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UWI today ( 10-27-2013 )

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UWI today
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OUR NATION 04Invest in Your Homeland President Carmona OUR SPORT 14Ten Whole Years of e Half Todays Race Day!Has it all come to Nought? A Vision for CARICOMOUR REGION 07 Rebuilding Montserrat An Education Passport OUR ARTS 12Film Student Eyes e Prize O to Holland e Dream of Regionalism(See Page 8)

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 OUR CAMPUS EDITORIAL TEAMCAMP US PR IN CI PA L Professor Clement Sankat DI RECTOR O F MARK ET ING AND C O MMUNI CAT IO NS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill DI RECTOR O F MARK ET ING AND C O MMUNI CAT IO NS Ag.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio ED I TOR Ms. Vaneisa Baksh CO N TACT US The UWI Marketing and Communications Ofce Tel: (868) 662-2002, exts. 82013 / 82014 Or email: uwitoday@sta.uwi.eduAt the beginning of June, a M emorandum of U nderstanding was signed in Trinidad and Tobagos Parliament for the establishment of a Confucius I nstitute (C I) at the S t Augustine campus of e UWI is had been one of the outcomes of the S tate visit by President Xi Jinping, of the Peoples Republic of China in 2010 when a three-year M OA had been signed between the campus and the CI where the G overnment of China provided a lecturer in the M andarin language and Chinese culture to e UWI Centre for L anguage L earning from January 2011. On October 23, at a ceremony lled with stirring performances at the Daaga Auditorium on the S t Augustine campus, the Confucius I nstitute was formally launched in the presence of the M inister of F oreign Aairs, M r Winston Dookeran; Chinese Ambassador, His Excellency Huang Xingyuan; UWI Chancellor, S ir G eorge Alleyne; Campus Principal and Pro Vice-Chancellor, Professor Clement S ankat, Campus Council Chair, M r Ewart Williams and President of the China Agricultural U niversity, Professor KE Bingsheng. G uests were welcomed by Professor S ankat, who said that through the C I e UWI will strengthen its relations with China. is will be done by making available the teaching of Chinese to corporate and private citizens; deepening our understanding of Chinese culture in general and more specifically Chinese culture in business. Additionally, research will be conducted on contemporary China in areas such as science and technology, trade and the economy, the arts, international relations and global higher education, he said. Professor Bingsheng, whose university (CA U ) will partner with The UWI on this initiative, said that although there are already more than 300 C I s in over 100 countries in the world, the one being launched was one of the most important results of the Chinese Presidents visit. I t is my strong belief that the establishment of the C I will not only provide a good platform for facilitating mutual exchanges and understanding in the eld of languages and cultures, and thus play a big role in promoting economic cooperation and peoples friendship between our two countries, but also offer good opportunities to explore potentials for educational and research collaboration between the two universities, he said. China Agricultural U niversity is one of Chinas key research universities, and accredited as one of the elite universities for a special support programme in China. G uests were also addressed by Ambassador Huang Xingyuan and M inister Dookeran before the ceremonial unveiling of a plaque of commemoration. There were performances by the Chinese Arts and Culture Studies Society, the Chinese S teel Ensemble of Trinidad and Tobago, M s Anya Reyes, and students from the Centre for L anguage L earning, before the Dean of the F aculty of Humanities and Education, Professor F unso Aiyejina, brought the ceremony to a close.A commemorative plaque was unveiled at the ceremony when the Confucius Institute was formally launched at Daaga Auditorium. From le: President of the China Agricultural University, Professor KE Bingsheng; Chinese Ambassador, His Excellency Huang Xingyuan; Minister of Foreign Aairs, Mr Winston Dookeran; UWI Chancellor, Sir George Alleyne, and Campus Principal and Pro ViceChancellor, Professor Clement Sankat. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIMConfucius InstituteLAUNCHED Fostering Regional Discourse FROM THE PRINCIPAL e UWI stands out as one of the strongest symbols of West I ndies integration and it must continue to nd ways to promote the interests of West I ndian societies through the interaction of our sta, students, alumni and key stakeholders. is is what many of us, through discussion and sometimes erce debates, have been doing over the years and e UWI has provided a forum to facilitate this. Times have changed and we have witnessed the growth of national institutions as well as the penetration of foreign institutions, all responding to market demands for tertiary education. While this may be a positive sign, is it sustainable in the long term? And is this helping to build our indigenous knowledge base and to strengthen West I ndian capacity in a manner that will ensure robustness and quality? CAR I CO M has a key role here. Higher education funding, quality, accreditation, articulation and mobility, together with research and innovation, must be high on CAR I CO M s agenda and our region must support this much more than it is doing! I think it is time for e UWI, with CARI CO M s support, to establish itself as the leader in driving the transformation of the entire higher education sector of the region. Our institution has the experience, the regional machinery and the human capacity to take the lead in creating the framework for a federal university system that encompasses all publicly funded Caribbean tertiary education institutions. I have spoken of this before as a means of building sustainability and West Indianness as we go forward. We need to create a new generation of West I ndians committed to such a cause, and our schools and universities are great starting points. And as we look to CARI CO M to deepen the integration movement, CARI CO M countries can also look to UWI, as a model on how we have brought 16 sovereign territories together to create a unique regional institution that has continued to grow and thrive over 65 years. With this in mind, we have initiated a regional discourse, rst by inviting the Secretary-G eneral of CARI CO M, Ambassador Irwin L aRocque to share his vision on its future, and by having S ir S hridath Ramphal further the conversation with his insights. We will continue to foster this type of regional discourse at the Campus and hope that this commitment to regionalism will continue to spread across our individual national territories as we seek to address challenges that are common to all West I ndian societies and to strengthen our position as a region in international aairs.CLEMENT K. S ANKATPro Vice-Chancellor & Principal

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4 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 OUR CAMPUS Personally, it is an incredible feeling that forty years ago, in 1973, I was, like most of you here today, a new student, beginning my university life at e U niversity of the West Indies, but at the Mona Campus in Jamaica. I am proud to be a graduate of e UWI this premier academic institution which, since the opening of its rst campus in Jamaica in 1948, has produced thousands of alumni who have gone on to impact the region and the world in all spheres of endeavour. Today, I join in welcoming this years incoming class and I congratulate you all on making it to this next level of your academic career. U sually, on such occasions the focus is understandably on you, matriculating students, however, I challenge you to consider that you are not here solely by dint of your own hard work and commitment. Reect on those who helped make today possible. Perhaps it was a parent or guardian, a teacher, a study partner, a friend, a mentor. Perhaps it was someone with whom you may never even have spoken but who provided the necessary inspiration for you to pursue excellence. Perhaps it was that classmate whom you made it a point would never beat you in exams, or maybe it was someone who callously or unwittingly told you that you would never amount to anything. Perhaps poverty or other dicult life circumstances helped rm your resolve to achieve. Encouragement comes in all forms and perhaps, without that push or that support, we would never scratch the surface of our potential. S uccessive governments and by extension, the taxpayers of Trinidad and Tobago have also invested in you by providing free tertiary education for our citizens. is privilege must not be taken lightly for there are some who do not enjoy this privilege. By investing in you, the nation is demonstrating not only its commitment to your future but also its belief in your potential. Always remember, even as you focus on your own individual dreams and pursuits, that you are the nations investment. Permit me to share with you a few of my thoughts as you embark upon your university career: THE I MPOR T AN CE OF DIS CI PL INE With an average of some twelve hours per week of scheduled classes, time management is critical