 cadets at the University of Wisconsin. Almost 200
universities now have Scabbard and Blade Chapters. Each school's chapter is called a
Company and is assigned to a Regiment. The University of Florida's Scabbard and Blade
Chapter is Company H, 2nd Regiment.
The purpose of Scabbard and Blade is to raise the standard of military education, to
encourage and foster the essential qualities of good and efficient officers and to promote
friendship and fellowship throughout all detachments.
Membership is by election only and is a lifetime membership. To be eligible one
must be in the Advanced ROTC program of either the Army, Navy or Air Force, have an
overall GPA of 2.5, an ROTC GPA of 3.0 and be nominated by the PMS.
Some of the major activities sponsored by Scabbard and Blade include the ROTC
blood drive, the tri-service field day, and the annual Military Ball.


II-6





SECTION III


INSTRUCTION









SECTION III


PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION

1. GENERAL

The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps Program is primarily a 4-year program
through which individuals can earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the US
Army, US Army Reserve, or Army National Guard. (There are provisions for completion
of the course of instruction in less than 4 years these provisions will be discussed later
in this section) AROTC is divided into two courses, the Basic and the Advanced Course.
The Basic Course consists of the first 2 years of instruction which normally corresponds
to the freshman and sophomore years. The last 2 years constitute the Advanced Course
and normally correspond to the junior and senior year of college or graduate work.

AROTC training for both the Basic and Advanced Course is divided into four areas:
classroom instruction, leadership labs, physical training (PT) and Field Training
Exercises (FTX).

Cadre members teach the classroom instruction, which centers primarily on concepts,
theories and ideas. The Basic Course classes (MS I and MS II) meet once a week for one
hour and the Advanced Course classes (MS III and MS IV) meet twice a week for one
hour.

Leadership lab is the primary hands-on portion of AROTC training. Lab is designed
to put into practice those subjects discussed in the classroom. This is also and ideal time
for confidence building events such as rappelling and the combat water survival test. MS
IV cadets organize lab with instruction given by knowledgeable cadets from all MS
levels. Lab is conducted for all cadets at the same time. Lab consists of a two-hour block
of instruction Thursday from 1355-1550.

The cadet chain of command plans, organizes and executes PT three times a week
(Mon, Wed, and Fri) from 0600 to 0700. All cadets are encouraged to attend all PT
sessions. (For mandatory attendance times see your class syllabus.)

Field Training Exercises are cadre led exercises performed one weekend a semester
usually at Camp Blanding Training Site (CBTS) near Starke, FL. They are designed to
introduce the cadets to a more realistic training environment and assess their abilities to
perform and lead in a field and garrison environment. Common activities include
rappelling, weapons firing, tactical exercises, land navigation and confidence course.


III- 1









2. BASIC COURSE

Basic course instruction consists of 2 credit hours of classroom instruction per
semester and includes a 2 hour leadership lab.

Any University of Florida student is eligible for the basic course classes. These
classes confer college credit just like any other class on campus and the student incurs no
military obligation by taking the class.

Provisions exist for students who are unable to attend the Basic Course to gain entry
into the Advanced Course by alternate means. Students desiring to attend a Basic Camp
for 5 weeks may do so in place of completing the 2 years on campus Basic Course. Basic
Camp is normally attended between the sophomore and junior year of college.
Completion of Basic Camp carries with it no military obligation but enables the student
to enter the Advanced Course if selected by the PMS. Cadets are also able to "compress"
their MS I and II years into a single year, by taking both classes and the lab at the same
time. This allows academic sophomores to begin the program without needing to go to
Basic Camp.

Upon the approval of the PMS, students who have completed High School Junior
Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) and/or military veterans may be granted
placement credit in lieu of attending the Basic Course upon the approval of the PMS.

3. ADVANCED COURSE

The Advanced Course is designed to provide instruction necessary for the level of
military knowledge required of a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

Acceptance into the Advanced Course is based on successful completion of the Basic
Course or fulfillment of one of the previously discussed alternative provisions, and
carries with it a military obligation. Additional factors considered are:

Medically qualified
College grade point average
AROTC grade point average
Full time student status
No major court convictions
Physical fitness
Must have 2 years of college left
Must be a US citizen
Be under 30 years of age at time of commissioning (may be waived)
Not currently a member of any armed service (USAR and FLNG
exempted)
No disqualifying disciplinary action at the University

All cadets under contract receive a monthly tax-free subsistence allowance (currently
based on MS level) during the academic year. While attending Advanced Camp, cadets
are paid at the rate of 1/2 the base pay of a Second Lieutenant.


III 2










4. COMMISSIONING

The normal commissioning for cadets within this battalion will be at the completion
of the spring term each year. Cadets successfully completing their ROTC and degree
requirements during this term will be commissioned. Often cadets complete ROTC
requirements before completing baccalaureate degree requirements and therefore are
commissioned at the end of fall or summer semesters. Before commissioning, MS-IV
Cadets will be required to purchase a complete Officers Class A uniform which will be
inspected by the Cadre before the commissioning ceremony

5. MILITARY SERVICE OBLIGATION (MSO)

Upon commissioning, cadets will incur an MSO of 8 years. This 8 year period can be
served in several different ways. The information below lists several options:

a. Reserve Forces Duty (RFD): Under this program a cadet is commissioned as a
Second Lieutenant and placed on active duty for a period of about 90-180 days to attend
their basic branch school. After completion of this course, the lieutenant returns home
and serves in a Reserve or National Guard status for 6 years and 2 years Individual Ready
Reserve (IRR).

b. Active Duty: Upon successful completion of Advanced ROTC, a cadet may
apply for Active duty. This may be granted by the Department of the Army, depending
upon the needs of the service. Upon completion of active duty, an officer may elect to be
released from the active Army and be placed in reserve status to complete the obligation
period, or may apply to remain on active duty, which must be approved by the
Department of the Army.

c. Educational delays: Cadets may be granted educational delays from active duty
to pursue advanced degrees. This does not increase their active duty obligation unless the
Unites States Army subsidizes the program.

6. SPECIAL SCHOOLS/TRAINING

In addition to the normal AROTC on campus program of instruction cadets may
attend several of the Army's specialty schools describe below.

a. Airborne Training: Each summer cadets are selected to attend the Army
Airborne School at Ft. Benning, GA. All cadets are eligible to compete for the slots.
Selection is based on a competitive order of merit that focuses on the cadet's physical
fitness, GPA, motivation, and ROTC performance. Upon successful completion of
Airborne School, the cadet is awarded the Army Parachutist Badge, which may be worn
both as a cadet and on active duty as an officer. This option is NOT available for MS I
cadets with no prior service military training.

b. Air Assault School: Selection is similar to that of Airborne School. The training
at Air Assault School centers on helicopter operations and rappelling. Graduates receive


III 3









the Air Assault Badge, which may be worn as a cadet and on active duty as an officer.
This option is NOT available for MS I cadets with no prior service military training.

c. Cadet Troop Leadership Training (CTLT): Selected MS III cadets are eligible
to train with actual Army units upon completion of Advanced Camp. Cadets are assigned
to positions held by Second Lieutenants and gain first hand experience in the duties of an
officer. CTLT usually lasts 3 to 4 weeks.


III 4





SECTION IV


'I


A\


SCHOLARSHIPS









SECTION IV

SCHOLARSHIPS

1. SCHOLARSHIP CADETS

Cadets who are presently on scholarship should familiarize themselves with the
following procedures and information.

a. University Fees:
(1) Tuition and fees are paid by indicating "Army ROTC Scholarship" on the
bottom of your fee card pays tuition and fees and having it validated in Rm 200 at the
HUB before the deadline. All late fees are payable by the individual.

(2) Payment for repeating a course is not authorized. If you must retake a course
please advise the ROTC office and we will make arrangements for you to reimburse
the cost.

b. Books, Supplies and Equipment:
(1) Each semester you will receive a lump sum, presently $300.00 a semester,
which you will use to buy anything you deem necessary. Any unspent money is
yours to keep and any expense in excess of the lump sum will be paid by you.

c. Academics:
(1) Scholarship cadets are required to take both the class and the ROTC lab.

(2) Scholarship cadets will participate in all physical training and field training
exercises.

(3) Scholarship cadets must take a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester.
Any variation must be approved by your AROTC instructor and/or the Professor of
Military Science (PMS).

(4) Professional development classes are required in communications, computer
literacy, and military history. Consult your instructor for specific classes that fulfill
these requirements.

(5) To avoid scholarship probation or the loss of scholarship status you must
maintain a GPA over 2.0, receive no subject failures, maintain a "B" average in
ROTC and continue to progress towards a timely graduation date.

d. Monthly Stipend:
(1) All contracted Cadets will receive a monthly stipend based on their current
MS level. The stipend will be by direct deposit into a checking or savings account.



2. APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS


IV-









Students not already on a AROTC scholarship may compete for scholarships at any
time during the academic year. Approved scholarships will begin in the semester
following approval. See the Battalion ROO for details and the application. Two and
three year competitive scholarships in all academic disciplines are available to qualified
students. The Army Scholarship provides all of the financial benefits explained in the
preceding paragraphs. To be eligible to compete for an Army ROTC scholarship,
students must meet the following requirements:

U.S. Citizen

At least 17 years old

Be under 27 years of age on 30 June of the year eligible for
commissioning (prior service gets day for day extension up to 3 years
of active duty service).

Medically qualified

Be a full time student

Minimum SAT of 920 or ACT of 19

College GPA 2.5

Must have a 3.0 in Army ROTC coursework




Interested students should see their instructors.


