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UWI today ( 09-29-2013 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)
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UWI today
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UWI Marketing and Communications Office
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St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
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SPORT 21e Power of the Game A Tale of Apartheid and Prison Hide Away is the name of this painting done by UWI MPhil candidate, Candice Sobers. Candice is presenting a thesis, e Aesthetics of the Mundane: Techniques of Resourcefulness and Survival Among Working Class Trinidadians, for this Cultural Studies degree. The practice-based research thesis is being accompanied by paintings, drawings and a handbook, reads of Survival: Sixty Resourceful Techniques for Family Life, as part of a series of that would represent the body of her work for the MPhil. Her three-year research has been a fascinating story of the travails and triumphs of six families. Please see Page 18 for more.THE PA IN TED WORDRESEARCH EXPO 09Look at the Future It will Blow Your Mind HOMAGE 12A Tribute to the Bird Our Doctor of Calypso SAFETY 20Security Forum When Supermans Power was Not Enough

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 CA MPUS NEWSVice-Chancellor honoured in Scotland Welcome Home, Jehue! Well Deserved, Professor Deosaran EDITORIAL TEAMC AMPUS PR INCIPAL Professor Clement Sankat DIR ECTO R O F M A RKETIN G AND C OMMUNICATIONS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill DIR ECTO R O F M A RKETIN G AND C OMMUNICATIONS Ag.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio EDITO R Ms. Vaneisa Baksh CONTACT US The UWI Marketing and Communications Ofce Tel: (868) 662-2002, exts. 82013 / 82014 Or email: uwitoday@sta.uwi.eduVice-Chancellor of e UWI, Professor E. Nigel Harris was honoured in Scotland at the 600th anniversary of Academia of the University of St. Andrews on September 13. He joined 18 honorees lauded by St. Andrews University as some of the best minds of our generation, leading academics from around the globe, as the university acknowledged the outstanding achievements of women and men whose thoughtful scholarship and outstanding integrity has changed both our world, and the way we understand our place in it. Vice-Chancellor Harris was hailed as not only an outstanding university leader but a man whose very distinguished record in medical research is widely recognized, particularly in the eld of technology. e university noted the Vice-Chancellors work Congratulations are in order again for Jehue G ordon who won another gold medal at the Belgacom Van Damme Memorial IAAF Diamond L eague meet in Brussels, Belgium, on F riday September 6, clocking a personal best of 47.69 seconds. Just three weeks before, on August 15, Jehue had also taken gold at the IAA F World Championships in the 400m hurdles. Jehue was presented with the Chaconia G old Medal at this years Independence Awards. It has brought what must have been a hectic season to a close for the time being. As he returns to this St. Augustine campus to enter his nal year in the Sport Management Programme, we welcome him back, and trust Professor E meritus R amesh Deosaran was awarded the Order of the R epublic of Trinidad and Tobago for distinguished and outstanding service to the nation and his academic work at the Independence Day ceremony. Prof Deosaran, an Independent Senator, served as Director of the Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCCJ) and the Ansa McAl Psychological R esearch Centre at e UWI, St. Augustine Campus. Prof Deosaran was instrumental in developing several successful programmes in psychology and criminology at St Augustine. What set him apart from many was his willingness to make his views known publicly on matters of crime and its prevention, for example, but this was always rooted in his in 1983 in the field of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, as a Welcome F ellow in the R heumatology Unit at the R oyal Post G raduate Medical School at Hammersmith Hospital in L ondon. that with his commitment and discipline, he will nd as much success in his pursuits here as on the athletic stage. research. He has given distinguished service to the region and The UWI congratulates him on this national award. Well deserved, said St Augustine Campus Principal, Prof Clement Sankat. Come See What Research Can Do FRO M THE PRINCIPAL I t is not easy to persuade people of the value of research. R esearch, by its very nature, requires time and resources, two commodities that oen get short shri because most would prefer to invest in projects and measures that bear fruit quickly. Oen, research in elds that seem obscure or irrelevant to issues commanding public attention is frowned upon as a waste of that same time and resources. Yet, in developing societies, in spaces like ours, where we are blessed with many unique circumstances through our history, geography and economies, we need to create and nurture ways of seeing and doing things that t and suit our needs and tastes and do this dierently. We need to imagine a new future for our societies. So we need to better understand ourselves and our environment before we can fully explore our capacities. e research we do here at the St. Augustine Campus, including our Medical Sciences F aculty at Mt. Hope, spans an extraordinarily large range, but too little of it is visible to the public, though its impact is felt at many levels. But our research needs funding and this is why in the lead-up to the national Budget presentation, I had encouraged governmental support for an increase in expenditure in this area. We know in lean economic times, these are areas that commonly get pushed down the ladder. But if e UWI is to deliver on its mandate of teaching, research and service, then any diminution of the research eort, will result in a poorer country and region. We must summon the will to create a fertile ground for research, innovation and creativity to thrive. Trinidad and Tobago is best poised to do this but it requires the commitment and collaboration of our private and public sectors, our tertiary institutions and civil society. In the rst week of October, we are hosting a Research Expo, to which we invite the public. Here, we will oer a sample of some of the outstanding research being done at the university, and I promise you, it will be both informative and memorable. More importantly, it will be a demonstration of local capacity that will surely convince anyone that the time and resources we have so far invested in research are worth every cent, and then some. We look forward to seeing you at the UWI Research Expo 2013. CLEMENT K. S AN KATPro Vice Chancellor & Principal

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4 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 CA MPUS NEWS Ambassador I rwin LaR ocque, SecretaryG eneral of the Caribbean Community (CA R ICOM) will deliver a Distinguished Open L ecture, discussing the status of the regional integration process and his vision for the future of CARICOM on ursday October 3 at 5.30pm at the Daaga Auditorium on the St. Augustine Campus. e lecture is part of a new series at e UWI St. Augustine, focusing on CA R ICOM: exploring its usefulness to the region and its future on its 40th anniversary celebrations. In his presentation, Ambassador LaR ocque will trace the evolution of the integration process (the F ederation, CA RIF TA, Common Market, West Indian Commission, CSME) and discuss CARICOM today: what we set out to do; what we have done and where we are. He will also delve into his vision for the regional body, which includes active stakeholder involvement in integration, across youth, the private sector, media and civil society. Ambassador Irwin LaR ocque, a national of Dominica, is the seventh Secretary-G eneral of CARICOM. He is the former Assistant SecretaryG eneral for Trade and Economic Integration at the CA R ICOM Secretariat, a position he assumed in September 2005. Prior to that, he served at senior management levels in the Public Service of Dominica for over 18 years. He believes that the CSME cannot succeed without the advancement of the social sector, such as human resource development and youth. Ambassador LaRocque has managed diplomatic negotiations with third countries and international development partners. He has much experience in management, public administration, economic development, trade, foreign aairs and diplomacy. Members of the public are invited to attend at no charge. For more information, contact the Marketing and Communications Office, UWI St. Augustine at 662-2002 ext. 83726 or email at marketing.communications@sta.uwi.ed uWhither O ur Caribbean Community? A Conversation with Sir ShridathI t is almost paradoxical that in a region renowned for its diversity, the strains of insular ity still plague eorts at development. In the past, separate UWI campuses with dierent faculties, propelled students to move around in order to study their elds of choice. It promoted a larger, more profound sense of what it means to be West Indian among students, and those who have studied and worked outside of their homelands have attested to this broadening of their personal landscapes. While this is still so, times have changed in that students do not move around as much among our campuses, and technology, even as it has brought everything into the home space, has not encouraged the human contact that physical interaction brings. e International Oce and the Institute of International R elations have been working together to nd ways to open the minds and hearts of the student populace and came up with the concept of an International Week, themed, K nowledge Without Borders, that would bring a spectrum of events to the St. Augustine campus presenting elements of learning in a global context. The IWeek, as it is called, runs from October 7-11, and features foreign films, international food, a student exchange fair, volunteer opportunities, music, and even for eign language speed dating. e week begins with a private ceremony at the J FK Quadrangle at 10am and a lecture by the doyen of West Indian integration, Sir Shridath R amphal at 7pm. ere will be many other fascinating lectures, panel discussions and dialogues as well. Wednesday October 9 has been dubbed International Dress Day, and the St. Augustine campus will be invited to turn out in national costumes of any heritage. K nowing the air and panache inherent, we are sure to see some magnicent representations of our diverse heritage. For more information about iWeek, please visit www.sta.uwi.edu/iweek Institute of International Relations Mrs. Marilyn Ramon-Fortune E: marilyn.ramon-fortune@sta.uwi.edu T: (868) 662-2002 ext. 82084 Ms. Ekana McAlister E: ekana.mcalister@sta.uwi.edu T: (868) 662-2002 ext: 83235 The International Oce Ms. Colette Hosten E: colette.hosten@sta.uwi.edu T: (868) 662-2002 ext. 82480 Ms. Ava Claxton E: ava.claxton@sta.uwi.edu T: (868) 662-2002 ext. 82681 Dr Keith Nurse assumed responsibilities as Executive Director of The UWI Consulting Company, eective August 1. The UWI Consulting Company is the entity through which The UWI provides consulting services regionally and internationally. Dr Nurse will be assisted by Deputy Director Professor Claremont Kirton. Prior to joining UWI Consulting, Dr Nurse served as a consultant and advisor to several governments and regional organizations, including the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the Caribbean Export Development Agency and the Caribbean Tourism Organization. He also served previously at international organizations including the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Organization of American States and the Commonwealth Secretariat. He is the incumbent World Trade Organization Chair at The UWI and former Director of the Shridath Ramphal Centre for International Trade Law, Policy and Services, UWI, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados. Professor Claremont Kirton is Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at The UWIs Mona Campus, Jamaica. His academic research and policy oriented analytical work are concentrated on issues related to Caribbean economic development. He has researched and published in the area of banking and nance, dealing with indigenous banking, non-bank financial intermediaries (credit unions, housing nance institutions), nancial sector crises and informal nance. Professor Kirton has provided advisory and consulting services to regional and international agencies such as the Inter-American Development Bank, Caribbean Development Bank, United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Bank, and the European Union.Dr Keith Nurse (right), E xecutive Director of e UWI Consulting Company and Professor Claremont Kirton, D eputy Director.NE W DI REC TO R S A T T HE UWI CON SULTIN G CO MP AN Y Ambassador Irwin LaR ocque, Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community (CARIC OM )