to your academic success and total development. At university, procrastination is your worst enemy as it is easy to lose focus on why you are here in the rst place. THE I MPOR T AN CE OF T EAMWORK ere are persons of varying ability and it is a sad truth that students are oen content to watch others stumble and not oer assistance. is is unfortunate and ironic since, in the working world, success is oen dened by how well one can work with others. Why not begin changing that mindset while you are here? THE I MPOR T AN CE OF PERSIST EN CE I t is oen said that education is the key to success. While this may be so, experience has taught me that persistence is sometimes an even greater key. History shows that many of the worlds most successful men and women were not the brightest and most educated, but were the most innovative and most persistent. THE I MPOR T AN CE OF C HARA CT ER/PERSONAL INTEGRITY e world is replete with examples of highly accomplished men and women whose lack of integrity has been exposed and whose reputations have been permanently tainted. F ame, wealth, brilliance and talent will all be skewed without integrity. I ntegrity is not for national and international leaders alone. I t equally applies to each of you here today. THE I MPOR T AN CE OF SERV IC E S elshness has become a cancer in our society. e gied and talented among us must not exempt themselves from service and from engaging themselves in the issues of the wider society. I have observed that, by virtue of their exceptional gis, skills and talents, we have placed them on pedestals and in glass boxes, only to be admired and emulated. I n so doing we rob them and ourselves of that humility that is born of service, to their and to our ultimate detriment. I encourage you to seek out opportunities to serve. I also ask you to consider investing in your homeland. Even if you go abroad to pursue further studies and to gain invaluable experience, why not return home and invest in those who have invested in you? Our nation needs its best and brightest if it is to continue to move forward. As university students, you are not isolated from the real world. You are a part of it. e university is not the proverbial ivory tower that most make it out to be. Real life and its attendant issues do not retreat while you study. ese are the years in which you begin making important is version of the address by His Excellency Anthony omas Aquinas Carmona ORTT, S.C. at the Annual Matriculation and Welcome Ceremony at e UWI St. Augustine Campus JFK Quadrangle on ursday 19 September, has been slightly edited for length.Invest in Your HomelandBY P RESI DE NT ANTHO NY C ARMONAGuests at the Matriculation Ceremony were entertained by UWIs Arts Chorale, conducted here by Kendra Flores. PHOTOS: ROBERT T AYL OR

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 UWI student, Jehue Gordon, who is also a national award winner, was presented with a token of recognition for his outstanding performances in track and eld from St. Augustine Campus Principal, Professor Clement Sankat at the Matriculation Ceremony. and potentially stressful decisions about the future. While you are here, you may face family conict, divorce of parents, breakdown of relationships, serious illness, death of a loved one, pregnancy, academic pressure, bullying and even sexual abuse. Any of these issues can force you into a place where you may feel powerless, severely aecting your ability to cope and to focus on your studies. I have heard far too many accounts where students have found themselves unable to cope with various types of stress, leading to depression and ultimately suicide. According to the World Health Organisation, among 15to 19-year-olds, suicide is the second leading cause of death worldwide aer accidents. e G lobal School Health Report for Trinidad and Tobago (2007) indicated approximately 18% of students within the 13-15 year age group who were interviewed considered attempting suicide. You are a group more acquainted with success than with failure. What happens when you fail? What happens when you do the wrong thing? What happens when life doesnt go as you planned? I want to raise the importance of genuine community and friendship. You may think you have friends because you have liming and study partners but do you really look out for one another? Can you tell when something is really aecting your partner? The graduation ceremonies at the St. A ugustine campus of The U WI (Oct 2426) have just ended, closing a chapter in the lives of many new graduates as they set off on new journeys. The six valedictorians W ainella Isaacs, Grace Bhagwandeen, M artrecia A lleyne, S henelle R amjewan, S amantha Jackson and Cherisse Ratiram spoke on behalf of their graduating classes, while each ceremony was addressed by one of six honorary graduands. This campus conferred honorary degrees on the Rt R ev Clive A bdulah and Mr Ian R andle ( LLD ) D r L akshmi P ersaud and M s M arina S alandy-Brown ( DL itt) and D r Theodosius P oonK ing and Dr E lisha Tikasingh ( DS c) Best wishes to all the students and honorees. In our next issue we will feature more on our graduation ceremonies. Look out for it! I t is important that you have people who you can conde in, people you can share the dicult issues with, whether they are friends, family, religious leaders, counsellors, professors. ere is nothing noble in suering silently, especially if that suering will lead to hurting yourself and those who love you. I have noted the emergence of the disturbing new trend of cyber-bullying. Technology is a tool of great benet, providing convenience and utility, and helping to make the university experience both pleasant and productive. But like any other tool, technology is only as good as the person using it. U sing the I nternet, especially websites such as F acebook, Twitter and YouTube, people have become cowards, resorting to lurking in cyberspace, using fake social media accounts and harassing and degrading others with whom they have a dispute. Where has your manliness gone? Why not come out of the shadows, look the other person in the eyes and discuss your beef, as it were? Dont add to this generation of cowards. I congratulate you, once more, and look forward to the lasting contribution which you will make to the further development of our beautiful nation of Trinidad and Tobago, to the Caribbean region and to the world. Graduation Time!

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 7 OUR CAMPUSA Little Volcano about to EruptBY VA NE ISA BA KS HI admire nature and the outdoors so I absolutely love hiking, says Denecia, so every weekend in Montserrat a group of like-minded people would go hiking through various trails. On this particular day [in March] we went into the unsafe zone and walked to the top of St. Georges Hill where we had a panoramic view of the volcano, she said, as she shared the photo she took (below). Above, Denecia West on the green St. Augustine campus. PHOTO: SAFIYA ALFONSO Yawl see the same blue sky as we do? at was just one of the questions that came her way in her rst days on whats supposed to be one of the more sophisticated islands in the Caribbean. I t didnt surprise her too much though. Coming to UWI s S t Augustine campus on a partial scholarship called Rebuild M ontserrat, Denecia West has had a load of odd questions. S hes been asked things that would make regionalists cringe over the lack of West I ndian knowledge; but shes also found that Caribbean friendliness has the same warmth no matter what twang its packaged in. ey dont know anywhere in the Caribbean; if its not Trinidad, Barbados or Jamaica, they dont know. A lot of people, I ve told them I m from M ontserrat, and they say, oh, you speak F rench, dont you? N o, that is M artinique. ey just dont know, she says with a wry smile. But she made friends quickly, and they have acted as guides, showing her the ropes, explaining jargon, introducing her to Trini cuisine, and making sure she understands the need to be vigilant about her security. Denecia has just begun her rst semester in the F aculty of S ocial S ciences, reading for a B S c in Public Sector M anagement, an area she has always been interested in, mainly because of her disgust at poor service. What grinds my gears is walking into an organisation and seeing people not doing their work, obviously wasting time; inefficiencies. N ow, back home, there are some incidents of people in the public service not doing any work. I believe that I can make a change especially when you have mistakeslike million-dollar mistakesjust because one person did not do their job. I think there needs to be an iron st (laughs) in the public sector. And for people to take their work seriously because a lot of people just go to work for 8 o clock, 8.30, and leave 4 oclock, at 3:55. N othing gets done. There is that, plus there is also what I believe is corruption, not only M ontserrat, but in governments. M any people go into politics saying that they will x corruption from the political side, but I believe that you can x it from the administrative side. Say for instance a politician makes a decision; they say were going to grant ve people scholarships. at sounds very good, doesnt it? But then, the administrators are responsible for choosing those people, and