IV 2













































































IV -3




SECTION V


MILITARY COURTESY









SECTION V


MILITARY COURTESY

1. GENERAL

Military Courtesy is simply the display of good manners and politeness in dealing
with other people. Military courtesy conveys respect from both subordinate and senior to
each other.

2. HISTORY OF THE MILITARY SALUTE

Soldiers of arms have used some form of the military salute as an exchange of
greeting since the earliest times. It has been preserved and its use continued in all
modern armies, which inherit their military traditions from the Age of Chivalry. The
method of rendering the salute has varied through the ages, as it still varies in form
between the armies of today.

In the Age of Chivalry, the knights were all mounted and wore steel armor, which
covered the body completely, including the head and face. When two friendly knights
met, it was the custom for each to raise the visor and expose his face to the view of the
other. This was always done with the right hand, the left being used to hold the reins. It
was a significant gesture of friendship and confidence, since it exposed the features and
also removed the right hand, the sword hand, from the vicinity of the weapon. Also, in
ancient times, the freemen (soldiers) of Europe were allowed to carry arms; when two
freemen met, each would raise his right hand to show that he held no weapons and that
the meeting was friendly. Slaves were not allowed to carry arms, and they passed
freemen without the exchange of a greeting. In the Middle Ages gentlemen often went
about clothed in heavy capes under which swords were carried; upon meeting a friend,
the cloak was thrown back by raising the right arm, thus disclosing that the right hand
was not on the sword hilt. The civilian counterpart of the salute is manifested in various
ways such as raising the hand when greeting a friend, tipping the hat when meeting a
lady, and using a sign of recognition between lodge members. This sign is always one of
greeting between soldiers, and was continued even after modem firearms had made steel
armor a thing of the past. The military salute is today, as it seems always to have been, a
unique form of exchange of greeting between military personnel.

3. RENDERING THE HAND SALUTE

When in uniform cadets should salute all cadet officers and cadre officers of all
services. (see Appendix B for information concerning insignia of rank). It is appropriate
to accompany the salute with a word greeting, for example "Good afternoon, MA'AM."
Below are examples of situations where you would salute.

a. When walking outdoors in uniform and you approach a cadet or cadre officer.

b. When outdoors in uniform and the American Flag is being raised or lowered.


V-1









c. When in uniform, a cadet reporting to an officer in his office, will make his
presence at the door known, enter when permission is given, come to attention, salute,
and state his name. EXAMPLE:
"Sir, Cadet Jones reports," He will remain at attention until given "AT EASE." Upon
completion of his business, the cadet will come to attention, salute, do an about face and
leave.

d. When an officer (to include a cadet officer in uniform) approaches a uniformed
group outside, the first cadet to recognize the officer will call "ATTENTION" and all
cadets will salute and remain at attention until given "AT EASE", "REST", "CARRY
ON" or some other command, or until the officer passes.

e. If the cadets are performing a work detail, only the person in charge will come to
attention and salute. The detail will continue to work.

f. When in formation and an officer (to include a cadet officer in uniform)
approaches, the person in charge calls the formation to attention and salutes.

g. Salutes are not rendered in the following areas or cases:
(1) Indoors, salutes are not exchanged except when reporting to a superior
officer.
(2) When actively engaged in sports (basketball, football, etc.) or in the
middle of training.

4. USE OF "SIR" OR "MA' AM"

All cadre and cadet officers are addressed as "SIR" or "MA'AM" as appropriate. As a
general rule "SIR" or "MA'AM" is used in speaking either officially or socially to any
senior officer. The word is repeated with each complete statement. "YES" and "NO"
should always be accompanied with "SIR" or MA'AM"

5. THE SENIOR'S PLACE OF HONOR

Another ancient military custom dictates that you should always walk or sit to the left
of your superiors. For centuries, men fought with swords, and because most men are
right handed, the heaviest fighting occurred on the right. The shield was on the left arm,
and the left side became defensive. Soldiers and units who preferred to carry the battle to
the enemy, and who were proud of their fighting ability, considered the right of a battle
line to be a post of honor. Therefore, when an officer walks or sits on your right, he is
symbolically filling the post of honor.

6. ATTENTION

When an officer enters a room occupied by enlisted personnel, the room is called to
attention. It is not proper, however, for officers to follow this custom at the approach of a
senior officer. The question then is how to get officers to attention without shouting the
command. Generally, this is accomplished by the individual officers assuming the
position of attention when appropriate or one officer announcing the presence of the


V-2









senior and the other officers then assuming the position of attention. For example, if the
classroom were filled only with cadet officers and the PMS entered the room, one of the
cadet officers would announce "Ladies and Gentlemen, the Professor of Military
Science."

7. COURTESY TO THE FLAG AND NATIONAL ANTHEM


When the National Anthem or its counterpart in Field music, "To the Colors" is
played, when the flag is passing in parade, when the flag is raised at reveille and when
the flag is lowered at retreat, the cadets in uniform should render the hand salute.


8. DISPLAY OF THE UNITED STATES FLAG

Below are proper displays of the U.S. Flag:

When displayed over a street the flag should be suspended vertically with the union to
the North on an east-west street or to the east on a north-south street.
When with another flag against a wall with crossed staffs, the U.S. flag will be on the
left as you face the wall looking at the flag. The U.S. flag staff will be to the outside.
When flown at half-staff it should be first raised to the top then lowered back to the
half-staff.
When flown with other flags or pennants on the same halyard, the U.S. flag will be
the highest.
When carried with other flags, the U.S. flag will either be out in front or on the right
side of the line of march.
When on stage the U.S. flag will on the right side looking out from the stage (the
audience will see it to their left side).

9. REPORTING

When reporting to a superior officer in his office utilize the following procedure:

a. Remove your cover (unless under arms under arms means that you are carrying a
weapon).
b. Knock on the door or door frame.
c. Enter after being instructed to do so.
d. March to a position about 2 paces from the officer's desk and halt.
e. Salute and report (for example MA'AM, Cadet Smith reports to CAPTAIN
GATOR.)
f. Remain at attention until instructed otherwise.
g. Upon completion of your business, salute (always salute at the position of
attention); execute about face and leave.


V-3




SECTION VI


UNIFORMS









SECTION VI


UNIFORMS

1. GENERAL

A sharp looking uniform is an indication of self-respect, pride, alertness and a good
attitude. When you wear the uniform you represent Army ROTC to all on campus. You
are on parade! Always wear a uniform that is clean, neat and complete. No article of
civilian clothing will be worn with the uniform. Jewelry such as key chains and
decorative tie clasp will not be worn while in uniform. Jewelry such as a wristwatch, ID
bracelet, and not more than 2 rings are authorized as long as there are conservative and in
good taste. Male cadets will never wear ear or any other body peircings while in
uniform!

2. SPECIAL UNIT UNIFORMS

Special units within the detachment are authorized to prescribe special uniform items
and wearing instructions.

3. UTILITY UNIFORM

The battle dress uniform (BDU) is the primary cadet uniform for training. Refer to
figures VI-1 and VI-2 for placement of items worn on this uniform.

4. MALE CLASS A (GREEN) UNIFORM

The green uniform is comprised of the Army green coat, trousers, green shade 415
shirt, garrison cap, four-in-hand necktie and shoes (low quarters). The Army green
uniform may be worn with or without the green coat. Refer to figures VI-3, VI-4, VI-5
and VI-7 for placement of items worn on this uniform.

5. FEMALE CLASS A (GREEN) UNIFORM

The female green uniform is comprised of a green coat, green skirt, green slacks,
green shade 415 shirt, neck tab, shoes and hat. Refer to figures VI-6 and VI-8 for
placement of items worn on this uniform.

6. UNIFORM WEARING TERMINOLOGY/INSTRUCTIONS

a. BLOUSED BOOTS refers to the legs of the uniform pants being worn tucked
inside the combat boots. Pants should be tucked with the excess material to the rear.
Bootlaces are also tucked inside the top of the boot and out of sight.

b. BRASS refers to metal insignia used to indicate cadet rank and AROTC
affiliation (ROTC crest for cap, ROTC letters, ROTC torch). All cadet brass is non-
subdued (brass colored) unless otherwise prescribed by your instructor this includes
brass worn on the utility uniform.


VI-1









c. GIG-LINE refers to the line formed by the uniform shirt opening, the edge of
the belt buckle, and the zipper flap of the uniform pants. A proper gig-line exists
when your shirtfront opening, forward edge of your belt buckle and zipper flap line,
all line up in a continuous straight line.

d. HEADGEAR collective term for caps, hats, helmets and other items worn as a
covering on your head. Also referred to as "cover". When outdoors in uniform you
will wear the prescribed headgear for that uniform. When indoors you will not wear
your headgear, unless you are under arms.

e. SKILL BADGES refers to badges earned at Army schools such as Airborne or
Air Assault School. Skill badges earned by prior service personnel as well as those
earned while in cadet status are authorized for wear on the cadet uniform. Skill
Badges will not be worn on cadet headgear.

f. GROOMING The Army allows many different hair styles as long as they are
kept in a neat and clean manner. Extreme "fad" haircuts are not allowed, including
lines or designs cut into the hair or scalp. Dyes and tints can only be used if they are
natural to human hair and present a neat appearance.
For males, the hair on top of the head will be neatly groomed and will not present
an unkempt appearance. Hair will present a tapered appearance and when combed
will not fall over the ears or eyebrows or touch the collar except for the closely cut
hair at the back of the neck. Sideburns will be neatly trimmed and will not extend
below the lowest part of the ear opening. Males will be clean-shaven except that
mustaches are permitted. Mustaches will be neatly trimmed and will not cover the
upper lip line or extend sideways beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the
corners of the mouth. Beards, goatees, and handlebar mustaches are unauthorized.
For females, the hair will be neatly groomed. The length and bulk of the hair will
not present an unkempt or ragged appearance. Hair will not fall over the-eyebrows or
extend below the bottom edge of the collar. Hairnets will not be worn. Hair holding
ornaments, such as clips, barrettes, pins, etc., must be unadorned and plain and must
be transparent or similar to the hair color. They will be used inconspicuously.
Cosmetics and nail polish are authorized but must be used conservatively and must
compliment the uniform. Extreme colors and shades are not authorized.
Both males and females are expected to maintain good daily hygiene and wear
their uniforms so as not to detract from the overall military appearance. Military
standards are not only for appearance, but for the health and safety of the soldier as
well.