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 ENERGY CA MPUS NEWS UWI has chocolate on the brain these days as the folks at the Cocoa R esearch Centre (C R C) prepare for their third annual World Cocoa and Chocolate Day (WCCD) celebrations, set to take place on October 1. Introduced to the world by the International Cocoa Organisation (ICCO), the occasion was designed to recognise the eorts of the small farmers worldwide who cultivate the cocoa that becomes chocolate. e C R C, custodians of the International Cocoa G enebank, Trinidad (one of the largest collections of cocoa germplasm in the world), wanted to especially honour farmers from Trinidad and Tobago: men and women who nurture the revered Trinitario cocoa bean, born and bred in our soil and in very high demand from places like France and Switzerland, known for their brands of ne or avour chocolate. e C R C also wishes to raise public awareness about the plight of small cocoa farmers who work so hard but struggle to make an adequate living because the cocoa industry in Trinidad is very small-scale. F armers also deal with issues of low acreage and low productivity says Head of the C R C, Professor Pathmanathan Umaharan. erefore, their protability is very low and farmers are migrating out of the cocoa industry. But, he continues, there are ways to combat this, including better management practices and niche marketing. e C R C is inviting the public to visit the UWIs J FK on October 1st, and join in their celebrations, where they will not only spend a day surrounded by the sights and scent of chocolate, but learn about the industry and the world renowned Trinitario cocoa bean. e day will take the form of an exhibition, where visitors can go from booth to booth, sampling pieces of ne or avour chocolate, chocolate ice cream and Mexican hot chocolate. ey can also purchase chocolate bars, bon bons, trues and drinking chocolates from Trinidads famous chocolatiers, including Isabel Brashs Cocobel and G ina Hardys Ginas Trues ere will also be other cocoa products on sale, such as cocoa butter soaps, drinks made from the pulp of the cocoa pod, cra items fashioned out of the husks and neutraceuticals (health items) made from cocoa. Visitors will also have the opportunity to meet Trinidad and Tobagos top innovators in cocoa; learn about cocoa, the industry and the work of the CR C; and sign up for cocoa tasting and cocoa making classes. Other highlights of the day include games and competitions for adults and children, including a cocoa pod balancing race, guess the number of cocoa beans in the jar and Jeopardy featuring cocoa based questions. F or the chefs and food connoisseurs, there is the Innovations in Chocolate F ood and Beverage Challenge which invites members of the public who have a real sweet-hand to create a dish using chocolate as one of its base ingredients. e days events begin at 10am and end at 6pm, and members of the public are invited to attend at no charge. e Scent of ChocolateBY S ER AH A CHAM

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6 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 CONFERENCE ON THE ECONOMY (COTE 2013) Poverty and inequality are phenomenal issues that are at the core of development policies and initiatives. Yet, what denes development and what it means to manage for development have been the subjects of much debate, and increasingly so in the Caribbean. This region, a melting pot of diversity, hosts a contingent of Small Island Developing States (SIDs) whose economies have been plagued with a number of challenges, mainly as a result of their shared colonial past, peculiar territorial construct, and the fact that their economies are driven by one productive sector. It is against the backdrop of these challenges that one can locate the Conference on the Economy (COTE), an annual event held by the Department of Economics at The UWI. This conference has sparked the interest of many stakeholders who have a vested interest in the path to sustained development. It has stimulated discussions on current and relevant issues that address the social, economic and environmental problems of communities and by extension, nationalities across the region as well as in the global community. Currently, in its seventh year, the theme of this years COTE is Managing for Development in Caribbean Economies: Addressing the Challenge of Poverty and Inequality. The theme of this years COTE is critical as the issues to be discussed affect the engine of the economy. Figuratively, the economy can be seen as a car and development the ultimate destination of the driver while the engine is its people. Inherently, people have always been at the heart of development. Hence, the theme of the conference addresses problems of the engine such as poverty, the inaccessibility of an individual to basic amenities of life, and inequality, the uneven distribution of wealth and opportunities. Both problems are direct impediments to sustained development. From its inception, the role of COTE has been to inform and educate, in the hope of shedding light and arousing attention to germane concerns of economies nationally, regionally and internationally. In addition to meaningful discussions, the conference also seeks to encourage the participation of the next generation of economists and social scientists through a strong youth component that encompasses sixth form students from our secondary schools as well as UWIs undergraduate and postgraduate students. These activities involve an essay writing competition, two debating competitions and two poster competitions that specifically target these groups. A key feature of COTE is that of acknowledging and recognising past Heads of the Department of Economics. This years conference will honour Dr Ralph Henry, a wellknown and outstanding scholar in the eld. Dr Henry holds a B.Sc. degree in Economics from The University of the West Indies and is a grandaunt from the University of Alberta, Canada where he attained his doctorate in Education Administration in 1972. He has held a number of prominent positions, including that of Senior Lecturer at The University of the West Indies in 19801998, Chairman at the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago in 2003-2005 and the Chairman at the Kairi Consultants Limited from 1990 to present among notable others. To date, Dr Henry has published a variety of scientic papers that have contributed signicantly to the eld of economics specically in relation to that of social economic theory and application. It is only tting that The Department of Economics commends his achievements For more information about the conference and its activities contact the COTE Secretariat at cote@sta.uwi.eduCONFERENCE THEMES Poverty Reduction, Income Distribution and Intergroup Inequality in the Caribbean Labour and Migration Nexus in the Caribbean Pursuing Diversication and Development through Culture Export-led Development in the Caribbean and Global Value Chains Deepening Caribbean Regional Integration in the Eclipse of the North Atlantic Trans-nationalisation and the Underground Economy in the Caribbean Education and Human Resource Development for Caribbean Competitiveness COTE 2013 takes place at the Learning Resource Centre Auditorium, UWI St. Augustine, from October 10-11 from 9am to 4pm. For more information, please visit http://sta.uwi.edu/ conferences/13/cote/index.asp Is Poverty Paralysis?BY N ATA L IE T HOMASand contributions to the eld by choosing to honour him at this years conference and allowing his work on poverty and inequality inspire the theme of the conference. The Conference on the Economy (COTE 2013) will be held from October 10th to October 11th, 2013 at the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) at the St Augustine Campus at The University of the West Indies, Trinidad. The Feature Speaker at the Opening Ceremony of the Conference will be by Former Governor of the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, Dr. Euric Bobb. The Conference will also host informal Arm Chair Discussions on the 18th September and the 10th October to highlight issues in Poverty Reduction, Income Distribution and Intergroup Inequality in the Caribbean. Students at COTE 2012

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 UWI RESEARCH EXPO: OCTOBER 1-5 e UWI St Augustine Campus has partnered with the National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited to host an historic UWI R esearch Expo from October 1-5. e multi-faceted event will appeal to a wide range of stakeholders from university researchers, high school students and entrepreneurs to innovative pre-teens. e diverse oerings of this Expo is a rst for the university, as it encourages visitors to explore interactive displays, participate in a symposium on research, enterprise and impact, view UWI lm screenings, enjoy mini-concerts, and have a chance to take part in more than 30 miniworkshops available at the Campus. On Saturday, young researchers-in-the-making and their family members can explore the UWI Marketplace and Kids Fun Park. Speaking at the ocial launch of the R esearch Expo at the Office of the Campus Principal on September 5, Professor Clement Sankat, UWI Campus Principal, promised that the Expo would be informative, engaging, exciting and memorable. is university has a legacy of creating new knowledge and developing impactful research initiatives that have Adventures in Research!helped to develop our country and region in a wide range of disciplines in the arts and sciences for over y years, he said. Our students and researchers are passionate about what they do, they have an innate curiosity about the world and they continue to partner with local and international stakeholders to develop their innovations. Also at the launch, CEO of the Trinidad Chamber of Industry and Commerce (TTCIC), Ms. Catherine Kumar, underscored the importance of public, private and tertiary learning institutions collaborating to support research initiatives. e R esearch Expo is an initiative that the Chamber fully endorses as it will help to put a spotlight on the central role played by research in private sector development and entrepreneurship and in building the competitiveness for our country. It is my hope that this partnership between the UWI St. Augustine Campus and the National G as Company of Trinidad and Tobago would encourage many other corporate entities to support university research, innovation and knowledge transfer. In this way, the private sector would play its part in ensuring that research not only responds to but also anticipates the needs of society and improves the lives of the people in our country, Ms Kumar added. Similarly, Vice President of Human and Corporate R elations at the National G as Company of Trinidad and Tobago L imited, Mrs. Cassandra Patrovani-Sylvester, spoke of the legacy of innovation and entrepreneurship that has made Trinidad and Tobago a leader in the global energy sector. It is through this sense of adventure, this opening of the mind and harnessing of Trinidadian and Tobagonian ingenuity, that this relatively tiny country has become one of the largest exporters of ammonia and methanol in the world. Our courage and imagination have won us the respect of players many times our size. It is therefore an open question what will come of projects like UWIs innovation and research initiatives. Its exciting to think that many of the young minds that will benet from this project will move on to create, innovate, and maybe even change the face of the country in ways we cant yet imagine, using technology that hasnt yet been invented, she explained during her presentation at the Expo launch.Heres Whats OnNext week, the UWI Research Expo kicks-off with a day filled with everything chocolate, at the Cocoa Research Centres celebration of W orld Chocolate Day at The JFK Auditorium on October 1. The next day, the Symposium on Research, Enterprise and I mpact will be held at the Learning Resource Centre. It will feature presentations and panel discussions that highlight the key ndings of some of the projects that benetted from dedicated research funding from the government of Trinidad and Tobago, as well as other UWI projects. These presentations will focus on the various initiatives that have contributed to national and/or regional development by creating enterprising solutions, engaging our communities or facilitating evidence-based policy-making. The Expo itself opens on Thursday 3 and runs through to Saturday 5 at the JFK Auditorium and Quadrangle. Here, interactive displays including experiments, a gaming zone, zoology museum, as well as a seismic research booth, among many others, will be showcased by the respective Faculties and Units. A wide range of free mini-workshops will also be held at the Campus, providing unique, hands-on learning opportunities to participants: including steel-pan tutorials, Understanding 4G Networks, Chinese Business Etiquette and Renewable Energy Application workshops, to name just a few. A comprehensive schedule is available on-line. Its an opportunity for the entire family to learn about UWI research at the Expo on Saturday 5, while at the same time enjoying products from Units including those of the University Field Station and Cocoa Research Centre at the UWI Market Place. At the Kids Fun Park, they can enjoy mini-concerts, storytelling and carnival character parades, get close to the animals in the petting zoo, and have fun in the gaming zone, shing pond, bouncy castle and UWI SPEC sports challenge zone. The Expo is open to the public and guided tours are available for schools upon request. For more information please email: uwiresearchexpo@sta.uwi.edu or visit the website at www. sta.uwi.edu/researchexpo ere are lots of things for the children too at the Kids Fun Park. PHOTO: MARK HARDYVice President of Human and Corporate Relations at the National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited, Mrs. Cassandra Patrovani-Sylvester lauded the courage and imagination that has brought Trinidad & Tobago international respect. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIMBY A NNA WAL COTT H AR DY