that is where, I think, the corruption is. N ot all the time it is the politicians. S ometimes it is the administrators who need a slap on the wrist to understand that you cant be biased, and nepotism and all of that doesnt work all the time. Denecia may sound like a re-breathing dragon, but shes really a cheery, spirited, gutsy 21-year-old with a strong sense of purpose, and one of them is to improve the quality of life for people generally. S he grew up in post-volcano M ontserrat, being just three when S oufrire erupted in 1995. e island, which once had a population of around 12,000, is really a massive re-building project, with almost everything either still under construction, newly-built, or about to begin. N early two-thirds of the island has been uninhabitable since then, and more than half the people have packed up and moved out of the British dependency. e population now stands at just under 6,000, a little less than students graduating from this campus every year, or just around half of the Queens Park Ovals capacity. e eruption took away half of the country in more than one way, slashing a line right through its belly, disgorging countless families, many of whom had to be separated for long periods, ruining the economy (once a musicians recording paradise), and virtually rendering the 16km x 11km island invisible to even its nearest neighbour to the north, Antigua. L iving in an environment where services were always strained and limited, Denecia developed a erce revulsion for ineciency and corruption, and a desire for adventure, for stepping out of the connes of this space. S o when she heard of the scholarship, she jumped at it, quickly applying to the S t. Augustine campus and barely making the deadline. S hed heard Trinidad was a big bacchanal city, a giant ongoing party, and when she landed at Piarco International Airport, the rst shock was the highwaysthe number of lanes, the volume of tracit was unlike the simple, uncluttered roads back home. en, the taxi driver warned her about crime. Crime! e murder gures astound and scandalize her. In M ontserrat, we may have a murder once every three or four years, she says. e biggest crimes are petty the. I lived by myself for two years. F or the rst two months I didnt realise that my sliding door couldnt close. Id been sleeping in my bed, I d been walking around my house, I le my house and came back, and the sliding doors never closed. N ever locked. And nothing has happened to me. Nothing has ever happened to me. You know how many people fall asleep and leave their doors open? And heres another thing. I know this one is going to catch you o. Youre leaving your car, and you want to leave the windows down, you leave the key inside; because if rain falls, somebody is going to come and close up the window for you. Nobody would drive o with it? And go where? she asks. ats when the enormity of this young womans leap from M ontserrat to S t Augustine really hits you and you want to cheer her on through the remarkable journey she has just begun.

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8 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 OUR CAMPUS When Eric W illiams inscribed From Columbus to Castro to me in 1970, the seed of CA RIFT A had sprouted; the Caribbean C ommunity and C ommon Market was on its way to being agreed. Work on the Treaty to formalise and ll it out was in hand under the guidance of William D emas at the Secretariat as he toiled in the vineyard of regional economic integration and inspired a generation of West Indian regionalists: economists and others. The Treaty was signed at Chaguaramas on July 4, 1973the original Treaty of C haguaramassigned initially by Prime Ministers Errol Barrow, Forbes Burnham, Michael Manley and Eric Williams. The signing of the Treaty has been described as a landmark in the history of West Indian people; and so it was. But we had attered to deceive. We gloried in the parchment, but ignored what it required. Within years, we had relapsed into inertia and worse. For seven years, from 1975 to 1982, the Heads of Government Conference with the C ommon Market Council, CA RIC OMs principal organdid not meet. N o wonder that CAR I CO M languished during the 1980s as well. But towards the end of the decade fortunes changed. Michael M anley replaced S eaga in Jamaica and in Trinidad and Tobago A. N .R. Robinson entered the vineyard lamenting CARI CO M s lack of not only political but philosophical underpinnings. M anley brought Jamaica back to its Caribbean roots; but it was Robinson who helped CARI CO M return to its intellectual moorings. His Paper addressed to the 1989 Heads of G overnment Conference at G rand Anse, G renada, which he entitled e West Indies Beyond 1992 was a wake-up call to the region. 1992 was 500 years since Columbus mis-named voyage of discovery. ough I was in L ondon at the time his paper was being prepared, the Prime M inister consulted with me on it. I was enthused that a new leadership was emerging. e response of his colleagues at G rand Anse was equally encouraging, and among the conclusions embodied in the Grand Anse Declaration and Work Programme for the Advancement of the Integration Movement was:We are determined to work towards the establishment in the shortest possible time of a single market and economy for the Caribbean Community. I t is now more than 25 years since that assertion. West I ndian technicians took their leaders to the brink of implementation with the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas. But there was no actionno political action, no political will to act. I n all the years, over two decades, nothing decisive has happened to full the integration dream of Grand Anse. Twenty years ago, in 1993, following the rejection of the West I ndian Commissions proposal for an executive authority for the Caribbean Community, I expressed concern that the emphasis of the political and bureaucratic establishment thereaer would be on sovereignty and national turf in generala cloistered immaturity; because now, in the era of globalisation, sovereignty has so little content. How, for example, has the individual sovereignty of Caribbean countries insulated them from the power of external forces? e World Bank has graduated them from concessional nancing; the OECD has imposed criteria for nancial services that are enforced by the IMF ; the WTO has refused to accord special and dierential treatment to the small and vulnerable economies of the region; the 27nation E U demanded reciprocity with each of the Caribbean countries individually under an Economic Partnership Agreement; and several of the regions governments have individually entered economic and nancing arrangements with China which lack any real negotiation. Powerlessness, not power, is the political reality at every national level. S overeignty, still touted, has lost much of its meaning. Yet West I ndian governments, unable to assert it in the wider world, seek fullment in asserting it against each other. Have West I ndian leaders been advised that all is well? N o, of course not. I n the face of the storm, they have sought shelter in the old refuge of local control, not the new haven of regional integration. CARI CO M s leaders appear to have settled for nominal unitythe lowest level of regionalism consistent with identity. S o, it seems that where vision is vital, there is stagnation; where leadership is essential, there is inertia. But, to pause in a rapidly moving world is really to stop; and to pause in mid-ight is to plummet. I t is not as if the regions political leaders are not able and enlightened West I ndians. Each of them possesses these qualities and more. S o why, when acting collectively, does a vision of Caribbean integration elude them and leadership to drive the process lapse? I t is because both vision and leadership point to the necessity for them to share controland sharing requires a commitment to mature regionalism. I f in 300 years the Caribbean has not reached there, will it ever? I know that the region must; and I believe that it can. But, in doing so it must recapture the spirit of its earlier eorts that, aer the federal project failed, brought the region from CARIFTA to CARI CO M and saw it deal with the edgling European Community with a unity then that was stronger than theirs. I t is important to retain the vision of Time for Action and full the hopes of West Indians for West Indian lives. I t is instructive that, while last year Caribbean leaders were pausing integration, there appeared in the Barbados Nation newspaper an account of a verbatim conversation with a local food vendor. I value the vendors sentiments, expressed in her own words, for their honest reection of how West Indian people feel:From Jamaica to Guyana is one West Indian nation. Whats the reason for a CARICOM passport if we cant have a Caribbean nation? I cant tell you what a Bajan is, because what you nd in a Barbadian, you nd in a Trinidadian, in a Vincentian, in a Jamaican. Because people are just people; and West Indian people, we are a gem. I dont see Grenadians, Guyanese, St. Lucians. I see people. e only thing that separates us is us.I meant to stop there. But no conversation with you tonight can now exclude the cornerstone decision of the Caribbean Court of Justice in the M yrie case given last Friday. M y West I ndian vendor should feel good. e CCJ conrmed her assertion that from Jamaica to G uyana is one West Indian nation. I ts nding on the facts about Ms M yries mistreatment is timely and, I feel, incontrovertible. But its greatest contribution is the regional jurisprudence it armed. e ruling has established the paramountcy of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas over national lawin regional matters. It has conrmed the status of the Treaty as the Constitution of the CAR I CO M Caribbeana founding document which no claim to national sovereignty can transgress. I t has taken great learning and courage for the CCJ to pronounce it in so erudite and authoritative a manner. To shun the Court in its wider jurisdiction is now a reection on the country opting out. Now, let us converse. is is an edited excerpt from the lecture delivered by Sir Shridath Ramphal on October 7 at the beginning of International Week 2013 on the St. Augustine campus, which was hosted by the Institute of International Relations. You can nd the full text of his presentation in our online version at http://sta.uwi.edu/uwiToday/default.aspe Moving Finger OF H IS TORY