VI-2









7. STANDARDS

a. The wearing of the black RAIDER T-shirt under BDU's is not authorized except
when attending Raiders.

b. Do not mix civilian and military clothing. Do not wear field jacket with civilian
clothes.

c. Do not carry pistol belt, WEAR IT!

d. Carry conservative back packs, no neon colors.

e. Do not wear field jacket without gloves.

f. Do not carry umbrellas when in BDU's; use poncho or parka.

g. Jewelry:

(1) No earrings (female: when wearing BDUs) Male (never). Body piercing of
other body parts is not authorized. Females may wear one small set of earrings while in
Class A or B uniforms. Earrings will not exceed 6 mm or 1/4 inch diameter. They will be
gold, silver or white pearl; unadorned and spherical. They will be worn as a matched pair
with only one earring per ear lobe.

(2) Only 2 rings are authorized for wear; a class ring and a wedding ring.

(3) Necklaces must have a religious medal on them or they cannot be worn.

(4) Conservative watches are authorized and encouraged.

h. Do not walk or stand with hands in pockets.


VI-3






FIGURE VI 1 UTILITY UNIFORM


ofFIC4E


OLusTro


CAP INSIGNIA IS WORN CENTERED ON THE CAP FRONT


Cadet officer not yet branched Cadet officer branched

Insignia is centered on the collar and 1 inch up from the bottom edge




/1 1 INCHf\


MS III CADET


MS I / II CADET


Insignia is centered in line with the Vee of the collar 1 inch from the
collar point.


FIGURE VI 1 UTILITY UNIFORM






FIGURE VI 2 UTILITY UNIFORM


*tELD JACKer


Rank for enlisted is the same as shirt Officer rank is worn on the shoulder loops
Centered 5/8 inch from the shoulder.


CIIPLETE BATTLE MIES IIIFII


Cap with rank


Collar insignia (1 inch see Fig VI 1)

.U.S* Shoulder patch (ROTC) 1/2 inch below shoulder
seem and centered on left sleeve

Skill badges (ie Airborne Wings) centered over
left pocket, 1/4 inch above US ARMY, 1/2 inch
above another skill badge
Recondo Badge- centered on left pocket (MS VIs)
Gauntlet Award center on right pocket

BDU shirt worn outside of pants

Black Belt, Black Buckle


Pants bloused into boots



l- Boots, black leather or jungle


FIGURE VI 2 UTILITY UNIFORM






FIGURE VI 3 MALE CLASS A INSIGNIA


40LE8T4


Cap insignia is worn
centered on the left side,
1 inch from front edge


GREEN SHADE 415 SHIRT


Rank insignia epaulets of
officers and enlisted

Enlisted pin-on rank is worn
on the collar not shoulder
epaulets

415 shirt may be worn as an
outer garment or with a tie
and the green coat

White T-shirt must be worn

Name tag centered between
pocket top and top of button


FIGURE VI 3 MALE CLASS A INSIGNIA


OVFIC4#





FIGURE VI 4 MALE CLASS A UNIFORM JACKET


DOLLAR INSIGNIo


MS I MS IV
MS II Branched
MS III
Not
Branched
MSIV
SHOULDER PATCHEs


SHOULDER LOOPg

O O




r 5/8 inch


Crests centered between rank and button


FIGURE VI 4 MALE CLASS A UNIFORM JACKET






OPTIONS OF WEAR GREEN UNIFORM
Minimum Complete Uniforms


Garrison cap with FGB
Crest for enlisted and
Rank insignia for
Officers (see fig. 3)

Shoulder loops
(see fig. 4)

Shoulder boards for
officers / shoulder
boards or collar pins
for enlisted

Black four-in-hand tie
required with coat,
optional when coat is
not worn


Name tag required


SBlack web belt with
Polished brass buckle


4--


4 --


Trousers touch top of
instep in the front,
midpoint between top of---
heel and top of shoe in
back. Trouser crease
should not break




Black socks i
Black, highly polished
low quarter shoes


FIGURE VI 5 MEN'S
GREEN UNIFORM
OPTIONS





FIGURE VI 6 FEMALE CLASS A UNIFORM


OSS "A" JA
C 0A


sHOULDER LOOp8


Awards and Badges are worn on the female Class A Jacket in the same relative
manner and location as the male's. Items will be placed so as to conform with the
individual's body configuration


F 1EM iLe ll uii sill


MS I / II
MS IV NOT BRANCHED


MS IV BRANCHED


Collar insignia is worn 1 inch above the notch with the center line of the
insignia bisecting the notch and parallel to the inside edge of the collar


FIGURE VI 6 FEMALE CLASS A UNIFORM








Place the bottom of the ROTC insignia 1 inch
above the notch, center on the right collar
with the center line of the insignia parallel to
the inside edge of the lapel (Not as shown)

Center unit crests on the shoulder loops,
an equal distance from the top of the
rank and the outside edge of the bottom,
with the base of the insignia toward the
rank. Rank is centered 5/8 inch
from the shoulder seam.
Center regimental crest 1/8 inch
above the top of the pocket flap.
Wear the regimental crest 1/4 inch
above unit awards and foreign
badges if worn.
Center unit awards 1'8 inch above
the top of the pocket flap. '


Center the nameplate on the flap of
the right pocket between the top of
the button and the top of the pocket.


Branch insignia is worn 5/8 inch
below the notch of the collar and
parallel to the inside edge of the
lapel

When combat and special skill
badges are worn, center them 1/4
inch above the ribbons. When more
than one badge is worn above the
ribbons, badges will be stacked 1'2
inch apart and may be aligned to
the left to present a better appear-
ance.
Center shoulder sleeve insignia on
the left sleeve 1/2 inch below the
top of the shoulder seam.

Center ribbons 1'8 inch above the
top of the pocket flap. Third and
subsequent rows may be aligned
to the left to present a better ap-
pearance.

Center marksmanship badges on
the pocket flap 1,8 inch below the
seam. If more than one badge is
worn, space them 1 inch apart.
When special skill badges are worn
on the pocket flap. place them to
the right of marksmanship badges.

















Trousers will reach the top of the
instep and be cut on a diagonal line
to reach a point approximately mid-
way between the top of the heel
and the top of the standard shoe in
the back. The trousers may have a
slight break in the front.


The sleeve will be 1 inch below the
bottom of the wrist bone.


Figure VI-7


Class A


Uniform

The Army green uniform is au-
thori:ed for year-round wear. For
a more detailed discussion of
proper wear of the uniform and
accessories, conult Army Regu-
lation 670-1.









Center the bottom of Ine ROTC insignia on the
collar 1 inch up from the notch ,,irth the center
line of the insignia parallel to the inside edge of
the lapel. i.. ,. '. ~i,I,- .

Center unit crests on the shoulder
loops an equal distance from the
top of the rank and [he bottom of the
Dutton with the base of the crests
pointed toward the top of the rank.
Rank is centered 5/8 inch up from
shoulder seem

Center the regimentalcrest 1 2 inch
above the nameplate. The regi
mental crest will be worn 1/4 inch
above any unit awards or foreign
badges if worn.


Center the nameplate horizontally
on the right side between 1 and 2
inches above the top button Adjust
placement of the nameplate to con-
form to individual figure differences.






The sleeve length will be 1 inch
below the bottom of the wrist bone.


Branch insignia is worn 1 1/4 inch
below the ROTC and parallel to
the inside edge of the lapel


Center shoulder sleeve insignia on
the left sleeve 1 2 inch below the
top of the shoulder seam.

When special skill badges are worn
above the ribbons, center them 1/4
inch above the ribbons. When more
than one badge is worn above the
ribbons, badges will be stacked 1 '2
inch apart and may be aligned to
the left to present a better appear-
ance.

Center ribbons on the left side with
the bottom row parallel to the bot-
tom edge of the nameplate.

Center marksmanship badges with
the upper portion of the badge 1/4
inch below the ribbons. It more
than one marksmanship badge is
worn, space them 1 inch apart.
When special skill badges are worn
below the ribbons, place them to
the nght of marksmanship badges.


Figure VI-8


Class A


Uniform
The Army green uniform is autho-
rized for year-round wear. Certain
awards and accessories can be ad-
justed slightly on the uniform to
conform to the individual's figure.
For more information, consult
Army Regulation 670-1.


The skirt length will not be more than
1 inch above or 2 Inches below the
crease in the back of the knee.



Black oxford shoes or black service
pumps may be worn. The pumps will
be plain, with closed toe and heel.
The heel will be between 1/2 and 3
inches high.






FIGURE VI 9 PHYSICAL FITNESS UNIFORM


* Socks are white and calf high in length
* Shoes are "Running shoes" only, not cross trainers, basketball, or others
* Cadets will be clean shaven
* The Physical Fitness Uniform (PFU) shirt is worn tucked into the PFU
shorts
* Grey or black "Biking" shorts are authorized underneath the PFU shorts
(Must be above the knee with no obtrusive markings or patterns)
* Commanders may authorize wear of other items for cold weather
(ie. black watch cap, black gloves, etc.)