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 A vibrant and productive entity on e UWI campus, the Institute for G ender and Development Studies (I GDS), proudly marks its 20th anniversary in the 2013-2014 academic year. As part of the celebrations, commemorative events are carded to take place across the wider UWI family at the IGDS: the Nita Barrow Unit at Cave Hill, Barbados, and the I GDS: R egional Coordinating Unit and Mona Unit in Jamaica. e agship event, however, is an International Conference on Gender Transformations in the Caribbean, which will take place from 6-8 November 2013, at e UWI, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago. e I GDS, St. Augustine Unit will host this three-day regional conference on behalf of all the units. e purpose of the conference is to bring together the main players who were responsible for its development and expansion, to highlight and promote the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary discourses in the areas of Caribbean and diasporic research on gender and to continue the succession planning and handing over to new generations of scholars. e research theme of the conference, Continuities, Challenges and Transformations in Caribbean G ender R elations, allows for this blend of joyful reunion and embracing of new partners in the emancipatory project that is Caribbean gender and feminist studies. Over the two days e conference opens with a keynote address by Dr Alissa Trotz of the University of Toronto on Wednesday 6 November at the Learning Resource Centre Auditorium.Come, Light A CandleT he UWI, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Ministry of Food Production and other stakeholders, will host a candlelight vigil on October 17, from 5.45pm to 6.30pm in front of the Main Administration Building at the St. Augustine Campus. This vigil is part of the 2013 World Food Day observations with the theme Sustainable Food Systems for Food and Nutrition Security. This simple ceremony is meant to signify the importance of linking the aspirations of the global community with individual commitments to Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger, Millennium Development Goal Number One. This year again, as a symbol of global commitment to Eradication of Extreme Poverty and Hunger, participants will hold candlelight vigils across all time zones of the planet. Every year, World Food Day provides a sobering reminder that, in a world of plenty, more than 800 million people go hungry each day. This means that one in 12 people does not get enough food to lead a healthy and active life. More than a decade after world leaders pledged, at the 1996 World Food Summit, to reduce the number of chronically undernourished people by the year 2015, much still remains to be done. In Trinidad and Tobago, with sustained economic growth and national prosperity, poverty still aects more than 16% of our population. Join us and show your commitment to play a part in the eort to reduce poverty, malnutrition and hunger! From our planet.of presentations, scholars drawn from the Caribbean, USA, Canada, UK and elsewhere will deal with topics that range from environmentalism and eco-design in G uadeloupe to blogging and cyberfeminisms to language and performance in Bolivian wrestling. e range of presentations reects the diversity of gender studies within and outside of the Caribbean and the potential scholarship waiting to be tapped. e conference opens with an address by Dr Alissa Trotz of the University of Toronto on Wednesday 6 November, at the Learning R esource Centre Auditorium which will be the hub of its activities. e conference comes to a close with bang not a whimper, in an IG DS F undraising Banquet at the Health Economics Unit Auditorium, Gordon Street, on F riday 8 November. e nal event will honour and feature addresses by Professor the Honourable Barbara Bailey and Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, Principal of the Cave Hill Campus. All events are open to the public and I GDS welcomes the UWI Community to celebrate with us for our 20th Anniversary. F or more information on how you can be a part of our regional legacy please visit the I G DS conference website at http://sta.uwi.edu/igds/20thanniversary/conference/ index.asp or email us at igdssau2013@sta.uwi.edu CA MPUS NEWS20 BI G YEARS for IGDS e ninth Sir Frank Worrell Memorial Blood Drive took place on September 6, and this year, former Trinidad and Tobago cricket captain, Daren Ganga was asked to be patron. As he addressed its opening, Ganga praised donors saying that they were able to look past themselves, giving an actual part of their physical being for the benet of another person, who they may or may not even know. The Sir F rank Worrell Memorial Blood Drive was started in Trinidad and Tobago in 2009 by Nari Contractor, to whom Sir F rank had donated blood aer his head injury in 1962. It is held twice annually at the UWI St. Augustine Campus. In photo, Daren Ganga poses with Campus Principal, Professor Clement Sankat. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM Blood Brothers

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12 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 HOMAGE B orn in Grand R oi Village, Grenada on the 9th of July 1935, the infant, who was nineteen years later to become the L ittle, then the Mighty Sparrow, was taken to Trinidad by his migrant parents in 1937. His rst public appearances as a performer were with St. Patricks R oman Catholic Church Choir and at school concerts at the Newtown Boys R oman Catholic School. L ater he would sing his repertoire of sentimental Nat Cole, Sarah Vaughan or Frankie L ane ballads at parties. An early admirer of the calypsos of K itchener, Melody and Spoiler, he started in 1954 to make a precarious living as an itinerant troubadour making the rounds at nightclubs and restaurants, accompanying himself with his guitar. In the 1955 Calypso season, he made his rst appearance in a tent at the Old Brigade Tent, South Quay, Port of Spain, singing e High Cost of L iving. Touring G uyana aer the 1955 Carnival season, he improved his performance beyond recognition and emerged in 1956 as both Calypso K ing and R oad March champion, singing the famous Jean and Dinah. In seven years time, he had performed sucient calypsos to be able to publish several long-playing records and singles, and a songbook entitled One Hundred and Twenty Calypsoes to R emember. What this meant was that the young Sparrow was recording close to twenty new songs per year. Since 1956, he has won the Calypso Monarch title seven more times, the latest being in 1992, and the R oad March a similar seven more times, the last occasion being in 1984. In addition, he has won the Calypso K ing of K ings Competition on both of the occasions and 1988that he has competed. Sparrow has, over his 46 years as a performer, received many honours and accolades. Some of the most signicant of these have been a Chieaincy of the City of L agos, Nigeria (1977); awards or certificates of appreciation from the governments of Nassau (1980), the Virgin Islands (1980), Barbados (1981), Jamaica (1993), Trinidad and Tobago (1969, 1974 and 1993, when he was awarded the second highest honour in the land, the Chaconia G old Medal for long and meritorious service). Besides these, he has been honoured in various cities: Detroit (1962); New York (1984); Austin (1985) where he was made an Honorary Citizen of the City of Austin; Newark (1986); Winnipeg (1987) whose Mayor proclaimed June 3, 1987, Sparrow Day; Brooklyn (1990); Tallahassee (1994). e University of the West Indies, St. Augustine in 1987 conferred on him its Honorary Doctor of Letters Degree. e Order of the Caribbean Community, however, is something special. e criteria that any recipient of this Order must satisfy are strict and dicult. A recipient must, rst of all, have contributed to the political, cultural and social development of the Community and the consequent impact on the life of the peoples of the Caribbean. The Mighty Sparrow has, as we have seen, been honoured in various Caribbean countries. He has located his narratives about society and politics in specic Caribbean islands. Apart from direct social and political commentary, he has made an immense contribution to the social wellbeing of the Caribbean Community through his function as celebra0nt, chantwell, warner, prophet, satirist, purveyor of joy, delight and elation; raconteur of the folk tales of our daily grass-rooted life, maintaining and expanding the rich oral tradition of the Caribbean. e output of songs through whose performance Sparrow has achieved all this, has been phenomenal. He is at present in the process of re-recording his lifes work on forty Compact Discs. He easily satises the rst of our criteria for the Order of the Caribbean Community. Criterion No. 2 states that the recipient must have contributed to raising the self-esteem of the region. Sparrows achievement as a performer, social critic, selfmade intellectual and entrepreneur, is living evidence of the example he has set the small people of the region of their own potential. As entrepreneur, for example, Sparrow has not only created and generated the cultural product out of his own and the regions entrails, but has created and accessed the local, regional and international markets within which the cultural product has been disseminated. F or many years he owned and managed his own recording company and record shop. And during the 1980s, developed the famous Sparrows Hideaway as an entertainment centre. W hen news of the Mighty Sparrows illness broke, a collective sense of dread that we were on the brink of losing this giant gripped millions around the world. So it is with great relief that at the time of writing, word from his family is that he has taken steps towards recovery, which we hope will be full and fast. But even as we celebrate his indomitable will and resiliencethis is the man who more than once has had to declare that he was still alive in songwe are mindful of his advancing years. It seemed tting to celebrate his life with him, so that he could be reminded of how enormous has been the space that he has carved in Caribbean memory. More than 25 years ago, The University of the West Indies conferred upon him an honorary Doctor of Letters (1987) and to many he has since been known as Doctor Bird. But sadly, many only know him by his songs, which have been one aspect of this phenomenal man. All too often, the journeys and achievements of our icons remain sketchy for later generations. All too often available information is inadequate for people to really grasp the true measure of the men and women we choose as standard-bearers. For more than fty years, Slinger Francisco, the Mighty Sparrow, was music to our ears, and we wish to pay homage to his presence. Professor Gordon Rohlehr, the most tting person to fully render such a tribute, has shared this fuller version of what he prepared for the citation when he was presented with the regions highest honour, the Order of the Caribbean Community in 2001. S LIN G ER F RANCI SC Oe M ighty Sparrow, from the archives of the Alma Jordan L ibrary.