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 In 2011, Professor N orman Girvan, myself, and a team of researchers from the UWI Institute of International Relations (IIR) undertook a wide-ranging study which sought to assess the state of the regional integration process in general, and CARI CO M in particular. We interviewed over 100 key stakeholders from across the region, and our study came to two main conclusions. First, we discovered that there is huge attachment to integration and a strong desire from people across the Caribbean to see it succeed. However, second, there appears to be an almost similarly large degree of pessimism regarding the likelihood of this happening, and a generalised perception that the integration process, as it is presently conceived, is in steep decline. S o how can these two apparently competing tendencies be reconciled? I n our study, we suggested 20 recommendations which would require vision, ambition and a complete restructuring of, not just CARI CO M, but both the rationale and apparatuses for Caribbean regionalism more broadly. Very few of these ideas have gained traction, but we did nonetheless set out an expansive and optimistic vision for what regional integration might become. M ore recently, the CAR I CO M S ecretariat itself commissioned a report by the L andell M ills development consultancy. is was markedly narrower, more technical and constrained in its scope. I t focused specically on the operation of the S ecretariat itself, and suggested a slimming of the institutions focus to simply deal with a number of priority areas in which policy could be implemented. Beyond this, CAR I CO M s ambition and responsibility would be drastically curtailed. What we have, then, are essentially two competing visions of the future of integration. There is the view encapsulated in the IIR report which can be considered an optimistic, yet perhaps less realistic and excessively hopeful view, which sees both CAR I CO M and the wider integration process that it underpins in a considerably more expansive light. en there is the second view, which is notably more austere, but perhaps more pragmatic regarding the likely capacity of CAR ICOM to eect meaningful transformation, and which eectively sees the institution shrinking to take on a necessarily more narrow, but arguably more focused, portfolio of responsibilities. I t is very much within the contours of this second view that S ecretaryG eneral Ambassador I rwin L aRocques own vision for CARI CO Mwhich was the subject of his Distinguished L ecture at the S t Augustine campus of e UWI on October 3can be understood. I n many respects, L aRocques lecture was deeply impressive. He made a convincing case for the defence of the institution, highlighting a number of areas of successful policy development about which the public are oen poorly informed. He quite rightly noted that CAR I CO M is the longest surviving integration movement in the developing world, and globally is second only to the European Union (E U ). He also emphasised that the test of CAR I CO M s success is not simply about what happens in the Secretariat, but should rather be ascertained by reecting on the myriad institutionsof which there are more than 20which orbit it. M oreover, the S ecretary-G enerals analysis of the problems aicting the regional integration process was candid, lucid and sobering. He displayed a shrewd awareness of the changing regional, hemispheric and global context in which CARI CO M is operating. A number of processes, such as the inability of Caribbean countrieswhich are relatively better o in GDP per capita terms than those in other developing regionsto access concessional nancing, and the huge debt burdens that many are carrying, all militate against a commitment to the implementation of regional edicts which are often perceived as being expensive. L aRocque was also quite right, in my view, to stress that integration has to be about much more than trade, something which has dominated the process since the establishment of the C SM E and the broader dominance of neoliberal ideas since the 1980s. Where I am perhaps less in agreement was in his assertion that, too oen, we set ourselves over-ambitious targets which doom us to failure. M y disagreement with this notion stems from the fact that it reects the fundamentaland perhaps unbridgeabledivide between the two positions encompassed within the IIR and L andell Mills reports respectively. On the reading advanced by Ambassador LaRocque which, given his role and the very dicult job that he has to do to balance a range of competing tendenciesthe contours of the possible are necessarily perceived as being heavily constrained. is is further reected in the solutions which he advanced during his lecture: focusing on the kinds of priority areas identied in the L andell M ills report, engaging in a three-year restructuring of the CARI CO M S ecretariat, undertaking consultations relating to economic recovery, strengthening governance, improving infrastructure and so on. M oreover, he ended by posing a number of salient questions: Should we deepen or widen? Can we do both at the same time? Should sanctions be introduced to ensure compliance? What are the most appropriate governance arrangements? e problem, as I see it, is that we know the answers to these questions. M any reports have been written by the regions nest mindsfrom Sir S hridath Ramphals 1992 report of the West I ndian Commission, Time for Action to Professor N orman Girvans Single Development Vision of 2006, and Professor Vaughan L ewiss 2007 report on creating new institutions of CAR I CO M governancewhich oer wide-ranging prospectuses for infusing the integration process with energy and direction. However, the kinds of answers that all of them proposed do unfortunately exist well outside the constraints within which Ambassador L aRocque himself, and our regional technocrats, are operating. M oreover, they all involve deeply political rather than simply technical solutions. And this brings us full circle: L aRocques proposed solutions are, within these perceived constraints, about the best that we can hope for. ere is, for example, little doubt that the S ecretariat itself requires a signicant degree of institutional transformation. However the travails in which the CAR I CO M S ecretariat nds itself are of a second order nature, and they only exist as a reection of a series of much deeper problems. Consequently, the proposed technical solutions are largely palliatives, aimed at treating symptoms, not the rst order problem of the core sickness itself. e central aspect of this is the enduring unwillingness of the regional political elite to cede power to regional institutions with the prerogative to enforce compliance and implement regional policy. is is something the E Ua regional grouping of countries with far less in common than those in the Caribbeanmanaged 20 years ago. Even the OEC S as Ambassador L aRocque himself noted, has managed it too (with the signing of the Revised Treaty of Basseterre in 2011). When viewed in this light, CARI CO M s performance unfortunately appears distinctly less impressive. S imply because it has survived for 40 years, does not mean that it will remain relevant for another 40. M y sense is that, without a rediscovery of the political purpose of integration, and a conscious widening of the boundaries of the possible by those in power in the region, a period of decline could well become terminal. I t barely needs saying that such an eventuality would be an absolute tragedy.A Vision for CAR ICOM?BY MATTHEW L BIS HOPDr Matthew Bishop is a lecturer at the Institute of International Relations, e UWI, St Augustine. For the full text of the lecture by Ambassador Irwin LaRocque please visit our website at http://sta.uwi.edu/uwiToday/default.asp LaRocque was also quite right, in my view, to stress that integration has to be about much more than trade, something which has dominated the process since the establishment of the CSME and the broader dominance of neoliberal ideas since the 1980s.