FIGURE VI 9 PHYSICAL FITNESS UNIFORM





SECTION VII


AWARDS


opwwwooo


465









SECTION VII


CADET AWARDS

A variety of awards (medals, ribbons, certificates, etc.) are presented each year to
members of the Fightin' Gator Battalion. These awards recognize meritorious
performance in the areas of military, scholastic, physical, and personal achievement. The
Army, national and local societies, organizations, businesses and private individuals
sponsor the awards. Below is a listing by category of awards available to UF AROTC
cadets.

1. FIGHTING' GATOR BATTALION RIBBON AWARDS

These ribbons are awarded to UF cadets based on performance throughout the year
within the ROTC program. Below are the names of the ribbons and the criteria for each.

a. Advanced Camp Completion:
Awarded to cadets who have completed ROTC Advanced Camp.

b. Camp Challenge Completion:
Awarded to cadets who have completed ROTC Basic Camp.

c. Cadet Goldminer:
Awarded to a cadet responsible for either enrollment of a new student in a Military
Science class or recruitment of a non- scholarship or enrolled Basic Camp applicant.

d. Iron Warrior:
Awarded to any cadet who achieves a score of 270 or above on the Army Physical
Fitness Test.

e. Outstanding Academic Achievement:
Awarded to actively participating members of the Fightin' Gator Battalion who
achieve an overall semester GPA of 3.0 or higher.

f. PMS Outstanding Service:
Awarded by the Professor of Military Science to any cadet who performs exceptional
service to the Army ROTC program.

g. Ranger Challenge:
Awarded to members of the Fightin' Gator Battalion Ranger Challenge Team.

h. Simultaneous Membership Program:
Awarded to a cadet who completes 6 months as a SMP participant.


VII- 1









i. Superior Academic Achievement:
Awarded to actively participating members of the Fightin' Gator Battalion who
achieve an overall semester GPA of 3.5 or higher.

j. Overall Field Training Exercise (FTX) Performance:
Awarded to the Basic Course cadet who achieves the highest overall score on graded
activities at each FTX.

k. Company Marksmanship:
Awarded at the FTX to the cadet from each company that achieves the highest
marksmanship score.

1. Overall Marksmanship:
Awarded to the basic course cadet with the highest marksmanship score at the FTX.


VII 2









2. AWARDS SPONSORED BY ORGANIZATIONS, SOCIETIES AND
INDIVIDUALS

a. General. These awards are normally given at the annual cadet awards ceremony
held at the end of the school year. Awards consist of plaques, medals, ribbons, and/or
certificates.


b. ADPA LEADERSHIP AWARD:

Sponsored by the American Defense Preparedness Association. This award is given
annually to an MS IV cadet based on the following criteria:

Upper half of University academically
"B" or above in all ROTC classes
Top 20% of platoon and company at Advanced Camp
Participates actively in athletics and campus activities
Demonstrates outstanding leadership qualities

c. AMERICAN LEGION AWARD FOR GENERAL MILITARY
EXCELLENCE:

Awarded annually by the American Legion Post of Gainesville to an MS III and an
MS IV cadet meeting the following criteria:

Top 25% academically of the University
Top 25% of the ROTC class
Display outstanding qualities of military leadership, discipline,
character and citizenship

d. AMERICAN LEGION AWARD FOR SCHOLASTIC EXCELLENCE:

Awarded annually by the American Legion Post of Gainesville to an
MS III and an MS IV cadet who meets the following criteria:

Top 10% of ROTC class
Leadership abilities
Active in student activities, organizations, and sports


VII 3









e. AMVETS AWARD:


Sponsored annually by the American Veterans of WWII/Korea/Vietnam and Gulf
War to an MS III cadet in good academic and military standing for diligence in the
discharge of duty and willingness to serve God and Country.

f. AUSA ROTC AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Association of the United States Army to an MS III cadet in
the top 10% of the ROTC class, top 25% of the University and who contributed the
most through leadership to advance the standing of the ROTC unit at the institution.

g. AUSA HISTORY AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Association of the United States Army to a cadet
recognized for excellence in the study of military history.

h. CIVITAN LEADERSHIP/CITIZENSHIP AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Gainesville Civitan to an MS II and an MS III cadet who
demonstrate high qualities of leadership and citizenship.
i. DAR AWARD:
Awarded annually by the Daughters of the American Revolution to an MS IV cadet in
the top 25% of the ROTC class and top 25% of the University who has displayed
loyalty, patriotism and dependability.

j. DAUGHTERS OF FOUNDERS AND PATRIOTS AWARD:
Awarded annually by the Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America to an MS I
cadet in the top 25% of the ROTC class who has demonstrated excellence in military
history, American history or a related course and demonstrates potential for
leadership and reflects the ideas of patriotism.
k. GENERAL MARSHALL ROTC AWARD:

Awarded annually by the General George C. Marshall Foundation to an MS IV cadet
with the most outstanding performance at Advanced Camp and demonstrated high
leadership and scholastic qualities.
1. GENERAL KINZER AWARD:

Awarded annually in the name of General John M. Kinzer, the UF Cadet Commander
SY 39-40, to an MS IV Cadet meeting the following criteria:
"B" or higher in university academic standing
Top 25% of ROTC class
Positive attitude toward ROTC and commissioned service
Demonstrated leadership ability
Outstanding personal attributes of appearance, dependability and
initiative
Active duty selectee in a combat arms branch


VII 4









m. GENERAL VAN FLEET DOUGHBOY AWARD:


Awarded annually in the name of General James A. Van Fleet, a former PMS at the
University of Florida. This award is given to the MS IV cadet who selects Infantry as
his first branch choice and who demonstrates the highest leadership capabilities and
aptitude for a career in the Infantry.

n. MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Military Order of the Loyal Legion to the outstanding MS
III cadet who exemplifies military bearing and leadership and who has been of
significant value to the enrollment efforts of the unit.

o. MILITARY ORDER OF WORLD WARS AWARD OF MERIT:

Awarded annually by the Military Order of World Wars to an MS I, MS II and an MS
III cadet who have shown overall improvement in military and scholastic studies
during the school year and have indicated a desire to serve their country.

p. NATIONAL SOJOURNERS AWARD:

Awarded annually by the National Sojourners to an outstanding MS III cadet who has
contributed the most to encourage and demonstrate Americanism within the corps of
cadets and on campus.

q. RESERVE OFFICER ASSOCIATION AWARD:

Awarded annually by the ROA to an MS II, MS III and an MS IV cadet in the top
10% of their ROTC class who has indicated a desire to obtain a commission and
possesses high moral qualities and leadership ability.
r. THE RETIRED OFFICERS ASSOCIATION AWARD:

Awarded annually by TROA to an MS III cadet who is involved in ROTC
extracurricular activities and maintains a high GPA and class standing.
s. SAR AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Sons of the American Revolution to an MS I cadet in good
standing militarily and scholastically who has a high degree of merit and excellence
in ROTC and has contributed the most to the cause of patriotism and service to his
Nation and Community.
t. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESIDENT'S TROPHY:

In June 1938 the members of the University of Florida ROTC Infantry Regiment
presented a saber to their Regimental Commander, Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Stephen
C. O'Connell. In June 1969 Stephen C. O'Connell, then President of the University of
Florida, returned the saber to the UF Corps of Cadets. The saber is now awarded
annually to the most outstanding MS IV cadet. The saber hangs on permanent
display at Van Fleet Hall.

u. VFW AWARD:

Awarded annually by the Veterans of Foreign Wars to an MS II cadet in good
standing academically and militarily who has demonstrated capability and diligence
in a related activity of the ROTC program.


VII 5









3. ROTC AWARDS

These awards are sponsored by the University of Florida AROTC Detachment or by
the Department of the Army.


a. PMS OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARD:

Awarded by the Professor of Military Science to any cadet who performs exceptional
service to the Army ROTC program.

b. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPERIOR CADET AWARD:

Awarded annually to the outstanding cadet in each year of military science who is in
the upper 25% of the academic and ROTC class, shows academic and military
leadership and demonstrates strong officer potential.

c. ROTC MEDAL FOR HEROISM:

Awarded to any cadet who has distinguished himself by acts of heroism on or off
campus.

d. GATOR GUARD AWARDS

(1) MARK BARRETT AWARD:

Awarded annually to the outstanding guardsman of the year. Based on pride,
professionalism and esprit. This is the Gator Guard's highest and most prestigious
award.

(2) OUTSTANDING 1st, 2nd YEAR MEMBER:

Awarded annually to the outstanding 1st and 2nd year members, respectively.

(3) OUTSTANDING PLEDGE:

Awarded annually to the individual who demonstrates the best performance during
spring activities .

(4) KING REX PARADE (MARDI GRAS):

Awarded to individuals who successfully participate in the King
Rex Parade at Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

(5) VENUS PARADE (MARDI GRAS):
Awarded to individuals who successfully participate in the Venus Parade at Mardi
Gras in New Orleans.

(6) UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HOMECOMING PARADE:

Awarded to individuals who successfully participate in the annual University of
Florida Homecoming Parade.


VII 6









(7) GATOR GUARD MEMBERSHIP:

Awarded to individuals who successfully meet all requirements for membership in
the Gator Guard.

(8) GATOR GUARD ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT:
Awarded to all Gator Guardsmen who achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 and above.
Student must have been full-time and actively involved with the Gator Guard during
the semester.

(9) FLORIDA STATE JROTC DRILL/RIFLE MEET OFFICER:

Awarded annually to the Guardsmen who plan, organize and supervise the State
JROTC Drill/Rifle Meet.

(10) GATOR GUARD CORD:

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate drilling proficiency and meet membership
requirements.

e. GATOR RAIDER AWARDS

(1) DISTINGUISHED RAIDER:

Awarded each semester to the Raiders who have distinguished themselves by
outstanding performance, service and effort in the Gator Raiders.