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 Sparrows success has not come easily. It has, as he asserts in his famous calypso, e Outcast, been won in the face of immense social prejudice hypocrisy and negativity. According to Sparrow: Calypsonians really ketch hell for a long long time To associate yuhself with them was a big big crime If your sister talk to a steelband man e family want to break she hand Put she out, lick out every teeth in she mout. Pass! You outcast! In response to these pressures, Sparrow has been rebel, warrior, the aggressive life-force beneath the very foundations of Caribbean society, pushing down walls, transgressing boundaries of race, colour, class and caste, dening freedom. Sparrow has been an inveterate and eloquent campaigner for the music; for an increased percentage of playtime for local music; for adequate copyright legislation; for the ethic of hard work and professionalism. It was he who in 1967 (Education a Must) advised Caribbean youth to value and make full use of the widening educational opportunity that had come with Independence. He has set an example and lied up many of his colleagues and helped establish, in Derek Walcotts words, the calypsonian as citizen rather than ruin revived for a season. G rass-rooted, connected, in touch; yet uid, exible, capable of adapting to whatever each circumstance demands, Sparrow has been an icon of the Caribbean person. Man Will Survive, he sings, aer economic misfortune and political catastrophe. Age Is Just a Number, he declares, aer recovering from illness. rice in his career: Simpson (1959), Sparrow Dead (1969) and the less direct Man Will Survive (1992) he has had to sing songs challenging and mocking rumours of his death and illustrating his awesome resilience, a power to constantly rearm and reinvent himself. Criterion ree requires that the recipient of the Order of the Caribbean Community must have contributed signicantly to the forging of a stronger Caribbean identity within the Community and in the Diaspora. We may consider in this respect, Sparrows focus on Caribbean politics in many of his songs; his memorable calypsos on the West Indian F ederation and the deep regret he shared with many other poets and artists when that brave experiment at Caribbean unity came to naught; his playful construction of narratives about recognizable Caribbean types of men and women; his inscription of a powerful personal style of performance that has been imitated by younger singers up and down the region. Sparrow once dened his mission as being always to be doing something new and better. He has tended to welcome new initiatives in calypso and has recognized the right of each new generation to be dierent from its predecessor. He has, in short, reinforced the selfcondence of the community of performers to draw on tradition or arm change, as they might wish. Contributing to a sense of regional identity at home and abroad required intervention at critical moments in the societies evolution. Sparrow in 1957 along with the then youthful L ord Superior, led the famous calypsonians boycott of the Savannah Calypso K ing Competition. at boycott established for good grass-roots peoples understanding and statement of their identity as creators, indispensable to the making and performance of national culture. Similarly, K erry Packer was addressing much more than cricket. at calypso was a blistering satire against the persistence of aristocratic privilege and autocratic control in Caribbean societies nearly two decades aer Independence. Twelve years earlier, Sparrow had with Sir Gareld Sobers (1966) rearmed the age-old connection between great cricket and great kaiso, as he vigorously celebrated hero and tribe: the greatest cricketer on earth or Mars and the great team that Sir Gareld Sobers had led to the rst West Indies victory in a Test Series against Australia. Signicantly, Sparrow had dubbed Sobers knight long before Her Majesty realized that she would have to perform that ritual. Mas in Brooklyn (1969) recognizes the important fact that exile in the metropole has been a great eraser of the dierences that separate West Indians at home. It dont have no who is who/ Brooklyn equalize you. Equalized through exile, Caribbean people enter joyously into their true identities: a Sparrow observation with profound implications. ere can be no doubt at all that Sparrow has satised the third tough criterion for admission into the Order of the Caribbean Community. The final criterion of the Order of the Caribbean Community involves the projecting of the excellence of the Caribbean people on the world scene. Sparrow has done this in a number of ways. He has for nearly ve decades been regularly criss-crossing the world as a performer in America, Canada, the United K ingdom, Europe, Japan, Africa and the Caribbean. L eave the Dam Doctor was a top tune in Nigeria een years aer it had been sung in Trinidad; Mr. Walker was as well-loved in Tanzania as in the Caribbean. R obert Mitchum sang and recorded a version of Jean and Dinah in 1957. In 1981, then United Nations Secretary G eneral K urt Waldheim honoured Sparrow for his performance of Wanted, Dead or Alive. Prince Andrew is reported to have bought several copies of Philip My Dear. e former United States Secretary of State, General Colin Powell, confessed to his love for Sparrows calypsos, to which he said he constantly listened while contemplating the weighty issues of National Defence. Internationally, Sparrow is better known, thank G od, than most of our regional politicians. There has been an international facet to his work from as early as R ussian Satellite and Princess and the Cameraman to as late as Isolate South Africa, Crown Heights Justice and Dont Touch Mih President. As we have seen, the people in several of the places that Sparrow has been visiting over the years have showered honours on this son of G renada, Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribbean, Brooklyn and the World. It is most tting that the Caribbean Community should do so now In honouring the Mighty Sparrow, the Caribbean Community will also be honouring all those who have collaborated with him through the composition of lyrics, the arrangement of melodies and the accompaniment of his performances. Notable among these have been musician Bertram Innis and wordsmith R eginald Piggy Joseph, both deceased, the phenomenal Winsford Joker Devine, Calypsos major lyricist for three decades now, and the scores of musicians and supporting singers, too numerous to mention individually, whose contribution has been indispensable to Sparrows success over these forty-six years. An oral and public art form, Calypso is as much the result of communal endeavour as it is of individual talent. F or his outstanding contribution to the development of the Caribbean R egion, the Caribbean Community salutes its distinguished son, Dr Slinger F rancisco, the Mighty Sparrow, by conferring on him the Order of the Caribbean Community (OCC).A LittleBIRD,A MightyS ON G e Mighty Sparrow, from the archives of the Alma Jordan L ibrary.

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14 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 GRADUATION CEREMONIES HONO RAR Y GR ADUANDDr L akshmi Persaud Staying Outside of the Box Among our six honorees this year is Dr Lakshmi Persaud, award-winning novelist (ve novels), writer and teacher. Dr Persaud will be conferred with the D L itt and will address graduates of the F aculty of Social Sciences at the ceremony on the morning of October 25. She shared some thoughts with editor, Vaneisa Baksh.PHOTO COURTESY: DR LAKSHMI PERSAUDVB: I feel compelled to write by the things that disturb me, is one explanation youve oered for your drive (ve novels in just about a dozen years is quite prolic). Would you say that it is your way of seeking to resolve or understand the nature of the disturbing things? Do you think it has led to writing that might disturb the reader? LP: e things that trouble me greatly are the grave injustices done to the weak by the condent and powerful, especially when they cleverly present themselves as upright men with panache, and get away with it because the onlookers, the citizens, are short-sighted, lack integrity and courage, so no one dares to ask questions. Writing about anything compels the writer to nd out more about what has happened, why it happened, what factors were responsible for or inuenced the situation with which she is engaged. is writing, to my knowledge, has not disturbed the reader, as youve suggested could happen. Instead, readers fall into three categories. F or example, my novel: For the Love of my Name is an allegory of a Caribbean region, the majority of whose citizens chose for partisan reasons, to support an illegal, authoritarian regime which damaged the economy almost irretrievably. A few reviewers marvelled at the courage of the writer and one even suggested that such writing showed that the Caribbean had matured, had come of age. Readers who supported the perpetrators of the regime dismissed the novel by a powerful silence. irdly, those who were indierent saw it entirely as a work of ction and commented on the authors style of writing. VB: The dierence in the movement of time between the developed world and developing countries is a signicant one, especially in terms of the demands it makes on family life, on mastery of technology, and the way humans communicate. What has it been like for youas a woman, born in 1939, living for over 30 years in the latter environment before spending another 30 years or so in the former? How does one cope with this pace and its demands? LP: One copes because one must, for to do less is to retreat and reduce participation in the wider society. e pressure to cope well, surrounded memy three young children, who were told daily that their mother would put everything right soon. Your learning curve is almost perpendicular. Within a short time (we arrived in the UK in August and school opened in early September), you have to understand the dual education systemprivate and state; you have to nd out by any means which schools are considered good and which not as good. You have to learn rapidly where to shop for fresh vegetables and spices, where the shops that oer good value for money can be found. You have to learn how to cook a variety of dishes with only a very few vegetables, as most of the tropical vegetables and fruits were absent from Mill-Hill shops in the s. ings have since vastly improved, with Londons population now representing a miniature of world culture, so creating the demand for a greater variety, and better quality consumer goods. Punctuality is the norm for trains, buses, the theatre, for government and private functions. If it so happens that it is announced that the train will be ve minutes late, travellers behave as if they were told it would be very late. e importance of time to Londoners is not only seen by this, but by what you are surrounded by. Travellers are using their laptops on trains, or in the back of cars, professionals are engaging with their clients by their mobile phones. You get the feeling that the time available anywhere must be used well, for living is streamlined here, and there is a dierent balance between their world of perpetual aspiration and that of entertainment. e particulars youve mentioned in your question, one can master in a short time, but by far the most dicult in the s was human relationship. e culture is dierent, expectations are dierent. You may at times be embarrassed, by the simplest of things. I heard a pleasant looking West Indian woman, greeting those in the waiting room loud and clear with: Good morning when she entered the Mill-Hill Medical Practice. Maybe that was just her manner; she was brought up this way to greet those before her with a simple good morning. But here, everyone turned slowly towards the morning sound as a moving spotlight that suddenly stilled, framing her. eir eyes appeared to have projected themselves forward. Why? To use an English expression: It is just not done. However, the most dicult to cope with, is the racism which your young children will face in school and not understand why it exists. My recent novel Daughters of Empire [2012] shows how one mother coped with all that was thrown at her. VB: As a writer, one is often classied and asked to dene oneself within certain parameters: as a woman, as a feminist; as a Caribbean woman; as a Caribbean Indian woman, as an immigrant; and so on, how do you feel about these attempts at classication? LP: At birth, when I was still in a cradle, and later, swung to sleep in a hammock, the rst aroma of food, the rst taste of solids and the rst sounds I heard of the spoken word would have had their origins in India. I accompanied my mother to ceremonies: weddings and pujas and Kathas, the plays of the epic Ramayana, performed in an open Savannah. She took me at dawn to the river to bathekartic kay nahan; Shivratree, I described in the novel Buttery in the WindI prepared the deyas for Divali, and so from birth, begins the eortless absorbing of the culture of ones family. I grew up in a multicultural Trinidad, comprising also of varying shades of African and European culture; later, as I travelled to countries far and wide and studied in the UK, I absorbed a variety of thinking, beliefs, ways of doing thingsthe culture of the people.