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10 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 OUR CAMPUS In August, seven graduate trainees and vacation interns from e UWI took time o from their assignments at the Point L isas-based methanol producer, M ethanex Trinidad L imited, with nine other trainees to install equipment and appliances at the Autism Place in DAbadie. I n this programme, students are chosen from dierent elds of study and the internship merges dimensions of exposure including practical work experience, mentorship and facilitating a meaningful contribution to society. UWI graduates also have an opportunity to apply for the G raduateI n-Training programme with the prospect of working at Methanex Trinidad L imited. Charles Percy, M anaging Director and Chief Executive Ocer, M ethanex Trinidad, outlined the signicance of the project: As part of our holistic development training, we challenge our trainees to plan and implement a project that has positive social impact. rough the project at Autism Place, they have improved the facilities, and consequently, the level of care that the dedicated volunteers are able to provide. F aheema Baksh, a M echanical and M anufacturing Engineering student, related her transformative experience. At rst I was just excited by the opportunity to gain work experience at a world-leading company like M ethanex. O pen Campus V aledictorianA Trinidadian, N ikishia G reenidge was the 2013 Valedictorian at the Graduation ceremony of The UWI Open Campus on October 12. A former student of Vessigny Secondary School in Trinidad, where she now teaches, 33-year-old N ikishia was honoured for excellence in A dditional Mathematics and Mathematics, the subjects she loves most, and which she has taught for 12 years. She also oers free extra classes and volunteers at the N ational C entre for Persons with Disabilities. A s a paraplegic, N ikishia has faced several challenges, but she prefers that those who see her disability in the context of what she should not be able to do, instead seek to understand better the social and physical limitations and boundaries that exist, and design methods to circumvent these diculties. She had acquired a BSc degree in Information Systems and Management in 2004 as an external student of the U niversity of L ondon, and then, to further her interest in Mathematics E ducation, she enrolled in 2009 with the UWI Open C ampus to read for the online BEd D egree in Secondary Mathematics E ducation, which she completed this year with First Class Honours. She has already begun a MSc degree programme in Mathematics at the St. A ugustine C ampus, and plans to read for the postgraduate diploma in Instructional D esign with the UWI Open Campus.D isability S tudies at the F aculty of M edical S ervicesThe Unit of Public Health and Primary C are at the E ric Williams Medical Sciences C omplex, Mt. H ope has integrated Social Disability Studies into the teaching programme of fourth-year medical students at the Faculty of Medical Sciences. Via an Introduction to Social D isability Studies, lecturer Maria Thomas, assisted by Teresina Sieunarine led students through a process of sensitization that included building awareness of the experiences of persons living with disabilities. Ms. Stacy Parris, a member of the Disabled Peoples International, Trinidad and Tobago Chapter, delivered a stirring rendition of one of her poems, entitled, I have a questionWhat do you see when you look at me? The process continued with information on the dierent models of disabilities, appropriate language for referring to persons with disabilities, and the importance of advocacy to ensure the application of human rights for this population. Social D isability Studies at U WI began in Behavioural Sciences as an effort to support the integration of persons with disabilities into society. This social policy initiative from the Social Work U nit is designed to assist the social functioning of the community of persons with special needs by changing attitudes in the wider population. Students of Behavioural Sciences have benefited from this course and some have gone on to promote the rights of persons with disabilities in their various fields. The introduction of this course to medical students extends Social D isability Studies beyond the social sciences to professionals who would interact and treat with persons with disabilities during their own work experience. The two-hour lecture will be repeated every eight weeks to reach the six groups of clinical students.at perspective changed quickly, because I realised how much deeper this was than just a vacation job. ey guided us with professional experience, but it was the inculcation of the M ethanex value systems that made this experience fullling. Working with my peers from UWI in giving back to the kids at Autism Place has changed my life. N o matter where I end up working eventually, I will always seek to make a dierence and give back to society as M ethanex has shown us that we can. e M ethanex projects ties in perfectly with the concept of service learning and community engagement that is being stressed at e UWI S t Augustine campus. Deputy Principal, Professor Rhoda Reddock, under whose oce this initiative falls, supports the idea that it works at many levels: not only for the recipients, but because it is an important pillar in the development of students. It enriches everyone. Over our 23 years of existence, weve depended on the goodwill of people and organizations to operate this facility. We have 450 families accessing the services and each week, we cater to approximately 60 persons with a range of disabilities. ese tools which the M ethanex team has given us, will enhance the autism-friendly environment we oer to the persons who access our facilities, said Teresina S ieunarine, President of the Autistic S ociety of Trinidad and Tobago (ASTT). Methanex trainees look on with AS TT Programme Coordinator, Amoy Boodoo (centre), as an Autism Place volunteer bakes some goodies using the new stove donated through the Methanex-led project. e Autistic Society of Trinidad and Tobago was founded in 1990 to support persons with autism and their families through a parent support group. e executive and sta comprise parents of persons with autism and operate on a voluntary basis. ey help these persons achieve their full potential through education, training and advocacy.Students Help at Autism Place

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 OUR FILM W hen she was 12, she got her first camcorder and discovered a world waiting to be recorded. Soon, everyone in the family expected her to be the one taking pictures, recording their gatherings. She edited her rst home lm then too, and has even done music videos with her cousins. For Maryam Mohamed, lming has been a passion for exactly half her lifeshes 24so when she nished her BSc in Sociology with a minor in Psychology, she was thrilled to begin a double major in the Faculty of H umanities at The U WI; a B A in Film Studies and Film Production. For her dedication and application to her studies she sounds like a model studentshe was given the bpTT Student A ward at the just concluded Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival, a prize she is careful to point out is not for her short lm, If I could Fly, but for her studentship. A group of students from U WI lm programme was nominated for the award (based on our GP A ) then we had to write an essay stating why they should select us to go to the International Rotterdam Film festival and how will this benet us personally and professionally. The award is sponsored by bpTT and its an all-expense paid trip to Holland for the lm festival, she explains. For Maryam, this award is thrilling, because while she loves the lm world, she hardly has plans to enter it. Shes shy, she says, and just the thought of attending the award ceremony, or the lm sessions where she had to talk about her work, terried her. But its clear the bug has bitten her bad, because when it was time to go, she went, and when it was time to talk, she talked, and now she says it was a great experience. Yet curiously, she does not harbour any desire to make the lm world her careerat least not in a big, full-edged way. H ijabs are her customary wear, and her father is an Imam. Is it because it might go against her religious beliefs? A lot of people think I cant do a lot because of restrictions, she says. I believe I can work around it. There arent many Islamic lms She says she feels her own beliefs have shaped what she wants to do. She wants to do lms that send a message to people because she believes moral standards have dropped and vices have risen. She feels that her psychology and sociology training has brought an additional dimension to her script writing and perhaps this might bring some