(2) OUTSTANDING RAIDER:

Awarded annually to an MS III Gator Raider who best personifies the image of
excellence.

(3) GATOR RAIDER FTX:

Awarded to all Gator Raiders who participate in an overnight Gator Raider Field
Training Exercise.

(4) GATOR RAIDER ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE:

Awarded to all Gator Raiders who achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 and above. Student
must have been full-time and actively involved with the Gator Raiders during the
semester.

(5) GATOR RAIDER MEMBERSHIP:
Awarded each semester to all members who have actively participated in the Gator
Raiders.

(6) GATOR RAIDER TAB:

Awarded to all first semester members who pass the Level 1 Phase Test.


VII 7









(7) GATOR RAIDER BLACK BERET:


Awarded to all Gator Raiders who have earned their Raider Tab and have passed the
Level 2 Phase Test.

(8) GATOR RAIDER FLASH:

Awarded to all Gator Raiders who have earned their Black Beret and have passed the
Level 3 Phase Test.

(9) GATOR RAIDER CORD:
Awarded to all Gator Raiders who have earned their flash and successfully completed
the Level 4 Phase Test.

f. ADVANCED CAMP AWARDS

(1) WARRIOR OF THE PACIFIC RIBBON:

Awarded to each cadet from the school finishing lst at Advanced Camp.

(2) REGION COMMANDER'S LEADERSHIP AWARD:

Awarded to the top cadet at Advanced Camp.

(3) CAMP COMMANDER'S LEADERSHIP AWARD:

Awarded to the number 1 cadet from each cadet company at camp.

(4) PLATOON LEADERSHIP AWARD:

Awarded to the number 1 cadet from each platoon at camp.

(5) PHYSICAL PROFICIENCY AWARD:

Awarded to cadets scoring 300+ points on the record physical fitness test.

(6) MILITARY PROFICIENCY AWARD:

Awarded to the top 5% of the cadets at camp according to military proficiency scores
as prescribed by Headquarters Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).

(7) ROTC RECONDO BADGE:

Awarded to all cadets who successfully complete the RECONDO training events.


g. ADDITIONAL AWARDS

Additional awards are outlined in AR 672-5-1. These awards are not given at this
detachment on an annual basis and are therefore not listed in the cadet handbook. These
awards are available to University of Florida cadets where applicable. For information
on these awards see AR 672-5-1.


VII 8




SECTION VIII


ADMIN







APPENDICES


4
-r b
re J






THE FIGHTING' GATOR BATTALION


Battalion Commander


I I I
Scabbard & Blade Battalion Ranger
President CSM Commander


I I
S-1 S-2


Executive
Officer


-V


I I
Raider Gator Guard
Commander Commander


I


E Z EI S-I I
S-3 S-4 S-5


CADET ORGANIZATIONAL CHART


|







ARMY / AIR FORCE / MARINE
RANK CADRE OFFICER


0-6


CADET
ARMY / AIR FORCE / NAVY


COLONEL (silver)



LT. COLONEL (silver)


0-5


NAVY
CADRE OFFICER
CAPTAIN


tt I


,,, pA


COMMANDER


MAJOR (gold)


LT. COMMANDER


88A


0-4


%U


BP






ARMY / AIR FORCE / MARINE


CADRE OFFICER
CAPTAIN (silver)


0


ARMY / AIR FORCE / NAVY


CADRE OFFICER


LIEUTENANT


0


08A


0


1st LIEUTENANT (silver)


0


LIEUTENANT J.G.


0


2nd LIEUTENANT (gold)


0


RANK


0-3


0-2


0-1


onA


=


ENSIGN


NAVY


c i(


CADET


on






APPENDIX C ENLISTED RANK


VION?
IEO@M


@@/MANOD


99ROIANT
GFiT
@ILA


[PIROVATE

@UL@@
DrTI
E~oDi~T


Cadet enlisted rank corresponds directly to active duty
enlisted rank. The highest cadet enlisted rank is Cadet
Command Sergeant Major, the highest common active
duty enlisted rank is Command Sergeant Major, all lower
ranks correspond the same. There are two active enlisted
ranks that do not have an equivalent cadet rank. They are
Specialist and Sergeant Major of the Army. There is only
one Sergeant Major of the Army in the entire Army.


APPENDIX C-1


STPP*
SEREAN


IOVWion


R@EANT
EANRIM


NAMTE
RI@EANT






APPENDIX C ENLISTED RANK


MERIT BASED RANK SYSTEM

Crawl Phase: Freshmen/Military Science First Year (MS I)

Private(no collar insignia): Entry level cadets.

Private Second Class (one chevron): (This rank may be skipped if the CDT meets PFC
standards) STANDARDS:



* Awarded when CDT passes PT test with a minimum APFT score of 180. Minimum
score of 50 points in each event.
* The CDT must keep a minimum 2.5 University of Florida GPA and a ROTC
minimum of 4.0 (for freshmen this may be gauged loosely on mid-term exam results.)
To be promoted, the cadet supplies the proof necessary about their GPA.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least one Battalion function (as approved by the CDT
CDR of the Company).

Private First Class (one chevron and a rocker): STANDARDS

* The CDT must achieve a minimum score of 200 on the APFT. Minimum score of
50 points in each event.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least two Battalion functions (as approved by the CDT
CDR of the Company).
* The CDT must maintain a minimum 3.0 University of Florida GPA and a ROTC
minimum of 4.0 (this may be determined by mid-term test results).
* Participate in the semester FTX.

Walk Phase: Sophomore/Military Science Second Year (MS II)

Private First Class: Entry level MS II cadet rank.

Corporal (two chevrons): STANDARDS

* The CDT must score a minimum of 225 on the APFT.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least two Battalion functions.
* The CDT must participate in the semester FTX.

Sergeant (three chevrons):

*** Detail Rank For Squad Leaders only

Sergeant First Class (three chevrons and two rockers)

*** Detail Rank For Platoon Sergeant only


APPENDIX C-2






APPENDIX C ENLISTED RANK


Run Phase: Junior/Military Science Third Year (MS III)

First Semester of the Junior Year

Corporal: Entry level MS III cadet rank.

Sergeant: STANDARDS

* The CDT must score a minimum of 240 on the APFT.
* The CDT must maintain a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA and a 3.0 ROTC GPA.
* The CDT must Pass an off-campus land navigation course and score a minimum of
80% on the written land navigation exam.

* The CDT must volunteer for at least 2 Battalion functions.

Staff Sergeant (three chevrons and a rocker): STANDARDS

* The CDT must score a minimum of 255 on the APFT.
* The CDT must maintain a minimum University of Florida GPA of 2.8.
* The CDT must have a minimum BRM score of "sharpshooter" (30+ hits)
* The CDT must have at least one "E" on a LDP evaluation.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least 2 Battalion functions.
* The CDT must score a minimum of 90% on the written land navigation exam and
pass the off-campus course.

Second Semester of the Junior Year

Corporal: Rank carried over from previous semester.

Sergeant: STANDARDS

* The CDT must score a minimum of 240 on the APFT.
* The CDT must have a minimum cumulative GPA, (ROTC and University), of 2.5.
* The CDT must pass the off-campus land navigation course and score a minimum of
80% on the written exam or have a minimum BRM score of "Marksman".
* The CDT must volunteer for at least 2 Battalion functions.

Staff Sergeant (used for acting Squad Leaders as well): STANDARDS

* The CDT must score a minimum of 255 on the APFT.
* The CDT must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.8.
* The CDT must have a minimum BRM score of "Sharpshooter".
* The CDT must have at least one overall "E" on a LDP evaluation.
* The CDT must participate in one on-campus organization.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least 2 Battalion functions.
* The CDT must score a minimum of 90% on the written land navigation exam and
pass the off-campus course.


APPENDIX C-3






APPENDIX C ENLISTED RANK


Sergeant First Class (three chevrons and two rockers)
***This rank is usually a detail rank for Platoon Sergeant***

For superior achievement an MS III may earn this rank. However, the cadet Sergeant
First Class will remain an integral part of the squad, he/she is still subject to the acting
Platoon Sergeant and Squad Leader during training.

STANDARDS
* The CDT must be in the second MS III semester.
* The CDT must have at least 2 "E" LAP ratings.
* The CDT must score a minimum of 270 on the APFT.
* The CDT must have a BRM score of "Expert".
* The CDT must score at least 90% on the written land navigation exam and pass the
off-campus course.
* The CDT must volunteer for at least 2 Battalion functions.
* The CDT must maintain a university of Florida GPA of at least 3.0 and a ROTC GPA
of 4.0
* The CDT must participate in at least one on-campus organization.

When a cadet reaches their MS IV year, they are assigned a rank and position in the
Battalion. These rank and positions are directly proportionate to their achievements on
campus, in ROTC, and at Advanced Camp.