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 GRADUATION CEREMONIES HONO RAR Y GR ADUANDR t R ev Dr Clive Ormiston Abdulah In All ings, Balance Among our six honorees this year is the Rt Rev Dr Clive Ormiston Abdulah, the rst national to be elected Bishop of the Anglican Church. Bishop Abdulah was also the rst Bishop to serve on the University Council (1971-1975) and the rst West Indian to serve on the Board of Directors of the Anglican Centre in R ome. Bishop Abdulah will be conferred with the LLD and will address graduates of the F aculty of Social Sciences at the aernoon ceremony on October 25. He shared some thoughts with editor, Vaneisa Baksh. It is understandable that ones perception and attitudes will be formed by ones experiences, so inuencing ones writing, hence the reason for the classication. However, writers prefer not to be classied. Toni Morrison would not like to be classied as an African American woman writer. She sees herself as a writer who writes what she wishes to write. When Salman Rushdie, on a BBC TV interview, many years ago said he observed that she does not write about white people, she replied, Why should I? Writers do not like classication; to them it means being put into a closed compartment, a man-made box. ey are aware that it is not only gender, place of birth, race, place to which one has emigrated that inuence us, which is what the classication youve identied is saying. I shall refer to the above as Inuences A. ere are many other inuences which help to form ones attitudes or perceptions of things. F or example, travel, family background, education, the time of birth and the age of the writer when writing, ones personality, ones motivation, i.e. why does one write? Is the writer living in a country that is well-to-do or very poor, democratic or authoritarian; what is the attitude to life of those close to the writer? I shall refer to these as Inuences B. We are each unique individuals as our DNA and thumbprints show. is is why classication should be used with care, being aware of its weaknesses will greatly assist the reviewer and reader. With inuences A which is what classication is based on, one may know where the writer is coming from, but we do not know where he is going, because B kicks in. Antoine de Saint-Exuperys insightful observation helps to explain why one must be alert to the very many factors that inuence attitudes: e meaning of things lies not in themselves, but in our attitudes to them. So when a writer is classied, he/she needs only to smile and think: Cest La Vie. VB: What does this honorary degree mean to you? LP: is is an honour which I never expected would be conferred on me. It has le me with the feeling that I must now try even harder at all times, irrespective of what my task is, or where I am, to oer my very best graciously. It must be my default position. I am also intensely aware that I have been greatly helped by my parents and family and by the excellent early education I received at the Tunapuna Government Primary School, and later at St Augustine Girls High School and St Josephs Convent in Port of Spain. I have also had the good fortune to have had intelligent, knowledgeable, articulate reviewers with insight and at times with courage, to swim against the tide. VB: How far should the separation of church and state go in a society like ours? CA: I am aware that in the USA, this has become an issue from time to timebanning prayers in schools and removing the L ords Prayer from public placesyet successive Presidents have closed their addresses May God Bless America. Even now, the various State governments give very generous grants to religious bodies for the care of the aged, and other social outreach programmes. ese instances demonstrate the diculty in separating church and state activities, since the bottom line is that both deal signicantly with the same people. Lines cross inevitably. As I have earlier indicated, the church, in my view, is mandated to speak and act on behalf of the oppressed in the society, it cannot and must not fall into the condemnation of Karl Marx that religion is the opiate of the people, closing the eyes of its membership and others to the realities of life; as if the church must deal with heaven above and leave things of the earth to the state and others. ere has to be a balance, and this is informed by an intelligent theology. VB: You were ordained as the rst national to be Bishop in September 1970, those were tumultuous times; the society was restless with revolutionary ideas; how would you compare these times with then? CA: We are too close to the economic disparities that led to the situation in 1970. at said, comparisons are odious, as it is said. e faces of those who have have changed, but the have-nots are still primarily the Afro-Trinis. e cry today is for jobs, housing, crime reduction and the relevance of education. en, it was for equality in the sharing of resources. ere is an overlap, of course. Today, greed and the lust for power stalk the land. en, the exodus of Caribbean people came almost exclusively from Jamaica, so that T&T had a strong middle class. Today, the middle class here is shrinking fast. When this happens narcissism sets in. VB: What does this honorary degree mean to you? CA: e decision by e University of the West Indies to award me the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws at the coming Convocation in October has brought a ood of mixed feelings. At rst blush, I am thrilled to have been considered worthy of being a recipient of such a high honour. On the other hand, I am le wondering if, at this rather late stage of my life, there is more being demanded of me, and would I be in a position to fulll the expectations that some may have of me. As I reect over the years past, this award will stand above all others that I have received. I am so persuaded, since the University is a regional institution and its immediate purview is the Caribbean, making the award, in a real sense, a Caribbean one.

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16 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 VB: You say you are a boy from the bush; what made the boy transfer to a laboratory; or would you say it was a bush lab? ET: Being born in the bush you live in close harmony with nature so you have an inclination to study biology, but when I went to high school at Naparima College, biology was not taught at that time. I had to go abroad for my tertiary education and biology in general became my prime interest, specializing in the study of parasites. Why parasites? When I was little boy hookworm disease was very common in Trinidad and when I studied parasites I found the lifecycle of hookworms (and subsequently other parasites) to be very fascinating. When I completed my PhD degree I received a fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation to study arboviruses (viruses transmitted by insects, ticks and mites) at the Trinidad Regional Virus Laboratory. Most of these viruses have wild mammals and birds as hosts so I was back in the bush collecting wild animals and blood-sucking arthropods and taking them back to the laboratory to test for the presence of arboviruses. VB: What was your role in the rst island-wide yellow fever vaccination programme in the late 1970s? ET: e rst island-wide yellow fever vaccination programme actually took place in 1955 as there was an outbreak of yellow fever at that time aer an absence of 40 years. en there was an epizootic (an outbreak amongst animals) in Howler monkeys in the Guayaguayare forest between 1977 and 1978. At the time the newspapers were reporting that the monkeys were being poisoned. I suggested yellow fever to colleagues at the GRADUATION CEREMONIES HONO RAR Y GR ADUANDDr Elisha Tikasinghe Nature in Man Among our six honorees this year is Dr E lisha Tikasingh, a scientist who has received numerous awards for his work in parasitology, entomology and arbovirology. Dr Tikasingh will be conferred with the DSc and will address graduates of the F aculties of Science and Technology, and F ood and Agriculture at their joint ceremony on the morning of October 24. He shared some thoughts with editor, Vaneisa Baksh.PHOTO: MARK LYNDERSAYCaribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC) and ocials of the Government. When we did further research, my colleagues and I actually found the virus in mosquitoes and the monkeys. at discovery sent the Government ocials into an island-wide vaccination programme which was assisted by the Immunization Unit at CAREC. However, I did not actually participate in the vaccination programme. VB: What would you say has been your most important contribution to humankind? ET: Research work is like building blocks; you build on the work of other researchers and others will build on your work. It is not easy to say how my research on various subjects will help humankind at this juncture, only the future will tell. Having said that I think one of my most important projects was one where I developed a technique to produce large amounts of hyperimmune ascitic uids which were used to help identify unknown arboviruses. Many arbovirus laboratories in other countries used the technique developed by me and my colleagues. VB: What does this honorary degree mean to you? ET: Sometimes a scientic researcher works quietly in his laboratory hoping he will make a contribution to science and not thinking about rewards and awards, so when he is awarded an honorary doctorate at the end of his career, its like icing on the cake. Sometimes it is not easy to judge the quality of your own work, nor how it would help other researchers, so that being awarded with an honorary DSc suggests that your lifes work has been recognised. I will always cherish this honour from UWI.