transformative, persuasive element to her lm making. In any case, she says she doesnt want to leave Trinidad to go to H ollywood, for example. She grew up in C aroni Village with her parents, her three siblings, her grandmother, an aunta really extended family settingand she feels strongly about these family ties. I believe in family and that kind of vibes, she says, noting that on campus, for instance, shes found that for students, friends mostly take precedence. My family are my friends, she says with a big smile. And theirs is the world she wants to capture on lm.BY VA NE ISA BA KS HFI LM FESTIVAL RESULTSA total of 142 lms were screened as part of the 2013 trinidad+tobago film festival (ttff), which officially closed on October 1, right after its awards ceremony on September 29. Of the 50 feature films screened at ttff, 23 were C aribbean and diaspora lms, which represented 14 countries. Five of the lms were world premieres, while nine enjoyed their C aribbean premiere, and one its international premiere. In addition to the feature lms, the Festival screened 56 C aribbean and diaspora shorts, as well as 36 experimental works from the Caribbean and the diaspora in its New Media section. tt 2013 C ompetition WinnersJU RY PRI ZE: BEST F EATURE MELAZA, directed by CA RLOS LECHUGA (Cuba) *The jury awarded a special mention in this category to GOD LOVES THE FIGHTER directed by Damian Marcano (Trinidad and Tobago / USA) JU RY PRI ZE: BEST DO CUMENT ARY There was a joint rst prize: FATAL ASSISTANCE directed by Raoul Peck (Haiti) / SONGS OF REDEMPTION, directed by Miquel Galofre and Amanda Sans (Jamaica / Spain) JU RY PRI ZE: BEST LOC AL F EATURE FILM GOD LOVES THE FIGHTER, directed by Damian Marcano (T&T / USA) JU RY PRI ZE: BEST S HORT There was a joint rst prize: PASSAGE directed by Kareem Mortimer (Bahamas) / PREVIOUS SCENES directed by Aleksandra Maciuszek (Cuba / Poland) JU RY PRI ZE: BEST LOC AL S HORT AFTER MAS, directed by Karen Martinez (Trinidad and Tobago) BEST CARIBBEAN FILM B Y AN IN T ERNATIONAL DIRECT OR 3 KIDS, directed by Jonas DAdesky (Haiti) *The jury awarded two special mentions in this category: TULA: THE REVOLT, directed by Joeren Linders (C uracao / The Netherlands) and THE STUA RT HALL PROJECT, directed by John Akomfrah (UK) N EW M EDI A PRI ZE Olivia McGilChrist P EOPLES CHOICE F EATURE GOD LOVES THE FIGHTER, dir ected by Damian Marcano P EOPLES CHOICE DO CUMENT ARY SONGS OF REDEMPTION, directed by Miquel Galofre and Amanda Sans P EOPLES CHOICE S HORT JAB IN THE DA RK, directed by Robert McFarlane R BC FO CUS PITCH PR I ZE Shakira Bourne B PTT STUDENT A WARD Maryam Mohamed B PTT FILM I N D EVELOPMENT A WARD Kevin Adams The Shuttered BugMaryam Mohamed says she struggles with her shyness. PHOTO: SAFIYA ALFONSOFilm student ghts her fear of ying high

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12 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 OUR ARTS S tudents of the theatre arts at The UWI stand to benet from a scholarship that oers training in any aspect of theatre, with an emphasis on acting. Prots from the local staging of O S tarry Starry Night, Nobel Laureate Derek Walcotts latest play, will fund this scholarship. The play, which premiered to sold-out audiences and enthusiastic reviews at the L akeside Theatre, E ssex U niversity, E ngland, premieres in Trinidad and Tobago at the Central Bank A uditorium, Port of Spain with a Gala on Thursday, N ovember 7 from 7.30pm (tickets: $500) followed by three more performances on Friday 8, Saturday 9 and a matinee on Sunday 10. A ny prots will be allocated to the Derek W alcott S cholarship for O utstanding S tudents in the Theatre A rts at The U WI, St A ugustine campus. A n A ctors Workshop for U WI and U niversity of Trinidad and Tobago ( U TT) students will also be held in November. The play is a highly poetic recording of one of the most signicant and notorious moments in the history of painting: Paul Gauguins visit to a troubled Vincent van Gogh in A rles, France 1888. The lead roles feature Trinidad and Tobago artists W endell M anwarren and N igel S cott as well as E uropean-based compatriots, Brian Green and St L ucian actress, Nathalie La P orte ; playing alongside British actors D avid Tarkenter and M ichael P rokopiou. The musical score, which was composed by long-time friend and collaborator of Walcotts, the award-winning composer G alt M c D ermott (Hair) will be performed by musician G ene L awrence. The production is directed by Walcott and Barbara Pierson. The play will be published in 2014 by Faber and Faber ( U K) and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux (USA). General/Reserved Tickets ($200/$250) are available at Paper Based, Normandie Hotel, St Anns 625-3197, or at the Alliance Franaise, St Clair, or email starrynighttrinidad@gmail. co m or call 681-3358 for delivery.StarryScholarship Four Visual Arts students at the Department for Creative and F estival Arts were recognized at a Pan Trinbago Award Ceremony on October 9 for their designs in the recent SteelFesTT 2013 parade. The students recognized for Best S tudent Design are N elshan Phillips for Curepe S cherzando, and L eann Marie Gill for Curepe Polyphonics. Honourable mentions were made of Marsha T repte for the design for Hummingbird Pan G roove, and R ajendra R amkallawan for Musical Gems. Twenty-five students participated in the project, led by lecturers Lesley-Ann N oel, Jade Achoy and Gerrel Saunders and with the support of recent graduates R ishma Hansil and Christel Mohammed. e S teelfesTT project provided an excellent opportunity for the students and sta to test their design and project management skills.Visual Arts S tudentsDesign for Pan Curepe Polyphonics by Leann Marie Gill Curepe Scherzando by Nelshan Phillips Rajendra Ramkallawan for Musical Gems

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 OUR ARTS When someone says theyve been to Haiti, spent time in Haiti, found a place in that countrys landscape, been accepted by a warm and friendly people, an unsaid question forms on the faces. Why? is may be followed by a shi of lightlike a passing clouda revision of the regard for the one who went. Haiti does not exist really in our minds, our geography, says K wynn Johnson. I f someone has to think about Haiti, they might think voodoo, or collapsed economy. Dr M atthew S mith of Jamaica says, People are just curious about Haiti, not interested. Johnson went to Haiti for the rst time in December 2010. e earthquake had occurred on Tuesday, January 12 at 16.53the epicentre was L eogane, and the destruction was terrible in Port-au-Prince and the coastal town of Jacmel, some 20 miles or so outward from the centre. I t is estimated that over three million were directly aected in a population of 12 million. Hundreds of thousands died. It may take up to 12 years to clear the rubble, many more to rebuild some of the structures. Today, the presidential palace has been demolished; who knows if it will be re-built. N ot unique to Haiti, she claries, aer the 1985 M exico City quake, the last tent city was removed 15 years later. I n 2010, K wynn simply felt drawn to Haiti. S he had spent seven years at the Carnival I nstitute with Pat Bishop, building the rst and only costume archive. Perhaps, she thought, she might undertake a PhD study; something about the vulgar way the international media covered the dead and dying. e UWI Cultural S tudies PhD gave ample latitude to an artist who had been practising and exhibiting for almost ten years, working in an eclectic range of media from oils and watercolours to embroidery. e PhD prospectus is liberal and encouraging: Research by practice can be considered an active engagement with theory, arguments, thoughts and ideas not only through the written word but also through the critical process of developing/ creating paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, lms and videos, performance events (dance, theatrical works), musical compositions, installations and other manifestations of practice. M ost of 2010 went in planning to travel to a devastated country during its months of crisis. ere was cholera too, she said. I didnt know how to get there, how to get around, or what I would do. S he arrived in Port-au-Prince just aer Christmas, for a two-week eld trip, her rst time in Haiti. S he was walking around Port-au-Prince, and in one photograph caught the light through a rose window in the rooess N otre Dame de lAssomption. I t was light that would not have been there had the cathedral not been decapitated. On that same eld trip, a chance excursion led to another revelation. I wanted to nd a particular papiermch Carnival mask and I was told that I should go to Jacmel. So I went. S erendipity lives in her recollection of that rst visit. Jacmel chose me, she says. Home of My HeartHow a PhD art student found her callingBY PAT GANASE S he found