APPENDIX C-4









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PROFESSORS OF MILITARY SCIENCE
ARMY ROTC



DATES NAMES RANK BRANCH


From
1905
1906
1909
1919
Sep-1921
1925
Jul-1929
1933
1936
1938
1943
Jan-1946
1947
Sep-1954
Jul-1956
Jul-1958
1961
Sep-1963
Jul-1965
1969
May-1971
1974
Jan-1978
1980
Jun-1983
Aug-1986
Jun-1987
Aug-1989
Oct-1992
Aug-1996


Jul-2000 Present Richard W. Sheppard


To
1906
1909
1919
1921
Jan-1925
1929
Jul-1933
1936
1938
1943
1945
Jun-1947
1954
Jun-1956
Jun-1958
Jul-1961
1963
1965
Mar-1969
1971
Jun-1974
1977
1980
1983
Aug-1986
Jun-1987
Aug-1989
Oct-1992
Jul-1996
Jun-2000


James D. Taylor
L.R. Ball
Edgar S. Walker
Bloxham Ward
James A. van Fleet
Arthur C. Tipton
James A. Van Fleet
Gilbert M. Allen
William S. Browning
S. R. Hopkins
Ralph L. Joyner
E. M. Edmonson
George S. Price
Harry M. Grizzard
Marvin A. Kreidberg
Glenn A. Farris
Thomas A. Graham JR.
James T. Hennessey
Arlo W. Mitchell
Robert M. Atkins
Charles D. McKeown
Richard J. Glikes
Jerry R. Novak
Robert E. Walsh
John R. Taylor
Walter L. Olson
Michael D. Burke
Gerald A. Roberson
Lance W. Bardsley
Charles W. Ameson Jr.


LTC AV


APPENDIX D


CPT
LT
COL
MAJ
MAJ
MAJ
MAJ
COL
COL
COL
LTC
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
COL
LTC
LTC
LTC
LTC
LTC
LTC
LTC


Infantry
Cavalry
Cavalry
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Field Artillery
Field Artillery
Field Artillery
Field Artillery
Field Artillery
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Field Artillery
Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
Armor
MP
Infantry
MP
SC
SC
SC
SC
SC









CHAIN OF COMMAND


The chain of command represents the direct line of leaders from the top of the
military command structure down to the University ROTC Department head "The
Professor of Military Science". Complete the chain of positions by filling in the names of
the individuals currently in those positions.


Commander in Chief



Secretary of Defense



Secretary of the Army


Army Chief of Staff


Commander of Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC)


CG, Cadet Command


Commander, 1st ROTC Region



CDR, 6th BDE, 1st ROTC Region



Professor of Military Science


(To be filled out in pencil and kept current)


APPENDIX E









GLOSSARY OF ARMY TERMS


Below are some often used terms that cadets should be familiar with. Some are
common acronyms and others represent terminology used in the conduct of drill.

A. Drill Terminology: (Reference Field Manual 22-5)

base the element on which a movement is planned for regulated.

cadence the uniform rhythm in which a movement is executed, or the number of
steps or counts per minute at which the movement is executed. Drill movements
are normally executed at the cadence of quick time or double time; quick time is
the cadence of 129 counts or steps per minute; double time is the cadence of 180
counts or steps per minute.

ceremonies formations and movements in which a number of troops execute
movements in unison and with precision just as in drill; however, their primary
value is to render honors, preserve tradition, and stimulate esprit de corps.

cover aligning oneself directly behind the soldier to one's immediate front while
maintaining correct distance.

distance the space between elements when the elements are one behind the
other; between units it varies with the size of the formation; between individuals it
is an arm's length to the front plus 6 inches, or approximately 36 inches, measured
from the chest of one soldier to the back of the immediately to his front.
(Measurements in this manual are approximate, based on the average stature of a
soldier).

dress aligning yourself with the person to your right.

drill certain movements by which a unit (or individuals) is moved in an orderly,
uniform manner from one formation to another, or from one place to another.
Movements are executed in unison and with precision.

element an individual, squad, section, platoon, company, or larger unit forming
as part of the next higher unit.

file a column which has a front of only one element. (see formation below).

flank the right or left side of any formation as observed by an element within
that formation.

formation the arrangement of elements of a unit in a prescribed manner: (2
types):


APPENDIX F









1. Line. A formation in which the elements are side by side or abreast of
each other. In a platoon line, the members of each squad are abreast of each
other with the squads one behind the other.

2. Column. A formation in which the elements are one behind the other. In
a platoon column, the members of each squad are one behind the other, with
the squads abreast of each other.

FM 22-5 The Army field manual that provides guidance for Army-wide
uniformity in the conduct of drill and ceremonies.

guide the person responsible for maintaining the prescribed direction and rate of
march.

interval Close. The lateral pace between soldiers, measured from right to left
by the soldier on the right placing the heel of his left hand on his left hip,
even with (top of) the belt line, fingers and thumb joined and extended
downward, with his elbow in line with his body, and touching the arm of
the soldier to his left.

Double. The lateral space between soldiers, measured from right to left by
raising both arms shoulder high with the fingers extended and joined
(palms down) so that fingertips are touching the fingertips of the soldier to
the right and left.

Normal. The lateral space between soldiers, measured from right to left
by the soldier on the right holding his left arm shoulder high, fingers and
thumb extended and joined, with the tip of his middle finger touching the
right shoulder of the soldier to his left.

post the correct place for an officer or noncommissioned officer to stand in a
prescribed formation.

rank a line which is only one element in depth. (see formation above).

step the prescribed distance measured from heel to heel of a marching soldier.

B. Acronyms/Abbreviations ARNG Army National Guard

APMS Assistant Professor of Military Science, an ROTC instructor that is a
commissioned officer.

APFT Army Physical Fitness Test, evaluates individual level of physical
conditioning.


APPENDIX F









CO Commanding Officer, the officer occupying the position of unit
commander, only one per unit, the highest position in the unit.

COMPANY military unit made up of 2 or more platoons. Normally
commanded by a captain and containing approximately 150 people.

CTLT Cadet Troop Leadership Training, includes MS III's after summer camp.

D&C Drill and ceremonies (see FM 22-5).

FTX Field Training Exercise

HQ's Headquarters

NCO Noncommissioned Officer, sergeants

OML Order of Merit List, all ROTC students are placed on OML's based on
their performance in ROTC. OML'S are used as selection criteria for awards and
special training opportunities.

PLATOON sub-unit of a company, usually led by a Lieutenant, and consists of
approximately 30 people.

PMS Professor of Military Science, senior officer and head of the Army ROTC
detachment at the University.

PT Physical Training, i.e. running and exercising.

SM Service Member

SMP Simultaneous membership program. ROTC cadets who are also active
members of National Guard or Army Reserve units.

SOP Standing Operating Procedure.

SQUAD sub-unit of a platoon, led by a NCO, consists of approximately 10
people.

TRADOC Training and Doctrine Command, the major Army command that
ROTC is a part of.

UCMJ Uniform Code of Military Justice.

USAR United States Army Reserve

XO Executive Officer, the next person down from the Commander.


APPENDIX F









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CADET COMMANDERS UF CORPS OF CADETS


1905-06 1906-07
1907-08 1908-09
1909-10 C/MAJ Ralph D. Rader 1910-11 C/MAJ Albert G. Davis
1911-12 C/MAJ Robert R. Taylor, Jr 1912-13 C/MAJ W. H. Crom
1913-14 C/MAJ J. F. 1914-15 C/MAJ Norris McElya
1915-16 C/MAJ E. M. Yon 1916-17 C/MAJ J. T. Barns
1917-18 C/MAJ Samuel Wilkinson 1918-19 C/MAJ Samuel Wilkinson
1919-20 C/MAJ Malcom N. Yancy 1920-21 C/MAJ William G. Wells
1921-22 C/MAJ D. E. Williams 1922-23 C/MAJ Horace Wilson
1923-24 C/MAJ K. B. Hait 1924-25 C/MAJ H. M. Salley
1925-26 C/MAJ Silas M. Creech 1926-27 C/COL Canton Crenshaw
1927-28 C/LTC R. L. Hughes 1928-29 C/LTC Carl Owenby
1929-30 C/LTC Rainey Cawthon 1930-31 C/COL William McRae
1931-32 C/COL Chester Yates 1932-33 C/COL Edgar J. Lambert
1933-34 C/COL Daniel McCarthy 1934-35 C/COL Norman Stalling
1935-36 C/COL Hubert C. Schucht 1936-37 C/COL Raymond Caraballo
1937-38 C/COL Richard Neuman 1938-39 C/COL W. I. Wood
1939-40 C/COL John M. Kinzer 1940-41 C/COL Weaver Gains
1941-42 C/COL Norman Wheelock 1942-43 C/COL Woodford H. Hayes
1943-44 1944-45
1945-46 1946-47 C/COL Karl Borcheller
1947-48 C/COL Karl Borcheller 1948-49 C/COL Leonard Voight
1949-50 C/COL Wayne Sergent 1950-51 C/COL Eugene Cochran
1951-52 C/COL Dan Boone 1952-53 C/COL John Lewis Hall
1953-54 C/COL R. C. Pearson 1954-55 C/COL James R. Sweat
1955-56 C/COL Robert L. Fisher 1956-57 C/COL James C. Langley
1957-58 C/COL Joe M. Brown 1958-59
1959-60 1960-61
1961-62 C/COL Philip Wahibom
1962-63 C/COL George D. Jenkins; C/COL James Pugh J.
1963-64 C/COL Robert L. Voelkel
1964-65
1965-66 C/COL Gary W. Arnold; C/COL Harry M. Schindehette
1966-67 C/COL Stuart H. Watkins
1967-68 C/COL John LeMoyne; C/COL James Cox
1968-69 C/COL John Mcphail
1969-70 C/COL Louis A. Pucci; C/COL Mark Carlson
1970-71 C/COL John C. Heckin
1971-73 C/COL Larry G. Rodd
1973-74 C/COL Wayne R. Cribbs
1973-74 C/COL Walter Garrison
1974-75 C/COL John D. Frketic; C/COL Dennis Fitzsimmons
1975-76 C/COL James D. Bulger; C/COL Edwin G. Grenelle