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 17 ART BOOKSWe are Jacmelians. e thing created a void. But the artist is in residence! Give me back my cement bag. Give me back my canvas. Habitation and transcendence, e thing created an absence. We are Jacmel Our space etched with dawn, Our place etched with dusk. Sharing fried plantains. Sharing Barbancourt. Let the speakers echo K ompa If you must. Hadriana needs a turkey for the New Year Dancing with rubble on her shoulder. Balancing a bucket of water on her head. Rebuilding with rubble and street dust. Holding a Prestige wrapped in a napkin. for Depestre e mais-moullen is ready, forget the pumpkin. Bayard and Ebby are setting up the lights e Alliance is on their way.Kwynn Johnson, the artist, sketching in Jacmel, Haiti, 2011.How the L ight E ntersUWI student and artist, Kwynn Johnson has been exhibiting her work at So Box Art Gallery, before taking it to Jacmel, Haiti in November. e exhibition, titled, How the Light Enters, is a collection of drawings produced in the town of Jacmel. It forms part of her research for a PhD in Cultural Studies. It runs until October 21. Translation and re-publication of a classic textBy Armando Garca de la Torre Francisco M orales Padrn (Canary Islands, Spain 1923-2010) earned a Doctorate in History in 1952, taught at the University of Seville from 1958 to 1989 and was awarded Spains highest scholarly honour, the R oyal Medal of K ing Alphonso X the Wise. His decades-long work in Spanish colonial archives produced several books illuminating the history of the Spanish West Indies. He wrote an unsurpassed history of Spanish Jamaica in 1952 and has complemented it with the book on Spanish Trinidad in 2011. The book Spanish Trinidad opens with the story of Columbuss arrival on the island in 1498 and traces its history to the British conquest in 1797. Morales Padrn sheds light on the lives of the rst peoples of Trinidad, their contact with the first Europeans on the island, the Spaniards, and later the arrival of African descendants who were instrumental to the economic and social development of Trinidad from the 16th to 18th centuries. Spanish Trinidad also narrates how throughout the 16th century, the Spaniards used the island as a springboard in their quixotic search for the mythical kingdom of El Dorado whilst defending it from Dutch, F rench, and British pirates who encroached and attempted to seize the island, with quite devastating eects. Spanish Trinidad provides the reader with a wealth of previously forgotten original sources, letters and documents from G overnors and island citizens. e book situates the history of Trinidad from 1498 to 1797 in a truly global context. Historical literature on Trinidad has focused on the British period of colonisation, the 19th century leading to independence and aer 1962. Spanish Trinidad oers an opportunity to understand what happened earlierof how Trinidadians of diverse backgrounds interacted and attempted to create a new Trinidad. It book will be launched in Jamaica on November 13. Armando Garca de la Torre (PhD, History, Washington State University, 2006) is Lecturer and Researcher in Spanish and Latin American History at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus, Trinidad and Tobago. His work focuses on the Spanish period of the Caribbean in a global context. He edited and translated Spanish Trinidad. tell Ambroise its time to wake up, Or the water truck wont play My Heart Will Go On Dadou is coming from the cemetery Djuice is driving like a maniac. Because someone cut down the tree. e city of light is guiding my way I need a motor-taxi to take me home e water is coming over the bridge ere is blood under the Cap R ouge. e road of friendship is around the corner Lissa is baking bread Because Herby Marshal cooked the iguana. Launder your day in the basin bleu Stop at Florita for wiand coee Pick up a baguette at Cadets boulangeie Send me a Vtiver bundle from Paskal e power comes back at three. Give Danticat a tourist mask It will scare o the spirits at last. Blan! Stop hovering over me, You are blocking my light Kwynn Johnson, 2013.e City of Light

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18 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 I n his 1999 food memoir based on growing up in Barbados, Pig Tails n Breadfruit Austin Clarke relates what happened when a mule-cart driver transporting bags of our had a mishap. One of his carts wheels hit a big rock on the road and it catapulted him, the mule, the cart and the bags of our onto the road; one of them split wide open. F ederation start. People began owing out of their houses, alleys and lanes like peas spilling across a linoleum oor. e whole neighbourhood swarmed the mule cart with their bowls, plastic cups and cooking tots, and one woman, who could not nd any utensil large enough to carry away the our, resorted to using her po, her bedpan, having rst washed it out under the warm aernoon water of the public standpipe. e men and women knew about germs and mules and the public road and public decency, so they scraped o only the good our from the top. ey swept the black our into the gutter, and washed the road with water from the public standpipe. e mule-cart driver then washed his face and continued on his journey. He understood the villagers. F lour was the staple of their diet, but during those starving war-days there was none, and the people had been cutting and contriving. at art of making ends meet with ingenuity, practicality and varying crimes and misdemeanours is universally practised and this was perhaps one of the major ndings of the research done by Candice Sobers in pursuit of her MPhil in Cultural Studies at e UWI. Sobers, who has a BA in Visual Arts and describes herself as UWI furniture chose to do her MPhil in researching the environment and coping mechanisms of families whom shed become acquainted with through her husband. She started o with ten families, but for one reason or the other (in one case, the main link committed a murder and went to jail) the number decreased to six. In real terms, what she has done for over three years is to virtually embed herself with these six dierent families from various parts of the island, not just observing them, but partaking in what was to her a radically dierent way of living RESEARCHCutting and ContrivingBY VANEISA BAK SH and of seeing the world. e word research usually constructs images of laboratories or libraries; either way, it suggests something structured, solitary and, well serious. In academic circles, research must meet rigid standards, and sometimes it is tough for researchers to get past the rigidity with which those standards are dened. Academic documents are a fine example of how unrelenting the language alone can be when it comes to making communication obscure. So when Candice opted to do this research, she titled her thesis rather technically and almost as a mask of the raw nature of her research: e Aesthetics of the Mundane: Techniques of R esourcefulness and Survival Among Working Class Trinidadians. e practice-based research thesis is being accompanied by paintings, drawings and a handbook, reads of Survival: Sixty R esourceful Technique for Family L ife, as part of a series of that would represent the body of her work for the MPhil. She had the handbook printed at her own expense, and planned to sell copies at her art exhibition which ran for a week in mid-September at the Art Society Gallery. e exhibition too is part of the research. e paintings and drawings on display were done during the course of her time spent with the people shed begun calling by the academic term, informants but who are now remembered in a much more human way. She has many stories to tell: some sad, some scary and discouraging, but at the same time, many display the capacity of the human mind to adapt and adjust to all manner of situations. And in the stoic, accepting way they have of coping with all the bottles and big stones life keeps throwing at them, there are remarkable examples of how dierent peoples realities can be, and how what can be normal for one person, is utter disaster for another. In the process of this research which she ocially started in 2010, having already established contact with the families, she too had to make many adjustments, becoming pregnant and then caring for a newborn while traipsing up and down from Couva, Macoya, Curepe, Santa Cruz and Private Address Candice Sobers, UWI MPhil candidate

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 19 O n S eptember 10, The UWI St. Augustine welcomed its first cohort for the Master of Science (MSc) programme in Renewable Energy Technology in the Department of Physics of the Faculty of Science and Technology. The programme was developed through a partnership with the University of Flensburg, Germany, and the Flensburg University of Applied Sciences. Speaking at the launch, Campus Principal and Pro Vice-Chancellor, Professor Clement Sankat, welcomed and thanked Professor Dr Hermann van Radecke of the University of Flensburg for agreeing to share his expertise by teaching the course in Wind Energy as part of the new programme. He said, On my recent visit to Flensburg, Germany just last month, I learnt that Germany is quite advanced in its development of renewable energy technology. It is therefore my hope, that as we partner with the University of Flensburg and Flensburg University of Applied Sciences, and by extension Germany, The UWI, will learn much and therefore will also have much to share with Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean region as we seek to develop sustainable energy technologies and in particular, renewable energy technologies. This programme was developed by The UWI to address the need for the Caribbean region to become equipped in terms of building capacity in technologies which will support protection of the environment and also meet the challenges of escalating price of fossil fuels and their use. The programmes emphasis is on providing new graduates and persons already working in various sectors of the economy with professional training and education in renewable energy technologies. It has been developed in tandem with another masters programme, an MSc in Renewable Energy Management and some of the courses will be common to both programmes. On August 22, The UWI signed an MOU with the University of Flensburg and the Flensburg University of Applied Sciences to undertake the development of collaborative research programmes, academic programmes and other activities in the area of sustainable energy systems and management. With the development of the MSc Renewable Energy Technology in the first instance, the MOU also governs the establishment of a common doctoral programme in Renewable Energy Technology, Policy and Management. Other partners in the development of this programme included the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany through the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), Dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology at UWI St. Augustine, Professor Indar Ramnarine, Head of the Department of Physics at St. Augustine, Dr. Ricardo Clarke, Programme Coordinator, Dr. Indra Haraksingh and colleagues at Mona and Cave Hill campuses of The UWI. The MSc in Renewable Energy Technology, commencing September 2013, is oered 15 months (full time) or 27 months (part time), including an Internship and Research Project component. NEW PROGRAMMEMasters in Renewable Energy T echnology in Sangre G rande, down in a valley, a place so beautiful they call it Avatar. I ask about the composition of the families, and she describes one household. In there are the grandparents and their four childrentwo girls, two boysand their partners; one of the girls has what she refers to as a visiting union as the father of her one child does not live there. Her siblings altogether have another six children, ages ranging from three to seven. ats 16, sharing two bedrooms, and though all of them hold menial, low-paying jobs, except for the grandmother, things only hold together because of the things they do by the side. She was introduced to scams undertaken as routinely as a days work. She heard about burglary and robbery techniques. G ambling, drinking, and drug use were constant factors, thought at varying degrees from family to family. And she formed friendships that have persisted. When the grandfather, whom she calls that particular familys main informant, died, she realized a lot of her information was lost. He had shown her how to make concoctions like shampoos from Bois Canot and cocoa, and many other home remedies for ailments. She began to collect data for these techniques and recorded them, even as she was learning to incorporate them into her own lifestyle. Even a treatment for fever. But then there is a fever technique that they showed me, with a burning plate, and when you use that, one night, its gone, and its not even something to take internally. Its just something from the outside. So I thought these things were just priceless, she said. As she tells stories of her encounters and revelations, it is clear that this has been a lifechanging experience for her. e art that resulted from her sojourn reects it. e pieces depicting houses, cluttered kitchens, outdoor bathrooms and even a sexily clad woman making a detour to avoid people seeing where she livedthese pieces distort colours, lines, proportion, juxtapositions pretty much the way artists do. But hovering at the edge of her words and images, there is something that says that the concept of what is normal, like art, has many dierent interpretations. She was introduced to scams undertaken as routinely as a days work.Wedgeeee Structural Poverty