a city of artists living in the coastal town aer which the port in N ew Orleans had been patterned. Journalists, writers, musicians, artists have always chosen Haiti. I am inspired by the fount of Haitian history and culture through Walcott, Rudder, CLR James, L loyd Best and so many others. ose who had been living and working there when the earthquake struck had re-composed themselves to continue. I t was a lesson in continuity and creativity in what she calls a ruinscape. K wynn found accommodation in Jacmel with two lmmakers and has been there on seven eld trips so far. I ts so comfortable being in Haiti. Everything feels like homethe people, language, seafood, art galleries, carnival, artisan studios, Cine I nstitute, Haitian rum, fried plantains, simplicity life. One day, I used the words, vie-ki-vie, dreevay, and everyone laughed and told me those were Haitian. When I am in Haiti, I imagine this is what Trinidad was like a hundred years ago, she says. An earthquake alters lifelike the I ndian Ocean quake and tsunami at Christmas 2004; the tsunami in Japan in 2010; or the S an F rancisco earthquake of 1906. But the ruined landscapethe dislocationshe believes, might be necessary to create cracks in our perception, and let light in. Jan limye a rantre ( how the light enters; comment penetre la lumiere )as the body of work that makes up this Haiti exhibition is calledcaptures the ruinscape of Port-auPrince and Jacmel. ese drawings were made on location during her eld trips. M any are composites of fractured details, views and human gures weighted down with loads on their heads casting heavy shadows. Her choice of graphite on vellum is for an ephemeral ghostly eect: ruinscapes that have lost solidity and become as translucent as the spirits that traverse them. I ntroducing the exhibition, K wynn wrote, M y drawings represent places and spaces that continue to be meaningful to those who lived through the 2010 earthquake. This practice-based PhD is a study of the visual languages used to describe both loss as well as continuity. Twenty graphite drawings on vellum were selected for the just ended exhibition in Trinidad. N ext, she travels to Jacmel to open on N ovember 15. I hope I have done justice to this town that allowed me to work there for three years. I hope I have produced an honest view of the way life continues. S he is hoping that Jan limye a rantre has a part in the collective memory, in the way that the rubble art of Haitian artist Anderson Ambroise does. (Ambroise has taken hand-sized fragments of tile and wall from the rubble of broken buildings and paints on them.) ese drawings are not art therapy, she says. e artist creates works of art to re-inject meaningto ruined architecture, to shattered lives. S he refers to the poem A Citys Death by Fire by the young Derek Walcott aer the town of Castries was burnt. ree years later, Haiti is the home of her heart. Aer the presentation of her dissertation, she intends to continue this body of work for the next ten years. Haiti is my lifes work, I know that now. S he will go to the Citadelle up north; and then west to Jeremie the town of poets; to be the Trini artist travelling in Haiti as long as I can do it. S he calls her Jacmel City of Light, a place where life is lived in the here and now, in friendships, in work, in simple acts of sharing a meal, a conversation, laughter, tears, light. I felt the best way to write about my three years in Jacmel was to do so in a poem, and to speak about people and places dear to me. e poem reads in part:Launder your day in the basin bleu Stop at Florita for wiand coee Pickup a baguette at Cadets boulangerie Send me a vetiver bundle from Paskal e power comes back at three. Give Danticat a tourist mask It will scare o the spirits at last. Blan! Stop hovering over me, You are blocking my light.Manoir Alexandra, Jacmel Haiti, 2010 e Exhibtion mounted at So Box Studios

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14 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 ENERGY OUR SPORT UWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHON TODAY L ooking back, 2012 was always going to be the calm before the stormwith the big 10th anniversary looming. And so it was. e 2013 race brings together a stellar cast of runners from no fewer than nine countries that would make any regional road race proud, and arms the UWI SPEC I nternational Half-M arathon as an annual feature on our nations sporting calendar. Heading the list on the mens side are two proven K enyan athletes: our 2011 and 2012 champion, Texas-based G eorge Towett, and M ichigan-based Philip L agat. Towett is fresh from clocking 2:17:16 at the Akron M arathon in Ohio. L agat was the M ost Outstanding F oreign Athlete at the 2008 Southern Games, who moved up to the marathon last year and won the Quad Cities Marathon in 2:19:41. F or the very rst time we will see a top Cuban road runner in our midst, N orbert Curbeco, who boasts a PB (personal best) of 1:04:21 in the Half. Jamaican marathon champion Rupert G reen, four-time winner of the Reggae M arathon, who was the top Caribbean runner at last Decembers Run Barbados Half, will make his eagerlyanticipated bow to road running in Trinidad. Pamenos Ballantyne needs no introduction to the Trinidad public, having been the dominant distance runner in the English-speaking Caribbean for the better part of 20 years. T&Ts Richard Jones who nished in second place last year, 1 minute 19 seconds adri of Towett, will lead the local challenge with the up-and-coming M atthew Hagley and the durable veteran Curtis Cox. Trinidad-based K elvin Johnson will ensure that Guyana is represented at this forum. ere will be an intriguing three-way battle among the women. Our 2012 Champion and Caribbean distancerunning queen, Tonya N ero of T&T, will be up against our 2009 Champion N igerian-born M ary Akor and the exciting 27-year-old K arla U rbina Rojas of Venezuela for the top honours. M ary Akor is the most well-known of our elite runners, having represented the USA at two IAAF World Championships marathons. S he has run over 50 marathons. I n her own words, she uses some marathons as long runs and she just happens to win some. Amazingly, at the age of 36 last year, she clocked a PB of 1:14:19 in winning her hometown race, the L os Angeles Rock n Roll HalfMarathon. I ncidentally, with both races on the same day she chose to run UWI S PEC this year. In M ay this year, she picked up US $9,000 as the winner of the Pittsburgh M arathon in 2:37:35. N eed we say more? S pectators are in for a treat. I n our 2004 inaugural race, Tonya N ero was barely 15 years old when she placed third among the women. S he has now developed into the champion female distance runner we have been desperately seeking all these years, and for her, this 10th anniversary race may just be another step on the road to world class level. L ike M ary, last year she did a PB and set a new national record of 1:15:13 at the IAAF World Half-M arathon Championships in Bulgaria. K arla Rojas clocked 1:16:48 at the S amsung HalfM arathon in Caracas last year. at time would have been good enough to secure victory in each of the previous nine years except in 2006 when the classy Jemima S umgong blitzed the course in 1:12:07. To be sure, we didnt expect 2013 to be an ordinary year. I must thank my good friend, Raque S hah, who acted with Dr I va G loudon as midwives to deliver this UWI S PEC HalfM arathon. I dont know how runners react to this thing that gets them out of bed at four or ve in the morning to train to run 13.1 miles. Organising this race has not been easy. It is the largest mixed race (male and female) in Trinidad, and it was limited to 1,010 entries this year. I would like to see a gradual increase in the number of participants, and for it to develop into an unocial Caribbean half-marathon championship. I think we have taken a big step in that direction this year. However, in future it would help if our sister races in the Caribbean recognise that this one is held on the last S unday of October, as is has been since 2010. is year the South-American 10K in G uyana is on the same day as ours. at eectively rules Cleveland F orde out of our race as he understandably will want to run his home race. Tonya N ero is the female defending champion of both events and the clash of dates put her in an awkward position. We hope such a situation could be avoided in future in the interest of the sport. L ooking further ahead, we hope to partner with N AAA/ N ACAC to host the N ACAC HalfMarathon Championships one year which would bring to our shores the top distance runners of the USA, M exico, Canada and the other NACAC countries. F inally, my heartfelt thanks go to the many people who have contributed selessly to get this race on the road today. Raymond Chin Asang is Technical Director of the UWI SPEC International Half-Marathon.A Race to The FutureBY R AY MOND C H IN AS A NG