APPENDIX G-1









1976-77 C/LTC John L. Markman; C/LTC Guy E. Raymond
1977-78 C/LTC Albert-M. Pino; C/LTC Winfred B. Alexander
1978-79 C/LTC Joseph1 Miller; C/LTC Thomas A. Daymude
1979-80 C/LTC Douglas B. Houston; C/LTC Monica Banse-Faye; C/LTC Juan J.
Winters
1980-81 C/LTC James M. Simmons; C/LTC Darrell Henderson; C/LTC Bernard
Scott
1981-82 C/LTC Chris E. Corbitt; C/LTC Jeryl S. Cornell
1982-83 C/LTC Thomas Newcomb; C/LTC Pierre R. Lys
1983-84 C/LTC Nancy Bryant; C/LTC Brian K. Haddle
1984-85 C/LTC Don A. Grundel; C/LTC Brian T. Whelan
1985-86 C/LTC Michael Fellows; C/LTC Edward G.Pruett
1986-87 C/LTC Jason E. Garfield; C/LTC Michael Aaron
1987-88 C/LTC Dennis Sweeney; C/LTC Thomas Dye
1988-89 C/LTC Brad Baldwin; C/LTC JeffMilhorn
1989-90 C/LTC Samuel Larkin; C/LTC Christopher Diez
1990-91 C/LTC N. Daniel Nelson; C/LTC William J. Schaum
1991-92 C/LTC Christopher Cornelius; C/LTC James Perry
1992-93 C/LTC Shannon Cecchini; C/LTC Richard Ennis
1993-94 C/LTC Jaren Grady; C/LTC Jerome Redmond
1994-95 C/LTC Joseph Kushner; C/LTC Kathleen Allred
1995-96 C/LTC Edwin Escobar; C/LTC Chess Lamm
1996-97 C/LTC William J. Brooks; C/LTC Daniel A. Alvarez
1997-98 C/LTC Roderick Stout; C/LTC Matthew Bowman
1998-99 C/LTC Chari Kelly; C/LTC Robert Snow
1999-00 C/LTC Jason Raub; C/LTC Jason Frketic
2000-01 C/LTC David Hammerschmidt; C/LTC Hideyoshi Johnson
2001-02 C/LTC Jeremiah Cordovano; C/LTC Nathan Hagemeier
2002-03 C/LTC Jamie Umberger; C/LTC Joshua Brown


APPENDIX G-2






APPENDIX H


U. S. ARMY BRANCHES


ADJUTANT GENERAL CORPS


ARMOR


AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY


AVIATION


CHEMICAL CORPS


CORPS OF ENGINEERS


FIELD ARTILLERY


FINANCE


APPENDIX H-






APPENDIX H


INFANTRY


MEDICAL SERVICE CORPS


MILITARY INTELLIGENCE


MILITARY POLICE


ORDINANCE


SPECIAL FORCES


QUARTERMASTER CORPS


SIGNAL CORPS


TRANSPORTATION CORPS


APPENDIX H-2






APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD


1. PURPOSE: To review and respond to possible honor code and behavioral violations
during cadet activities.

2. SCOPE: This instruction is applicable to and directive upon all cadets of the
Fightin' Gator battalion at the University of Florida. The Board exists to work in
conjunction with counseling and Green Cards, not in place of these important initial
actions.

3. STRUCTURE:

a. The Board convenes given one or more of the following circumstances:

(1) 3 unexcused absences from training events, e.g. (lab, PT, FTX's, etc.) as
required by MS level.

(2) Failure to attend an event to which one has committed oneself, e.g. (football
media pass detail, community service projects, etc.).

(3) Cadet Company Commander's recommendation with Cadet Battalion
Commander's approval.

b. The board members are the S-1 (presiding), A Co. Commander, B Co.
Commander, and one MS IV member each of the Alpha and Bravo Company
staff.

4. PROCEDURES:

a. The Board convenes under the conditions stated in paragraph 3.a. above.

b. The S-1 presides over the Board meeting.

c. The Board and the cadet(s) involved are present and in proper uniform
determined by the S-1.

d. The Board uses the AROTC-CDB 1-1 Board Recommendation form and
AROTC-CDB 2-1 Individual Record of Proceedings form to conduct the
proceedings.

e. The AROTC-CDB 2-1 forms (5) remain in the file record of the proceedings
while the AROTC-CDB 1-1 continues through the approval process before also
being filed in the record of the proceedings.

f. The cadet(s) involved addresses the Board stating all details pertaining to the
situation.


APPENDIX I-1






APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD


g. Each member of the Board hears and records the testimony of the cadet(s)
involved using the AROTC-CDB 2-1form and is free to ask questions.

h. The Board recesses after reviewing the testimony. Members deliberate and
vote on an action to be taken from the guidelines in paragraph 5 below. The
results are recorded on the AROTC-CDB 1-1 form.

i. Majority decision decides the outcome of all deliberations.

j. The cadet(s) under consideration of the Board remains immediately outside
the closed deliberation room until ordered to return before the Board to hear
its recommended action.

k. All recommendations made by the Board are reviewed by the Cadet Battalion
Commander and Cadet XO, and then by the Professor of Military Science or
his/her cadre representative before action is taken.

(1) Recommendations not approved at either the cadet or cadre level are
returned to the Board for amendment. The initial AROTC-CDB 1-1 is
placed in the file record and a new AROTC-CDB 1-1 is produced with the
'Convening Date', 'Amendment Date', 'Cadet(s)', and amended
'Recommendation' blocks completed within two days of receipt by the
Board.

(2) All amendment actions must be completed with the result of an approved
action within two weeks of the initial convening.

(3) Recommendations approved through the cadre level are placed in the file
record and action is taken.

1. The cadet(s) involved are notified of the amendment actions or final approval
within one week of the Board's initial convening.

m. Written reprimands for record as covered in paragraph 5.d. below are signed
by the S-1 as Head of the Cadet Disciplinary Board.

n. Failure to appear before the Board by the cadet(s) summoned results in an
investigation by the S-1 and CO of the cadet's(s') unit. Based on the results
of the investigation the Board will reconvene under mitigating circumstances
or refer the cadet(s) to their cadre advisor for formal counseling if mitigating
circumstances are absent or found invalid.


APPENDIX 1-2






APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD

o. Failure to appear before the reconvening of the Board or meet with their cadre
advisor for formal counseling results in referral to the PMS for formal
counseling.


5. RECOMMENDATIONS:

a. Take no action.

b. Issue a verbal reprimand.

c. Take administrative action that is commensurate with the severity and scope of
the infraction with the specific aim of correcting the deficiencies, e.g. (full
uniform inspections for chronically out of uniform cadets or having chronically
tardy cadets arrive 30 minutes early to events for the next two weeks.).

d. Issue a written reprimand placed in the cadet's file with possible suggestions of,
but not limited to, removal of consideration from special schools, e.g. (Airborne,
Air Assault, etc.) and removal of consideration from enrollment into and/or
advancement through the advanced course.

e. Referral to their respective cadre advisor for formal counseling.

f. Referral to the Professor of Military Science for administrative action.


APPENDIX 1-3


ADERSHI






APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD


APPENDIX 1-4







APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD

BOARD RECOMMENDATION

Convening Date:

Amendment Date (as applicable):

Cadet(s):


Testimony:


Cadet Disposition:

Recommendation:



Results (circle one): 5-0 4-1 3-2

Comments (optional):


Signatures:


S-1 A Co. CDR B Co CDR A Co Staff B Co Staff

Cadet Review (circle one): Approved Not Approved

Comments (optional):


Signatures:


BN CDR XO

Cadre Review (circle one): APPROVED NOT APPROVED

Comments (optional):


Signatures:


OR
PROFESSOR of MILITARY SCIENCE CADRE REPRESENTATIVE

INDIVIDUAL RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS

AROTC-CDB form JAN 98 1-1
APPENDIX I-5







APPENDIX I
AROTC CADET DISCIPLINARY BOARD


Date:

Cadet(s):

Testimony:


Cadet Disposition:

Comments:


AROTC-CDB form JAN 98 2-1


APPENDIX 1-6






APPENDIX J


Cadet Evaluation System

The Cadet Evaluation System (CES) applies to MS III's preparing to be accessed. It
provides a point-based system to quantify the leadership assessment process each MS III
goes through prior to and at Advanced Camp. Its purpose is to allow Cadet Command to
develop the most objectively-based Order of Merit List (OML) possible to rank order all
newly accessing cadets in a given year. Two OML's are made from the Cadet Evaluation
System: the OML is used to decide on the Distinguished Military Student/Distinguished
Military Graduate, (Top 1/3 of the class), and the Cadet Command OML that is used to
determine Active or Reserve forces duty and branch selection. Ultimately, the CES is
used as a major factor in determining suitability for commissioning.
The CES provides the opportunity to earn a possible 3000 points; 1000 points can be
earned at Advanced Camp, and 2000 points can be earned on-campus; 1000 from a
normalized cumulative GPA, and 1000 from on-campus evaluations (LDP, Military
Science Participation, Extra-Curricular Activities and Community Service). The CES
will be as objective as possible.

On Campus CES (OC-CES)

The OC-CES consists of five parts:

1. Overall GPA (1000 points). Cadets earn points based on comparing their overall
GPA to the mean GPA of students in their major and year group at the university.
The overall CUM GPA is compared by major to account for differences in grading
standards between schools and colleges. The normalized CUM GPA will be
converted into points. GPAs equal to the mean GPA receive 800 points.