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20 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 I n Criminology and Criminal Justice, there has always been a discourse on deterrence versus rehabilitation as it relates to individuals who come into contact with the criminal justice system. With crime apparently spiralling out of control in Trinidad and Tobago and attempts at deterrence seemingly failing, rehabilitation of oenders seems a viable option. While many students at the Campus are engaged in prison research at prison facilities in Trinidad and Tobago, few have chosen to return to share the results with the institutions. Part of the Criminology Units focus is on outreach eorts aimed at giving back something tangible to the society while conducting meaningful research. So we were happy to respond to the invitation of undergraduate Criminology student Nicole Huggins, who is attached to the Trinidad and Tobago Womens Prison, to attend their Miss Emancipation Queen Show 2013. Arlene Hamblin (MSc student), Crystal Martin (MSc student in International R elations) and I attended, with Ms Martin taking on judging responsibilities. Prizes with a total value of $1,000 were personally donated to the Miss Emancipation Queen 2013 (Miss G ambia) by lecturer Dr. R andy Seepersad, Ms Martin and me on behalf of the Criminology Unit. It was enlightening. e inmates excelled in the talent segment, evening gowns (every gown, headpiece and even items of clothing on display, were designed and sewn by inmates of the G arment Construction department at the Womens Prison), and importantly, the intelligence segment where they had to answer several questions ranging from reparation and rehabilitation to the importance of Emancipation Day celebration for all races in Trinidad and Tobago. ree of the most provocative questions were: In recent years, it has been suggested that descendants of slaves should be compensated for the slavery experience. What are your views on compensation for descendants? Why is Emancipation a celebration for everyone and not just for Afro-Trinbagonians? What does the African slavery experience teach us about strength? Answers to these particular questions above elicited rapturous applause from the audience. e Miss Angola representative answered question one by stating that she was against reparation for descendants of slavery as reparation fosters a continued culture of hopelessness and dependency and that while slavery was immoral we should learn from the experience and move forward. Miss Togo answered question two by stating that Emancipation Day celebration is important for all persons in Trinidad and Tobago as other races in Trinidad and Tobago had suered from some form of bondage which required emancipation and that it is important to celebrate being emancipated. Ms Kenyas response to the third question was to use her personal experience to demonstrate that despite the atrocities which the enslaved African endured, they showed strength, courage and determination and used a variety of means to survive the experience. After this show we were more convinced that rehabilitation should be at the forefront of national crime reduction strategies. e Programmes Department of the Trinidad and Tobago Prisons Service should be commended for hosting this event.From le: UWI students Wendell C. Wallace, Crystal Martin and Arlene Hamblin. PHOTO: STACY SIMONWendell C. Wallace is a Doctoral candidate and part-time lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice, and budding Criminologist at the UWI St. Augustine Campus. Students join inmates at Womens Prison E mancipation D ay Queen ShowBY W ENDELL C. W A LL ACE CA MPUS NEWS UWI LIFEEvery year, The UWI welcomes incoming undergraduate and postgraduate students with a series of orientation events coming under the First Year Experience programme. One element, UWI Life, is one of the most anticipated events of the year, providing for students a warm and casual welcoming environment that provides them with much of the information they need to begin their campus journeys. As events were unfolding at the Sport and Physi cal Education Centre ( SPEC) in the information section, students were happily surprised by the visit of Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar. The Prime Minister not only spoke briey to the students, but she spent some time milling about with them, and posed for a few photos as well. Minister of Tertiary Education, Senator Fazal Karim was also on hand, as was the Campus Principal, Professor Clement S ankat. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM When Supermans Power was Not EnoughAs part of an ongoing campaign to sensitize sta and students to security issues, the St. Augustine Campus hosted a Security Forum on September 12 at the JFK Quadrangle. The theme of this years security campaign is Sec-UR-ity, UR @ the centre. Sta and students have expressed concern about security both on and o campus, and this forum was meant to be a space for dialogue that would enable improved measures, but also to raise awareness about what already exists. Despite a blitz of messages to sta and students, the provision of shuttles from the Mt Hope location, and even visits by Superman, the turnout was disappoint ingly poor. Two new hotlines were introduced though: UWI Mobile Police Post 645-1594 and the Campus Security Emergency Hotline 662-4123.

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 21 Twenty years ago, a man stumbled upon some remarkable documents in Cape Town, South Africa. The contents of these documents would signal the beginning of a 14year, life-altering journey for Professor Charles P. K orr, as he worked to uncover the story behind a strictly FIF Acompliant, eight-club football league formed within the isolated connes of R obben Island prison, most famously known for Nelson Mandelas 18-year incarceration there. Now, I know what you might be thinking: A complex, well-organised football league in a prison? ats preposterous! Its one of the oddest things you might expect to hear about a prison, especially one that housed political prisoners during South Africas era of apartheid. But then I had the opportunity to sit down with Professor K orr at the Hyatt R egency hotel as he was visiting Trinidad to deliver a lecture. e result? My general apathy toward sports was startled into accepting that football is never just a game. is was Professor K orrs rst visit to Trinidad. He was invited to deliver a special guest lecture to the UWI/ FIF A/CIES Postgraduate Diploma in Sports Management 2013-2014 group of students, titled Sport and the Struggle for Social Justice: the R obben Island Experience. He gladly accepted, given his connection to the programmea spino of the FIF A International Master in L aw, Management and Humanities of Sport, in which he is visiting professor. Comfortably seated at the Hyatt waterfront, Professor K orr began explaining the reason for his expansive research into this obscure discovery. It began when he was taken to the R obben Island archives, where he discovered something bizarre, the prisoners had been writing letters to each other during their time on the island, each closing with Yours in sports, a baing touch when they were in such close proximity. F ascinated, he was eager to learn more, and subsequently found that the political prisoners had created a highly structured, highly bureaucratized football league during their incarceration. Digging deeper, he realised that the prisoners had compiled all the documentation you would expect from a premier league or the NBA. At that point, he knew he had to do something with the information. First came a feature lm in 2007, More an Just a Game, requested by FIF As Jerome Champagne, which Professor K orr co-produced. Two years later he co-authored a book by the same name, focusing on the stories of ve former R obben Island prisoners, men with whom he has forged close friendships. In the movies, Professor K orr said, the concept of sports in prison is always depicted as a mindless activity to take prisoners minds o their dreary existence. However, it was this same mundane essence of an everyday activity that, in part, made the R obben Island football league so extraordinary, considering the prisoners living conditions. He described the prison as hell where prisoners were forced to labour in a quarry, and had insucient clothing, food and sleeping arrangements, coupled with a severe lack of contact with the outside world. What I found fascinating is how football brought the prisoners together. ere were two main political factions on the island: the African National Congress (ANC), and the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), neither of whom agreed on anythinguntil it came to football. Being able to play football became important enough to submerge political dierences on the island, and it took a collective eort of three and a half years to gain permission to play. eir persistence through various punitive measures, including the halving of meal rations, paid o, and the 1,400 prisonerstrong, eight-club Makana F ootball Association was established. e Makana F .A. is the only football association ever to be granted honorary FIFA membership. At that moment, I had a moment of clarity. I understood the R obben Island experience; I suddenly knew why Professor K orr described football as more than just a game. e sport became a symbol of hope and freedom to the prisoners, and created a unied front in the struggle against apartheid. F ootball would never be the same for the prisoners again; they had showed they could beat the authorities. Just imagine, the chairman of the league was PAC, and the secretary ANC. e leagues constitution contained a no discrimination clause. One of the most poignant consequences was that the guards were forced to take the prisoners more seriously as people, no longer to be considered of a lesser race. ey would eventually even challenge one another, place bets, and ask aer the strongest players. Professor K orr considers his R obben Island research to be far and away, the best and most important thing [hes] done, and ever will do as an academic. He says that the acclaim achieved by the lm and book brought an interesting transformation to his and the prisoners lives, adding that the book could best be described as demonstrating that revolutions are made by foot soldiers, not generals. To put it plainly, my mind was blown. Truthfully, sports had never held much interest for me. In preparation for the interview, I read for the rst time about West Indian cricketer Sir Vivian R ichards, unequivocally revered as one of the greatest batsman of all time. His determination in the 1970s, regarded as the darkest days of apartheid, led the West Indies cricket team to a 15-year stint of victory. He wanted to send a message that all cricketers were equal, and cricket thus took on much greater signicance than a simple series of matches when politics was brought to the pitch. What I read forcefully resonated with me aer hearing Professor K orr detail what the R obben Island prisoners achieved through football. I never knew sports could be so impactful. As the interview wound down, I inquired as to the Professors impression of Trinidad thus far. He simply turned his head towards the sea and said, that. L iving in the land-locked state of Missouri, thousands of miles from the coast, Trinidads waters carved his initial impression, as his rst eld-trip was to the beach. Incredibly, the last time hed been on the beach was in 1970. He frowned at the timing of his arrival, which coincided with the one week of the year Professor Charles Korr spoke on Sport and the Struggle for Social Justice: the Robben Island Experience to the UWI/FIFA/CIES Postgraduate Diploma in Sports Management 2013/2014 group of students.More than just aGAMEHow sports suddenly made sense to meBY JHIVAN PARG ASS SPORT G RAD UA TI NG: Calistra G regoire, a student of the 3rd cohort of UWI/ FIF A/CIES Postgraduate Diploma students, graduating class of 2012/13, receives her certicate from Mr. Vincent Monnier, CIES Senior Manager of International R elations, at the 2013 UWI/ FIF A/CIES Welcome and G raduation Ceremony in September. Ms. G regoire completed the programme with Distinction. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM that the Asa Wright Nature Centre closes for maintenance, an unfortunate coincidence which prevented him from exploring Trinidads oldest nature centre. I thanked him for his time, and he departed, leaving me quietly to my racing thoughts, and my newfound respect for the game of football. (http://us.macmillan.com/morethanjustagame/ ChuckKorr has the book and heres the IMDB link for the movie http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1144914/)