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SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 ENERGY OUR SPORT UWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHON TODAY10 Q with Jason Williams 1 As a child, what did you want to be as an adult? I wanted to be in entertainment. I was quite a chatterbox and I love to entertain my family, once mum, sis and cousins were laughing I felt happy. 2 Now that you are an adult, how far away are you from that childhood vision? Im living my childhood ambition and its all good 3 How would you describe what you do professionally? I describe it as a specialized eld that one must have a natural knack for. Its one that you could study for, but I think one must have a passion for it to bring quality entertainment to the table.4 How has life changed for you since the runaway success of Palance in 2010? It made me more visible and put me on the radar of a wider cross-section of locals, especially mature folks and extremely young children, so Ive made it my business to conduct my business in a respectful and cordial manner since more people are looking on, especially the children.5 What would you say made the video for it such a huge hit? Its creativity, authenticity and innocence. 6 At very short notice, you agreed to be one of The 10 supporting the half-marathon. What made you say yes so quickly? Because Ive built a beautiful relationship with UWI over the years, the sta and C ampus Principal really make me feel at home so Ill always support any venture the campus is bringing to its students and supporters.7 Your charity of choice is Break the Silence, how come? I wanted to support a charity thats helping young people cope with sexual abuse. Its sometimes swept under the carpet and I would like to lend my voice and platform in the media to bring awareness and let young people who are in this predicament know there is help. 8 Would you say you are an athlete? N ot no big star athlete but Im okay, always been very athletic. Tried everything in school twice. 9 Youve been a great supporter of U WI events, and students love it when you host them on campus. What do you think makes them so hyped? Just being natural and talking on a level that they understand. It also helps that I make them laugh with my antics and most times the Marketing team gives me lots of free stu to distribute. Hmmm, now thinking about it, the UWI crew hype is over all the free-thing, not me... (sob, sad face). 10 Running 13.1 miles in a half-marathon is not easy at all, whats your plan should you run out of steam? $5 Bus Route maxi... Who say gustine!!!!Jason JW W illiams is a Trinidadian television and radio personality. He is one of the voices behind the Red Hot M orning Show on radio station Red 96.7 FM and hosts the popular local primetime television programme S ynergy N ights. He is also a soca artiste, most famously known for the 2010 hit P alance, with Ancil Blaze Isaac Jr. JWs chosen charity is Break the S ilence whose role and tireless cause he considers a crucial element in todays society. H is personal credo is once you can believe it you can achieve it, a testimony to the success he has achieved in his career. The Break the S ilence Initiative seeks to raise awareness of child sexual abuse and incest, break the stigma and shame surrounding the issue, and to promote the revision of related child protection policies and programmes in T&T. Funds from the HalfMarathon would support the spread of the awareness-raising campaign (wall billboards during the UN s International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women and 16 Days of A ctivism against Gender Violence, N ov 25 to Dec 10, 2013) as well as to put related audio material (a seven-episode soap opera) on the radio.This year, as part of the special commemoration of this tenth year, a number of symbolic changes have been made. Registration will be open to the rst 1010 runners; and the race gets going a bit earlier, starting at 10 minutes to six. The focus in this tenth year is giving; giving to charitable organisations, and 10 people were invited to champion 10 charities and to encourage the public, as well as sta and students to contribute $10 towards one of these people and the money would go towards their chosen charity. Anyone can donate, even as groups, organizations, faculties; because the aim is to support the marathon and its related charities. Contributions can be made until November 15.

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16 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER, 2013 UWI C ALEN DAR of E VENTSNOVEMBER DECEMBER 2013UWI TODAY is printed and distributed for e University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, through the kind support of Trinidad Publishing Co Ltd, 22-24 St Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad, West Indies. UWIAA DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS November 24 25 special UWI Alumni Awards will be presented on N ovember 24, 2013, to celebrate e University of the West I ndies Alumni Associations 25th anniversary year. All alumni of e UWI (degrees, diplomas, certificates) graduating between the 1960s and the present are eligible, EXCEPT current or retired full-time members of sta, and members of the current executive of the Alumni Association Chapter. Posthumous awards will not be made. For more information, please contact: UWI Alumni Association, Trinidad & Tobago Chapter trinidad.tobago@alumni.uwi.edu THE GREATEST PROFESSION November 29, 2013 Daaga Auditorium, UWI, St. Augustine The UWI partners yet again with G uardian Group (G uardian L ife of the Caribbean), to host their biennial Premium Open L ecture. is year, the guest speaker is Dr Todd Zakrajsek of the Department of Family Medicine at U niversity of N orth Carolina. Dr Zakrajsek will be presenting on the topic TEACHING : Joys and Challenges of the Greatest Profession. For more information, please contact: Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at 662-2002 ext. 83591 or Marketing and Communications Oce at ext. 83635. GENDER TRANSFORMATIONS November 6-8 UWI, St Augustine Learning Resource Centre Auditorium St Augustine U nder the auspices of the I nstitute for G ender and Development S tudies ( IG DS ), Regional Coordinating U nit, M ona, the S t Augustine Campus hosts the 20th Anniversary Conference on Gender Transformations in the Caribbean. The aim of the three-day regional conference is to map the legacy of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary discourses in the areas of Caribbean and diasporic research on gender. For more information contact: IGDS at 662 2002 ext. 83573/83577, or igdssau2013@sta.uwi.edu HOW NATIONS SUCCEED November 7 Daaga Auditorium St Augustine The Open L ectures Committee of The UWI St Augustine, in collaboration with CARISCIENCE, the U niversity of the S outhern Caribbean ( USC) and the U niversity of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT) hosts a Distinguished Open L ecture featuring Professor Calestous Juma of Harvard U niversity, titled How N ations S ucceed: Higher Education, Research and Technological L eapfrogging in Emerging Economies. For more information, please visithttp://sta.uwi. edu/news/ecalendar/event.asp?id=2018 SEISMIC RESEARCH CENTRE OPEN HOUSE LAST CHANCE! Final Date: November 21 The UWI S eismic Research Centre is celebrating 60 years and has been inviting the public to a free Open House on the last ursday of every month at the Centre on G ordon S treet, S t Augustine. Each 90-minute session includes a tour of the Centre, demonstrations on earthquake and volcano monitoring techniques, safety and preparedness tips and information material. Time slots: 2pm, 3pm and 4.30 pm. 13 years and over. Space is limited. For reservations and details call 662-4659 or email info@uwiseismic.com UWI T ODAY WA NT S T O HEAR FR OM YOUUWI TODAY welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. Please send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu TODAYHALF-MARATHON DAY!5.50am SPEC, St. Augustine is year, as part of the special commemoration of this tenth year of the UWI S PEC INTER N AT IONAL HA LF -M ARATHO N the focus is on giving; giving to charitable organisations, and 10 people were invited to champion 10 charities and to encourage the public, as well as sta and students to contribute $10 towards one of these people and the money would go towards their chosen charity. Anyone can donate, even as groups, organizations, faculties; because the aim is to support the marathon and its related charities. Contributions can be made until November 15. For further information on how you can donate, please contact Ms Renata Sankar, Marketing and Communications Oce, UWI, St Augustine at Tel: 662-2002, ext 84245, or email at Renata.sankar-jaimungal@sta.uwi.edu