2. PMS Leadership Assessment (600 points). Each MS III cadet will receive at least
7 formal Leadership Development Program (LDP) evaluations during the course of
the school year. These will be a combination of garrison and tactical leadership
positions. Certified cadre and MS IV's will evaluate the cadets using established
Performance Standard Indicators in their leadership positions to rate the cadets as
Excellent (E), Satisfactory (S), or Needs Improvement (N) in the leadership
dimensions as well as an overall rating. Feedback in the form of counseling is given
to the cadets by their evaluators so they can improve their leadership. Once an MS III
cadet has completed a leadership floor, an After Action Review is given to the
evaluator. He/she then completes a Cadet Self-Assessment Report (Cadet Command
form 156-2-R [Yellow Card]). This form gives the cadet the opportunity to give a
summary of his/her performance and list their strengths and weaknesses (in terms of
the 16 leadership dimensions) during that leadership floor. Once the cadet turns in
their form, the evaluator must review it for writing ability and unobserved actions,
then completes his summary of the MS III's performance on the Leadership
Evaluation Report (Blue Card). The evaluator will then counsel the cadet on his/her
overall performance and discuss the cadet's dimensional strengths and weaknesses.
Counseling will take place NLT COB of the next school day following the
completion of leadership duties at an agreed upon time between the evaluator and


APPENDIX J-1






APPENDIX J


evaluated cadet. All evaluations (Blue Cards) are averaged, by leadership
dimensions, at the end of the MIS III school year. Each PMS dimension summary
rating earns CES points as follows: an E rating earns 37.5 points; an S, 30 points; an
N, 22.5 points. While "Values" ratings are rated S or N, they are not scored for CES
points. The maximum number of points possible for all E ratings is 600. The
minimum number of points possible, all N ratings, is 360.

3. Leader potential Assessment (200 points). This is broken into two categories
worth 100 points each. The first is Performance and Potential rated by the MS III
advisor and the second is Leader Potential rated by the PMS. The only valid entries
for each of these categories are 100, 85 or 70.

4. Extracurricular Activities (100 points). These points are designed to reflect a
cadet's involvement in extracurricular activities (whole person concept); e.g. clubs,
fund-raisers, community service, sports etc. and support provided to otherjobs that
are considered, "above and beyond". The maximum number of points allowed for
ROTC-related activities is 50; the remainder must come form other campus or
community extracurricular activities.

5. Military Science GPA (100 points). Each semester of ROTC instruction is
graded on a 100-point scale. (The 100 Military Science GPA points is a weighted
average of the semesters, i.e. the first year x 1, second year x 2 and third year x 3,
then divide the sum by 12). The military science GPA points (max of 100 points)
will come from the cadet's average grade (based on a 100-point scale) from all ROTC
classes taken. Example: a 95% A grade is worth more than a 90% A.

Advanced Camp Cadet Evaluation System

The Advanced Camp Cadet Evaluation System is based on a possible total of 1000
points. You must score at least 770 to pass. This system is divided into eight areas:

Military Proficiency

1. Army Physical Fitness Test (100 points). While at camp, cadets will take the
standard Army Physical Fitness Test. Cadets must score at least a 180 point raw
score and at least 60 points in each of the three events, in order to pass the APFT.
The following formula is used to award CES points: PT (points) = (APFT score) / 3
The maximum PT score is 100 points. The minimum passing APFT score of 180 will
earn 60 points.

2. Land Navigation (100 points). Cadets at camp are tested on written map reading
skills and practical day and night land navigation ability. Raw scores are given from
all three parts, weighted 20% for the written test, 50% of the day practical test, and
30% for the night practical test. A raw score of 100 % is the maximum possible. The
minimum passing score is 79% on the written test (14 of 20) and 70% on each of the
two practical tests (35 of 50 on the day test and 21 of 30 on the night test). Points are


APPENDIX J-2






APPENDIX J


awarded using the following formula: LN (points) = (Raw Score). If a retest is given
and passed, the minimum passing score is awarded for the retested part only. Passing
all parts of land navigation is a camp completion requirement.

3. Basic Rifle Marksmanship (0 points). While at camp, cadets will fire the
standard qualification course, on which a total of 40 hits are possible. A cadet must
score at least 23 hits to qualify, which is a camp completion requirement. This event
is scored on a "go"/ "no go" basis.

Leadership

4. Field Leaders Reaction Course (FLRC) (40 points). Each cadet will receive one
leadership evaluation at FLRC, assessed by trained assessors from that committee.
The CES score is as follows: an "E" is 40 points, an "S" is 32 points and an "N" is 24.

5. TAC Leadership Positions (180 points). While at Advanced Camp, cadets are
placed into different chain of command leadership positions and graded by a different
TAC advisor for each. Cadets will have, at a minimum, three garrison leadership
floors (with at least one above squad level). TAC evaluators will observe, classify,
and rate as many leadership dimensions as possible while the cadet is in a leadership
position. The CES points earned for each of the three recorded positions are: "E"
earns 60 points; "S" earns 48 points; and an "N" earns 36 points.

6. TAC Summary Ratings (300 points). At the end of camp, the platoon TAC team
will analyze all leadership ratings (Blue Cards) a cadet has received and determine
summary ratings for each leadership dimension. They will consider each dimension
separately, across all leadership floors. This is converted into a point score giving the
cadet some percentage of the 300 available points. The CES score is as follows: an
"E" is 18.75 points, an "S" is 15 points and an "N" is 11.25 points.

7. Committee Leadership Positions (180points): Every cadet receives two leadership
evaluations in squad Situational Training Exercise (STX) and one leadership
evaluation in platoon STX by different assessors. Committee evaluators will observe,
classify, and rate as many leadership dimensions as possible while the cadet is in a
tactical leadership position. Cadets earn CES points as follows: an "E" earns 60
points, an "S" earns 48 points and an "N" earns "36" points.

8. TAC Overall Assessment (100 points). This is the Leader Potential Assessment
similar to the on-campus PMS Leader Potential. At the end of camp, the TAC team
will consider it's own observations as well as those of other cadre, peer evaluations
and camp support staff. This is converted into a score giving the cadet a percentage of
the 100 available points. The only valid entries are 100, 85 or 70 points.

Upon completion of Advanced Camp, these scores are totaled and placed on Cadet
Command Form 156, a form crucial for the cadet's overall accession packet. This
form shows scores in each area, point totals (this also includes other information, i.e.


APPENDIX J-3






APPENDIX J


BRM score, recondo badge, regiment mean and max score, etc.).

It is imperative that the all cadets realize how much GPA, OC-CES, and Advance
Camp effect him/her on the Overall Order of Merit List (OML) and with accessions.
Remember LEADERSHIP DOESN'T STOP ONCE THE EVALUATION IS
OVER!

The following page is a copy of a CES worksheet, which outlines a cadet CES
scoring.


APPENDIX J-4










APPENDIX J




ADMINISTRATIVE DATA


TOTAL CES POINTS: 0


ACADEMICS
ACAD IAJT: Cadet's GPA: Mean GPA for Major: CES CPA Pr: 800

Ldr Opp Job Performance Summary Card
Score Position Held Date VAL ME PH EM CN IP TE TA CO DM MO PL EX AS DE BD LR














PMS Leadership Dimension Rollhp:
FALSE #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### #### ##### #### ####
PMS LEADERSHIP DEMENSIONPOINTS: 0.0 I 1_
"Extra Curricular Activities"


Aetiities List
Color Ourd 10 0 20
DnlTeam 10 0 20
RangerChal "BeretTest" OR 10 0 20
RengerChallenge, Bde Team 15 0 30
Success as Recruiter 10 0 20
Success as Recruiter 10 0 20
Member ofUSARorNG 10 0 20
OtherCadetOrgarnsatons 10 0 20
Unused n/a 0
HonorSocietles 10 0 20
CommutiutySe-evie 10 0 20
Student Govenmment/Cormrttee 5 0 15
IntramuralTeam 10 0 20
BandMember 10 0 20
Theateror DebateTeam 10 0 20
RecogrnedClub orTeam 15 0 30
VarsityAthletics 20 0 40
ElectedOfficial Social Orgarsation 5 0 10
Leader of any above 10 0 20
ResidentAdvisor 10 0 20
Peer Educator or Tutor 5 0 15
Work (one pointpe hour perweek) 20 0 40
Other n/a 0
Unused n/a 0

"Whole Pers" Indicator Points
TotalPoints-Extr ROTC 0 Total Points-Extr Curricular
Total Points Applied (100 max)


LEADER POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT ValidEntries: 100/8570
Advanced Campq
Perfonance and Potential(PTO Only)
On-campus
Perfonnance andPotential (MS III Advisor)
Leader Potental(PMS)


MIL SCI GPA COMPUTATION
CRS NUMBER GRADE
MS 100 0.0
MS 101 0.0
MS 102 0.0
MS 103 0.0
MS 104 0.0
MS 200 0.0
MS 201 0.0
MS 202 0.0
MS 203 0.0
MS 204 0.0
MS 300 0.0
MS 301 0.0
MS 302 0.0
MS 303 0.0
MS 304 0.0


TotalMlitaryScience Credits
Cumulative GPA, Militay Science


0
0.0
rn 2


On Campus Evaluation
Grade Point Average (1000 max) 800
Extra Cumcular Actvtties (100 max) 0
Military Science GPA (100 max) 0
PMS Dimension Rollup (600 max) 0
Performance and Potential Assessment (100 Max) 0
Leader Potential Assessment(100 Max) 0
Total On Campus Points (2000 max) 800


APFT (100 Max)
Land Navigation (100 Max)
Leadership Position Assessment (400)
TAC Dimension Rollup (300 Max)
Performance and Potential Assessment (100 Max)
Total Advanced Camp Points (1000 max)
BRM
RECONDO


PMS SIGN/DATE


CDT SIGN/DATE
NOTE BDE CDR SIGNATURE INDICATES REVIEW OF ROTC AND EXTRACURRICULAR PTS,
BDE CDR SIGN PMS DIMENSION SUMMARY, AND MIL SCI GPA POINTS. (1,2,&3ABOVE)


APPENDIX J-5


NAME:
SSAN:


i-i I------- --- ------




* U


ILL


TO W


* U




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