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22 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 Ground of Grounds! Symbol of a once great Cricket Empire! I dreamt of the day that I would full a childhood dream and set my eyes on the mighty Bourda. Now well into my sixth decade of earthly existence, I nally had the privilege of gazing upon Bourda. I shivered as I remembered the languid grace of Lance G ibbsan o-spinner of such purity that only with the 15 degrees capitulation of the ICC has he now been surpassed. R emember 1965? G ibbs 6 for 29; Australia crushed under his mesmerising guile. Numbers 2, 3, 4 and 5 falling to the Master Spinner. My mind raced to thoughts of Clive L loyd, prowling panther-like in the covers. e vicious hook shot of R oy F redericks contrasted with the patient prodding of L eonard Baichan. And can we forget the most technically astute righthander in our cricket history, the irrepressible Baboolal [R ohan K anhai] (no disrespect to the Master Blaster who no doubt is the most destructive right-hander to have played the true sport of kings)? What about Basil Butcher and Joe Solomon; even Colin Cro of much more recent vintage? Is there still memory of the little man with the unruly hair and the unbuttoned shirt? Acclaimed as Killer K alli for his destruction of Dennis the Menace L illee. Bourda was the stage where these giants played their part in the pantheon of West Indian cricket. e symphony of bat and ball rising and reaching a crescendo at this coliseum when the turtle destroyed the hare as Chanders took a mere 69 balls to blast an Australian bowling attack into oblivion. e man without knowledge as to why he is called Tiger truly roared on that day and Bourda rocked in rapture as it acknowledged a modern-day icon of cricket obstinacy and mercurialness. Bourda, sweet inimitable Bourda, the cricketing Olympus where G eorge Headley took the English apart in 1930 with a century in each innings. Sixty-four years later, the Prince of Port of Spain, Brian Charles L ara strode unto the hallowed ground of Bourda and had his audience singing his praise as he destroyed England with a masterful 167. Of course, we suffered also at Bourda before Fire descended in Babylon. In 1973, Walker and Hammond crushed our spirits with a 10-wicket victory over a team with ve G uyanese ( K anhai, F redericks, K allicharran, L loyd and Gibbs). Of all our Test-playing adversaries, we saved the best for our former colonial master, England, who suered the most at our hands at Bourda, losing four times and only winning once. Yes, at Bourda, we trampled their aspirations and made mockery of their historical claim to cricketing supremacy. Even politics was part of the myth and mystery of Bourda. It was in 1981 at Bourda that we played one for Mandela as we rejected Englands R obin Jackman for his links with apartheid South Africa. With these thoughts swirling, expectations rose as I strode purposefully down the fresh looking Shiv Chanderpaul Drive, only to turn the corner and be confronted with an image that has remained indelibly imprinted in my mind. e faded sign of the R ohan K anhai Stand. Crumbling fences, crushed under the foreboding gaze of the mighty Amazon. What madness is this? What has led to the demise of such a proud cricketing venue? Is it the developing world mentality where we quickly forget the past when provided with a new future? Is Bourda a casualty of the rise of Providence G round? Do we honour a past cricketing icon and a present cricketing demigod in the presence of a decaying and dying cricketing venue? Bourda just before the 2007 Cricket World Cup held in the West Indies. Matches for the tournament were played at the specially constructed Providence Ground and Bourda has fallen into a shabby state of disrepair. PHOTOS: RAHUL BHATTACHARYAFrom Mecca to GraveyardA cricket lover faces heartbreak at his rst visit to his beloved BourdaBY DR RAJEND RA RAMLOG AN SPORT Does our past mean nothing to us? Are we satised that we have transformed a mecca of cricket into a graveyard of past glories? Madness! It is all that resonates through my mind. is must be madness. I must have been transferred into an alternate world where love for our heritage is fleeting and the reverence for our cricketing ancestors is but lip service. My soul trembled as I gazed on the dying arena felled by human parsimoniousness. How I mourn your slow asphyxiation by human callousness. My celebratory aria composed as I anticipated my rst encounter with Bourda was quickly transformed into a eulogy. e only words that resonated within were those of the immortal Shelley. My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, e lone and level sands stretch far away. Yesterday Ozymandias, today Bourda, beware your fate. History and tradition mean nothing as our lands are slowly being strangled by a generation of barbarians who trample our proud memories into the ground. To borrow and transform the cry of David Rudder, Rally! Rally! Rally round Bourda. Dr. Rajendra Ramlogan is Professor of Commercial and Environmental Law in the Department of Management Studies. He has published numerous articles and authored several books including Sustainable Development: Towards a Judicial Interpretation; Judicial Review in the Commonwealth Caribbean; and e Developing World and the Environment: Making the Case for Effective Protection of the Global Environment. I must have been transferred into an alternate world where love for our heritage is eeting and the reverence for our cricketing ancestors is but lip service.

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SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI TODAY 23 ENERGY UWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHON1 What is the charity to which you are aliated? My wifes NGO, Arts Insight, which seeks to empower dierently abled persons.2 What made you decide to participate as one of the Ten in this half-marathon? The Director of SPEC called and asked if I would participate and I reluctantly agreed as I have never ventured there.3 How would you describe your outlook on life? I am an eternal optimist. I look for the good in people and situations.4 What would you say is your daily motto or mantra? I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.5 What would you say is the most important aspect of your role as University Registrar? Serving all the various stakeholders, especially the students, employees, the Vice-Chancellor and the Chancellor. The focus in this tenth year of the UWI SP EC I nternational Half-Marathon is giving; giving to charitable organisations, and so, the Marketing and Communications Oce team came up with a plan to invite 10 people to champion 10 charities and to encourage the public, as well as sta and students to pledge $10 towards one of these people and the money would go towards their chosen charity.6 Youve brought a refreshing amboyance to your position, has your approach brought any challenges? Refreshing Flamboyance! I am the same Will Iton that Ive been since I discovered myself. I dont take things personally and I can laugh at myself. Having said all that, I work hard at getting the desired results.7 What advice would you give to a student in terms of choosing a career? Do something that you really like.8 How do you keep yourself t? I play tennis as often as Professor Al Wint, i.e. nearly every day. I swim in the sea at least twice per week, I go to the gym at least three times per week, and I walk my dogs several miles on the weekends. I have nine big dogs (Mastis).9 Have you ever run in a marathon or distance event? No, but my twin brother [Wain] has and I followed him to the nish line.10 Would you say you are an athlete or sportsman? Yes. I still play competitive tennis. I ran in the inaugural Carifta Games circa 1971. I played schoolboys football for St Vincent Boys Grammar School and Queens College (Guyana). I almost forgot I was the national table tennis champ for St Vincent for many years and represented St Vincent at Windward Island Championships and Caribbean Championships.10 Q withClement William I ton The 13.1 mile journey, beginning at 10 minutes to six o clock, will use the Priority Bus Route up to La Resource and loop back to the nish at UWI SPEC. The Universitys Registrar, Clement W illiam I ton has agreed not only to champion a charity, but to take part in the half-marathon as well. Editor, Vaneisa Baksh put these mini marathon questions to him.

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24 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER, 2013 UWI CAL ENDAR of E VENTSOCT OBER NOV EMBER 2013UWI TODAY is printed and distributed for e University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, through the kind support of Trinidad Publishing Co Ltd, 22-24 St Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad, West Indies. ART EXHIBITION: H OW THE LIGHT ENTERS Soft Box Art Gallery Port of Spain, How the light enters Visualising absence and continuity in the Jacmelian ruinscape, is an art exhibition by e UWIs K wynn Johnson, MA, PhD Cultural Studies candidate, and artist. e exhibition will also run at the Alliance F ranaise, Jacmel, Haiti, from November 15-25, 2013. For more information contact: Dr Maarit Forde, Lecturer, Coordinator of the Postgraduate Programme in Cultural Studies, Department of Literary, Cultural and Communication Studies at 662-2002 ext. 83567 or email: maarit.forde@sta.uwi.edu. GENDER TRANSFORMATIONS Learning Resource Centre Auditorium UWI, St. Augustine Under the auspices of the Institute for G ender and Development Studies (I G DS), R egional Coordinating Unit, Mona, the St. Augustine Campus hosts the 20th Anniversary Conference on G ender Transformations in the Caribbean. e aim of the three-day regional conference is to map the legacy of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary discourses in the areas of Caribbean and diasporic research on gender. For more information contact: IGDS at 662 2002 exts. 83573/83577, or igdssau2013@sta.uwi.edu COTE 2013 Learning Resource Centre, UWI, St. Augustine COTE is an annual landmark event of the Department of economics at UWI, at which ndings from quality research and other studies are presented to inform stakeholders on economic and social policy. is years conference honours previous Head of Department, Dr R alph Henry, and will examine the theme Managing for Development in the Caribbean: Addressing the Challenges of Poverty and Inequality. For more information, please visit http://sta.uwi.edu/conferences/13/cote/index.asp. UWIAA DISTINGUISHED ALU MNI AWARDS November 2 25 special UWI Alumni Awards will be presented on November 2, 2013, to celebrate e University of the West Indies Alumni Associations 25th anniversary year. All alumni of e UWI (degrees, diplomas, certicates) graduating between the 1960s and the present are eligible, EXCEPT current or retired fulltime members of sta, and members of the current executive of the Alumni Association Chapter. Posthumous awards will not be made. For more information, please contact: UWI Alumni Association, Trinidad & Tobago Chapter trinidad.tobago@alumni.uwi.edu SRC OPEN HOUSE October 24 Seismic Research Centre Gordon Street St. Augustine In celebration of its 60th anniversary, the Seismic Research Centre has been hosting a monthly Open House on the last ursday of each month until November 2013. The Open House includes a tour of the facility, insight into monitoring techniques used for earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis, simple hands-on activities, important safety information and 60th anniversary memorabilia. All members of the public are invited to attend. Advance bookings are encouraged for 2pm, 3pm and 4.30 time slots. For more information, please visit http://www.uwiseismic.com/ UWI RESEARCH EXPO JFK Quadrangle & Auditorium, Learning Resource Centre UWI, St. Augustine R esearch that has made a difference will be showcased at the R esearch Expo, where interactive displays will feature work in the arts and sciences done by UWI sta and students. A Symposium on R esearch, Enterprise and Impact will also be held at the L earning R esource Centre. ere will be miniworkshops, book readings, concerts, special tours, lm screenings and a gi shop where UWI products including UWI Press publications, chocolates and plants will be on sale. On Saturday 5, members of the public are welcome to enjoy e UWI Market Place and Childrens Fun Park. For more information please contact: Anna Walcott-Hardy at 662-2002 ext. 84451 or email: uwiresearchexpo@sta.uwi.edu UWI T OD AY WA N TS T O HEA R F ROM YO UUWI TODAY welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. Please send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu